* Posts by Julian Bradfield

94 posts • joined 19 Jul 2008

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Farewell Unity, you challenged desktop Linux. Oh well, here's Ubuntu 17.04

Julian Bradfield

Re: My thoughts on this ...

apart from the fact that xfwm or whatever it's called has less flexible key/button binding than twm had 30 years ago...I compile my own version just to get basic features, sigh.

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That apple.com link you clicked on? Yeah, it's actually Russian

Julian Bradfield

Re: Not just Mac

The addresses are not incorrect - they are *supposed* to be displayed in cyrillic, that's the whole point!

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Good news, everyone! Two pints a day keep heart problems at bay

Julian Bradfield

No, I'm sober enough to read the actual BMJ press release - and the end of Orlowski's article, where he defines moderate as 20g/day (which is probably a mistake for 20ml/day), or a tad over 2 units (or probably intended to be 2 units), which is a pint, not two pints.

Also, the BMJ press release defines it as 14 units a week.

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Julian Bradfield

Re: Small beer?

Tesco Value Bitter - 2.1% . Yes, it tastes like it, too.

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Julian Bradfield

Moderate drinking is two units per day - that's one pint of beer, not two, unless you drink small beer.

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Large Hadron Collider turns up five new particles

Julian Bradfield

Re: This is the stuff that binds Quarks together

It's described as the Omega_c^0, so it's the neutral one, ssc.

The Omega_c^0 has been seen before - it's just these excited states that haven't.

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Dormant Linux kernel vulnerability finally slayed

Julian Bradfield

Re: Slayed?

Err...

"The knight slew the dragon", etc.

I sentence you to fifty hours' reading of the Bible.

Your remark about fixed is also wrong. The accent has only ever been used in poetry and hymns, to force the unnatural pronunciation when the metre requires it. Both the past verb and the past participle were often written "fixt" as well as "fixed" in the early days of the word's history (it's a modern import to English, sometime in the 15th century).

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RAF pilot sacked for sending Airbus Voyager into sudden dive

Julian Bradfield

Re: Grounded?

Military discipline isn't some kind of private club agreement - it's statute law. Anybody sentenced to imprisonment is automatically dismissed unless there's a really good reason not to, but that doesn't stop them serving the sentence.

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NHS patient letters meant for GPs went undelivered for years

Julian Bradfield

Re: Optional

My favourite was when (during a long slow recovery from a severe illness a while ago) I went in to have my regular blood check in the morning, continued going about my day, and then at 7pm the phone rang: "This is the emergency room at the ERI. The lab's just phoned us about your blood results. Ermmm..are you alright?" Either I can cycle happily with a blood glucose of 2.0, or the lab made a mistake:)

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Grumpy Trump trumped, now he's got the hump: Muslim ban beaten back by appeals court

Julian Bradfield

Re: Ahh, guys, any of you ever hear of the Constitution?

One of these days, you should read your constitution. It doesn't mention the words "National Security", or even any 19th century equivalent term. It also says very little about either the powers or duties of the president.

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Fired Ofcom Remainer bod sues UK gov for withholding his payoff

Julian Bradfield

If you consult a decent dictionary, as another commentard suggests, you'll find that "disinvite" dates from about 1640, while "uninvite" dates from about 1660. So they've both been around a long time. "disinvite" has been out of fashion for a couple of centuries, but if it's making a come-back, it is a comeback, not something new. (Not that there's anything wrong with being new.)

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Sysadmin figures out dating agency worker lied in his profile

Julian Bradfield

Re: Enter == submit

Until the Windows-ization of Unix got to it, the sequence of keystrokes described was the standard way of logging in to both text and graphical login screens. On our work desktops, it stopped working that way about a year ago (when we moved "up" one version of Scientific Linux, and got all the Gnome3 crap), and I still haven't got used to not being able to type username ENTER password ENTER

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systemd free Linux distro Devuan releases second beta

Julian Bradfield

Re: Ubuntu adopted it

Middle button works fine on my (X)Ubuntu laptop...I'd love to see the source for this!

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Hackers electrocute selves in quest to turn secure doors inside out

Julian Bradfield

Re: "then increased the amount of electrons running through their prototype."

Wrong. The abbreviation is capitalized; the full unit name is not. From the SI Brochure:

Unit names are normally printed in roman (upright) type, and they are treated like ordinary nouns. In English, the names of units start with a lower-case letter (even when the symbol for the unit begins with a capital letter), except at the beginning of a sentence or in capitalized material such as a title. In keeping with this rule, the correct spelling of the name of the unit with the symbol °C is "degree Celsius" (the unit degree begins with a lower-case d and the modifier Celsius begins with an upper-case C because it is a proper name).

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Brexit may not mean Brexit at all: UK.gov loses Article 50 lawsuit

Julian Bradfield

Maybe you should read the judgement? It is a major plank of the argument that the EU treaties were prepared for by Parliamentary legislation *before* being formally made by prerogative, so that Parliament was asserting explicit control of the prerogative wrt EU treaties.

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Google man drags Emacs into the 1990s

Julian Bradfield

Re: text mode!

xrdb -query | grep Background

*Background: #d8c078

XEmacs*Background: #D8c078

is my choice. Really annoys me that all these Gtk programs ignore it.

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UK Science Museum will reconsider its 'sexist' brain quiz

Julian Bradfield

The strongest claim I can immediately find about spatial awareness is that men are 1 standard deviation better than women. That's a long way from "nearly all men are better than nearly all women", or even from "nearly all men are better than the average woman".

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Linus Torvalds won't apply 'sh*t-for-brains stupid patch'

Julian Bradfield

lspci

lsusb

or is that not what you meant?

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UK nuke warhead builders shift IT gear into public cloud

Julian Bradfield

Re: Unwise

Required pedantic comment: "Restricted" doesn't exist any more. There's only OFFICIAL, OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE, SECRET, and TOP SECRET.

I got an OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE email...from the Research Councils, telling me to do my grant reviewer's training...complete with encrypted PDF with non-unique password in following email.

Sigh.

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How to scam $750,000 out of Microsoft Office: Two-factor auth calls to premium-rate numbers

Julian Bradfield

Re: FFS

Email address validation hard? Nah, just needs a two page regex.

http://www.ex-parrot.com/pdw/Mail-RFC822-Address.html

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Osborne on Leave limbo: Travel and trade stay unchanged

Julian Bradfield

I suspect that if Scotland decides for independence (and I'm one of the English immigrants who voted No last time and will vote Yes this time), and Westminster tries to deny it, we'll just take it.

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'Leave EU means...' WHAT?! Britons ask Google after results declared

Julian Bradfield

Re: google search....

the negotiation process you're describing (with EP approval) is what happens after notification to withdraw. If negotiations fail, then we just leave after two years with no deal at all - the treaties cease to apply, and we fall back to general WTO rules on trade etc, no agreement on visa-free travel, no nothing.

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'2nd referendum' topples site

Julian Bradfield

Re: 2nd Referendum

Because there is no mechanism for showing somebody the door.

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Julian Bradfield

Re: 2nd Referendum

Unfortunately, Parliament has no control over pressing the button that starts withdrawal from the EU, as opposed to disentangling it from domestic law. That's up to the government.

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Brexit threatens Cornish pasty's racial purity

Julian Bradfield

Re: Swings and Roundabouts.

This sounds like a Euromyth, since lots of things I buy say where they were made, laid or grown.

Oh look, it dates back to a tabloid euromyth in 2004 !!

http://blogs.ec.europa.eu/ECintheUK/made-in-britain-labels-to-be-axed/

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Cold space gas? Sure, supermassive black holes can eat that. Nom, nom, nom

Julian Bradfield

Re: Some numbers, please?

From a quick scan of the article and one of the references, "cold" seems to mean 10-20 K,

and "hot" seems to mean 100-1000 K.

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New periodic table names

Julian Bradfield

That's Ts for Tennessine.

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On her microphone's secret service: How spies, anyone can grab crypto keys from the air

Julian Bradfield

Re: How?

It's in a refereed publication, one of the authors is Adi Shamir (as in RSA). I'd believe it's interesting, unless you're willing to read the paper to find out otherwise.

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Earth's core is younger than its crust surface

Julian Bradfield

Re: Gravity

The time dilation between two points depends on the difference of the gravitational potential between them, not on the field strength at either point. The centre of the earth has a zero field, but a low potential relative to the surface (if you drop something down a tube to the centre of the earth, all that kinetic energy has to come from somewhere!).

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EU set to bin €500 note

Julian Bradfield

Some 14 years ago, I spent a month in Switzerland as a guest researcher. On the first day, my host took me to the finance office, and they paid my month's salary in cash. Nice 1000Fr notes... Some years later, I reluctantly decided it was time to change the ones I hadn't spent. I took them to the post office, who took them into a back room, came out again saying "gosh, they do have interesting security features", and then insisted on giving me my sterling in RBS £100 notes instead of into my bank account. I walked swiftly to my bank.

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German prof scores €2.4m EU grant to crack software on your bicycle

Julian Bradfield

Last time I saw him (a few years ago now), he was working on wireless brake controllers. It's a very interesting exercise analysing the reliability of wireless brake controls, and computing that despite your natural horror at the idea, they're no more likely to fail than a brake cable is to snap.

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'Bring back xHamster', North Carolina smut watchers grumble

Julian Bradfield

Re: REALLY NOW

Why do people assume toilets are segregated by gender, rather than by sex?

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Infosec bods pop mobile money crypto by 'sniffing' e-mag radiation

Julian Bradfield

Old Handle: the paper says after observing "a few thousand" signatures.

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'Just give me any old date and I'll make it work' ... said the VB script to the coder

Julian Bradfield

Re: VBA date handling has taken at least five years off my lifespan

Um, the tax year starts on 6th April.

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400 jobs to go as Texas Instruments calls time on chip fab in Scotland

Julian Bradfield

Re: Texas and Motorola - common issues

Erm, Vulture@C64, glass is the one thing you absolutely *don't* keep hydrofluoric acid in - one of its main uses is etching glass (which is silicon dioxide, of course). Suitable plastics are ok.

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The paperless office? Don’t talk sheet

Julian Bradfield

Re: I'll see your dot matrix

I still have boxes of line printer output that I use for lining the larder shelves.

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2015 was the Year of the Linux Phone ... Nah, we're messing with you

Julian Bradfield

Re: No excitement here, please.

Funnily enough, fvwm is what I use as my window manager. 2.4 even - I've never been bothered enough to "upgrade" to 2.6.

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Julian Bradfield

No excitement here, please.

"Excitement" means new bloatware that breaks half my workflow and expects me to learn another crappy UI.

I want to run with software that's been essentially unchanged for at least ten years!

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The Register's entirely serious New Year's resolutions for 2016

Julian Bradfield

The following short Stylish entry considerably improves my BBC experience - no doubt I could do better if I could be bothered..

@namespace url(http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml);

@-moz-document domain('bbc.co.uk') {

* { font-size: small !important; }

div.albatross__image { display: none !important; }

div.cormorant-item__image { display: none !important;}

div.pigeon-item__image { display: none !important;}

div.sparrow-item__image { display: none !important;}

div[class='swift faux-block-link'] {display: none !important;}

}

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Enraged Brits demand Donald Trump UK ban

Julian Bradfield

Re: Basically

Just to be pedantic, "worship" comes from "worthship", not "worthyship". There's no trace of -ig/-y anywhere in its history.

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'Dear Daddy...' Max Zuckerberg’s Letter back to her Father

Julian Bradfield

Re: How about we get them modern electricity grids and cheap reliable energy first?

Most estimates over the last few years of deaths due to climate change (i.e. the increase in mortality today over what would have been predicted with a 1990 global climate) run at a couple of hundred thousand per year. That's quite a long way from "nobody".

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Google to end updates, security bug fixes for Chrome on 32-bit Linux

Julian Bradfield

My life mostly runs on a 32-bit laptop, and will for as long as it continues to function.

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Big mistake, Google. Big mistake: Chrome OS to be 'folded into Android'

Julian Bradfield

Re: One less ...

People have been using "less" in this way since Old English, people including such masters of the tongue as King Alfred - what's 1500 years of usage set against the personal preference of one 18th century grammarian, which is how the whole less/fewer fetish got started.

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Ireland moves to scrap 1 and 2 cent coins

Julian Bradfield

Re: Makes sense

£100 Britannia coins are legal tender, too.

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Android in user-chosen lockscreen patterns are grimly predictable SHOCKER

Julian Bradfield

Yawn. I lock my phone at all (with a simple pattern) solely because it's the only way to stop the damn thing unlocking itself in my pocket. If my phone gets stolen, there are a couple of passwords I need to change as soon as practicable, but that's it. The Google account associated with it contains only my calendar, which is not sensitive.

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Net neutrality: How to spot an arts graduate in a tech debate

Julian Bradfield

Um, "stochastic" means the opposite of "evolves deterministically". It means something that behaves randomly, so that analysis has to be done statistically rather than deterministically.

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You CAN'T jail online pirates for 10 years, legal eagles tell UK govt

Julian Bradfield

Re: Just as a technical aside

Much UK law applies to both Scotland and England (and the other bits). In particularly, copyright law is the same in both. Ever since the Union, UK statutes have said which bits of the UK they apply to.

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Small number of computer-aided rifles could be hacked in contrived scenario

Julian Bradfield

Re: spin drift. (Coriolis Effect?)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jX7dcl_ERNs

demonstrates almost a foot of difference in impact point between shooting east and west at 1000 yards.

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Mozilla flings teddy out of pram over France's 'Patriot Act'

Julian Bradfield

Re: Laws and the public good

Hear, hear! I've always thought that I don't really much care how much the spooks spy illegally in order to do their real job, though for practical reasons I'd rather they focussed on actual targets rather than dragnets - I'm more worried if they're *allowed* to spy, because that means they can then make legitimized use of their observations for political ends beyond protecting us from random Islamists or non-random Russian presidents.

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Low price, big power: Virtual Private Server picks for power nerds

Julian Bradfield

If you want a UK-based outfit with good support, I've been very happy with Bytemark for several years now. The selection in the article seems rather US-biased.

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