* Posts by David Nash

427 posts • joined 15 Jul 2008

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NASA lights humongous rocket that goes nowhere ... until 2019

David Nash
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Coat

Re: RS-25 turbo pump

I think I read it recently in "Into the black" by Roland White...but I forget, sorry!

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Ten new tech terms I learnt this summer: Do you know them all?

David Nash
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Re: Fibre

"The name will be like USB speed names"

Or telescopes:

https://www.universetoday.com/133800/rise-of-the-super-telescopes-the-overwhelmingly-large-telescope/

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User left unable to type passwords after 'tropical island stress therapy'

David Nash
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Re: Government staff: need I say more?

I would imagine that 99% of people who state or question whether "the internet" is down, are using the phrase as a short way to refer to their internet connection and know full well that "The Internet" is not down. I know I've done so myself, despite being well acquainted with the meaning.

Pretending that you think they mean the entire Internet is just petty and achieves nothing.

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Hey, remember that monkey selfie copyright drama a few years ago? Get this – It's just hit the US appeals courts

David Nash
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Alert

Re: EEK!

I think you mean OOK

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David Nash
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Re: Devil's Advocate

"They exist precisely to differentiate us from the rest of the animal kingdom"

No they don't, they exist to try to avoid the exploitation and/or abuse of people. Exploitation and abuse of animals is a separate issue.

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David Nash
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Re: Just sayin'

" Animals, perhaps, especially monkeys have far more in common with people than the artificial construct that is a corporation"

Depends on which context. Corporations are made of people. Hence for legal issues about subjects invented by people (like copyright) corporations are much closer to people.

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David Nash
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Re: Just sayin'

"Corporations can hold copyright, and they're not people, per se."

This point is addressed in the article. Why would you raise it as if it's your idea?

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'My dream job at Oracle left me homeless!' – A techie's relocation horror tale

David Nash
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Re: Oracle treating employees badly?

"That meant that if I wrote a book, composed any music, created a video all royalties would go to Oracle."

This is a common type of clause except that they usually say if it's related to your work, or that you have to get agreement in writing to exceptions. Many employers would be reasonable about such things I think, and I doubt that Oracle would be able to win a case claiming that since JR Hartley worked for them when he wrote "Fly Fishing", they owned the rights.

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David Nash
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Better to pay off the Mortgage than have savings plus a huge debt.

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David Nash
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"By the way - what sort of "insurance" is it that you can get AFTER getting sick and have it pay for the treatment? Normally getting health insurance involves a medical check-up and examination of hospital/medical records."

Health insurance provided as a benefit by an employer often covers continuation of existing treatment when you switch jobs. Such insurance also doesn't normally need a medical checkup either.

At least in the UK.

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LHC finds a new and very charming particle: the Xicc++ baryon

David Nash
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Re: Awe

"I'm definitely putting Quantum Dynamics as my religion / "belief system" on the next census."

Can something be a religion if there is evidence to support it's claims?

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Create a user called '0day', get bonus root privs – thanks, Systemd!

David Nash
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Re: the problem with clueless amateurs...

See also Dunning-Kruger effect.

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Fresh cotton underpants fix series of mysterious mainframe crashes

David Nash
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Re: Cats at 40,000 volts

Surely the usual reason to want cats out of your garden is to stop them using it as a toilet. Replacing it with the same stuff but smelling like lions rather than little cats, seems counterproductive.

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Google hit with record antitrust fine of €2.4bn by Europe

David Nash
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Re: Erm

I'm no fan of Google in some ways, but I agree with this comment.

Tesco advertises its own petrol stations in its supermarket car park too. Should they be told to give equal prominence to BP et. al. and other supermarkets?

The reasoning seems to be that because "everybody" goes to Google first, they have acquired some responsibility to promote their competitors.

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Ex-NASA bod on Gwyneth Paltrow site's 'healing' stickers: 'Wow. What a load of BS'

David Nash
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FAIL

Where's the harm?

The harm comes about when they believe all this crap and so-called alternative medicine* is going to heal them or their loved ones of real diseases. Placebo effect notwithstanding, there have been cases of people dying because they trusted in the power of positive thinking or in homeopathy rather than the best that medical science can offer, however nasty the latter is, it is at least normally based on some evidence that it can help.

*What do you call alternative medicine that works? Yes, you guessed it, "medicine".

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Hacker exposed bank loophole to buy luxury cars and a face tattoo

David Nash
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How does this make him a "hacker"?

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In the week Uber blew up, Netflix restates 'No brilliant jerks' policy

David Nash
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fair dismissal?

So they'll fire " those who figure if they do a decent job without f*cking up they'll have a safe job"

IANAL but I'm not sure they can get away with that in Europe.

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You can't take the pervs off Facebook, says US Supreme Court

David Nash
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Re: But someone makes money?

"Otherwise, why should YouTube, baby's mother and all, profit from this and the musicians not?"

The musicians or other rights holders presumably profit from the mother's playing of the music, or the radio station if it was such. The inclusion in the background is using that music, yes, but *fair* use. Not copyright infringement.

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Virtual reality audiences stare straight ahead 75% of the time

David Nash
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Re: Clever image processing algorithm

Clever, maybe, but also don't forget that the blind spot is compensated for by the brain making stuff up. Also when the brain decides what it is you have seen, it reinforces that strongly even in the face of evidence to the contrary. See optical illusions, unreliability of eye-witnesses, etc.

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Oops! Facebook outed its antiterror cops whilst they banned admins

David Nash
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Just the one

Yes so if you have a separate FB account for work, you are breaking the terms.

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Now you can 'roam like at home' within the EU, but what's the catch?

David Nash
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Re: High HIDDEN COST for calls INSIDE a roaming country

"Do my new rights also cover the calls I make from home to friends abroad?

No. Calling from home is not roaming. The new rights cover communications (calls, SMS, data) made when roaming in the EU, which means when travelling abroad in the EU. The prices of calls from home to a foreign country, including in the EU, are not regulated."

But this was not the question. The question, which does not seem to be addressed in the linked FAQ, is what happens to calls TO (eg.) Germany, when you are physically IN (roaming) Germany.

The assumption seems to be that they will be treated as international calls since they are "like home", where "home" in this case is not Germany.

So unless your home bundled calls include international calls at no extra charge, calling Germany from a UK-homed-mobile when you are in Germany will now cost more than calling the UK from the same mobile when you are in Germany.

Which some people may not appreciate.

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Ever wonder why those Apple iPhone updates take so damn long?

David Nash
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Re: @SuccessCase

@Lord Elpuss

"Tests thoroughly" = roll out to all users?

I don't hear much support for Microsoft when they do that kind of thing.

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Labour says it will vote against DUP's proposed TV Licence reforms

David Nash
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@Pen-y-gors

I wish I could upvote you more than once. This is the point that the DUP clearly miss. A move to a full commercial model like Amazon (which I pay for and use) would lose all the minority interest programming that the BBC does.

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Raspberry Pi sours thanks to mining malware

David Nash
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Re: "Raspberry Pi sours"

As in raspberry slushies? I always wondered why they were blue. Or perhaps they are just pumped full of blue dye.

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We're not saying we're living in a simulation but someone's simulated the universe in a computer

David Nash
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"What's actually happening is that everything inside of that singularity is getting smaller relative to each other, which makes it appear that we are expanding away from each other."

Which is indistinguishable from expanding, right?

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DXC Technology puts reluctant office movers on naughty step

David Nash
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WTF?

Re: Not getting this....

Yeah if your office moves, you move. It's only a couple of miles. What's wrong with these people?

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Teen texted boyfriend to kill himself. It worked. Will the law change to deal with digital reality?

David Nash
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"He escaped a dismal, no end relationship"

He didn't escape. The relationship continued until the end of his life. To "escape" something you must get away from it whilst still alive.

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Please do not scare the pigeons – they'll crash the network

David Nash
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Re: The mystery of the internet that only worked when in the dark.

Indeed. The DAB radio in my kitchen stopped working when I replaced the multiple MR16 halogen bulbs with cheap LED ones.

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Do cops need a warrant to stalk you using your cellphone records? US Supremes to mull it over

David Nash
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Re: Location services isn't binary

Is iOS maps really kind of useless without location info?

I don't use iOS but I routinely refuse to give location info to Google Maps. I often want to check a route or look up something on the map or see the way to somewhere. I know where I am or where I intend to start from so I just zoom to it in a couple of seconds manually, or search.

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UK PM Theresa May's response to terror attacks 'shortsighted'

David Nash
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Unhappy

Re: Free NHS. Terrorism. Bombs, have shown health insurance is one less thing to worry about.

"Tory, Labour, whatever - vote (and do vote) for whoever you think will be best for the economy so we can afford the NHS."

It's not about being able to afford it, although clearly we need to but that's another story (one about tax). It's about wanting the NHS in its true public form, not the private-by-stealth version that the Tories want to bring in, which will make profits for their mates and put revenue above everything, especially that pesky standard of care the customers, er, I mean patients, expect.

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'My PC needs to lose weight' says user with FAT filesystem

David Nash
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Re: Windows 98

"a teletype and an acoustic coupler that allowed us access to the mainframe at the local polytechnic."

That sounds like what my school had too. It was upgraded for my last few years there, there was a govt. scheme that gave us a classroom with 10 RM 480Z machines and a shared hard drive. Must have been about 5Mb between us all, I reckon.

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Internet of snitches: anyone who can sniff 'Thing' traffic knows what you're doing

David Nash
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Re: Sleep sensor?

Because extending the "occasional medical use" to "diagnostic use" to "Check whether you have a problem" is the usual way it works in marketing. Convince people they have, or may have, a problem and they need the latest gadget to identify and/or fix it.

I'd guess that it's not streaming while you're asleep so someone can view it, it's streaming it to a cloud, sorry server, so that you can review it later.

See also the current fad for wearable fitness monitors, which were recently reported to be rubbish at measuring calories used.

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Auntie sh!tcans BBC Store after 18 months

David Nash
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Re: What I buy and do not own

That's why I buy CDs and won't pay for Spotify Premium, handy though it is for offline listening of things I am trying before buying.

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IT firms guilty of blasting customers with soul-numbing canned music

David Nash
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What's the solution?

A completely silent call would be disconcerting, and unclear whether you were still connected.

Given that people's preferred music varies, what is the best option? A continual ring tone?

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David Nash
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Re: Vomit

Yes those messages telling you that you can do most things on their website are some of the most annoying, for obvious reasons.

We need a "me too" icon...or would that just encourage such non-insightful messages as this one?

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David Nash
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Re: Suggestions for tech firms' hold music

"Blondie - Call me"

Surely you mean "Hanging on the Telephone"!

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UK General Election 2017: How EU law will hit British politicians' Facebook fight

David Nash
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Re: Confession time

How could they "be round later" if you didn't give your address?

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Amazon announces new Echo just as Microsoft's first Cortana-powered clone breaks cover

David Nash
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Sensible uses

There are sensible uses, but who trusts Amazon, or (especially) MS enough?

They could have been the ones who got famous for being responsible for that really useful gadget that you can talk to, but instead they are known for being responsible for gathering as much of your data as possible.

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Try to sell stuff through Facebook Marketplace and get locked out for 72 hours – nice one, Zuck

David Nash
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How does a picture help them "know who you are"?

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iPhone lawyers literally compare Apples with Pears in trademark war

David Nash
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Re: Dear Apple.

"With trademarks, companies have to defend them, as that is the law."

Yes (although someone recently here said that was a myth). But defend against a true threat/copy. Not something that the judge admitted was different in several ways.

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IT error at Great Western Railway charging £10k for 63-mile journey ticket

David Nash
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IT Angle

Re: IT Error?

"Did the computer really make an error or did a human goof up and the computer took one for the team?"

What's the difference? Computer error is always a human error at the end of the day.

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Alabama man gets electrocuted after sleeping with iPhone

David Nash
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Re: Zombie! Help! It speaks!

"for a given resistance, at a lower voltage, a higher current will flow."

I think you're getting confused about power transmission. Power=V*I so yes, if the power is the same, a lower voltage means a higher current, but in this case we are talking about the current drawn by a given load (ie. the guy's neck) which depends on Ohm's law, I=V/R therefore directly proportional to the voltage, while the resistance stays the same and the power will not be the same.

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Drive-by Wi-Fi i-Thing attack, oh my!

David Nash
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Re: Optional

I think it means that Apple views the bug as serious. Not Apple views the bug seriously.

Still came out wrong though.

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Facebook, Mozilla and Craigslist Craig fund fake news firefighter

David Nash
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Re: Fake news

No it isn't. Some topics are contentious but that's not fake news. Creationism for example is not "news" so can't be called "fake news".

Fake news is things that are just objectively untrue. I've seen reports of various examples over the last year. Unless those reports were fake...

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Uber wasn't to blame for robo-ride crash – or was it? Witness said car tried to 'beat the lights'

David Nash
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Re: Yellows, no

Happened to me in Spain, someone hit me from behind after assuming I wouldn't be stopping. Minimal damage, but the fool tried to claim it was my fault and called the police himself....it didn't go well for him!

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David Nash
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Re: The main issue

"The fact is, the self-driving robot car did not detect (or anticipate) something in its path, or try to evade the collision."

As I understood it, the self-driving robot car did not have something in its path. It was in the path of the other car, which hit it side-on.

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'Windows 10 destroyed our data!' Microsoft hauled into US court

David Nash
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Re: Aw, Bless

Hmm, I just tried some test folders and it put them in the zip with no problems.

Maybe this has changed.

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What should password managers not do? Leak your passwords? What a great idea, LastPass

David Nash
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"local storage is great... if it's not 2017 and you don't already have half your life in the cloud anyways, trusting it with tons of other important shit like I don't know, your finances, School curriculum, taxes, email, calendar, photos, relationships, etc"

Stuff like finances, taxes etc are not "the cloud". They are on hopefully well-protected servers of specific organisations dedicated to that task.

That's no reason to keep the passwords to those services in another "cloud". Keep them locally. Back them up, yes. I am not sure I would trust a cloud-based service with my passwords and NO local backup.

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Barrister fined after idiot husband slings unencrypted client data onto the internet

David Nash
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How on earth did an online backup service (if that's what it was) allow content to be indexed by Google and accessible to anyone without credentials?

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Dark matter drought hits older galaxies: Boffins are, rightly, baffled

David Nash
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Re: Occam's Razor with fractally serrated edges...

Yes, and it is not helpful to use phrases such as "baffled boffins" (except for alliterative purposes).

Talk of scientists being baffled and stumped only encourages those who don't understand the process. Too often scientists are accused of claiming to know everything, which makes such accusers pleased that they are "stumped" - nobody likes a know-it-all, after all. In reality science just describes what we see, and plausible theories to account for what we see. Bafflement occurs only if you take current accepted theory as cast-iron fact, which real scientists don't, despite what some science-illiterates and some sections of the press think.

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