* Posts by Alan Brown

7727 posts • joined 8 Feb 2008

Good luck building a VR PC: Ethereum miners are buying all the GPUs

Alan Brown
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Re: An Exercise in Futility?

"3) Isn't mining these a tremendous waste of GPUs and electricity - why not do something useful with the resources...?"

There are a number of worthwhile mathematical challenges which would fit the bill as worthwhile, but they tend not to scale well to cyrptographically strong challenges. (EG: The OGR project)

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Virgin Media biz service goes TITSUP* across London

Alan Brown
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Re: One fibre break

"Yes you had redundancies but every thing ran in one duct."

This happens depressingly often.

When you specify redundant pathing to a telco it's more common that they interpret this as "2 links, one duct" than not.

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Zero accidents, all of your data – what The Reg learnt at Bosch's autonomous car bash

Alan Brown
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Re: Nice idea, but

"Cellular phones are hit-or-miss, load up your software travel map route BEFORE you start from somewhere that does have coverage, and don't expect the turn-by-turn directions to arrive before the turn"

Look up. Way up.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SpaceX_satellite_constellation

Ok, it won't work in tunnels but between terrestrial 4G and the 3 competing satellite internet systems being rolled out, being "out of touch" is going to be difficult-to-impossible in coming years.

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Alan Brown
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Re: "way Toyota buggered up its throttle software."

See earlier posts:

If you're driving and you collide with a moose, then you were either driving too fast for conditions or weren't paying attention, or both.

The fact that the car will take care of the moose manouvre even in the case of "one materialised in front of me" means the crash rate should be even lower.

Likewise for "the kid just appeared from nowhere" - which I've seen drivers use when _I_ (4 cars back) could see that the kid was about to walk out in front of traffic (moving feet visible under the parked car obscuring the kid's body) and was already braking.

The _one_ time I hit a deer, I was travelling at less than 15mph and it actually ran into the side of the car. This is despite seeing a dozen a week on the roads I drive to/from work. If you know the hazard exists, you're ready for it. Most drivers aren't. An "auto" will be, and reaction times of 25ms instead of 700-1500ms will help.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Self-crashing cars

WRT the Toyota ECU, it was teardowns and disassembly subsequent to the cases which showed the entire system had suffered major league code bloat and quality rot over the years. (Early systems were coded in assembler, newer ones in high level language - and badly, etc.). The failure mode claimed was shown to be repeatable and not just some random bitflip.

There's a lot to be said for opensourced ECUs (which do exist as development projects), given they have more eyes on them and these days more brains trying to make them crash (unlike OEMs, who have limited teams developing for a purpose and even more limited teams trying to break them but who have a conflicting vested interest in getting them shipped as quickly as possible)

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Alan Brown
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Re: Cars withe EULA

"You won't be allowed to buy a car, just lease it. The car will own you."

Most people will choose to lease it for individual journeys on an as-needed basis.

Hellooooo Johnnycab.(*)

(*) The single most expensive and unreliable part of a taxi is the driver. Eliminating them is a good thing.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Zero accidents?

"It is impossible to achieve whilst guaranteeing that there will be no accidents."

The number of true "accidents" on the road can be counted on one hand each year.

Crashes due to mechanical failures are rare (and usually well signposted by the vehicle long before the crash happens).

Crashes are almost always caused by drivers being inattentive, reckless, impaired, or faced with dangers and continuing regardless (the number of crashes where more than one person has contributry fault is extremely high).

Eliminating the human is likely to reduce crash and injury rates by at least 95% and I'd be highly surprised if 80% is achieved immediately. Insurance companies will react by making manual driving an extremely expensive pastime, so unless you're very wealthy, you won't be driving that vintage 2002 Clio into the side of an auto-wagen. (surprisingly, margins in the insurance industry aren't that high. Modern cars are ridiculously expensive to repair and injury claims cost a fortune. Insurers could increase their profits whilst reducing premiums if the crash rate goes down and there will still need to be cover for fire/theft/vandalism/"tree fell on my car" type events.)

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Alan Brown
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Re: I find it hard to believe . .

" I don't think Level 3 is practical, and no one should try to implement it. "

Oddly enough most manufacturers agree with you. It's still needed as a development step but unlikely to see commercial release.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Nut Bush City Limits.

Not just Hanoi. Bikes are banned in urban areas of several SE Asian countries (and the traffic flows more smoothly as a result)

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Alan Brown
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Re: Nut Bush City Limits.

If traffic congestion is bad enough to justify a motorbike for that reason, then the better solution is vastly improved public transport and a ban on personal transportation.

50 people on 6 wheels and the road space of 3 cars is a lot higher density than you can achieve with bikes and the overall emissions are lower (especially with hybrid tech) even if road damage is higher (roadbed damage is proportional to the 5th power of axle weight coupled with the square of velocity - which is why the really heavy loads go so slowly.)

You'll get even higher density when the self-loading freight is self-propelling - and in congested conditions it's usually faster to walk.

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Alan Brown
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> As for performance data or accident investigation, many modern cars already store performance data fairly long term and "black box-like" sensor data useful for accident investigation.

That's _every_ car fitted with airbags in the last 25 years. The black box does double duty as the airbag controller - and yes, that data has been used in prosecutions and by insurance companies who didn't want to pay out (if you make a claim, the car passes into possession of the insurer. At that point the black box is their property and it's virtually impossible to prevent them using the data recovered for claim assessment purposes - this has been tested in court in both the USA and EU)

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Alan Brown
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" How many people do you need to be in a place to detect a traffic jam? If even 5-10% of people are willing to share the information then you'll still get 90% of the benefit"

Those "benefits" frequently have tradeoffs.

The road I live on (1/2 mile long, 30mph speed limit, 3 schools, 2 housing estates and a 70mph dual carriageway bypass road paralleling) had a major problem with night time speeding (80k cars per week, 60% speeding, 95% at night exceeding 40mph, 5k/week over 50mph). On the other hand it got majorly congested for 90 minutes at a time in the morning and evening.

Cue the council ignoring resident complaints about speeds and rolling out changes "to reduce congestion" - including so many parking restrictions that there are now 3 times as many houses as car parks.

We now have 100k cars per week, with even more night time speeding and the daytime snarlups last for 2 hours each morning and afternoon.

The rat runners who use the road outside of peak periods are prone to road rage incidents too. There have been a number of incidents of pedestrians on one of the three pelican crossings on the road being nudged by impatient drivers and I've witnessed a lot of drivers screaming abuse at anyone who dares slow them down (mostly women being aggressive too...).

My pick is that automated driving will reduce vehicle ownership levels and density (which will reduce the number of streets clogged up with parked cars) and remove the problem of 'entitled' types treating the roads like their personal racetracks even in peak periods (which will reduce speeding and congestion issues respectively, given that the vast majority of holdups are caused by drivers who won't be polite causing everyone else to have to stop or slow down to deal with their selfishness). We may even be able to reclaim our residential street as a residential street where it's safe for children to walk, with routing algorithms designed to treat ratrunning as the antisocial behaviour that it is.

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Move over, Bernie Ecclestone. Scientists unearth Earth's oldest fossil yet: 4bn years old

Alan Brown
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Re: 'seeded' from the same extrasolar source

"Not to mention properly designed eyes."

Which work and look amazingly similiar to ours, despite developing in a way that's almost, but not quite, completely unlike ours. (the outboard processing engines to image-process things before feeding to the main brain is another major variance)

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Alan Brown
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Re: why we dont we see life everywhere.

"We've hardly started "looking" elsewhere at anything likely."

Putting this in context.

The galaxy is 100,000 light years across. Our best planet spotting telescope has only been able to pick up large exoplanets up to 600 light years away - and super earths only reliably out to 200 light years.

There's a lot of unviewed space out there. Here be dragons.

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Alan Brown
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Re: 'seeded' from the same extrasolar source

cephalopods (octopii and squid) are relatively easy to explain as early divergers from our wormlike ancestors. It's more obvious in the giant squid dissection video on youtube.

Like worms, octopii and squid brains surround the mouth and even our fishy ancestors had multiple hearts (one per gill) that evolved from worms' multiple parallel pumps. That only dropped down to one heart somewhere before amphibians as the simple inline pump became more complicated (if you look along the family lines you can see the "knotting" effect that produced 2, then 3 and then 4 chambered hearts.)

As for the blood, there's only a one atom difference at a critical location between chlorophyll, haemocyanin and haemoglobin molecules. (magnesium vs copper vs iron respectively). Nature seldom starts over when it can adapt existing items - which explains why things end up as Heath-Robinson messes a lot of the time.

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Nvidia: Pssst... farmers. Need to get some weeds whacked?

Alan Brown
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Re: Assuming it works...

There are a number of food crops which were originally weeds that adapted to mimic desireable properties.

If the weeds adapt and become useful, they're no longer weeds.

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GPU-flingers' bash: Forget the Matrix, Neo needs his tensors

Alan Brown
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"Hooray more half-filled racks"

5 years ago I was asked to name worst-case scenario heat generation for our server room and the facilities people visibly gulped when I said "Well, I can fairly trivially put 45kW in a single rack and it's only going to get worse"

The limiting factor isn't cooling capacity but how much power we can get onsite. They wrote a report saying I was asking for impossibly large numbers when I stuck my finger in the air and said "I need 50kW _now_ and the capacity for up to 250kW in future would be nice, but 100kW would probably do(*)" - sure enough about 6 months later someone filed a request for systems which would have maxxed out the 100kW in the first pass and the 250kW fairly easily. Thankfully he didn't get budget for it (I told him that doing this would require major infrastructure in addition to the rack-mounted kit). You have to love academics shooting for the moon.

(*) I have about 25kW in the room and maxxed-out cooling due to manglement rejecting my initial estimate of 75kW as "too high", with another 20kW in old computer rooms that was supposed to be migrated in, but can't be. Pointing out that even a very low 3kW/rack over 18 racks adds up to 52kW didn't go down well.

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Ofcom issues stern warning over fake caller number ID scam

Alan Brown
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Re: RBS simply use Unknown number

> A proven security hole. They even suggest you call the bank. They then hold the line open and simulate a dialtone and ringing sound for your "call".

1: That doesn't work on mobiles. Or if you make the call on your mobile when the original was on your landline or vice versa.

2: Dialling a number other than the bank's should expose this one PDQ.

The "hold the line open" thing only works for about 30 seconds anyway. Just be sure to hang up and leave it longer than a couple of minutes.

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From landslide to buried alive: Why 2017 election forecasts weren't wrong

Alan Brown
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"Corbyn and his clan at one point discussing printing money for the gov to spend unlike QE which can be rolled back."

Virtually all the money in circulation has been crated by banks, not the treasury. Thatcher and her cronies found that out in stagflation days when they were frantically trying to rein in the money supply and banks were creating it (debt) out of thin air faster than they could call in the bonds.

What QE has achieved is to allow banks to roll back their leveraging of cash assets(*) to a more sustainable multiplier (ie, reducing the ratio of debt to cash they hold) without actually changing the amount of notional debt in circulation.

(*) In this context cash assets is "money from the treasury"(public money - where money created by debts to the bank is "private money"), not actual printed money - the latter only accounts for 2-3% of all the money in circulation and is why counterfeiting isn't nearly as big a risk as is made out - If people distrust the printed stuff they'll move more to electronic or other bank-driven transactions. If they distrust the issuer then the economy would collapse (which is what happened to the roman empire), but more pragmatically they will simply move to a different form of money - the example of what happened during the bank strikes in Ireland being a good example of what happens if cash and electronic transfers become unavailable (If you work on the basis that all money is a physical representation of debt and the real issue is whether you trust the debtor to pay up, then this point of view makes more sense. The government's debt is only different inasmuch as it's "legal tender for any and all debts", vs private debt which may only be able to be redeemed via specific channels)

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Alan Brown
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Re: "there was a margin of error of around 2 to 3 per cent for any forecast"

"Latest polls show X on 53% and Y on 47% so it still a statistical dead heat"

Similar in many countries where the margin of error is specifically mentioned and explained periodically.

The difference in this country is a wildly partisan press wanting to push the agenda of their party and willing to selectively interpret what pollsters give them to make it so.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Mandatory voting.

Regarding voting patterns with PR: "Of course, the results would probably have been different"

Absolutely. All you need to do to verify that is look at voting patterns in New Zealand before and after they switched from FPTP to MMP ~20 years ago.

The really interesting part is how minor parties(*) manage to spectacularly self-destruct when they get a few seats and find the relentless gaze of the media unearthing the less-than-savoury pasts of various members.(**)

(*) Particularly the Christian fundamentalist variety - who have tended to respond by erasing the people in question entirely from their official media as if they never existed.

(**) convictions and investigations for large-scale fraud, child abuse and domestic abuse figure highly.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Mandatory voting.

"There's not many people who can reasonably claim to not be able to spare the time sometime between 7am and 10pm, even on a weekday. "

There are many who can reasonably claim to not be able to access one particular polling station, which is one of the requirements at the moment.

I grew up in New Zealand which has a Westminster democracy. You are entitled to walk into any polling station in your electorate and vote without hassle. If you're outside your electorate you can walk into _any_ polling station and cast a "special vote" (which are handled separately, counted and then dispatched to the home electorate for confirmation). Voting is always on weekends.

The result is that the _lowest_ electoral turnout the country has ever had since WW2 was about 85% (and resulted in a lot of navelgazing about why people weren't voting), with figures usually being closer to 90%

The current way things are done is almost ideally setup to discourage voting.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Hmm

"I observed quite a few tories billboard posters and signs getting defaced, but didn't see a single labour one getting the same treatment."

In my area the only ones I noticed being defaced were the ones illegally placed on public land.

Apparently the tories are entitled to use roadside verges as their advertising space whilst noone else is allowed to do so. Others might call it flyposting but I can't possibly comment.

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Alan Brown
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Re: First Past the Post

"The financial position of the country with its lavish overspending during a boom is not the fault of the banks."

There wasn't that much overspending - especially compared with the amount of oil money pissed against a wall by successive conservative governments in an attempt to woo voters.

The double whammy was that the crash happened AND the oil money started drying up about the same time. Deregulation made the crash inevitable, given that the regulations in question were created in response to (and to prevent recurrances of) virtually identical crashes in the past.

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Alan Brown
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"It was Blair that insisted on the party being the main thing on the vote"

The day you accept that people elect _parties_, not individuals is the day you accept that proportional representation is needed.

My personal preference is for the MMP(also known as "AV") with 4-5% threshold option as this gives best proportionality and has worked well for decades in the countries that have tried it.

There is _nothing_ intrinsically wrong with a party not holding a majority in parliament. This forces government by concensus and reins in the more ideologically extreme policies. Problems arise when they're desperate willing to do deals with extremist minor parties to gain a majority as it gives those minor parties a degree of influence vastly in excess of their size (See "kingmakers")

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Alan Brown
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Re: (energy price cap FFS)

The climate change act is good - and not because of sea level changes; there are nastier bogeys waiting if we don't slash our carbon emissions. (See: 'anoxic oceanic event', 'leptav sea methane emissions' and 'storegga slides', then work out what the impact of 1-5GT of methane bubbling off the siberian continental shelf might be)

Fixation on renewables is double unplus good. Even with the country carpetted in windmills and solar panels there isn't enough electricity production available to replace all carbon-emitting processes, by a factor of 6-8. Yes you could just replace all carbon-emitting power generation but factoring in transportation, heating and industrial processes makes "just replacing current generation" woefully insufficient.

The amount of money being ploughed into renewables in _this_ country alone could pay for at least a dozen nuclear power plants which would produce far more reliable power (we need about 60-70 of them) for a far lower environmental impact than renewables.

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'My dream job at Oracle left me homeless!' – A techie's relocation horror tale

Alan Brown
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Regarding dream jobs.

Bear in mind that Freddy Kruger was a man of your dreams - AND that wonderland was entirely a dream.

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Alan Brown
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Re: If he had been in the UK

"Sacking people is now an art form to certain HR types - you know why they sacked you, they know why they sacked you, but the reasons for the tribunal are completely different."

Which is why you should ALWAYS record all meetings with the HR types.

When the recording shows what they told you is different to what they told the tribunal, fecal matter hits spinny thing not just for that case but for any previous ones. (and their credibility is shot in future cases)

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While USA is distracted by its President's antics, China is busy breaking another fusion record

Alan Brown
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Re: Crazy ideas?

"And it is very safe."

Except for the side effects of things - like death from untreated sepsis or cancer.

But at least you won't suffer any medication side-effects.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Crazy ideas?

Even in Columbus' time people were very well aware that the earth was round.

Columbus was crazy not because he thought it was a sphere, but because he thought it was around 1/2 the size everyone else did. He was expecting to find Asia only a few hundred miles off the european coast and came dangerously close to mutiny as the voyage went on far longer than his sailors expected. (He also falsified the ship's log to give sailors the idea they'd sailed a far shorter distance than they really had.)

(And this is all quite apart from the havoc he wreaked in the Americas)

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Alan Brown
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Re: Worse..

California's problem is the same as South Australia's.

Once you exceed 3-4% intermittent sources (wind and solar), your grid becomes extremely fragile when combined with "Must take" rules and feedin tarriff rates which are stupidly high

At this level of penetration it's time to start killing off the the hidden subsidies - solar/wind operators don't have to pay for the backing generator capacity that's required to handle no wind/no sun - by requiring them to start using systems to smooth output such that they can be baseload sources.

IE: Elon's battery banks should be paid for by the renewables suppliers, NOT by the grid operators. else it's even more hidden subsidy going into their pockets.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Worse..

"They will literally be so cheap that they will make sense anywhere south of Edinburgh. Huge brute forcing of the power problem but feasible."

People keep claiming this, but moving to a low carbon future needs to take into account that the maximum you can reasonably achieve by carpetting the countryside in windmills and solar panels is to replace existing power generation capacity (solar and wind are still less than the UK's nuclear output).

That overlooks that electricity only accounts for 30-40% of carbon emissions, so once you factor that in, you have a large shortfall to make up given that replacing heating, transportation, industrial processes etc with electrically-sourced energy is going to need 6-8 times more electricity than is currently produced (and then there's the issue of developing countries, which will need to ramp their power production up even faster and with greater multipliers)

The only viable long-term methods are nuclear - fusion or fission - and right now commercially viable fusion is still "somewhere over the horizon", so we'd better get our ducks in order. Nuclear is quite safe but molten salt systems pretty much eliminate ALL the nuclear accident causes we've seen in the last 70 years whilst also making enough heat that you don't need to site next to waterways (derating in hot weather to preserve river life/vulnerabilities to tsunamis) whilst still getting increased thermal efficiency, so not getting them commercialised and rolled out is rather silly.

From a biosphere point of view (NOT sea level rises) we can't afford to keep pumping CO2 into the atmosphere until fusion is ready. Geological history shows CO2 spikes go nicely with oceanic

anoxic events and mass extinctions. As an animal with a particularly oxygen-hungry lifestyle we're rather high on the "first against the wall" list if that happens.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Worse..

The US dollar has been the international trading currency of choice for decades because it's stable (Gold backing went away a long time ago) and the use of it drives the USA Hegemony (in the same way that use of the franc and pound did in past times. The days of the UK being a major world power went away the day that international trade stopped being done in Sterling.)

It's been postulated that one of the driving forces behind GulfWar2 was that Saddam was trading oil in Euros and that tolerating expanding international trade using the currency was seen by US interests as a more important threat than any "weapons of mass destruction" could possibly be.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Who still uses farenheight for things like this ?

Even Myanmar is switching to metric now....

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Alan Brown
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Re: let me guess...

"And it has to produce at least 5 times as much energy as you put into it in order to make useful power, due to the ~20% thermal efficiency of a typical steam plant"

That's "put into it" at the actual sharp end. Inefficiencies along the feedin process (lasers etc) come into play too, such that to achieve breakeven (electrical power out for electrical power in) it's more likely to require at least 100-fold amplification in the actual fusion unit, more likely 1000-fold.

Even after fusion gets to the point where it's a practical reality it's likely to take 25 years to become commercially viable. We need to get moving on LFTRs in the meantime.

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OMG, dad, you're so embarrassing! Are you P2P file sharing again?

Alan Brown
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" spotify can remove music, and you can't copy files from it to, say, an mp3 player"

Oh, can't you? *evilgrin*

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Alan Brown
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Re: Old-fashioned...

90% of everything published/released is crap. It was true then and it's true now.

Soulless zombie bands have always existed. The difference when looking back is that you're looking through the filter of time that allows you to see the reasonable 10% of what was released and ignore the rest.

The same applies to books. Most of what's published aren't fit to wipe your arse with and thankfully will be forgotten next year let alone next decade.

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Alan Brown
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Re: "You wouldn't bill me every time I take a book off my shelf"

They tried (and failed) to shut down public libraries.

They tried (and failed) to make the sale of secondhand books illegal.

They tried (and failed) to make the sale of secondhand records/tapes/CDs/DVDs illegal.

They tried (and failed) to make the same of home video recorders illegal.

They tried (and mostly suceeded) to make the sale of secondhand computer software illegal.

They've suceeded with ebooks and downloads and there have been some attempts using this as leverage to try (again) to get resale of secondhand physical media restricted along with new restrictions on libraries.

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Alan Brown
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Re: re: pay for the good/services

"The price is whatever the supplier believes they can maximize their profits at."

In a truely competitive market supplier prices will coverge on a cost + small margin model.

In the current market, suppliers manipulate the laws to prevent competition and can therefore charge what they want up to the point where they encounter consumer resistance - think of the piracy side of things as that consumer resistance in action.

This kind of supplier abuse is the exact reason why royal patents were abolished entirely a few hundred years ago and then the system recreated to give a fairer market. The USA's deliberate non-recognition of foreign copyright/patents until recently (and china's effective simliar policy) acted as similar reformation devices but it's clear that since WW2 things have been sewn up tighter and tighter on the supply side. It's time for another set of wide-ranging reforms which don't hand excess power to the creators and middlemen (especially the middlemen, who are generally ripping off both creators and consumers with gay abandon)

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Sysadmin bloodied by icicle that overheated airport data centre

Alan Brown
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Re: Welcome to the UK

"None of this was helped by equally numpty cleaners who, despite being told repeatedly, continued to pour inappropriate cleaning chemicals down the drains."

They tend to stop when given a choice of continuing to ignore instructions or being given a P45 (in the case of 3rd party cleaners, just threaten to cancel the contract for non-performance)

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Alan Brown
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Re: Welcome to the UK

If the job isn't as specified then the dolt doesn't get paid AND gets to wear the cost of making good.

Hitting fucktards in the wallet is about the only way to educate them.

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Intel AMT bug bit Siemens industrial PCs

Alan Brown
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Re: more details here

I'd be a lot happier about going to semiaccurate.com if the https version didn't have a _revoked_ security certificate.

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McAfee settles McAfee lawsuit over McAfee name

Alan Brown
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Re: Its rep was trash long before 2013...

"I still recall the days when McAfee the virus scanner was quite a respectable name"

It was trash long before 6.22 - I used to call it Make-A-FEE - separate scanner, cleaner and innoculation packages for $20 each per year

F-prot was $1, all-in-one AND updated for new malware more frequently than McAfee (this was long before Notron branched into AV stuff)

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BOFH: That's right. Turn it off. Turn it on

Alan Brown
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Re: Then there's change control idiocy...

Backout plan: It's a fucking cluster. If the updated node is fuddocked then you run on the other one(s) until you have the issue fixed. Once the updated node is working well, then and ONLY then do you update the other nodes with those adjustments taken into account.

VS the BA method of Indian remote management updating all nodes and then rebooting the entire cluster on the busiest weekend of the year.

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Alan Brown
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"I've seen someone handed a package for not getting the course. Three times."

Said package consisting of a trip to the front door accompanied by 2 guys from security, whilst carrying a small cardboard box of your personal belongings?

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Alan Brown
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Re: "it doesn't work"

We had a customer who complained that her main program kept disappearing down to a corner of the screen and she insisted we come out and fix it (which meant de-minimise the iconised program.)

After several visits, she swore black and blue she wasn't minimising it and claimed our staff were somehow doing it remotely and no matter how many times we showed her how to minimise/unminimise the program, she insisted that she couldn't expand it once minimised. When we started charging for callouts, she rapidly decided to become an ex-customer (no big deal for us, she was one of the ones who cost far more than their income)

Several years later, her husband admitted minimising the software when web browsing and hadn't said anything at the time because that would mean admitting to using "her" computer when she wasn't around (it was a family machine, apparently).

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Alan Brown
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"8 bits on the data, and 6 useful bits from the monitor."

You'd be surprised what you had stash in those 2 bits.

Take a look in the 1990s-era Usenet postings of Claudia Schiffer gifs sometime.

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Alan Brown
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Napalm requires signoffs.

Lusers like this deserve P45s.

Perhaps this kind of tactic can be used to sort out who's for the chop in the next round of redundancies.

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Alan Brown
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Re: do not enter the hypen!

> business users sitting with the developers and literally going "ah no.. I mean.. blah, blah, blah"

But that's not what you wrote in the legally binding contract.

No problem. There will be a small extra charge per off-contract change with a minimum fee of £250k

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