* Posts by Charlie Clark

6142 posts • joined 16 Apr 2007

UK consumer help bloke Martin Lewis is suing Facebook over fake ads

Charlie Clark
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Re: No permission is needed

No permission is needed - as things currently stand - to post content such as photos of other people - on to Facebook.

This depends a lot upon the jurisdiction but in most countries people do have rights to their own image and not just the weak as piss US DMCA safe harbour stuff.

However this case isn't about user generated shit, but paid for adverts where Facebook engages in a contract with the advertiser. The AGB's will almost certainly stipulate that the advertiser has obtained the necessary rights for the content and Facebook has a duty of care, after all it is being paid.

No wonder you got ridiculed.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Much needed lawsuit

I'm inclined to agree and think that the choice of a defamation suit, over which UK law is notoriously strict, is interesting. Nice way to set the precedent of liability.

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Apple's magical quality engineering strikes again: You may want to hold off that macOS High Sierra update...

Charlie Clark
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Re: No issues here

No problems here but it was a monster update and took quite a time to install.

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Musk: I want to retrieve rockets with big Falcon party balloons

Charlie Clark
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Re: Bouncy House

Would the astronauts have to take their shoes of before using it though?

hm, good question. I wonder if someone has told Stormy Daniels or Ruby?

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Charlie Clark
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Coat

bouncy castle

Isn't the Bouncy Castle by Trump™ the new name for the Whitehouse? To be inauguarated by Silvio Berlusconi…

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ZTE to USA: Sure, ban us, but you cannot afford such victories

Charlie Clark
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The US is a world power in decline, and that decline is accelerating.

It's easy to get sucked into that kind of discussion. The US still has a lot going for it, including an above average birth rate and by far the world's most advanced military capability.

The only thing that's really changing is that the US hegemony is declining in favour of regional trading blocs such as the EU and China. But such changes will hardly seem to affect the US itself directly for quite a while. The mid-terms will decide whether Trump's buffoonery will have any significant effect. Assuming it does then US influence in Asia is likely to be diminished forever. But US companies will still continue to trade there extensively.

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Charlie Clark
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It has been mostly replaced by the Euro over time in both Russia and neighbouring states.

True: dollarisation is usually aligned around trading industries, and oil and gas aside, Russia isn't commodity heavy and even oil and gas are partially traded in other currencies to remove that element of currency risk. Dollars are more important in Latin America, South East Asia and much of Africa. As most of the currency is circulated locally it doesn't even matter that there are a reasonable amount of it is forged.

If America ever does decide not to be the reserve currency of the world, it's going to have a fun time finding people willing to buy its debts. However, this currently isn't on the cards yet, though China is cautiously building out Renminbi based contracts.

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Charlie Clark
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The only value add that ZTE provides is no-longer cheap fingers

You seem to be misinformed: ZTE is much more than the manufacturer of cheap phones.

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LESTER gets ready to trundle: The Register's beer-bot has a name

Charlie Clark
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Most men only go to the pub to gawp at the barmaid's assets

So… this particular bit of gadget porn is bound to increase demand, init?

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Charlie Clark
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Pint

In loving memory

A suitable tribute. RIP Lester

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BOFH: We know where the bodies are buried

Charlie Clark
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Sure, but you also have to be prepared the predator with its own, possibly female, BOFH.

To be continued?

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Apple unleashes FoundationDB as an open source project

Charlie Clark
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Re: Can someone explain in simple terms what this is and why I'd want to use it?

And Cassandra and Kafka,…

This is open sourcing in the sense of "bored with this toy, do you want it?" It allows Apple to pull developers off the project and do minimal maintenance work.

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Oracle demands dev tear down iOS app that has 'JavaScript' in its name

Charlie Clark
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Re: What some companies need to realize...

But this is just cringe worthy.

It would if it were true. Oracle has very little chance of asserting copyright over Javascript, not least because Sun hardly bothered. But if Oracle were to go after anyone it would probably be the browser makers, most notably Google, because V8 powers node.js.

Oracle didn't become as big as it is by making bad products. I'm not a fan but for many years companies were happy to pay Oracle whatever it took to run their services. The Sun deal was poorly handled but at least Oracle understood that Sun had assets it was doing nothing with, which was a disservice to shareholders.

I've never liked MySQL and the Sun deal was one of the best things to happen to Postgres as developers switched from MySQL to Postgres. However, since the takeover, as far as I can tell, Oracle has taken quality in MySQL seriously, something that used to be an oxymoron. But it seems to be more interested in buying up the competition and dreaming up ever more licensing systems than development. And if it continues not to invest in its own products, it will lose market share and money faster than any of its patent trolling can make it.

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Charlie Clark
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No case to answer

This is a PR stunt if anything. Even Oracle's litigious legal team wouldn't try this.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Self Promotion

I think the author isn't sure at all as is suggesting it's a PR stunt by Guo.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Which is Which?

The point is moot: ECMAScript is the name of the standard that browsers follow though they refer to it as JavaScript.

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Size does matter, chaps: Oversized todgers an evolutionary handicap

Charlie Clark
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This is news?

I thought that the stag beetle was the example par excellence of trade off? You can either have big antlers to impress the ladies or a big cock to fertilise them, but never both.

Mating in humans seems to be generally odd with secondary sexual organs playing an important role: I don't remember a woman ever being particularly excited by the rest size of a todger which varies as much with temperature as anything else. Penetration == domination is the peculiarly male fantasy.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: It's not the size that matters.

Presumably there must come a point where a large stomach and large buttocks prevent any penetration at all.

Not sure if buttocks are that important, but, yes, people can get too fat to fuck… which is curiously enough what some men known as "feeders" get off on. Channel 4 documentary on this particular codependency.

However, I've also seen a woman saying that a man with a bit of a belly is more likely to stimulate the clitoris…

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Charlie Clark
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In return, we are the dominant species on our planet.

Sort of depends how you define dominance. I thought there was research indicating that our gene pool isn't big enough for us to be around much longer. And that's assuming we have a planet that's still habitable for us.

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Signal app guru Moxie: Facebook is like Exxon. Everyone needs it, everyone despises it

Charlie Clark
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Getting a cheap website does not get you known.

I never said it did.

There is literally no other platform that can get you known faster, and getting Likes is easy-peasy.

I'm not sure what likes have to do with it but getting known sounds incredibly vague. Whatever, Facebook expects you to pay to advertise just like everyone else.

As I said, don't conflate businesses with hobbyists. Lots of businesses use services like E-Bay to sell stuff: minimal knowledge required, looks shit but works, at least according to my local computer shop.

For hobbies I know quite a few people that use Wordpress and seem pretty happy with it. Again far from perfect but often good enough.

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Charlie Clark
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FAIL

For most of those there is no economically viable alternative to present whatever they want. It *is* indispensible to them.

Bullshit, not least for conflating businesses with hobbyists. Loads of ways to get a cheap website. For most small businesses the biggest cost associated with advertisting is the time they themselves have to invest.

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Europe turns nose up at new smartphones: Beancounters predict 7% sales drop

Charlie Clark
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For most of those there is no economically viable alternative to present whatever they want. It *is* indispensible to them.

For the flagships, yes. All the phones have known variants and respective builds. It can be a little tricky initially to work it out but you soon learn the particular variant name. Always back up your important data in advance.

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Charlie Clark
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Just do it!

Official LOS builds are rock solid and you can always install them on Sammys.

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Charlie Clark
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Yeah, sure ... where do you get that from ? daily fail or fox ?

You can do it on the back of a fag packet: average roaming surchage per user per year. Around 400 million people in the EU so that's € 3 - €10 per user per year, pure profit split between two networks. Sounds about right and puts the number in perspective. Some networks in some countries (Spain, Greece) used to rely on inward roaming for up to 20% of their income but that was a long time ago.

Still expect the networks to continue to hold their hands out for whatever's going. Along with the car makers for the hard work of simplifiying cars.

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Charlie Clark
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Speaking of the UK telcos, how would it be possible to have less onerous regulation than Ofcom? Can you have "negative regulation"?

How about the FCC?

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Charlie Clark
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French finance magazines estimate that losing roaming income will cost EU telcos between €1.2bn and €4bn a year which they have to get back somehow.

€ 1.2 bn/year across the whole EU is small; the loss of revenue to OTT services is (SMS to WhatsApp) is much higher.

They ramped up charges to non-EU destinations years ago. What they will do is reduce the number of shops selling phones to reflect falling demand. This will do more for the bottom line than any notional loss of profiteering. But I fully expect them to hold out their hands for subsidies or "less onerous" regulation: if they could achieve a similar level of competition as in the US, I'm sure they'd be happy.

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Charlie Clark
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I wonder if the drop in income due to the enforced free EU roaming has upset the business models for some of the traditional suppliers

Virtually none except for some very popular holiday destinations (Spain, Greece): ARPA has been on a slow downwards trend for years. The existing networks have been built and amorticised. We're just looking at a mature market.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: really? 5G as the big draw?

Because 4G was such a big draw over 3G?

I'm still on 3G because my provider doesn't do LTE. Apart from the increasingly obese "single page apps" that developers seem so keen on, I don't really notice the difference.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: So why should I be upgrading again?

because your current phone won't work on 5G network, that's why.

Since when? 5G is marketing term defined solely on the speed of the network. Technically it's a collection of further improvements on LTE, you know, Long Term Evolution. No one has the money for a new and incompatbile network (think Sprint's WiMax adventure) that no one will bother to use. 5G's main benefit will be to improve coverage and serve all the machines will need a connection for all the data they collect.

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Huawei CEO sings 'Bye, bye, mister American Pai', trims US C-suite

Charlie Clark
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Re: Poor ZTE

Who hasn't sold stuff to North Korea and Iran? Supplying Iran with weaponse used to be US government policy.

The FCC's policy is reminiscent of Japan in 17th century and something I've got no problem with. If America wants to ignore the rest of the world then let it get on with it. Except, of course, it has fingers in pies all over the place.

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Google, AWS IPs blocked by Russia in Telegram crackdown

Charlie Clark
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Re: Solution...

I'm not disagreeing with the potential of your solution but the risk is that public cloud operators start weighing up the loss of revenue from being completely blocked in Russia

Negligible loss of revenue but potential significant disruption to business using those servers. Anyway it's whack-a-mole against a nimble, motivated and competent opponent. Telegram requires tiny amounts of CPU for this kind of rerouting and could probably do it in JS running on CDNs.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Iron fire curtain!

I just thought Pootie had his panties in a wad, after that little business in Syria recently.

What, the one where the US telegraphed an attack eatly enough for all the Russian "advisers" to get out of the target area? Presumably they told the Syrians as well. The whole thing was yet another made for television demonstration of strength that was in reality just another expensive (those missiles aren't cheap) waste of time.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Solution...

It's already planning to implement some kind of VPN directly in the app. But it probably needs to make the servers a bit more robust: they went down for a couple of hours the other week. For Russia it probably doesn't need to do much as the Russian internet is deliberately lax. Russia has more than enough spooks for spying on people it doesn't like and doesn't worry too much about due process (Nemtsov) but it does like to maintain at least a veneer of respectability.

Interestingly Telegram is currently based in Dubai, a country which happily blocks lots of other messengers.

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Charlie Clark
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Stop

Re: GLAP

The article refers to one ISP's hamfisted attempt to implement the court's judgement, not the ability of the FSB via the IRA to hack other computer systems. It's perfectly possible that blocking IPv6 by the ISP is a deliberate attempt to sabotage the ban.

This is politics, not technology.

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Google to add extra Gmail security … by building a walled garden

Charlie Clark
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Re: Just when you thought Google had hit evil(MAX)

Possibly, but let's wait to see what's actually available. Sounds like the usual kind of shit you find in "groupware". As it's not interoperable it doesn't stand any chance of wide adoption but that might not matter for those planning to move from, say, MS Exchange, to G Suite and want the ability to recall those e-mails sent in error, because learning to double-check is just too hard.

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Google accidentally reveals new swipe-happy Android UI

Charlie Clark
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Re: Please no

You obviously haven't tried Sailfish OS, have you?

You obviously didn't read my post very carefully, did you?

I may well give Sailfish a try on the Gemini but if it's gesture only then I can guarantee that it will remain just a try. I work with lots of different systems and keybindings and gestures are the first items to fall off the stack because the monkey brain just can't cope.

Feel free to think of me as an idiot who just doesn't get it if it helps.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Please no

Discoverability is important. But I think its reasonable to have a few platform wide gestures.

I'm not against gestures per se – Opera introduced the swipe for the browser years ago and I miss it – I am against gesture only.

The research demonstrates that some monkeys never learn and, depending on the context, those monkeys are us…

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Charlie Clark
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Please no

Gesture only UIs fail on discovery. To quote Luke Wroblewski, who has been working Google for a while, obvious always wins.

Rule of thumb: anything that sounds like it won an award for being clever is going to end up being poor UX.

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UK pub chain Wetherspoons' last call: ♫ Just a spoonful of Twitter – let's pull social media down ♫

Charlie Clark
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Re: I, for one...

In Manchester just head for Sinclairs in the remodlled* Shambles Square: lovely Sammy Smiths for well under £2, unless you want lager in which case you deserve to pay more.

* Sponsored by the IRA. Those visionary architects that Mr Martin seems to want back in business.

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Go away, kid, you bother me: Apple, Google, Microsoft, Mozilla kick W3C nerds to the curb

Charlie Clark
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Has W3C's management of HTML ever not been a farce?

Yes, it was fine for the first few years, then it was captured by the industry and refused to do any development. For a while Microsoft was the biggest culprit because it wanted to extend the web via ActiveX. Frustration at the lack of progress is what led to the developer driven WHATWG, as has been well documented. Once the HTML5 specification was ready, it did look like there would be a rapprochement between the two bodies, but the W3C went back into committee mode so this spat was going to happen over something sooner or later.

The WHATWG doesn't get everything right: vendors do use it to push their worldviews, Apple with I-Phone specific shit but Google has had its own share of stillbirths, but following the software development model of only standardising something for which there are at least two independent implementations has worked well.

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Charlie Clark
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Yet, what does WHATWG have to replace the accessibility standards from W3G?

In a sense it obviates them by making accessibility a part of usability. For example, the nav-tag does not need and should not have the ARIA role "navigation". See http://adrianroselli.com/2017/10/dont-use-aria-menu-roles-for-site-nav.html for an interesting discussion.

The fundamental difference is that WHATWG tries to formalise working code and encourages expert input in the development of the process, whereas the W3C formalises first and expects the pixies to do the implementation. With regard to ARIA the W3C has created an industry of consultants in the area, most of whom have no real idea what accessibility is.

Capture by special interests is a risk of both approaches but the WHATWG has by far the better track record.

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Charlie Clark
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In particular Netflix has apparently strongly lobbied for EME

Yes, but essentially as a proxy for the content industry which won't license content unless there is a sufficient DRM figleaf. See Bruce Lawson's take on this from 2012-. The irony is that the rights holders still don't understand the technolofgy and are insisting on plugins to implement the DRM despite getting a standard.

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Samsung Galaxy S9: Still the Lord of All Droids

Charlie Clark
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It's not only not great, it's also illegal when it comes to your statutory consumer rights. You can require Samsung either to provide you with the necessary security updates or give you your money back. But you'll need a brass neck.

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Charlie Clark
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Mine does everything I need and runs upto date Nougat 7.2.

When did you get 7.2? I'm still on 7.1.2 after the April Fool's fuckup.

Got 8.1 on the old one (single crack on the screen so still totally usable, except as a waterproof navigation device) from one of the unofficial builds. Pretty nice with the write Gapps. Tried building 8.1 myself but gave up after problems with the blobs.

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Charlie Clark
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I'm onto my second S5 (both second hand), why change from such a fantastic device?

The screen burn-in sounds like hardware failure that should be covered by the 2-year EU warranty. I've not heard of it from anyone I know with an S7 or S8 but it is known to happen with some OLED screens.

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Schrems' Facebook case edges closer to ruling over EU-US data flows

Charlie Clark
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the whole thing will presumably have to start up again under GDPR

I don't think so. It was because of this case that the ECJ struck Safe Harbour down. So while some issues may need reevaluation in the light of changes in the law, it's unlikely to need to start the whole thing again.

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British government to ink deal for yet another immigration database

Charlie Clark
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Snout! Meet Trough!

NFT

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Continuing to waste public money

Not at all. If you have an effective border control system, then you know that anyone who is within the borders has a right to be there, so no need for any form of identity.

That's a big if…

Identity systems don't have to be sophisticated (full of biometrics) to be useful and a state-sponsored one means that companies don't have to invent their own or spend as much on fraudulent identity insurance.

I understand the legal and philosophical objections to id cards but a lot depends upon their implementation and associated laws. Difficult in the age of "won't someone think of the children!" and "is the dark-skinned man a terrorist?" to do this but doable as the recent rollout in India illustrates.

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Google's not-Linux OS documentation cracks box open at last

Charlie Clark
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Re: OOOS

If you're going to talk about OOP why would you mention Perl, especially when talking about developing an OS?

Compiling is what will give you the most speed and OOP makes a lot of sense for a lot of problem domains, especially GUIs and APIs. C is reserved for the kernel where the speed matters most.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Why C?

Why not C++ and ban use of insecure C and C++ libraries in building/developing the OS?

Why use C++ in the kernel?

BeOS had a C kernel and a C++ object-oriented OS. You can do this without coming up with Win32…

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