* Posts by h4rm0ny

4539 posts • joined 26 Jul 2008

'We asked firms if they were looking at Windows 8, most laughed'

h4rm0ny
Silver badge

I love how Gartner is ignored routinely by the IT community until suddenly some people hear what they want to hear and start quoting it repeatedly. Misquoting it mind you. It's not "Gartner", it's one employee's blog post and it was one of four or five in a series examining Windows 8. And he was really positive about it.

"My overall opinion on Windows 8 is actually really good. That’s why I’m surprised at the amount of press – they love taking that one sentence and pulling it out of context. That’s driving me nuts. Overall, it’s actually a compelling product, combining a tablet OS and a desktop OS... I think that’s a very smart move."

As to "0xB16B00B5"... instead of removing it, could they not just have added "0xB16C0C" and called it equality?

5
20

Gabe Newell: Windows 8 is a 'catastrophe' for PC biz

h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: @h4rm0ny - I believe the MS is getting a unusually bad rap here on this one.....

"Is that a fact? Can you give a reference for that please ? (I am not being sarcastic, it would be helpful, I'd like to see the wording, thanks)"

No problem. You can find the MS hardware certification requirements on their website. Here is a link to the PDF of them: MS Hardware Certification Requirements

If you skip down to the section on UEFISecureBoot (begins on page 118) it is covered in this section. As per usual, when you actually get into the detail it's more complicated, but the summary version that it is a requirement to be able to disable secure Boot on x86 is correct. Relevant passages below:

"17. Mandatory. On non-ARM systems, the platform MUST implement the ability for a physically present user to select between two Secure Boot modes in firmware setup: "Custom" and "Standard". Custom Mode allows for more flexibility as specified in the following:

a. It shall be possible for a physically present user to use the Custom Mode firmware setup option to modify the contents of the Secure Boot signature databases and the PK. This may be implemented by simply providing the option to clear all Secure Boot databases (PK, KEK, db, dbx), which puts the system into setup mode.

b. If the user ends up deleting the PK then, upon exiting the Custom Mode firmware setup, the system is operating in Setup Mode with SecureBoot turned off.

c. The firmware setup shall indicate if Secure Boot is turned on, and if it is operated in Standard or Custom Mode. The firmware setup must provide an option to return from Custom to Standard Mode which restores the factory defaults.On an ARM system, it is forbidden to enable Custom Mode. Only Standard Mode may be enabled.

18. Mandatory. Enable/Disable Secure Boot. On non-ARM systems, it is required to implement the ability to disable Secure Boot via firmware setup. A physically present user must be allowed to disable Secure Boot via firmware setup without possession of PKpriv. A Windows Server may also disable Secure Boot remotely using a strongly authenticated (preferably public-key based) out-of-band management connection, such as to a baseboard management controller or service processor. Programmatic disabling of Secure Boot either during Boot Services or after exiting EFI Boot Services MUST NOT be possible. Disabling Secure Boot must not be possible on ARM systems."

6
2
h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: If your computer runs Windows 7, it will run Windows 8

"I'm not so sure you're right. Doesn't Win 8 mandate secure boot?"

Windows 8 does not require Secure Boot. Windows 8 certification for new machines requires it. So if you want to purchase Windows 8 and deploy it on your home PC or in your company, you don't need Secure Boot machines. You can go right ahead. But if you're a manufacturer and you want the laptop you've just released to have the sticker on it, then it needs Secure Boot (and except on ARM, the ability for the user to disable it as well).

2
2
h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: Misunderstanding

"I never made such a claim; the referent of 'they' in my earlier comment was deliberately left hanging, and the comment to which I replied made no reference to Microsoft saying anything on the subject."

Well you're blaming Microsoft so either your "they" meant MS or else you're blaming MS for what other people said. In either case, I stand by my post.

"Nice how you jump straight from misreading my argument to ad hom; it's very progressive of you, although citing such an old-fashioned thing as "false memory syndrome" shows a disappointing lack of imagination"

That's not an ad hominem. An ad hominem is where I say your argument is wrong because of who you are. Suggesting that you might be suffering from false memory syndrome is actually a conclusion based on me perceiving your argument to be flawed and seeking an explanation for why that may be. E.g. you are 'remembering' something that never actually happened. People do this all the time.

Basically, my intent wasn't to insult you. My intent was to explain that I'm pretty certain that you're wrong and ask you to provide evidence for what you wrote. That still stands. So either you aren't saying Microsoft stated that any XP machine could run Vista (though you've only said that it's not proven that you were, which is a weird response), or you are saying that other people than MS misled you and you are using this as a basis to criticise MS. Which also doesn't seem supportable. That's not an ad hominem. I've made none.

3
2
h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: h4rm0ny

"Did you only read the first sentence of my post or something?"

I actually read the first two. I got excited before I reached the third one though and went and posted. Sorry - but we're in agreement so it's okay. ; )

3
1
h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: @Badvok - I believe the MS is getting a unusually bad rap here on this one.....

"And you can take a safe bet that those makers won't be bothered to provide the UEFI key to their kit, or if they do it will be lost somewhere in the supply chain and not reach the end-buyer. As long as Windows works, they will consider it "Job done", even *IF* MS is not leaning on them."

It's a requirement by Microsoft to get your Windows 8 sticker for your x86 device, that the user be able to disable secure boot. That's been said several times on these forums.

4
1
h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: Misunderstanding

"I believe they also said that if your machine runs XP it will run Vista, and look how well that worked out."

I think you have false memory syndrome. Plenty of computers that were running XP could run Vista. And plenty couldn't. It had to do with the age of the computer. I don't believe that MS ever said that just because XP ran on your machine that it met the requirements for Vista. Citation?

But anyway, we can see how well Win8 runs on a machine that runs Win7 because I'm doing it at home on my Desktop and my laptop. In both cases, I actually find Win8 faster. People have backed that up with various performance tests as well.

6
4
h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: Touch...

Why would you need to hunch over it? The reason desks are flat today is because things roll off them if they're not. But if it's all digital then there's no reason you can't have it like a drawing board. - they are much more comfortable to work at.

Sadly the cost of something like this will still be too high for the time being. But it would be awesome to have a drawing-board format device. Maybe an A3 version would be affordable.

4
4

Foreign intelligence agencies are biggest online threat, ex-Fed warns

h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: >"a company had lost a billion dollars of intellectual property in a weekend"

"How do we know this isn't just a bunch of liars who claimed to have invented the rectangle and completely made up a lie that that's worth a billion dollars"

Whilst obviously there are stupid patents and people who lie about, it does happen that these sorts of losses occur. When you get a Chinese company going from nothing to building cars comparable to American or Japanese companies in five years... Well that just doesn't happen through good R&D. It comes about through wholesale copying of other company's work.

1
2

Devs can't be bothered with Nokia's Windows Phone – report

h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: For how long?

"So W8 will run W7 apps. For how long? Likely W8.1 will drop that support."

What is Windows 8.1? Are you suggesting that a service pack would removed APIs? That's not going to happen. You're just spreading FUD.

2
3
h4rm0ny
Silver badge

"You brought a Lumia instead of a Galaxy SIII? LOL."

Uh, yeah. It cost me £160 SIM free and does everything I need it to do quickly and reliably.

2
4
h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: Duh!

"If multi-form-factor support was as easy as a recompile, Java would have won the day a long time ago. the fact that it hasn't is a hint that recopiling is not the only (or even the most important) issue."

Oddly enough, your post is a lot of what MS published on their developer blog. Particularly this one (though also others): Scaling to Different Screens

That you can deploy the same code to multiple devices (Windows Phone 8, tablets, desktops) is important, but there are actually new APIs in Windows 8 to do things like auto-rearrange menu systems for different screen sizes, alter images based on different screen resolutions. You'd probably find the link above very interesting.

1
5
h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: re: So you write an app now and it works on WP7.5 & WP8

"Since WP8 is not yet released, and the previous assumptions that WP7 devices would be upgraded to WP8 have proven false, it is probably best to assume the worst."

What assumptions? Show me any statement anywhere where Microsoft suggested at all that you could install WP8 on older WP7 devices.

On the other hand, they have actually stated that forward compatability is going to be the case and as you can actually grab the developer tools for WP8 and get stuck in now, you can actually see that it will be compatible. Why do you feel the need to post baseless assumptions where they spread and become misinformation? Can you not take a little care in checking your facts if you're going to write on a public forum?

2
5

Anonymous to expose 40GB of ISP data

h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: wtf

Maybe people will, instead of asking ISPs to be more secure with their data, ask the ISP's not to store the data in the first place. Or rather tell their governments to stop asking the ISPs to do so.

3
0

What happens when Facebook follows MySpace?

h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: I don't put any pictures of my son on Facebook

Unless of course his choice was that he'd rather not be on Facebook.

1
1

Apple seeks whopping $2.525bn Samsung patent payout

h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: "They did not invent."

"You do in racing cars."

Really? Actually square, not just rounded but slightly squarified? I can see the latter being useful for knowing exactly where you are with it or the ability to quickly exert more force without having to maintain as hard a grip, but actually square sounds both uncomfortable and more dangerous if you slammed into it. Do you have a photo of a racing car steering wheel?

"Your argument sounds like you have a few Apple products."

I have no idea where you got that from. I don't have any! I prefer Windows (both on computers and phones). I'm very confused how you took my post as having a pro-Apple bias. I was essentially saying that rounded corners are an obvious thing for practical reasons that anyone would almost certainly arrive at. The implication being that it's not the sort of thing that should therefore be patentable.

2
0
h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: "They did not invent."

Others have said that there is prior art. I expect there is but my comment on the matter is that it is more than a design issue actually. If you have something that just stands on your desk like a monitor for example, then rounded edges make no difference other than as a design aesthetic. But if it's a device you are to hold comfortably in your hand, lounge around with, turn about at different angles, then sharp corners are no longer just a design aesthetic but a practical matter. Rounded corners on a tablet are pretty much obvious for anyone who's ever held one in their hand.

There's a reason you don't often see square steering wheels in cars and it's not just because of tradition.

4
12

Iranian nuke plants rocked in midnight 'heavy metal blast'

h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: David Webb

Have you ever considered applying the same standards you hold the countries you don't like to the countries you do? Because you will find as bad things in those as well.

3
1
h4rm0ny
Silver badge

@Matt Bryant

"Merely demonstrating the shallowness of the sheeples' bleatings."

It's pretty reasonable to guess that someone outraged at mass slaughter by nuclear weapons is outraged by the slaughter part of it and will be outraged by the same number of people being killed in some other fashion unless there's some very good reason to assume otherwise. No 'shallowness' there.

The information on Japan is interesting though and I'll look into that as it is new to me.

"The point is that the US would avoid using nukes in such a manner - attacks on civilian targets "

This needs no counter argument to anyone with knowledge of history. I suspect you're trying to set up that Hiroshima and Nagasaki had roles in the Japanese war effort. They were also cities filled with innocent people and for most of us the latter is the most important part.

"Actually not a bad effort, though lacking in fundamental research. C+"

Thank you. The parts about Japan's military threat level at the end of WWII were interesting. B+ on that. Brought down to a C overall by a couple of logical fallacies and not considering both sides of an issue.

3
1
h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: Linux is free to and for everyone!

Actually, whilst you could technically leave various encryption modules out of the Linux kernel, I'm pretty sure they're in the source code by default. I think Blowfish et al. run afoul of USA's export restrictions. Nonsense and I fully agree with you, but the poster did ask about legal restrictions and at least within the USA, even if impossible to enforce, they do exist (unless I'm wrong).

0
0
h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: David Webb

"Firstly, the firebombing of Tokyo killed more people in one night (100,000+ night of 9th/10th March 1945) than either the Hiroshima (60,000) or Nagasaki (90,000) bombs, so I suppose you're fine with people being fried just as long as it's by conventional weapons"

Actually, I think in the absence of evidence to the contrary, it's reasonable to guess that anyone opposed to killing tens of thousands of people by nuclear weapons is probably also opposed to them being killed by being burned to death.

"Secondly, seeing as the Japanese had sworn not to surrender (94% of Japanese soldiers on Okinawa fought to the death and 100,000+ civillians dies fighting the Allies or by committing suicide), and their "innocent civillians" were being organised to resist with both conventional and kiamikaze means, it is highly likely the invasion of Japan we would have to have launched would have killed millions of both "innocent civillians" and Allied soldiers. Much more than Nagasaki and Hiroshima combined, which means dropping the nukes SAVED lifes."

An argument that presupposes American was being forced to invade Japan - a country which at that point was not capable of threatening American interests for a long time thereafter and which we know had already signalled to the USA that it wished to negotiate. How come this argument about saving lives is always trotted out and we're expected to never question the assumption that without the bombs America would be forced to invade Japan in a sustained land-war. Forced by what or who?

"Thirdly, even the simple nukes the Iranians are trying to produce will be much more refined and deadly than Little Boy or Fat Man, and will used on civillian targets simply because the Iranians don't have the tech to make targeted strikes"

If you suppose that American nuclear weapons are all programmed with targetting data to avoid civillian casualties, you have a rather limited grasp of nuclear weapons.

7
2

Dell uncloaks trio of muscular mobile workstations

h4rm0ny
Silver badge
Happy

Re: shiny object

I also like the openness about it: 'The marketing people like to have shiny things.'

That's a person who's come up via the engineering route, I bet you.

2
0

Brooks, Coulson to be CHARGED over phone-hacking

h4rm0ny
Silver badge
Thumb Up

YES!!!!!

(see subject)

1
1

Buzz: iPhone 5 arrives September 21, demand 'unprecedented'

h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: Hand goes up

If they have an iPhone 4 and they prefer it to any of the others currently out there and are used to it, then for them the iPhone 5 will probably be "better than the alternatives". It may not be possible to actually argue that a phone not yet released is going to be their best option, but for this reason it's a good working assumption.

But I am curious what would make the iPhone 5 so much better that they'd actually be willing to spend to upgrade. Presumably anything that runs on the new one would also run on the old one, so I would have thought the iPhone 5 is more of interest to newcomers than existing customers. Or am I wrong? (Genuine question, not looking for a reaction).

1
1

Windows 8 'bad' for desktop users - Gartner's one-word review

h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: @Matt

"On Windows this means getting hold of the installation media (that is: if you were lucky enough to actually GET installation media and didn't forget to put it somewhere safe) and after you've done that reinstalling the lot. Whoops; where is that serial key again ?"

Win8 works in a similar way to the Mac. There are a couple of options built in - a soft re-install that will keep your app settings and what you have installed, etc. And a hard re-install which is essentially a reset to how it was when it arrived.

0
2
h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: @Yet Another Commentard

See that's how criticism of WIn8 should be done - valid concerns with reasons. Not desparate flailing for anything that makes the OS sound bad even when the facts have to be distorted to fit.

There are obvious shortcomings in a number of the Metro apps, don't disagree.( At least in the beta. I'll reserve full judgement till I see the final versions.) I think a lot of these will be fixed early-ish on. For the most part, I will be using Win8 just like I use Win7 with the same software as before running on the Desktop. Metro will just be a start menu for me for some time to come. But yeah, nothing's perfect and I ain't going to argue against your points (pretty certain you'll be able to change colour schemes in Office 2013 release version if that helps). I just get annoyed when people come out with factually incorrect stuff that is easily disproved or close their minds to things that are actually better out of bias. Your post doesn't read like that so get an upvote from me!

2
5
h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: @h4rm0ny - Shock Horror

"I love how you assume that because you are willing to poke and prod an OS every which way just to see what happens, that everyone else must as well."

And I feel that love, I really do! And quite frankly I love how people keep re-phrasing what I wrote (move a mouse to the bottom left just as you did in Win7) to things like "poke and prod an OS every which way just to see what happens".

Half will work it out in no time. Half will probably watch the (I expect) inevitable "Welcome to Windows 8" video that will probably be on there and the third half will just ask someone else and be told - a process that will take five seconds.

Seriously, the action is almost exactly the same as in Windows 7 with two exceptions - one, if you're on a full screen application, you can still trigger the Metro screen without losing screen estate to the button as you do in Windows 7, i.e. you can get true full screen. And secondly, if you have multiple monitors as many of us do on desktop machines these days, you get the functionality by default on both monitors, meaning you don't have to travel your mouse all the way between the two.

And obviously it works well on hybrid devices where sometimes you'll use a keyboard and mouse and sometimes just use it as a tablet.

So what exactly do YOU prefer. No progress and everything always stays the same, or about a minute of inconvenience for some people who either can't work it out or refuse to read / watch instructions or ask someone? The answer to that question should be obvious. And yes, I do mean "progress". I've just listed actual things that you can do with the new version that you can't with the old that will be useful to many people.

2
5
h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: @h4rm0ny - Shock Horror

"So you don't see the problem with a UI that has hidden various key functions in the very corners of the display under the assumption that you can thumbswipe that location to get them to show up being forced upon non-touch-enabled systems?"

That's a funny way to re-phrase it's exactly the same but without a visible start button. Which is what I wrote. And no, as you just quoted me saying: I don't see the problem.

"Bad enough to be wondering which bit of the Control Panel you need to get to this time to eg disable 802.1x"

Any company that designed it's O/S around making the enablement or disablement of Firewire prominently displayed, would not be a commercial success I am thinking. But you're right. I wish it were as easy as just editing /etc/modprobe.d in Linux. That's much more intuitive!

As to your difficulty in opening Control Panel. You bring up Metro, you click All Applications and there it is. Though a lot of the things regular users will want to manage have been moved into the Charms menu. (Silly name, but there you have it).

5
17
h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: Fixed with a fracking start icon

Actually, it is better than Windows 7 because the context area is on both monitors. In my Win7 version, I have my primary screen on the right so I have to move the mouse all the way over to the second monitor (I have two 24" ones) to click on the start menu. On Win8, every monitor has the menu area on it. So it's actually less mouse travelling on average.

1
6
h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: Fixed with a fracking start icon

"I literally just drag the mouse to the farthest it will go in the bottom left and that puts it on my 2nd monitor"

Well okay, if the mouse is on my second monitor, I have to actually pause it in the area so in that specific case it is no better than Windows 7, I will grant you. But I'm in the habit of using the Windows Key so I haven't really noticed.

0
1
h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: @h4rm0ny - Shock Horror

"You're prob a tech. 95% of the UK are not and are quite happily fit into the public joe arena. Most of these people would scream if they saw no more Windows "start" menu."

I am a "tech". I'm an old C / C++ programmer now an engineering manager. But I honestly cannot see moving to the bottom left and clicking if there's a circle there and moving to the bottom left and clicking if there isn't, as a big difference. And I think we can expect MS to do some sort of "Welcome to Windows 8" video for new users to the system. Windows 8 will be pretty easy for new users. Half the complaints here are from people who think it's being 'dumbed down' after all. It is a certain sub-section of the IT profession that will get upset about this.

Most users will shrug, click on the bottom left and carry on. I think they'll even prefer big friendly images to looking through a menu that contains everything that is installed on their computer.

3
9
h4rm0ny
Silver badge

"Now, what is the upside, that makes you happy to pay for this shoer-term loss of productivity? Upside for your organisation, that is. Not for Microsoft"

There's some nice stuff in Win8 for BYOD. If I can have even program installs be part of someone's profile that I host in my own private cloud and be able to swap in any generic machine without having to worry about who has what software, that's a plus. If someone wants to use their own machine or take their work one off-site and I can lock down software on it to only be "installed" when they are connected to my secure VPN or on-site, then that's a plus. Ditto for document storage although that's more a part of Server 2012 and can be backwards-used on Win7 as well. Particularly I like not having to worry about uninstalling software and freeing up licences on people's personal machines that they own. Unassign the licence and transfer it to a different (or replacement employee) and Office is gone from their machine, for example.

Also, if I know that most of my employees just need Word and Outlook and our internal accounting system, I can give them a "Start Menu" that is just these three things and they never really have to leave it. Their screen is their program with Metro and they just flip between them as needed. Good for those people who are computer-phobic. Metro apps will remember their state. I just have to tell all the users - press the windows key and click on the program. No menu, no finding Excel under Office - just hit the key and select one of the four or five big boxes. Perfect. ;)

7
12
h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: Service Pack 1 (win8SP1)

"They will make it more difficult for people to load a different OS (secure boot) so users can't escape from Metro"

It's actually a requirement by Microsoft for an x86 device to get the Approved sticker, that the user be able to disable secure boot.

"They will probably have sufficient file incompatibilities in Office 2013 to force other users to upgrade"

I've been using Office 2013 beta and files created with it by default have opened fine in Office 2010 so far. I've not noticed any change. You need to back accusations such as this up, otherwise you're just scare-mongering.

Although that may be your aim as you have a history of posts like this. I recall you stated previously how the Surface would have heating problems. When I pointed out it actually had quite a neat all around vent so that it had airflow however you held it, you excitedly responded with a complaint that the Surface wouldn't be waterproof! Well, with a determination to find fault like that, I'm inclined to ask you to provide evidence of any accusations you make from here on.

1
3
h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: Fixed with a fracking start icon

"The "wave the mouse in the corner" trick is going to be the operating system's downfall."

I literally just drag the mouse to the farthest it will go in the bottom left and that triggers the Metro screen. There's no aiming required at all. Possibly you are using an older preview version?

1
4
h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: History repeats itself

"Obviously you missed this...

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/07/20/microsoft_posts_first_ever_loss/"

You should read your own article though. It points out that it's the result of spending $6.2bn on trying to take over the company aQuantive (thankfully it was a disaster as we don't need MS developing a major stake in the advertising business) and of having to defer another half a billion in profits for legal reasons. Your article, and I quote, says: "this quarter may be the Redmond-haters' last chance to gloat."

2
10
h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: History repeats itself

"M$ have lost the plot. They haven't had a truly viable product for years, and with each month they fall further behind."

Windows 7 has been very well received. If that's not recent enough for you, Azure is doing quite well and seems to be growing. If that's not recent enough for you, Server 2012 has some fantastic new features and is being very well received indeed. Particularly by those interested in virtualisation.

"The much-vaunted "surface" was shown to be an expensive joke"

How? Where? By who? You? Again, a lot of people like the look of it, reviewers seem optimistic and as far as I know prices haven't even been announced. Now that we've seen Office 2013 and know what is meant by "Office Preview" on the WindowsRT version, and it's pretty much the full office as far as 90% of the userbase are concerned, it looks like it's going to fly off the shelves if the pricing is even remotely sane.

"Windows Vista, 7 (and now 8) is just more shiny nonsense stuck on top of the same old broken, rotten core"

You plainly know very little about this, then.

"The programmers with any clue left M$ ten years ago when the marketers took over running the company"

Anyone who writes an operating system - whether Linux, Windows or Mac OS is worth some respect. It's not an easy task at all. You sound like someone who has never even ventured into Systems Programming.

"M$ need to realise that there's nothing cheaper than free"

Actually there is something cheaper than free - paying up front for what you find most suitable and making it back in increased productivity and staff costs. I use Linux for all my servers, but I use MS Office and Windows 7 for my business work. When Win8 comes out, I shall probably get a hybrid with a stylus for taking notes and sketching out diagrams for people. Partly because I like Win8 but also because I can hook it into existing Windows infrastructure neatly and take advantage of things like secure document management and cloud-based user profiles and security models to control it lock it down. These are big plusses for the corporate world.

"- even the most naive user now knows that a significant part of the cost of his store-bought computer is going to Redmond."

So tell me how much of the cost of a £400 laptop goes to MS and how you know this. And exactly what constitutes a significant part of the cost of a £400? Acer have a policy of refunding £20 for unused Windows 7 Starter edition. If you give them the computer, they will remove the OS and give it back to you plus refund. Big manufacturers do not buy their copies of Windows retail! Besides, you pre-suppose most buyers don't want a discounted copy of Windows coming with their computer. Do you think they'd prefer getting a blank PC and then going and buying a copy of Windows themselves without the benefit of the manufacturers bulk-bargaining with MS? Or do you suppose most users would be happy installing Ubuntu? Ubuntu is fine, but if you're going to rant about this, back it up with figures and think about what most users would like, not just people with an obvious bias against Microsoft such as yourself.

Companies are not football teams. They are companies and they sell you things if you give them money and don't if you wont. It is silly to take sides as if they are your friend and cheer or hurl abuse at the 'rival team'.

4
11
h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: Shock Horror

I've yet to have anyone actually demonstrate to me how Metro makes things harder on the Desktop than Windows 7. I hit the Windows key and type vm and up comes VMware. I hit it and type wo and up comes word. If I want word pad, then it's the next one down. I use about twenty programs regularly on my Desktop Windows (I am a power user) and that number of programs fits comfortably on my laptop screen Metro page, let alone my desktop monitor! A handful of things I have found to take longer such as turning on a VPN (two extra clicks), but these are my actual metrics, not opinions. So how is it actually hindering me doing anything?

8
40

Microsoft promises Metro developers 'fame and fortune'

h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: The thing is

And what exactly is it that you feel you can do with icons that you can't do with the tiles on Metro? They seem to only add functionality to me. Or are you one of those people that covers their desktop with icons and thus needs them to be tiny? (*shudder*)

3
11
h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Count another one here who both likes Metro and has had positive reactions from those that I've shown it to. I didn't like it at first but I actually did some metrics counting up how many clicks and careful positioning it took me to do something in Metro and how long in Windows 7 and Metro is typically the same or fewer. Seriously. Odd exceptions such as turning on a VPN take slightly longer, but overall the experience is quicker.

Yet some people genuinely love to hate. I was at a presentation on Server 2012 recently. After listing all the cool things in Server 2012, the presenter then opened up Win8 in a VM and spent 15 minutes ranting about how they had to position the mouse in a 40x40 pixel area to get to the Metro screen or had to click to expand the page to get the control panel. But you don't. To get the Metro page, you just swing the mouse pointer down to the lowest left part of the screen. You don't have to carefully position anything, you just drag it to the bottom left as far as it will go - which is technically even easier than positioning it on a Start menu that you can see. Control panel? Just hit Windows key and type 'co', it's the first in the list. I pointed this out to the presenter afterwards and turns out they actually knew about both of these things. But that wouldn't have given the satisfaction of an excited 15 minute rant and got the same laughs from the audience.

Whilst not everyone is going to like Metro, some people actually get enjoyment from hating it. Which is weird.

6
14

Has Nokia bottomed out? El Reg drills into the detail

h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: Have they bottomed out?

"I quite fancy a WP8 handset, but the main issue I have is putting down £400-500 on a SIM free handset only to hate it."

Hopefully there will be some lower-cost models. I paid £160 for the Lumia 710 and the only real difference between that and the more expensive 800 ones is a lower-quality camera and less storage space. I care about neither on a phone, so bargain for me. Windows Phone 8 devices are being made by several manufacturers, not just Nokia. So there should be some lower-end models.

3
7

BT bags MASSIVE £425m broadband rollout deal in Wales

h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: I'm happy with that...

"I feel it's best having one company instead of a complex multi-company network"

Sometimes it is. In these cases, the correct implementation is public ownership. Private firms are best kept in check by competition. If there's no competition, then private ownership is a bad idea because the pubic has no limiters on abuse. Public ownership at least grants some of that via elections. Yes, governments can implement guidelines and impose fines on a monopoly, but it's too easy for the private interests to give them the run around.

So something should either be nationaly owned where it is a natural monopoly (e.g. the roads network, power network) or have competition. And there's no reason you can't have a bit of both. E.g. roads network is a national property but highway maintenance companies compete for contracts. But a pure, private monopoly - sooner or later it will run away from you.

3
0

Microsoft: Azure now holds FOUR TREELLION objects

h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: But do you trust these numbers?

Whose? Those from Amazon or Microsoft? They're both massive corporations.

But yes, the numbers are probably accurate. Now tell me, do you trust the word 'object'?

3
0

Dell readies Linux Ultrabook for autumn release

h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: Ultrabook with Ubuntu and Steam for Linux?

"I can drive. Frankly, if I am forced to choose between a 12hr (each way) road trip with my wife through some lovely mountains and national parks (oh no!) and buying a Macbook..."

Not arguing that you shouldn't enjoy some mountains and national parks, but really why not just install Linux on any other laptop? I see this as an advantage for the non-technical user because Canonical will ensure that a reference machine like this would be will always work without hassle. But for a technical user like I presume you are, you should be able to overcome any issues easily. I've installed Ubuntu on a number of laptops and it's worked fine nearly always (exception of some Broadcom wireless stuff on an older one which I was still able to fix without it taking too long). Basically Ubuntu already works fine on most laptops so just grab one of those. If it's an issue of having paid for Windows with the laptop I believe you can get refunds for that if you don't use it. A pain, but less time consuming than your road trip.

1
0
h4rm0ny
Silver badge

I develop on Linux because I like the command line and I know how everything works. But you can develop on Windows easily enough. But really why bother with all those issues you talk about with installing Linux (again, not that hard if you know what you're doing), and just run Linux in a VM on Windows? That's what I do for day to day. My poor Gentoo install hasn't been booted in months. Stick Linux in a VM and you've got the best of both worlds with very little of the downside.

0
0
h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: Give me an Ultrabook with Secureboot turned off

Secure Boot is a thing that helps users, not restricts them. You can turn it off normally and for x86 machines, if you want to sell it as Win8 ready, then MS require that the user be able to turn it off.

Anyway, away from the red herrings, one of the main barriers to Linux adoption by users without a strong technical background is that you don't get it pre-installed like you do with Windows or OSX. If you do, then all the problems with making sure you have everything for the right hardware just vanishes, because the manufacturer has done that for you - the same advantage OSX and Windows enjoy.

1
0

Nearly 2 MILLION US Facebook users quit social network

h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: TV - right there with FB

"As is music. Very few people actually listen to music."

You may be confused because you no longer see people with giant ghettoblasters on their shoulders and think that people have stopped listening to music. In fact, if you look around you will see probably around 40-50% of people in urban areas have the little devices in their ears pretty much any time they aren't required to talk to other people or focus on hard problems (and sometimes even then) - these are actually called "headphones" and deliver music directly to the ears.

You're right about televison though. Amongst any generation currently under forty, it's really died off, largely replaced by other hobbies or the Internet.

1
0
h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: ...and the bubble starts to deflate

Actually although I predicted (along with a zillion other people) that Facebook would plummet, and it did, the slide seems to have arrested itself a bit whilst I thought it would just carry on sailing down. I can't really see why it's holding up around the upper $20's as it's P/E ration is currently 72.59 a rating that indicates that either it is insanely overvalued or there is going to be a truly staggering increase in revenue in the near future. As the latter looks pretty doubtful, we're left to conclude that it is massively overvalued.

My guess as to why the bubble has yet to truly burst is that so many people and big players have sunk so much money into it which they would currently loose due to the big plunge downwards from the initial IPO, that no-one actually dares sell right now because they can't afford to write off the loss or their afraid that selling would turn a big loss into a catastrophic one as shareholders paniced and tried to offload.

1
0

Behold: First look at Office 2013, with screenshots

h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: Why - Oh Why waste so much money when Open Office & LibreOffice are free?

"That handful would be the tens (if not hundreds) upon thousands of other academics that routinely use LaTeX day in, day out?"

Great though LaTeX is, all the maths students in all the world, only add up to a small proportion of people using office suites. But have you tried the equation editor in Word 2013, yet? Seems to have been improved. Just had a look and it works pretty well, imo. Was able to bash out some reasonably complicated equations by my standards.

1
0
h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: facebook? twitter? required cloud integration?

Facebook integration is just an option. Twitter is just an option. I have accounts on neither and work just fine on Office 2013 so far. Required cloud integration is both optional and you don't have to use Skydrive as your cloud. You can provide your own if you want the features but not to use MS's service.

All of the above is easily checked by a quick search or reading of their information.

1
0
h4rm0ny
Silver badge

Re: W8 only? Skype?

"So is this only going to run on Windows8, that would be a bit unusual for MS?"

No. It works on Windows 7 as well (but not XP). Includes the same features as well as far as I know. Even the streaming Office works on Win 7 so you don't actually have to install it / spend a licence for it if you want to run it on someone else's machine temporarily.

0
0

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2018