* Posts by tony72

411 posts • joined 2 Jul 2008

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UK Home Sec thinks a Minority Report-style AI will prevent people posting bad things

tony72

Re: Count me unimpressed

Amazon is great at recommending things I want to buy ... after I've already bought them. Hey you bought a nice TV; here are some more nice TV's. Thanks, already got one. I guess I probably don't buy enough from Amazon for them to properly profile me though, so maybe that's not fair, but on the surface, that seems to be about the level of intelligence behind their recommendations.

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Logitech: We're gonna brick your Harmony Link gizmos next year

tony72

Re: Unnecessary cloud linkage

There is a tiny bit of rationale to it, albeit not much. This is a sous vide cooker, and cooking times can be several hours (I've done a 24 hour pulled pork recipe). If you had a two hour cook, for example, you could prep it before you went to work, and then start it with the app two hours before you head home, and that would work even if you weren't sure beforehand what time you'd be heading home. Never done that, but you could.

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tony72

Unnecessary cloud linkage

Completely unnecessary cloud linkage of products is one of those things that's going to come to a head one of these days. I have one of those Anova Culinary Precision Cookers, and earlier in the year they updated their app and all of a sudden, you had to create an account online and sign in to use the app, a requirement which they dropped on users with no warning or explanation. Bear in mind that all this app fundamentally does is set a temperature and a time on the cooker. They subsequently claimed it was something to do with security improvements and Google Home integration, but somehow requiring signing in to a cloud account in order to set a timer between two devices on my own LAN seems like more of a security hole than an improvement, maybe it's just me. Fortunately the thing can be used on manual, and as far as I can tell they can't do remote firmware updates, so they can't brick it. But this kind of thing just seems stupid.

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OK, we admit it. Under the hood, the iPhone X is a feat of engineering

tony72

Stacked SLP

Stacked SLP, often referred to misleadingly as a "stacked logic board"

Okay, you told me what Stacked SLP doesn't mean, but what does it mean? Is this one of those things everybody else knows except me?

None of the acronyms on wikipedia seem to fit, and all 129 search results on "stacked slp" seem to refer to regurgitated iPhone X stories with no explanation of the term.

However searching for "slp" alone, it seems to stand for "Substrate-Like PCB". From this article;

The SLP, a main substrate for next-generation smartphones, is an advanced type of the current mainstream High Density Interconnected (HDI) PCB technology. Integrating the HDI PCB with chip packaging technology, the new substrate has a better efficiency by increasing the number of layers while reducing its area and width.

So as far as I can tell, SLP basically means PCBs with more layers and smaller, higher density features, and commensurately smaller chips. One can only assume that "Stacked SLP" means, well, multiple SLPs in a stack?

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Why are we disappointed with the best streaming media box on the market?

tony72

Limitations

The Roku Ultra is great. But its limitations are showing

It's limitations serve well to highlight the limitations of the streaming market as a whole. Because all those things that you point out that the Roku can't do, it's competitors can only do for their content, via their UI. So using those features across all the content you subscribe to, via a consistent UI, is only possible if you're willing to live in a single ghetto, and eschew the content only available elsewhere. And with the proliferation of streaming services, increased fragmentation of content availability, and ratcheting up of prices, that is heading towards a worse and worse experience.

In a fantasy future world, some sort of meta-streaming service will emerge, and people will be able to access shows from all the streaming services via it. Providers will realise that it's not practical for everybody to subscribe to every streaming service, and that it's better to make their content available to a wider audience via such a service than to use it as a tool to make people choose one service or the other. Well, a man can dream. For the moment, cable TV plus downloading and my own personal streaming service is about as close to the ideal as I can get.

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Fappening celeb nudes hacking outrage: Third scumbag cops to charge

tony72

Attitudes

If there is one plus side to the whole sorry affair, it's that the response from some of the celebrities involved may have shifted attitudes on such things. Movie star Jennifer Lawrence, whose private photos in various states of undress were leaked, pointed out that those viewing and commenting on the pictures were "perpetuating a sexual offense and you should cower with shame."

Have attitudes changed though? Do they even need to? Some major sites may have implemented policies to ban stolen photos, more through fear of lawsuits than any moral shift I suspect, but the Fappening pics are all still readily available online, and I can only speak for myself, but I'm certainly not cowering in shame for having looked at them.

At the end of the day, they were pretty tame, mostly not-particularly-sexy pics of people I don't personally know (and in the cast of most of the "celebs" involved, had barely heard of), which I checked out to satisfy some mildly voyeuristic curiosity, shrugged and moved on. Regardless of J-Law's hyperbole and similar, I just can't make myself feel too bad about it. It's like rubbernecking at a car crash; you didn't make it happen, you wouldn't wish it to happen, but there it is, what can you do?

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The case of the disappearing insect. Boffin tells Reg: We don't know why... but we must act

tony72

Re: I've read this book

@ THMONSTER - that's the one!

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tony72

I've read this book

I don't recall who it was by or what it was called, but I read a sci-fi book which covered the dying off of insects worldwide. It was pretty scary; according to said book, without fungus gnats, we would be pretty much overrun by fungi, so what crops didn't fail due to lack of pollinators would be taken out by fungi, and everybody would starve and die.

I don't know if I need to warn about spoilers in a book I can't name, by an author I can't remember, but spoiler alert! In the book, however, the cause of the die off was some sort of shared genetic time-bomb, and the eventual solution was to jurassic-park some fossilised insects whose genetic clock had thus been paused for a long time, and so wasn't on the same cycle as the insects that were dying off. Presumably the cause and solution of our die-off is somewhat different.

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BlackBerry's new Motion will move you neither to tears of joy nor sadness

tony72

Never mind the security aspects, but if it involves anything outside of standard protocols, consider me fundamentally unimpressed. Faster wi-fi ... as long as you use our routers, our phones, our tablets, etc? **** right off. I'm sick of manufacturers trying to hook people into their little "ecosystems", with features that only work as long as you buy all their kit. My money goes to manufacturers whose gear works best with everybody's kit, and who put there efforts into ecosystem-agnostic improvements, thank you very much.

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Hollywood has savaged enough sci-fi classics – let's hope Dick would dig Blade Runner 2049

tony72

Re: Hollywood being moribund

Can I vote for Consider Phlebus (Iain Banks)?

Rhiiiiight. And what sort of budget did you have in mind for that? I'm a huge fan of the Banks' work, but I hope nobody ever attempts to make a movie out of any of them. The amount of butchery required to squeeze a huge-scale epic space opera of that kind into a two hour movie ensures that it will lose all its character, and nobody is ever likely to spend the kind of money that would be required to do the stories justice. Just look at the adaptations of Frank Herbert's Dune as a cautionary tale. Some things are best left on the printed page, and visualized in one's imagination.

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Cops shut 28k sites flogging knock-off footie kits and other tat

tony72

Re: One use card numbers

I tried a virtual credit card (Entropay), the plan being that I'd top it up with only the amount needed for a particular purchase, and not leave it with more than a few quid balance. However I had a lot of trouble with it getting rejected, so I stopped bothering with it.

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Kebab and pizza shop owner jailed for hiding £179k from the taxman

tony72

Re: Sub heading should read

Me? Dodging taxes? I donner what you're talking about!

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Pirate Bay digs itself a new hole: Mining alt-coin in slurper browsers

tony72

Re: Yay for browsers and JavaScript

You'll get downvotes from the luddites around here, who seem to think javascript is the work of the devil, but have an upvote from me. I've played with javascript implementations of emulators, native javascript games, I seem to remember there is even a javascript port of ffmpeg for encoding video in the browser, etc etc. It makes no more sense to cap the cpu utilisation of javascript apps running in the browser than it does to cap the cpu utilisation of native applications; cpu-intensive apps need lots of cpu, wherever they're running, the cpu is there to be used.

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Would you get in a one-man quadcopter air taxi?

tony72

Why is that? Serious question, I have no clue about parachuting. But this thing claims an altitude of up to 10000ft, and Google says you can typically deploy a parachute down to 2000 feet, or even 700 feet for a reserve chute. So to the non-expert at least, it looks like there's parachute potential from an altitude standpoint. Presumably you'd have some sort of break-glass-to-access emergency button that would stop the rotors if you wanted to bail out, so you wouldn't get diced. As long as you have the altitude, it seems like it could work.

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Mozilla ponders making telemetry opt-out, 'cos hardly anyone opted in

tony72

Re: Not legal in the EU

Wrong. The GDPR specifically does not apply to anonymized data, so this would be perfectly legal in the EU.

Recital 26: The GDPR does not apply to data that are rendered anonymous in such a way that individuals cannot be identified from the data.

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tony72

Re: Another nail in the coffin...

Firefox started off with a great idea - a small core browser, which the user could then customise by using various Add-ons (Extensions, Plug-Ins, Dictionaries) that were important for what they wanted to do.So you ended up with exactly the browser that you wanted. That vision has long been lost :-(

I hate to point this out, but that was never Mozilla's vision" that was what people outside of Mozilla decided Firefox was good for. Mozilla primarily trumpeted the core features of Firefox - tabbed browsing, pop-up blocker, etc etc - things that were ground-breaking at the time. The minimalist, extensible browser idea didn't come from Mozilla. To quote the goals from the Firefox charter 1.0 from 2004, first line; Delivering the right set of features - not too many or too few (the goal is to create a useful browser, not a minimal browser) .

Yes, they aimed for a bloat free browser, but that mostly meant not shipping it with a suite of other applications in the way of the Netscape Suite. And yes, they promoted the hundreds of add-ons as a benefit, but those of us who've used Firefox since the pre-1.0 days, when add-ons were free to shit all over each other and all over the browser, will recall that the Mozilla devs attitude was that if a given add-on worked for you, great. If it didn't, don't use it. As far as they were concerned, add-ons were just a bonus, and a way to experiment with new features, and their job was the browser's core features. It took them literally years to engage with the fact that people were using Firefox primalrily because of the add-ons and extensions, and start working towards stable and secure add-on APIs. I quote another goal from the charter; Develop and maintain an extension system to allow for research into new areas without affecting the core and to allow for techies, early adopters, web developers and other specific communities to customize their browsers to suit their specific needs without affecting usability or download size for the mass market.. Extensions were not intended to be part of the mainstream Firefox experience. Which is probably a large part of the reason why we are where we are today.

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tony72

Re: I think that's a good idea

Mozilla isn't a for-profit corporation so they don't have the incentive to 'cheat' others collecting data might.

"Not for profit" != "Doesn't need money". Mozilla burns through plenty of cash, and with Firefox's dwindling market share, the current sources of that cash, such as money they get from certain search engines for making them the default provider, definitely aren't guaranteed. So there is certainly reason for Mozilla to think about additional revenue sources.

That point aside however, I tend to agree; they should just collect the data, bury the note about what they're doing in the small print like everyone else, and make sure that for those that do go looking, there is a very clear description of what data is collected, how it's anonymized, and what it's used for. Having a public debate about it, as this has now become, just makes all the privacy nutjobs flip their lids, and hilarious as that is to watch, it's not really productive.

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Science fiction great Brian Aldiss, 92, dies at his Oxford home

tony72

Re: The Greats have gone

I wouldn't personally put David Weber on the same level as some of those greats, but there certainly are more recent sci-fi authors I would put on that level, or that might be headed that way with a few more titles under their belts. Not many, but that's the point about greats - they are rare.

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London Mayor slams YouTube over failure to remove 'shocking' violent gang vids

tony72
Black Helicopters

Re: All they have to do...

It's pure censorship.

Actually it's worse than that - it's backdoor censorship.

If the content of these videos contravene any current laws, then Mr Khan or the police should prosecute the individuals concerned. If Mr Khan feels new laws are needed in order to criminalise the contents of these videos, well there's a procedure for that too.

But by trying to manoeuvre the likes of Google into performing the censorship without any law being broken, or any legal procedure having taken place, means the censorship would happen without any transparency or accountability whatsoever. Content would disappear into a black hole, administered only by internet companies' internal policies.

If Mr Khan wants to censor content that he finds distasteful, he should man up and call for a law that allows him/the government to do that, and take any electoral heat that results from passing such a law, instead of posturing.

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Brace yourselves, Virgin Media prices are going up AGAIN, people

tony72
Happy

Re: Is this to fund upgrades so they can fix the horrific congestion?

They were definitely a step up from TalkTalk I was with previously.

Okay, let's list who isn't a step up from TalkTalk. Any takers?

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Volterman 'super wallet': The worst crowdsource video pitch of all time?

tony72
Facepalm

At first glance ....

At first glance, despite Hipsterman's ridiculous pitch, there are actually a few desirable features being proposed, but I am dubious about the practicality of the whole thing, in terms of implementation and cost. It does integrate several items that I sometimes carry around when I travel. And I did leave my phone on my windscreen again last night (doh).

But my wallet is already thick enough without adding a battery and a bunch of electronics; I just can't see any way that this thing is going to be something I actually want to squeeze into my pocket. And how's that global wi-fi hotspot going to work? Is that just basically an embedded MiFi that you're going to buy a local SIM card for wherever you, or are they talking about something more interesting? And you're now going to add your wallet to the list of things you have to charge up every day?

I will be amazed if this ever actually sees the light of day.

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Now here's a novel idea: Digitising Victorian-era stamp duty machines

tony72
Thumb Up

On the plus side ...

On the plus side, I'm betting these stamp machines will never be taken down by ransomware or hackers.

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1Password won't axe private vaults. It'll choke 'em to death instead

tony72

Re: KeePass

+1. I use KeePass too, and sync the database between my PCs and phones using Resilio Sync, no cloud required. KeePassDroid is effective (if a little aesthetically challenged) on Android.

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Fancy fixing your own mobile devices? Just take the display off carefu...CRUNCH !£$%!

tony72

It's the way things are going

It's a shame how fast this seems to be becoming the norm. I fixed many of my own phones over the years, up to my Nexus 5, which needed the screen and back replaced at different times due to drop damage. My current Pixel will be the first phone that I'd need to deal with heating up adhesive to get the screen off, and having had a bad experience doing that with my Lenovo ultrabook (it's amazing how fast thin plastic parts can melt under a standard heat gun, even on the lowest setting, if you're not paying attention), I'd be a bit scared of that process.

But the fact is that repairability is not likely to be a key consideration in most people's buying choices, since repairing the phone is something you probably hope never to have to do, and most people will probably upgrade before the battery dies, so it's going to come way down the list of considerations when choosing a phone. So with little incentive for manufacturers to worry about it much, I suspect they'll do whatever suits them best, and if that means potting the whole innards in resin and making it 100% non-repairable, that's what they'll do.

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50th anniversary of the ATM opens debate about mobile payments

tony72

Re: Extinct in ten years?

You could still hold gold, or bitcoin. Both gold and bitcoin ATMs actually exist, so maybe that's the future for ATMs if cash goes extinct.

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Virgin Media router security flap follows weak password expose

tony72

Re: Who actually uses the router ?

I do that with the SuperHub 3 that they forced on me. Can you believe that in router mode, you can't change the lan-side IP address of that thing? Must be the only router on the planet that brain-dead.

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Cloudflare goes berserk on next-gen patent troll, vows to utterly destroy it using prior-art bounties

tony72

So...

"In the past, patent trolls had to hire lawyers and law firms," Prince said. "These guys do away with it entirely and have the owner be a law firm themselves."

So basically Blackbird Technologies LLC is to patent trolling as Prenda Law was to copyright trolling? If so then I wish CloudFlare spectacular success.

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Huge flying arse makes successful test flight

tony72

Re: 'world's largest flying craft' - I think not...

Maybe they mean "at the moment", as in currently operational?

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Another ZX Spectrum modern reboot crowdfunder pops up

tony72

Re: Why?

The hardware compatibility is an interesting twist, and that does make it a somewhat interesting proposition, although similarly not £200 worth of interesting. And the thing does look pretty cool, I have to admit. But I can't help feeling that a new, updated speccy is no more a "real" speccy than an emulator is. I no longer have a speccy, but if I got one, it would be for the nostalgia of having the real thing that I had back in the day. A clone, no matter how good, is still a clone.

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'Password rules are bullsh*t!' Stackoverflow Jeff's rage overflows

tony72

Re: It only makes it easier to crack...

Well said. But I have to say, I'm a techie, and I don't care (that much). As far as I'm concerned, my password strength is selected to stop someone easily guessing my password, or working it out from readily available information. If someone is going to get hold of the encrypted password DB and make a concerted effort to crack it, assume they're going to succeed, and look to other layers of security for protection. Otherwise it's just stupid; with the continually advancing power of CPUs and GPUs, do we just keep recommending longer and longer passwords? Reductio ad absurdum, people.

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Two-thirds of TV Licensing prosecutions at one London court targeted women

tony72

I'm sure I'll get flamed for saying it, but if we're going to have the TV licensing system as it stands, then everyone who's supposed to pay up needs to pay up, and that requires enforcement. If they were nice about it, people just wouldn't pay (that is to say, even more people than the hundreds of thousands of freeloaders that already steal BBC content by dodging the license fee); that's a fact, so distasteful as it is, they're getting a necessary job done.

I already watch very little BBC content, and chafe somewhat at paying the license fee as it stands, but if I have to not only pay for stuff I don't watch, but subsidise even more free-loaders who watch without paying makes it even more annoying. Personally, I'd support switching to a subscription model, instead of this silly pseudo-tax nonsense we're stuck with; so if you want to watch, pay for a subscription, just like any other pay TV. But sadly there doesn't seem to be any great deal of momentum behind implementing such sanity at the moment.

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Huawei P10 and P10 Plus: Incremental improvements but a few annoyances

tony72

Re: An array of lenses?

I'm guessing because it's not that easy a task to usefully combine the output from an array of lenses into a single image. I have read papers on doing that (Googles for PiCam [PDF]), looks like a good read. Certainly looks possible, but no idea how close that kind of thing is to being a commercial option.

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Neuromorphic progress: And we for one welcome our new single artificial synapse overlords

tony72

Re: That's how to do IT

Of all the things the EU spends/wastes money on (I'm sure we can all name a few hideously expensive EU white elephants, not to mention the absurd Brussels-Strasbourg shuffle), scientific research is probably the one that I have least problems with. Even if this particular project is not particularly well managed, some useful research will probably come out of at the end of the day, regardless of whether its specific goals are met.

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The Mail vs Wikipedia: They're more alike than they'd ever admit

tony72

Looks bad for Wikipedia

I have long been unimpressed by Mr. Orlowski's chip on the shoulder about Wikipedia, but I might have to change my opinion over this Daily Mail move. While the Daily Mail certainly has its issues, some other news organisations, for example some widely acknowledged to be little more than propaganda outlets for certain governments, are not similarly banned. I looked through the discussion they had before deciding on this ban, and while a handful of examples of factual errors on the part of the Mail were given, they were mostly on issues of low importance (celebrity news etc), and not enough anyway to say that they are systematically unreliable. I could certainly point to similar numbers of factual errors on far more important topics from a number of other news organisations.

Wikipedia has now put itself in the position of being the arbiter of what constitutes a reliable source for citations, without having a clear set of criteria for what constitutes such, or a rigorous process for considering and implementing a ban on a particular organisation. It looks bad to me, really bad. They need to step up and regularise this now, set credible criteria and procedures for deciding what constitutes a reliable source, and explain how they plan to evaluate all news organisations that are currently widely cited on Wikipedia in a fair way. But I'm not holding my breath.

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Who do you want to be Who? VOTE for the BBC's next Time Lord

tony72

Re: All mixed up in the Doctor's timey-whimey time stream...

That's a really feeble excuse for bringing Clara back. But I can't say I blame you.

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Google loses Android friends with Pixel exclusivity

tony72

Non-story?

There doesn't seem to be much behind this. Huawei made the choice to go with Alexa over Google's assistant for it's own reasons, according to Andrew's source; "It’s likely that Huawei made the decision in order to be in Amazon’s good graces, given that Amazon is an important seller of Huawei phones to U.S. customers." The post also mentions that Google has selected a single partner for the Android One (probably LG), and the blogger speculates "You’d have to think this is going to cause even more friction with Android OEMs. The smartphone market is slowing down (in the US as much as anywhere) which could mean some wondering whether it’s worth competing if Google isn’t making the field level (as well as playing in it the game itself)."

So we have one probably unrelated decision by Huawei, and some idle speculation from some blogger. No real information to support it. And even if he's right, as others have pointed out, the OEMs are the ones causing major problems in the Android ecosystem, with their inability to provide updates, and their insistence on stuffing their phones with bloatware and crapware that does the same job as the Google defaults only worse, and completely unnecessary clunky UI overlays.

I can only applaud Google's making sure that there are at least a couple of "clean" Android handsets on the market (fair disclosure; I'm a long term Nexus and now Pixel user). I'm pretty sure Google would play ball with any OEMs that were willing to return the favour, but they mostly want to preserve their ability to crapify Android, and try to divert users away from Google's ecosystem. That's their right, but you can't expect Google to be entirely happy about that.

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tony72

All "flagship" phones are shit price-performance wise, compared to what you can get for 1/3 or even 1/4 the price in the midrange. You don't buy a flagship phone if value for money is your primary goal, they're priced as luxury items.

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Sexbots could ‘over-exert’ their human lovers, academic warns

tony72
Paris Hilton

Umm

“If the machine over-exerts the human, it reduces the possibility of human sex,” Bendel warned.

I'm going to go out on a limb here and suggest that if you have a sexbot that you find so attractive and sexually fulfilling that you allow it to "over-exert" you, then you're probably not going to be that bothered about human sex.

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Huawei Nova: A pleasant surprise in a 5-inch phone

tony72

Narrow bezels is the new thin?

Just like it used to be "ooh, look how thin we can make the phone", now it seems to be "ooh, look how narrow our bezels are", regardless of whether it actually does anybody any good.

Personally, I'd rather have an extra millimetre or two of thickness, and a battery that lasts a few hours longer. And likewise I'd rather have an extra millimetre or two of bezel, and be able to hold the damn thing without accidentally touching the edges of the screen. But hey, can't have such practicalities get in the way of fashion, eh?

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Huawei Mate 9: The Note you've been waiting for?

tony72

Only a tiny fraction of them burst into flames, the only problem really is with you not being allowed to take in on many airlines now; if you have to travel, that's a bit inconvenient.

4
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Microsoft's nerd goggles will run on a toaster

tony72

Re: HoloLens is Standalone, Doesn't Have Minimum Requirements

Yes, this article makes no sense, or I'm confused. As far as I'm aware, the only "nerd goggles" Microsoft is producing is HoloLens. Windows Holographic is not "nerd goggles" in any sense that I can relate to; it's an augmented reality software platform which requires a suitable display device to display its output; that is HoloLens right now. So contrasting the requirements for Windows Holographic and HoloLens would not seem to be meaningful.

Microsoft has also said it plans to make Windows Holographic work with other VR display devices than HoloLens in the future, but again, contrasting the requirements for Holographic with the requirements for its potential display devices doesn't seem to get you anywhere, since you'd be using both.

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AI gives porn peddlers a helping hand

tony72

Re: Lack of Research

It's a creditable effort to recognise even that short list of acts to the claimed degree of accuracy, though, give them some credit. But if there's one thing the internet's not short of, it's source material to test this application on, so I imagine it will improve fast if it's being actively developed.

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Elon Musk wants to launch 4,000 satellites and smother globe with net connectivity

tony72

Almost every paragraph has a fake 'fact' in it.

Astounding, even for El Reg.

The whole article has a whiff of character assasination about it. I presume it was funded by a Musk detractor somewhere. ULA? Any car company?

It's a shame, because there are some interesting details about this plan that bear discussion, but the tone of the article may detract from sensible discussion. For example, I read elsewhere that the projected operational life of each of these satellites is only 5-7 years, which would seem to imply that 600+ satellites a year will need replacing. I have no idea how many such satellites can be deployed in a single launch, but it can't be that many, so that would seem to require a pretty ridiculous launch schedule. Or do they plan to somehow refurbish the satellites in orbit once they're initial operational lifespan is over? That's the kind of stuff I'd like to be talking about.

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Aw, snap: Independent disk drive failure rates from Backblaze

tony72
Paris Hilton

I am concerned

My porn collection is on a 6TB WD drive. It's a WD Blue, whereas the WD60EFRX used by Backblaze is a WD Red NAS drive, but my understanding is that the only difference is that the Reds have their firmware tweaked to be more reliable for 24/7 NAS use compared to the equivalent Blue drives. Better check those backups, eh.

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tony72

Re: This is very helpful.

Umm, these are consumer drives that Backblaze uses, are they not? At least that used to be the case.

Not sure it would be in any way practical for El Reg to test a sufficient quantity of a sufficient range of drives to be worth doing, unless they were going into business as a cloud storage provider or something.

2
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Google's new VR Daydream View will cripple your phone

tony72

Re: Boo

No! Noooooo! NOBODY can possibly believe that, no matter what marketing peeps claim. It's a phone FFS.

A Daydream-compliant phone is by definition designed, at least in part, for VR; that's the whole point of having the spec. Now while a manufacturer could in theory go to the trouble of meeting the fairly stringent display, sensor, and processing requirements to comply with the Daydream spec (which only the Pixel and the ZTE Axon 7 currently meet), and then not bother to do any development or testing of it under VR usage, that would seem to be a strange thing to do. Especially if the phone is being built for Google, and VR with Daydream View is one of it's more hyped features.

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tony72

Boo

Hmm, well I just bought a Pixel, and am waiting for the headset to become available, so I guess I'll find out soon enough if this is a real issue. For sure, extended VR use of my Nexus 5 with Cardboard leaves it very hot and crashy, but I kind of expected that since Pixel has actually been designed for VR use, that that wouldn't be such an issue.

On the plus side, it's winter, and the advantage of phone-based VR is you aren't tethered to a PC, so I guess I can always go outside and freeze my nuts off to keep the phone cool.

9
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More movie and TV binge-streaming sites join UK banned list

tony72

Re: Thanks, MPAA

@ FuzzyWuzzys - unfortunately I see a growing number of average Joe's buying £50 Android boxes with Kodi pre-installed, following a couple of simple steps apparently widely detailed online, and streaming away to their hearts content; it's pretty much plug-n-pirate, no skills needed. Premium TV, latest movies, the lot. I'm talking about people who barely have the IT skills to turn on a PC, so it can't be very hard. If the anti-piracy people really want to stop illegal streaming, they need to do something about that, because I can see that really turning into a nightmare scenario.

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Euro Patent Office staff demand new rights to deal with terrifying boss

tony72

Brexit

And yet, for largely political reasons, the Administrative Council – which consists of representatives from all the European countries that make up the EPO – refuses to fire the president.

It's stuff like this that means I'm beginning to warm up to the whole Brexit thing.

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