* Posts by Charlie Clark

4609 posts • joined 16 Apr 2007

Wannabe Prime Minister Andrea Leadsom thinks all websites should be rated – just like movies

Charlie Clark
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Re: What a choice

Sure, we all know that the next PM (and probably the one after) is a dead man walking

I'm currently torn between this kind of analysis (Bojo will be back when the waters are safe again though there might not be much of a country left by then) and putting it all down to being run by a clique of public school boys and oxbridge knobs.

Mrs Leadsom wants to bring back fox-hunting. Is she IDS' estranged sister? In any case the blue rinse brigade are going to love this.

Jolly hockey sticks!

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Charlie Clark
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Re: The obvious problem with this

Don't get sucked into a discussion of the details.

The only real thing that the UK can do is exert control over websites with .uk domains. As soon as this becomes onerous all content will move elsewhere and even this illusion of control would be lost.

But hang on: Britain could decide to leave the internet, couldn't it? That would keep all that nasty stuff out.

In reality, this is all just an excuse to allow mass surveillance to be setup.

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Linux letting go: 32-bit builds on the way out

Charlie Clark
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Re: Intel does not make "cheap"

They're not

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Charlie Clark
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The only performance advantage with 64 bit software is that the SSE part of Intel processors give you more floating point registers in a 64 bit process than a 32 bit process running on the same chip gets

That, along with the claim that 64-bit chips need more memory, would be true if the width of the architecture was the only thing that mattered. It isn't. I've seen some stuff from ARM where they claim that memory use is lower on 64-bit because the code is more efficient: what the hardware can do and what the compiler does are at least as important.

Microsoft has done a miserable job x86 to x86-64. I don't know about Windows 10 but for Windows 7 you have to have x86-64 version of the OS to be able to run x86-64 programs; x86 programs are stored in another part of the OS. Had they been less obsessed with market segmentation this distinction would have been removed years ago and legacy stuff would just run in the emulators that NT copied from OS/2.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: think about tablets

Looking on Amazon I can see Intel Atom-based tablets for under £60.

EOL items gathering dust somewhere since Intel decided to get out of the market. Intel doesn't do cheap.

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Microsoft's cringey 'Hey bae <3' recruiter email translated by El Reg

Charlie Clark
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Something's missing

"where did all that blood come from?"

Mine's the one with the well-thumbed copy of "Amateur Pharmacology" in the pocket.

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Oracle says it is 'committed' to Java EE 8 – amid claims it quietly axed future development

Charlie Clark
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Re: Die Java Die

Not even Tiobe makes that claim. They say The TIOBE Programming Community index is an indicator of the popularity of programming languages. It's certainly an interesting project but seeing Assembler back in the Top 10 gives grounds for some scepsis.

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Euro researchers more loyal and cheaper than Silicon Valley folk

Charlie Clark
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Re: German hairdressers

I know very few hairdressers that are GmbHs. They're infamously low-payers though.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Hypothetically

Not really possible.

RedHat, Ubuntu and others do have remote employees throughout Europe but employment law is employment law.

The article tackles this straight on: in Europe people are not driven solely by the prospects of a huge payout to join a company; they're also far less likely to move vast distances for work. This means that the employment market is "stickier" than Silicon Valley. Yes, it means it's less attractive for VCs but it also means you won't be wondering where your star developers have just gone to.

Anecdotal evidence suggests that European startups are often founded by migrants with access to capital or supply chain through the diaspora. The ventures differ from the typical US one in scale but they are just as innovative in their own way.

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Mozilla emits nightly builds of heir-to-Firefox browser engine Servo

Charlie Clark
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Headmaster

Minor quibble

Just use "MacOS" when referring to Apple's desktop OS. The article tries to go with Apple's trademark of "macOS" and reverts back to OS X in the next paragraph.

Just keep it simple because: "obvious always works".

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Are you an Olympian of software, a titan of tech? Prove it in our coding competition

Charlie Clark
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Yeah, stop oppressing us with your heteromediocrity!

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Charlie Clark
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Am I missing something?

Isn't this just a database projection?

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We have hit peak Silicon Valley: New crazy goal to disrupt entire cities

Charlie Clark
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Solutionism isn't the solution

The world is replete with studies of town planning: where it went wrong and where it went less wrong. But municipalities are at odds with the Libertarian VCs, like Peter Thiel, who think that municipalities have failed because they run on democratic and not commercial principles.

Still, whether it's unproven or not probably won't stop places signing up for these kind of experiments. After all, it worked for Le Corbusier.

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Germany: If Brits vote to Remain, we'll admit Hurst's 1966 goal was a goal

Charlie Clark
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Re: exporting bloody awful sausages

@Vincent

Sometimes you have to try these things out. Imagine a British style sausage (like one of Jeff Capes' fingers) but made like a Chorizo with cranberries in it. Works well. Though not as good as the red onion and ginger ones I recently had in France: there really were the dogs bollocks! Well, hopefully not literally.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Brits--gift from America if you vote to remain.

Oh my god! Please, no! Anyway, strictly speaking Detroit belongs to Canadia.

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Charlie Clark
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Nige would go down a treat in Saxony or Thuringia. He'd feel right at home and could go on stage next to Bernd Höcker. They grunt racist bollocks in harmony*.

* Probably not, actually. Farage, while espousing similarly despicable shite, has at least some kind of rhetorical gift whereas as Höcker just sounds constipated.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Dear Germany...

For the record: I'd never do that and bloody hate people doing it. Is this really a German specialty or just a cliche?

Fairs, fair matey: this really is something that a lot of Germans do. But I think that's partly because they like making reservations as it reduces the chance of being disappointed. They also go on exploratory trips to the airport a couple of days before they're du to fly.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: exporting bloody awful sausages

The mostert had me puzzled until I read it phonetically

It's the traditional name for mustard in and around Düsseldorf where it was more or less introduced by the French, and Düsseldorfer Mostert is now one of those jealously guarded regional designations. ABB is lovely and aromatic and comes charming earthenware pots, but I'm also a great fan of the hot enough to take the top of your head off Löwensenf that was introduced by someone from Dijon. Apart from that most mustard in Germany is the usual bland, tasteless nonsense you get anywhere.

Anyway back to food: along with good British style sausages there's a huge potential market for good, strong English cheddar. The Dutch currently have the market sewn up with the perennially bland junge Gouda (you can also get Beemster and Oud Amsterdamer) and cheddar is usually from Kerrygold. I'm sure something like Cornish Crackler would be popular here with a Röggelchen (bread roll made with rye flour) and a glass of beer. Damn it! I've got my own mouth watering now!

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Dear Germany...

You mean something that's already in the article?

Whoosh!

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Back in '66

Too young for that but the 1990 semi-final was another classic. Complementary styles, 100% commitment and such a pity someone had to win (Germany, of course) in the end.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: exporting bloody awful sausages

They are not the Wurst I have eaten

I prefer Krakauer and Mettwürste to the ubiquitous and extremely bland Bratwurst. In general, I prefer the British style of sausage, as long as they're from a real butchers, and was recently delighted to find my local butcher doing chorizo style sausages with cranberry. Luvverly, especially with a bit of Mostert (ABB is the best)!

But I will be testing the altbier and onion sausages soon enough!

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Wanted to look at the original article

You ain't missing much. Imagine the Sun but on quarto paper and with breasts on the front page.

Hell has special placed reserved for Bild and Sun editors. As with The Sun it's less offensive if you treat it as a comic. Apart from that, you can basically rinse and translate the racist bollocks from The Sun and you've got it. And like The Sun, it's mainly bought for a couple of minutes outrage at scandal of the day and the sports coverage.

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77 per cent ignore company social media policies

Charlie Clark
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Holmes

Confirmation bias

Well, of course, a majority of those using the internet at work will say it is for work purposes. I think it's difficult to create a large-scale survey that wouldn't support that assertion.

For tech stuff IRC, mailing lists and relevant forums (include StackExchange) are useful resources. Do they count as social networks?

LinkedIn's groups tend to be full of reposts of external resources by people trying to improve their own profiles.

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Why you should Vote Remain: Bananas, bathwater and babies

Charlie Clark
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Re: Cynical Observer E(USSR)

No, membership of NATO was what they were glad of

Know many people in the Baltic states do you? While it's true that NATO and the EU are entirely separate organisations (Finland and Sweden are both neutral), the principles underlying both are related: security for our main trading partners.

Hence, while it's mainly American boots on the ground, the Baltic states have also asked for German troops. Given the history, this is more than astonishing. They have also now all adopted the Euro as their currency, even though it means that they are lending money to Greeks who earn more.

Indeed, the economic pain of a US-led banking embargo is much more of a deterrent to Pootie's ambitions than the collective whining of the EU.

The US has very little trade with Russia so the embargo costs the US little. Some EU countries trade a lot with Russia. But then again, Russia was boycotting Polish produce even before invading the Crimea. In its own way, the US is as dependent on the soft power of the EU as the EU is upon the US military.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: 'little Englander's"... really??

Germany's car market is built to send 20% straight to us, as we love a German motor... You think there is any chance they will jeopardize that money?

Ah, the trade straw man argument: we have a trade deficit so everyone else has more to lose.

The Germans will be more than happy to continue to sell cars to the UK. But the terms of trade might make it a less attractive market: tariffs may be introduced or the UK might not be as rich, though we can expect the ruling British elite and the international denizens of Knightsbridge, etc. to continue to buy them in volume.

Anyway, where did Bojo pull that 20% from? Looks a lot like this article from July 2015 in the FT. Worth reading in detail because it was written before the hyperbole really got out of hand. The Germans expect difficulties but nothing they're not prepared for. But in 2011 cars to the UK only made up about 10% of German car exports. Looks to me like the Germans are rather good at finding new markets, ie. selling more cars to the UK when exports to Russia slumped.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: E(USSR)

Which might mean that the blue stealth helicopter with the gold stars is suppressing my free speech, or it might mean that you really need to re-foil your hat.

It's mind control, number 10 and not even a tin-foil hat can protect you!

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Charlie Clark
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Re: "Full disclosure: my startup OpenTRV has received funding from EU sources"

Can we hear from someone who doesn't have a vested interest? That disqualifies you, @Charlie Clark.

Oh? I have more of a vested interest that being a citizen of the United Kingdom? Please tell us more. Even better, picket my local polling station so that I can't vote.

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Charlie Clark
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You are starting to sound a bit deluded

Deluded and blowing smoke? Wow. I wonder what was the stuff you put in your tea? Enough of the ad hominem.

QMV does not apply in most areas and in any case the UK shouldn't find it hard to find allies in the council to veto anything. Thus far it's still not been required to enact legislation that it opposed.

I suppose you already know the EU doesn't actually have a free trade agreement with either the US or China? Switzerland does.

What's that got to do with it? The EU doesn't consider China a market economy. How can you have free trade with someone who doesn't compete freely? Oxymoronic if you ask me. And wasn't Switzerland forced to cede sovereignty to the US when it came to banking secrecy for suspected tax evaders?

That aside the EU trades heavily with China, the US and India (Germany exports far more to all three than the UK) under existing WTO rules, which means few areas are excepted. TTIP is supposed to mean free trade with America but is pretty much dead in the water on both sides of the Atlantic. In Europe because of the secrecy that the Americans demand, in America because an anti-trade Congress don't negotiate, never, no sir, get out the gun boats.

When it comes to who we should improve our trade relations with, I'd much rather the EU started to focus on how a more equitable trade with Africa can benefit both sides: let us please stop dumping surplus agricultural production and thus putting African farmers out business.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: @Custard Fridge: Cracking article

Err no matey, the primary reason for the state of many southern european economies is that the Euro simply does not match their economic requirements

Neither did repeated devaluations.

Greece is a special case, partly due to the massive levels of "creative accounting" by Goldman Sachs effectively defrauded itself into the Euro area. Southern Europe does not suffer from the exchange rate but from low productivity and high public debt.

At the moment all of Southern Europe is being hosed in Northern cash by holding down interest rates. This has meant hundreds of billions in savings for countries like Italy and is supposed to oil the political wheels so that much needed labour market reforms can be introduced which will hopefully help reduce un- and underemployment among the young.

Returning briefly to Greece: the country does provide an object lesson in the illusion of sovereignty. Last year the government ran a referendum against the offer from its creditors. It won the referendum but sill had no choice but to accept the offer from its creditors. This was a humiliating and unnecessary climbdown from an untenable, maximum position.

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Charlie Clark
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ooh, someone has coined a new term for us to project all our hate on! How clever of them.

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Charlie Clark
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Because we tried that…

We didn't. Call-me-Dave found he was in a spot because of a stupid manifesto promise he decided he'd have to keep (the manifesto is normally ceremonially burnt on the night of the election) and asked the other member states what they could give him quickly. Quickly meant no treaty change, so nothing substantial could be offered. Even then, there must have been some impressive arm-twisting to come up with what they did.

But for the previous 5 years the UK government had plenty of chances to push for reform. Instead it chose to isolate itself such as when it came to the Euro area fudge.

Leaving means having to renegotiate from the start most of the deals we already have with our major trading partners. Except that the UK won't have the right of veto any more. It's a bit like voting to leave the UN but expecting to keep a seat on the Security Council. Well, it's worth a try, I suppose.

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Charlie Clark
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Nicely put

It remains awfully convenient for domestic politicians to blame “Europe”

So true. Elsewhere you can substitute "Westminster" or "Washington" for the thing to blame.

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CloudFlare apologizes for Telia screwing you over

Charlie Clark
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Re: about Cloudflare

Not seen one of those for or a CAPTCHA for the Register but I have had my ip range blocked by other sites in the past, because other machines on the range were serving DDoS attacks. It happens. Who knows, maybe some kind of DDoS attack or similar (attacks on carriers are not unknown) was associated with this outage?

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Charlie Clark
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Re: about Cloudflare

What?

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Charlie Clark
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We've become so used to good service that we often fail to appreciate how much has to go right for things like the internet to work. The internet is designed to cope with having to reroute traffic but at the cost of latency.

And as the internet becomes more important to us, it also becomes a bigger risk. What this article doesn't say is that carrier failure is a fairly common (not not everyday) occurrence, however brief, in many parts of the world. Prioritising reliable Tier 1 providers is actually one way to mitigate this but even they can have their problems. I've yet to see a CDN that doesn't have the occasional wobble in one part of the world. As with all failures, when it happens good communication is key. Along with working out exactly what went wrong and whether you can prevent that happening again. The question is then: is Cloudflare's and Telia's analysis plausible and do their proposed changes sound reasonable? Or is this more like TalkTalk's crisis management?

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Three non-obvious reasons to Vote Leave on the 23rd

Charlie Clark
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Re: Remember Social Solidarity

employ minimum wage labour

And just how long do we expect the minimum wage to survive in a Bojo-Gove-Nige coalition?

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Charlie Clark
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Inside the EU, the laws being passed are proposed by un-elected commissioners

This is a gross misrepresentation.

All EU laws require the support of the member states through the body known both as the Council of Ministers and the European Council. There are now some areas where a majority vote (of member states) can lead to new laws but the UK has opt-outs for most of these.

The facts are, as Ken Clarke has pointed out, no British government has ever been forced to adopt legislation that it opposed in the Council of Ministers.

Facts, hey, who needs 'em?

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Charlie Clark
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Re: So where is the post to balance this out?

It's the battered partner's worst fear.

So, you're now stooping to comparing international agreements with domestic abuse? 'Nuff said.

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Supercomputers in 2030: Lots of exaflops and LOTS of DRAM

Charlie Clark
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Your crystal ball is cloudy

Both Intel and Micron are heavily invested in a DRAM world and it's clouding their ideas.

As systems get larger the power draw directly attributable to DRAM gets more important and should encourage research into less power hungry alternatives. It's not my field but I can imagine that people might start mulling over alternatives like a 2 ExaFlops DRAM system drawing 100 MW versus a 1.5 ExaFlops xRAM system drawing 10 MW and opting for the slower but cooler and cheaper to run system. MRAM looks good but Flash is also getting faster and faster.

Time to throw some dollars at that kind of research rather than yet another Silicon Valley service of minimal utility.

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Brexit: More cash for mobile operators or consumers? Pick one

Charlie Clark
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Re: Predatory pricing

But how much of the charge paid by the customer is the actual roaming charge, and how much is the customer's network's margin

It used to be over 50% went to the host network. The EU found evidence of collusion between networks to continue fleecing customers which is what led to the caps on roaming charges. I remember being in a room in 2000 when Fritz Joussen, then recently appointed head of Mannesmann D2, boasted about cutting roaming off to various Spanish networks in order to renegotiate terms so that it could get a bigger slice of the action, not for lower roaming charges.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Scaremongering

Didnt I read Iceland has organised trade with China too? They completed theirs while the EU takes much longer and is much slower. I am sure a report on the EU trade deals showed it had zero improvement over what we could achieve for us but takes longer.

I don't know what you read but your argument entirely speculative and completely ignores the fact that the EU effectively backstopped Iceland and prevented bankruptcy, which would have been brought on by, amongst other things, the UK invoking anti-terror legislation to sequester Icelandic assets after the much-vaunted light-touch regulation of IceSave, etc, when so horribly wrong. EU membership is also likely to go back onto the Icelandic political agenda. I'd welcome it, it might help us sort out the CFP.

Want a quick trade deal with China? Then agree to their terms. The EU has yet to recognise that China has a market economy which is a pre-condition for any kind of deal.

I find it offensive that you claim that the EU started a war in Ukraine. When did they deploy troops? Russia was in clear breach of international law when it invaded Ukraine. Russia simply didn't like a more or less democratic government in Ukraine signing any kind of agreement with the EU but this was a) not an act of aggression and b) not illegal.

The EU writes laws about the shape of a banana.

Nope: no laws about bananas were ever written but still a tabloid favourite. However, in a sop to France, the EU does give preferential treatment to bananas from the DOM TOM but I think there are similar agreements for some of the British overseas territories.

When I talk about workers' rights I am referring to those conferred by EU legislation. Nothing to do with the ECHR. which the UK held set up. Which is why, of course, the UK thinks it doesn't need to comply with ECHR judgements.

And with the EU dictating what is an extreme party

I must have missed that. Have Jobbik, UKIP, Golden Dawn, Front National, True Finns, the Swedish Democrats, öFP, get banned from the European parliament? No. As a matter of fact, the German Constitutional Court said that the 5 % hurdle, designed to prevent extremism, did not apply for European elections.

The trade area also favours buying from within the trade area but locks out developing countries which need the trade to help their poor and lower our prices.This is a tautology.

We have long passed the recession in this country…

Under what definition? AFAIK real wages in the UK have remained stagnant.

But how can we tell the EU to do this, it is a huge lumbering Goliath but it controls these things.

If you're a member of the EU you don't try and tell it what to do. You have lots of opportunities to initiate legislation and find allies to push it through (the UK was very active in the expansion to 25 member states, including the freedom of movement of Labour). But as long as the UK stands on its own in the corner, it's not going to change anything.

Basically, you have made up your mind and are pulling "facts" from thin air to support it. I think all your points can be easily refuted but I also know that it doesn't matter what I say, I wouldn't be able to convince you because you've made your mind up.. You know what: that's fine. In a democracy you get to vote for whatever you want but stop pretending that you're open to argument.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Scaremongering

Well, the lack of snappy soundbite arguments is one of the reasons why a referendum on EU membership is such a terrible idea. There are many things to like about the EU and a lot to dislike.

What do I like? Well, as I personally benefit from the freedom of labour then I'm all for it. But this shouldn't be taken in isolation. The ability for skilled (unskilled) labour to move around the single market allows companies to specialise (this is where the City of London profits so much). It also allows seasonal workers to work the harvests which means cheaper fruit and veg. Are there problems? Too, right there have: Germany's failure to apply the relevant legislation has led to wage-dumping in things like the meat industry which indirectly contributes to migration from west Africa. The law has been changed so people are being paid more but as long as the Germans demand very cheap meat…

My main reason for the EU is the hope that by trading and working together we're less likely to have wars with each other. Virtually everyone I know has stories of loss in the second world war and European history is replete with such senseless conflicts. We've now managed 60 odd years without one, which is impressive given our history. Wars are also such utter wastes of resources. Instead we've created CERN and ESA and many other fantastic projects. Our children now have opportunities that couldn't have been dreamt of 20 years ago. Note, Switzerland is already being frozen out of the next round of research project because of the threat of breach of contract.

The European Commission is at its most impressive when it is enforcing the single market and removing artificial barriers to trade such as subsidies to car makers and airlines. It is also powerful enough to negotiate with other countries like the US and China in matters of trade, as has been the case of airplanes or LCD screens or currently steel: the British government alone is pretty much powerless against the dumping of steel by the Chinese.

But there are also things I don't like such as the Common Agricultural Policy and the Common Fisheries Policy. Both these are vestigial policies of the origin of the EC and are effectively ways for governments to subsidise particular industries. Not that I am against making sure that farmers and fishermen can earn a living. But the subsidies should be vastly reduced and repatriated so that they benefit large farmers and landowners less. When it comes to fishing: we should ask for advice from Iceland which has managed to create a healthy fishery that turns a profit (Europe has lots of poor fishermen and not enough fish).

I also like the improved workers rights that the EU has given us. Although it's actually health and safety, the working time directive means it is far less likely that people like doctors and lorry drivers are working beyond the point of exhaustion.

There should be changes in the bureaucracy: we don't need one commissioner for every member state; the European Council gets too involved in micromanaging policy; the European Parliament needs something it can get its teeth into it. But to get any changes done we have to have a seat at the table amongst friends. If the UK leaves the EU it doesn't get to shape any of the discussions and how the EU should be changed.

The playground game theory advanced by some is sadly misguided. Yes, sometimes you can get more by refusing to budge. But, in general, it means you get less of what you want, especially when dealing with the more powerful. Should the UK decide to leave the EU it won't be able to set the agenda. With national elections next year in both France and Germany, national politics and positions are for more likely to occupy people along with Russian aggression and the slow and bloody decline of Syria, Libya and elsewhere.

Will any of this have impressed you? I doubt it very much. But, whatever happens, come Thursday this insane campaign will be over and we can look to moving on the next one.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Scaremongering

Cameron has already said he wont and has advocated Turkey joining at one point. Maybe someone else will veto, I dunno.

Bojo is on record (2012) as supporting Turkey joining the EU. He's the one with Turkish relatives, after all.

But let's face it: you're just here to troll not discuss.

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Charlie Clark
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WTF?

Predatory pricing

In the absence of relevant regulation would [insert cartel here] indulge in predatory pricing? Surely not. Phone companies, banks, utilities are amongst the most philanthropic institutions out there.

Not only is this article entirely speculative but it is also badly so. Roaming charges are paid to the host network and the UK is not a net recipient. If they were to be reintroduced for UK citizens visiting the EU in 2019 then it would be the host networks that would stand to profit. UK operators could only really expect to profit by charging more for calls to the EU. Though, as companies like Three and T-Mobile have already shown: lower international prices can be a good way to gain market share at minimal cost.

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Fujitsu picks 64-bit ARM for Japan's monster 1,000-PFLOPS super

Charlie Clark
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Re: This is why AMD and NVidia are making ARM chips

I don't know the future. But I do know ARM will continue to encroach on Intel's territory.

While I agree with this generally I don't think this announcement has much to do with that. It's more like a nail in the coffin of the Sparc. Of course, depending on how well the build goes, we may well see other HPC setups trying ARM out. But, then again cost / core, where ARM has an undoubted advantage, is much less relevant than in the data centre.

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TalkTalk CEO Dido Harding pockets £2.8m

Charlie Clark
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Re: Revolting shareholders...

And nothing ever changes, until a single large shareholder with an agenda comes along, which requires several billions in clout.

And even then it usually only leads to something like share buyback schemes which benefit large fund managers immediately. There have been several attempts in the US to improve governance and curb executive pay but none of them have been successful.

Even the almighty VW clusterfuck hasn't led to executive bonuses being touched.

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BOFH: Follow the paper trail

Charlie Clark
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Ah, the myth of the rational person

If only we were more prepared to admit how good we are at manipulating ourselves for other people's benefits…

Yes, I think you're right: a year's subscription to your shady scanning software is just what we need and what a fantastic blouse you're wearing!

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Safari 10 dumps Flash, Java, Silverlight, QuickTime in the trash

Charlie Clark
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Re: That is all well and good but...

Something to do with OSX Safari not supporting AVC3, and HLS not allowing the full iPlayer functionality. Mac users can use Opera 32 instead to access BBC HTML 5 content, though (and I'm no expert) it would seem more sensible if Apple could tweak Safari.

Seeing as Safari on the I-Pad and I-Phone already work fine without Flash, I reckon that by the autumn the BBC and others will have switched to running whichever DRM system Apple chooses to work with: you don't think you're going to be able to save any of that HTML 5 video, do you? This might also explain the EOL for older Macs which presumably don't have the necessary hardware.

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Lester Haines: RIP

Charlie Clark
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RIP

Lester's articles really embodied the spirit of The Register and helped to make it not just another IT news website. It was the sort of clever nonsense that even us skinflints would consider paying for.

My thoughts are with his family, friends and colleagues.

Not that this is in any comfort to the family but we need some kind of scholarship to fund research that can demonstrate that bacon and beer had nothing to do with it (I think this is probably the case at 55). Lester himself was a pioneer in this area!

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Xerox lays out BPO breakup plan

Charlie Clark
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Re: The trouble is ...

I think your detector of limey irony is faulty.

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