* Posts by Charlie Clark

4616 posts • joined 16 Apr 2007

Brexit: More cash for mobile operators or consumers? Pick one

Charlie Clark
Silver badge
FAIL

Re: Scaremongering

Cameron has already said he wont and has advocated Turkey joining at one point. Maybe someone else will veto, I dunno.

Bojo is on record (2012) as supporting Turkey joining the EU. He's the one with Turkish relatives, after all.

But let's face it: you're just here to troll not discuss.

6
3
Charlie Clark
Silver badge
WTF?

Predatory pricing

In the absence of relevant regulation would [insert cartel here] indulge in predatory pricing? Surely not. Phone companies, banks, utilities are amongst the most philanthropic institutions out there.

Not only is this article entirely speculative but it is also badly so. Roaming charges are paid to the host network and the UK is not a net recipient. If they were to be reintroduced for UK citizens visiting the EU in 2019 then it would be the host networks that would stand to profit. UK operators could only really expect to profit by charging more for calls to the EU. Though, as companies like Three and T-Mobile have already shown: lower international prices can be a good way to gain market share at minimal cost.

2
0

TalkTalk CEO Dido Harding pockets £2.8m

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: Revolting shareholders...

And nothing ever changes, until a single large shareholder with an agenda comes along, which requires several billions in clout.

And even then it usually only leads to something like share buyback schemes which benefit large fund managers immediately. There have been several attempts in the US to improve governance and curb executive pay but none of them have been successful.

Even the almighty VW clusterfuck hasn't led to executive bonuses being touched.

1
0

BOFH: Follow the paper trail

Charlie Clark
Silver badge
Thumb Up

Ah, the myth of the rational person

If only we were more prepared to admit how good we are at manipulating ourselves for other people's benefits…

Yes, I think you're right: a year's subscription to your shady scanning software is just what we need and what a fantastic blouse you're wearing!

8
0

Safari 10 dumps Flash, Java, Silverlight, QuickTime in the trash

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: That is all well and good but...

Something to do with OSX Safari not supporting AVC3, and HLS not allowing the full iPlayer functionality. Mac users can use Opera 32 instead to access BBC HTML 5 content, though (and I'm no expert) it would seem more sensible if Apple could tweak Safari.

Seeing as Safari on the I-Pad and I-Phone already work fine without Flash, I reckon that by the autumn the BBC and others will have switched to running whichever DRM system Apple chooses to work with: you don't think you're going to be able to save any of that HTML 5 video, do you? This might also explain the EOL for older Macs which presumably don't have the necessary hardware.

0
0

Lester Haines: RIP

Charlie Clark
Silver badge
Pint

RIP

Lester's articles really embodied the spirit of The Register and helped to make it not just another IT news website. It was the sort of clever nonsense that even us skinflints would consider paying for.

My thoughts are with his family, friends and colleagues.

Not that this is in any comfort to the family but we need some kind of scholarship to fund research that can demonstrate that bacon and beer had nothing to do with it (I think this is probably the case at 55). Lester himself was a pioneer in this area!

3
0

Xerox lays out BPO breakup plan

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: The trouble is ...

I think your detector of limey irony is faulty.

2
0
Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: So mergers are out, splits are in

Actually the current trend is merge and demerge as exemplified by the Dow and Dupont deal but also with Dell and EMC. This is the most tax efficient way of reducing competition in the relevant sectors: less competition means higher profits.

2
0
Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: The trouble is ...

@boltar

Not so sure about that. I think Lou Gerstner did pretty well with IBM. Good bosses are generally good in whichever domain they work in because they work out which people to listen to.

1
0

The Microsoft-LinkedIn hookup will be the END of DAYS, I tell you

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Meanwhile, elsewhere the sky fails to fall in

Other commentators seem to think that LinkedIn needs to merge at least as much as Microsoft with sites like glassdoor (no idea what it's like because I've never used it) becoming more and more popular for recruitment. Microsoft has yet to demonstrate that they can handle such an acquisition without completely bungling it.

For techies I think things like StackOverflow and GitHub could become more relevant. LinkedIn's endorsement and skills stuff just doesn't cut it but the connection metadata is useful, though the idea of being able to live solely from the network effect is starting to be debunked.

As with most recent deals, existing shareholders stand to benefit most from the debt-financed deal with income taxpayers standing to lose out. Sigh.

8
0

Apple WWDC: OS X is dead, long live macOS

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

I don't think I've ever not called it MacOS and I'm going to stick with it. I seem to remember them dropping that soubriquet a few years ago and nobody cared.

Wonder how long they'll try and force through the small letters: macOs, tvOs, watchOS only make sense in the echo chamber of the nonventor* strategy boutique.

Note to "journalists": there is no need to try and ape branding when writing copy; branding is always a combination of typeface and style and usually with requirements not to use the style in copy but to assert the trademark.

*I'm sure I've seen this before but just in case I'm claiming it as my commentmark™

0
1
Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: If just I could have 10.6 back

10.6.0 was a dog. I don't think they fixed some of the most serious bugs until 10.6.2 but it was then, indeed, pretty stable.

Mind you, I'd have to say that all of the subsequent releases have been stable: I've probably had about 10 system crashes in 10 years. But it's the random stupid bugs (Bluetooth, USB, graphics, etc.) in each new release that are so annoying.

0
0

Google doesn’t care who makes Android phones. Or who it pisses off

This post has been deleted by a moderator

PC market sinking even faster than first thought, thanks to Windows 10

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

False premise

Windows 10 isn't helping matters either, because lots of people are availing themselves of free Windows 10 upgrades rather than buying a new PC

This suggests that sales should pick up once Microsoft ends its magical upgrade offer. If so, why are sales projected to decline even more?

Consumers have PCs that are good enough and do more and more stuff on their phones. Businesses are happy with Windows 7 and are busy moving towards "thin" clients and BYOD. Microsoft has also realised that it might make more money from Office 365 and Azure than from supporting the PC renewal cycle, though it has also done a deal with Intel over the support for newer chips.

2
0

Get ready for Google's proprietary Android. It's coming – analyst

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: Why devs choose Android

According to Goldman Sachs, as of last year 75% of Google's mobile search ad revenue came from iOS, less than 25% coming from Android!

While I don't have access to any figures I must say that claim looks a bit suspect. I don't have any skin in the game so I don't really care either way. I was just reporting the gist of several articles I've read.

0
0
Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: Why devs choose Android

I suspect most of them still write apps for iOS first, since that's still where the money is.

Only for paid apps – there are other business models where the size of the Android market matters more. Indeed I've seen several articles including here on The Register that suggest that the Golden Age of the paid for app is over. Sure, there are those still making a lot of money but it is getting harder and harder to break into the market because there already is at least one app for everything.

1
0
Charlie Clark
Silver badge

It's a very tinfoil hat argument. One of the main reasons that Google uses so much open source stuff is that it means it has to do very little customer support. Going proprietary would change that completely and would open Google to new legal challenges such as monopoly which could lead to Google being forced to choose between Play services and other stuff. It can conveniently sidestep such challenges at the moment by rightly pointing out the choices for manufacturers and users.

3
0

Microsoft has created its own FreeBSD image. Repeat. Microsoft has created its own FreeBSD image

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: Just another good example...

How are they going to close FreeBSD up if the licence is more permissive than GPL?

Who should want to close it up? FreeBSD? Microsoft? Can't see it appealing to either. The permissive licence allows MS employees to work on the code without a lawyer present as is unfortunately the case with GPL code which counts as "tainted".

Microsoft has supplied source patches for running FreeBSD on Azure and they've been accepted. It's akin to providing hardware drivers. Really a case of "move along please, nothing to see".

2
3

Capitalize 'Internet'? AP says no – Vint Cerf says yes

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: Very simple

So why not capitalise the 'I' when referring to the big Internet which spans the globe.

Because it is only notional and virtual?

0
0
Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: Very simple

An "internet" is multiple networks linked together by routers.

The "Internet" is the global public network.

But the "Internet" is made up of all the internets, which makes it an internet itself.

It is very, very difficult to enforce prescriptive language use. General usage tends to follow conventions and the current one (from some time in the 19th Century) is not to capitalise generics. So, we generally write the sun, the sea and the earth but will capitalise them at will when we feel a need to emphasise or differentiate.

Split infinitives, sentences that end with prepositions are perfectly correct grammatically but that doesn't stop people saying this isn't the case. Add proper nouns that are lowercased to the list. Fighting against this is like commanding the sea. But whatever floats your boat.

3
0

Q: Is it wrong to dress as a crusader for an England match?

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Does an England match have to be football?

I'm sure crusaders are a regular appearance at cricket matches. I believe the Headingly Test Match saw Mexicans, Trumps, foxes and hunters. A crusader would hardly raise an eye brow.

As for the England football team: when they stop playing predictable crap then I might get round to wishing them well again. In the meantime I'll leave it to the ABU hordes* who don't follow a local team and are such an embarrassment at the international tournaments. Anyway, at the ground, they might be forced to change because the crusader garb offends one of the sponsors, as happened to Dutch supporters wearing Lederhosen in Stuttgart in 2006.

*I'm sure there is the odd long-suffering faithful among them, but well, you probably know the arseholes better than anyone.

1
0
Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: Could be worse...

Yeah, but I think he wanted to take a live one.

What's wrong with that? How about a goat? Long established tradition in Cologne

0
0

Why Oracle will win its Java copyright case – and why you'll be glad when it does

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: Multiple points

Open source software is also about NOT HAVING IT STOLEN.

No it isn't: ideas don't get stolen, they get shared.

1
2
Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: Multiple points

Having said all this, AO's article has a fair point that GPL and free software needs strong IP laws

Agree with you on the rest but not on this. The GPL is becoming less and less relevant because the FSF is fighting yesterday's battles.

Open source software is about co-operation not copyright.

1
11
Charlie Clark
Silver badge

It is fair use. And a court just ruled it so after an exhaustive case. Oracle has the right to appeal but it's an uphill battle. And long term Oracle loses anyway because Android is moving away from Java.

5
1
Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: According to Mr. Orlowski

Well, SAP tends to think you do, But then again, between them SAP and Oracle have pretty much carved up the enterprise software market between them. Did anyone mention cartel?

2
2

Kraftwerk versus a cheesy copycat: How did the copycat win?

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: What the court did examine, though, ...

Yes, the whole genre of "derivative works" from Marcel Duchamps to Warhol and Joseph Beuys has already been canonised and legally validated.

I was actually very surprised to see the case make its way to the Constitutional Court but I guess it makes a change from the political suits and the Court does get to choose which suits it hears.

5
0

Microsoft sells 1,500 patents to Chinese mega-phone biz Xiaomi

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Xiaomi is one of the fastest-growing smartphone manufacturers in the world

Not any more it isn't. Maybe the deal will help it expand outside of China.

0
0

Google is the EU Remain campaign's secret weapon

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: Fixit

Should not Google include some sort of damping to the google rank system…

Worth pointing out that Google is not a public utility but a private search and advertising company. As such it is largely able to do what the fuck it wants with search results. As long as it is not favouring its own products over competitors…

PS. Yahoo uses Bing

6
1

BBC's micro:bit retail shipments near

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: It's rubbish

The ecosystem for the micro:bit is getting there

True but the hardware could do with a bit more RAM, say 32 kB, and maybe a WiFi radio.

0
0

Cavium arms ARM bodies for fresh data centre compute charge

Charlie Clark
Silver badge
Go

Just the ticket

for the network data centre. That is some serious throughput for anything where the CPU isn't the bottleneck, and this is a lot of applications.

I was told a few years ago that a lot of the ARM chips would go straight from 28nm to 14nm and this looks like being the case. Now with the emergence of standard server API for ARM chips I can see demand for this kind of chip.

4
0

$10bn Oracle v Google copyright jury verdict: Google wins, Java APIs in Android are Fair Use

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: The saga goes on

Of course Oracle will appeal but Google does not have to do anything while they appeal. And the case has been extensive and the verdict unanimous, highly unlikely that the appeals will be successful.

In the meantime Google will continue to move away from Dalvik/Java towards native. Not sure whether the case played a role in that decision, but it is part of making Java less relevant to new developers. If Oracle had played this differently they could have made Java, or a particular flavour of it, a key component of Android.

4
0

90 days of Android sales almost beat 9 months' worth for all flavours of Win 10

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: sometimes I'm easily pleased

I'm still on Windows phone, but boy am i sorry about my choice in mobile platforms. I loved my Lumia 900 and i loved my 1020 even more, but since getting a 950, it's been a complete nightmare.

That sounds the tale of someone soundly punished for their loyalty!

Sounds like getting your screen fixed would be a good investment Remember when we used to keep phones for more than six months? Even though the latest and greatest devices are generally fantastic, something from a couple of years ago generally does the job just as well.

But It's a real pity. Although I'm a staunch critic of Microsoft, there is no doubt that they did provide Nokia with the basis for some excellent phones and I might have bought one if I could have got CyanogenMod on it. However, with a market share of less than 10% this was never going to fly, which is why Nokia got out of the business. Still a mystery as to why Microsoft bought it only to sideline and then trash it. Maybe that was just one of the many things that Ballmer started that Nadella didn't think was such a good idea. Got to give him credit for acting accordingly.

2
0

Apple: Another bug fix. Er, thanks, GCHQ

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: Or it's the fresh paint on a trojan horse

OTOH, friends who bit the El Capitan apple are reporting a lot of USB non-function, so maybe it does enhance security

Was really bad at the start but seemed to have been fixed in 10.11.4

10.11.5 does indeed seem to contain some major changes relating to the handling of images and particularly videos. As for the Easter Egg: you reboot and get invited to provide Apple with system telemetry…

0
0

Pointless features add to browser bloat and insecurity

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: Would it be feasible to make a modular browser?

Well, that's sort of how JQuery is supposed to work. But anything that uses remote code is inherently less secure than local code.

But proxy solutions like Opera Mini / Opera Turbo show how much work can be saved using this approach: web pages are parsed and largely rendered on the server so that all the browser has to do is display the stuff. As for secure: depends on the security of the proxies.

2
0
Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: What we need

Interesting fact about HTML5 sites that I see these days. They take up so much more resource, so much more screen space than those 'authentic 1990s' sites.

Maybe, but this not down to HTML5 itself. Take the BBC website: first of all it runs a script to send you to "right" domain, so I get bbc.com shoved down my throat. Then, the news page at least spits out a mobile page pretty quickly but immediately fucks things up by adding to it (manipulation of the DOM is always a killer. The actual layout itself using media queries and Flexbox is a lot simpler which is why the browser can actually parse and start to paint faster than the old table-based layout (the newer page is 32 KB and is parsed in 600 ms, the older one 45 KB and takes a second to parse). Well, that would be the case if all the shit was removed. The BBC website would also load a lot faster without all the hooks for the irrelevant crap below the fold: BBC Magazine, BBC Trending (I do hope this is getting binned in the current review), etc. As for the images: the larger images in the content make sense on a modern machine.

Commercial websites recently have let their agenda be driven by the advertising industry. They're realising too late that this is not what the users want (buy it's the advertisers who pay).

So as usual, it's a bad workman who blames his tools.

18
1
Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Dubious

I'm dubious about some of the numbers here.

SVG, for example, has a problem however you look at it: on one hand more than 15 per cent of the sites use it, on the other hand, nearly 87 per cent of blockers block it, but it's had 14 security warnings

SVG is simply an XML dialect for images so can't really be vulnerable. Implementations can. But it is a very useful for the web: it can replace heaps of co-opted technologies such as Flash, sprites and icon fonts in a more accessible and bandwidth-friendly web. SVG and Canvas (both are used for things like interactive charts) are more likely to be targeted because of possible hardware acceleration.

What does 87 % of blockers mean? I run a pretty tight ship and have blocked ads for years and have never seen SVG blocked.

20
0

Salesforce slaps UK Enterprise customers with 40% price hike

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

It could also just be related to the exchange rate: Sterling is down against many currencies this year.

0
0

Your next server will be a box full of connected stuff, not a server

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

ARM's 'server' market share is too insignificant to be visible to Gartner.

It is but it could still be in the hype cycle in the post-Calxeda "trough of disappointment". Maybe they're just waiting for someone to sponsor a report…

1
0
Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Why not ARM powered servers?

Because ARM didn't sponsor the report or shindig?

GFLOPs/Watt is now pretty close for most CPU designs. Intel is ahead in the process area and has better single-threaded numbers. Where ARM may yet shine will be in custom hardware extensions (encryption) and high-density, low-load areas.

10
0

Facebook's turbo-charged Instant Articles: Another brick in the wall

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Google AMP, though - in true Google fashion - AMP eschews existing standards like RSS or JSON in favor of re-inventing the wheel

Well, to be fair RSS is extremely limited and the extensions, such as the Yahoo media ones, are verbose because XML is verbose. JSON is poorly suited to rich media and would require transformation in any case. AMP is a subset of HTML which makes embedding in existing pages, such as a news preview, a doddle.

0
0
Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: But who's going to use it?

The walled garden offers more money. Once people get used to consuming content on these platforms then they will start getting ads that can't be blocked easily and publishers will get some money.

0
0

Cock fight? Not half. Microsoft beats down Apple in Q1

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Numbers basis?

How do they compile numbers for the I-Pad Pro when Apple sells so many of them directly? Or did Apple release them in such detail.

I think that the numbers are pretty impressive for Apple. The Surface Pro is a very nice piece of kit but it is also a drop-in replacement for a PC, which the I-Pad very much isn't. While I would have though that the majority of I-Pad Pros sold would be to hipsters and existing well-heeled I-Pad owners, if there is any migration from desktop to I-Pad then Apple will be very happy.

Device management is now sorted but for many workplaces there major headache is related to the software. Some stuff can go in the browser, some stuff might work well in a Citrix session, but other stuff will need to be "appified" (I think I'll have to give myself ten lashes for that). So, is the tie-up with SAP more than hot air?

2
10

Airbus to build plane that's even uglier than the A380

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: The A380 isn't ugly

Toulouse is the place to go to see Beluga's, always a couple of them around when you land.

It's also where I saw my first A380 and I must agree with you it really is quite spectacular to see them take off or land: enormous but graceful.

4
1
Charlie Clark
Silver badge

The A380 isn't ugly

NFT

6
0

60 per cent of Androids exposed by new attack on mediaserver

Charlie Clark
Silver badge
Stop

That's it

This

is the last

time I read

one of Mr Pauli's

articles.

Poorly researched and poorly written with a one sentence per paragraph style that makes it even harder to find any content, if there is any.

FWIW enterprise Android usually means locked down with an app whitelist. Or, increasingly, their own "app stores".

13
0

Chrome OS to get Android apps via the magic of containers

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: I hope this gets open sourced

vendors dropping support (for whatever reason) for Linux

hm, let's see: tiny market that expects everything for free? more GUI frameworks than you can count? weird licence restrictions?

Android in a container / VM has been possible for a while.

1
5

Google Chrome deletes Backspace

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Well, ain't you the clever one? I've suffered a lot with this. On a page with a form the behaviour of the backspace key is dependent upon where the focus is. Did you want to delete a letter or go back a page? It's such a slight difference…

9
5
Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: Long overdue

I'm surprised that Google, of all people, were the ones to make this usability blunder in the first place.

They weren't: browsers have been doing it for years but it did seem to affect their form handling more than most.

6
0

World goes SIM-free, leaving Sony and HTC trailing behind

Charlie Clark
Silver badge

Re: I just bought a £45 phone...

Meanwhile, the quoted repair cost for my Sony Z3 Compact remains £85. It's like when my mate's Hitachi disc cutter died and rather than pay £80 to fix it he bought one from Lidl or £50 with a 3-year guarantee.

Welcome to the world of builtin obsolescence: something not working, sir? Landfill it and buy a new one. You can't make the production lines for repairs as efficient/cheap the ones for making new ones. And throwing things away currently costs nothing.

2
0

Forums