* Posts by SkippyBing

1971 posts • joined 21 May 2008

iPhone XS: Just another £300 for a better cam- Wait, come back!

SkippyBing
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Re: 2018 is the year of stupidly sized phones

'Anyone remember the good old days when you just typed in a pin to unlock a device?'

I mean I think you can still do that with an Android phone, it's just Apple who seem to find that passe.

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SkippyBing
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Re: 2018 is the year of stupidly sized phones

'Motorcycle courier did cross my mind'

Or just a motorcyclist, it's far easier taking a glove off to unlock my phone and answer a message/change playlist/google wtf I am etc. than taking the helmet off and then having to get it back on. In fact with a bluetooth comms set on my helmet I just use the voice guidance for navigation rather than looking at the screen, although Google maps gets very passive aggressive if you miss a turn...

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Brits shun country life over phone not-spot fears

SkippyBing
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Rural?

What are they calling the countryside? I mean I live in a small town so even from the centre it's only a 10 minute walk to woods and fields, but we get decent broadband and 4G. Would we fall under urban or rural?

But don't move here it's rubbish and you'll catch scurvy or something...

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Brit boffins build 'quantum compass'... say goodbye to those old GPS gizmos, possibly

SkippyBing
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Re: Ah demonstation just in time. Norway / Finlands GPS knocked out by A.N. Other

'But isn't the North Sea notoriously stormy, meaning celestial AND terrestrial visibility was bad, your ship would regularly be tossed around off course, AND there's the risk of a lightning bolt throwing off your compass?'

Presumably why no one went anywhere by boat until the invention of GPS...

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SkippyBing
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Re: An Achillies heel?

'Also I'm assuming that even a brief interruption would be pretty dire.'

As long as it stores where it was when the interruption happened it shouldn't be too bad depending on how fast you're going. You could just reinitialise it at you're last known position, you'd then have a circle of error based on how far you could have gone in the time you didn't know where you were.

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SkippyBing
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Re: Impressive kit

'It'll have to be squeezed down to half a brick if they want to use it in vehicles'

Have you seen how big a nuclear submarine is? Plenty of room for one of those bad boys, just take the shower out.

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SkippyBing
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'the Chinese may have magnetometers sensitive enough to detect the hull of a sub from the air.'

Aww bless, only a few decades after everyone else then.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic_anomaly_detector

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British fixed broadband is cheap … and, er, fairly nasty – global survey

SkippyBing
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That's just the reverse of saying if everyone went for the cheapest option we'd save £Billions. We would, but would all be on Talk Talk and having our details hacked by a two year old with a speak and spell.

People choose the option that's best for them, unless they're idiots in which case they're probably also on a standard rate electricity tariff and deserve all they get.

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UK.gov to roll out voter ID trials in 2019 local elections

SkippyBing
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Re: Lack of a secret ballot is a greater problem

'(or at a minimum handing in the actual polling card!)'

Exactly, they go to the trouble of posting you a card it can't be that hard to make it an exchangeable token in return for which you get to vote. I mean obviously government's involved so it can be that hard and cost millions, but seriously no card no vote must be the simplest solution surely?

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SkippyBing
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To be fair if voter turn out was as high normally as it was for the Brexit vote no one would be worried about making it compulsory.

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SkippyBing
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Re: So...

'I don't have a passport and I have an old style paper only driving licence.'

I believe the solution there is to take the old style paper driving licence and a utility bill or bank statement. As it says two forms of non-photo ID are acceptable.

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Slabs, huh, what are they are good for? Er, not quite absolutely nothing

SkippyBing
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Re: Odd middle ground

I got mine to use when flying as a moving map, NOTAM and weather plotting thing, which is quite a niche use case but is better than the phone as the screen's that bit bigger. But at home although it's handy if I just want to browse the web/check emails, it's not what I'd call essential.

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SkippyBing
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Re: Tablet longevity

'Detachable keyboards are like motorcycle sidecars; less convenient than either a motorcycle or a car most of the time.'

Too true, my detachable keyboard is rubbish for getting to the shops.

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Budget 2018: UK goes it alone on digital sales tax for tech giants

SkippyBing
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Re: There will be £10m for a scheme to identify ways to keep physics and maths teachers in schools

Teachers - "Don't privatise education'

Also Teachers - "The government isn't running education properly"

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SkippyBing
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Re: There will be £10m for a scheme to identify ways to keep physics and maths teachers in schools

'That is one way to go but from what I hear from teachers it would be better if the gov would step back and stop trying to be in charge of what they don't understand.'

That does rather suggest teachers don't understand how Government works.

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Smartphone industry is in 'recession'! Could it be possible we have *gasp* reached 'peak tech'?

SkippyBing
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My current phone is a flagship from 2016, I'm vaguely looking at replacements in case the battery life gets any worse and because occasionally it's nice to get new shiny. Certainly for my use case any mid-range phone now exceeds my current phones performance, so why spend the extra £3-400? Plus they're less likely to come with a sodding notch.

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BT: We're stocking warehouses with kit ahead of Brexit to avoid shortages

SkippyBing
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Re: Because Brexit

'What would you call it instead of Brexit?'

Well in the case of Jamie's Italian I'd say poor food and service, but he still blamed Brexit.

In the case of Boeing who've just opened a production facility in Sheffield, their first in Europe, I'd say it's not an issue.

The director of the V&A Museum blamed Brexit for falling visitor numbers, despite record numbers of tourists visiting the UK.

So I'd say it's a number of complex factors at work, but it's easier to blame Brexit than the organisations own failings.

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SkippyBing
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Because Brexit

This decades equivalent of the Millennium Bug for excusing poor financial results.

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5.1 update sends Apple's Watch 4 bling spinning into an Infinite Loop of reboot cycles

SkippyBing
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Re: There's a sucker born every minute?

'Please stop rubbishing people's life style choices.'

Generally I agree with this statement, but some peoples' choices deserve to be rubbished or how will they learn?

E.g.

Vegans

Apple Watch owners

People who make lists

etc.

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Watch closely as NASA deploys the world's biggest parachute at supersonic speeds

SkippyBing
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Bit Late?

If it's landing on Mars in 28 months time isn't this all a bit last minute? I can't imagine there'd have been much time before launch to go back to the drawing board if it hadn't worked.

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Yer a solicitor, 'arry! Indian uni takes cues from 'Potterverse' to teach students law

SkippyBing
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I get about three of the references in the article, I suspect I have a new reason for not becoming a lawyer.

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Have you ever, ever felt like this? Have strange things happened? Is high-speed data going round the twist?

SkippyBing
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'a setup “the size of a table, which is completely impractical for telecommunications,"'

Is it just me who wants one of these table sized dohickeys then?

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London flatmate (Julian Assange) sues landlord (government of Ecuador) in human rights spat

SkippyBing
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Re: Lets Get Real @SkippyBing Silver badge

'Repeat after me, London is not part of Sweden or the USA.

So the Embassies being foreign soil or not makes no difference.'

The fact he's wanted in the UK for skipping bail definitely comes into it though, and London is definitely part of that.

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SkippyBing
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Re: Lets Get Real

'Statute of limitations stop when you leave the country and technically he`s on foreign soil'

Repeat after me, Embassies aren't foreign soil, they're just buildings that have been accorded diplomatic status.

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Facebook names former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg head of global affairs

SkippyBing
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I would have done it for half the price. I have no problem with whatever anyone calls me at that price.

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SkippyBing
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Re: I'm not missing the opportunity to flip this...

Of course if the 'Remainers' had listened to the concerns of the 'Brexiteers' maybe there'd never have been a referendum...

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Microsoft points to a golden future where you can make Windows 10 your own

SkippyBing
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'It sounds suspiciously like those helpful websites that claim to spot issues on your rig and offer a fix, before spraying your OS with layer upon layer of malware. Just without the malware bit.'

Are you sure about that second bit, I mean you'll still have Win 10 on there.

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SkippyBing
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Re: Deinstall Win 10?

'but everybody's got a DVD drive, more or less'

I think you'll find a higher proportion of computers have USB sockets than DVD drives these days. Most laptops for starters.

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Chinese biz baron wants to shove his artificial moon where the sun doesn't shine – literally

SkippyBing
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Re: Suitably Qualified and Experienced Personnel...?

My thought was, if it's not going to be bright enough to change the behaviour of fauna, and presumably flora, then what's the point?

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EU aren't kidding: Sky watchdog breathes life into mad air taxi ideas

SkippyBing
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Re: Helicopter emergency landing....

'In essence you trade rotor speed/inertia for lift just as you approach the ground and flare out. You have to have sufficient rotor speed for this, and in order to maintain this before reaching the ground you need to flatted out the rotor pitch using the collective pitch lever so that it effectively freewheels.'

Minor correction, the rotor isn't freewheeling. The rotor blades are twisted along their length, partly to reduce the lift generated by the outer sections as due to their much higher velocity the bending forces on the blades would be too great. This also means with the collective fully down the outer portion is in negative pitch so that the lift vector is now forwards of vertical, which provides an autorotative force which drives the blades. The inner portion is still providing lift which keeps the rate of descent to a sensible figure (normally less than 1500'/minute). Once near the ground you trade speed for lift to reduce the descent rate to something you'd be comfortable landing at.

As in the Clutha accident if the rotor speed decays below a certain level it's not possible to recover it, above that level you can normally increase or decrease the rotor speed to alter the glide ratio and various alarms should let you know if you're getting close to the limits.

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SkippyBing
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Re: Helicopter emergency landing....

'Hmm, I don't actually remember ever reading/hearing about a helicopter using autorotation to land safely.'

US Army Chinook

https://www.fayobserver.com/9397fb59-5c26-529c-b3c7-0abd743ef162.html

Danish AF Merlin after an apparent triple engine failure (UK exchange pilot flying)

https://www.pprune.org/rotorheads/576333-eh101-emergency-landing.html

There was also a successful auto rotation by a UK Apache in Afghanistan after they lost drive to the tail rotor.

https://www.pprune.org/military-aviation/579736-ah-64-tail-rotor-loss-article.html

Ultimately the usability of the aircraft afterwards is determined more by the terrain the auto rotation is carried out to, as unlike most airfields it's unlikely to be perfectly smooth. One of my instructors managed to get a Lynx on to a beach after an engine failure which was good flying going by the alternate landing sites, jungle or sea.

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AI's next battlefield is literally the battlefield: In 20 years, bots will fight our wars – Army boffin

SkippyBing
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Re: Humans will always have the most important battlefield role

'the high-tech side generally has a limited appetite for casualties

Really?

That's why the US invaded countries like Iraq and left behind masses of casualties (among the civilians of the countries involved)? Because they have a limited appetite for casualties?'

On their own side, they have a limited appetite for casualties on their own side. If you were worried about casualties on the other side you wouldn't go to war in the first place.

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Sync your teeth into power browser Vivaldi's largest update so far

SkippyBing
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If they asked nicely I'd probably pay them $1 a year subscription and save them faffing around with sponsored bookmarks.

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Never mind Brexit. UK must fling more £billions at nuke subs, say MPs

SkippyBing
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Re: TL;DR

I believe that would be a modification of the Russian method. I.e. we were just innocently towing this retired submarine when the rope broke and it sank in this quite deep bit of ocean. Oh well, nothing we can do now.

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Brits pay £490m extra for mobes they already own – Citizens Advice

SkippyBing
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Re: Let them pay

'SkippyBing I do not believe you.'

Simple, I have never paid insurance for any white goods.

I have never had to have any white goods replaced, or repaired in the eight years I've lived in my house*.

Not having paid insurance of £30 p/a on each of a fridge/freezer, washing machine, and dishwasher over the eight years I've had them is £30 p/a x 3 x 8, or £720. Which would happily let me buy a new £200 dishwasher and have change. Hell even not paying £30 p/a on the dishwasher would now let me buy one of equivalent value.

We should all be able to do maths, but apparently not all of us can do a decent risk analysis.

*Unless you count me replacing a plastic button on the washing machine myself, total cost £15 and half an hour of my time. So hardly worth the £240 I would have paid in insurance by that point.

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SkippyBing
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Re: Let them pay

a) If they don't charge the stupid people more, the clever people can't pay less.

b) Who buys a manufacturer's warranty? The amount I've saved by not doing that more than covers the cost of replacing a dishwasher in the unlikely event I have to. Same goes for phone insurance.

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SkippyBing
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How?

How do people not know they're contract is coming to end? Whenever I've got close to it I'm inundated with phone calls and texts asking if I want to upgrade, which reminds me to go onto a sim only tariff on those occasions I've gone down the bundled route to get a phone*.

*It oddly worked out cheaper one time.

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Apple hands €14.3bn in back taxes to reluctant Ireland

SkippyBing
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It could just rest in my account.

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First Boeing 777 (aged 24) makes its last flight – to a museum

SkippyBing
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Re: More than 8 hours

'I'm pretty sure I could spend two weeks going round the US just looking at aerospace museums, and I'd still have to miss some off the list.'

Ditto, I've seen a lot of the ones in the LA area through an equally aviation mad friend having emigrated there a few years back. You can find some unique stuff in the oddest places, e.g. the Western Museum of Flight at Torrance airfield is essentially a single hangar unit, but has one of the two YF-23 prototypes.

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SkippyBing
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Re: Fatal hull loss is more accurate

'Wow, that sounds more like a skit from a satire like Airplane!'

You can now find some pretty disturbing video of it happening, after they'd blanketed the area she was lying in with foam.

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SkippyBing
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Re: Is "designed by computer" better ?.

'Boeing's accountants are at least as good as Boeing's engineers.'

Hopefully they're better or Boeing are going to be bankrupt.

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SkippyBing
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Re: Is "designed by computer" better ?.

'The KC-46 is a military procurement program. It's supposed to go over budget.'

You'd think that, but it's a fixed price contract so the only budget it's going over is Boeings!

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SkippyBing
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Re: Is "designed by computer" better ?.

A lot of the problems with the KC-46 are to do with the refuelling and flight management systems, the latter taken from the 777 and put into what is basically a 767 for some reason. The aircraft bit is fine. Bet the USAF feel stupid not ordering the A330 MRTT though.

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SkippyBing
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Re: Fatal hull loss is more accurate

'Actually the first fatal hull loss is the Asiana flight (pilot error and bad documentation by Boeing) into San Francisco that cost several occupants their lives when the tail was ripped off.'

I believe, and I've used it as an example in Human Factors training a few times, one stewardess was killed when her seat departed the aircraft. Two passengers departed the aircraft because they weren't strapped in*, one of whom only actually died after a fire truck drove over her. The second time.

*Always strap in unless you want to get up and walk somewhere.

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SkippyBing
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Re: Feeling old yet?

'On a different note, with 20,519 flights totalling 49,687 flying hours we seem to be looking at an average flight time of ~2.5 hours, which seems low for a long-haul aircraft.'

I wonder if that's in part due to its test role with Boeing? I don't think Cathay have many short haul routes.

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SkippyBing
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More than 8 hours

The Hong Kong - Pima leg is going to be more like 15 hours if my LAX - Hong Kong experience is anything to go by. I don't sleep well on planes so the last four hours was a bit of a head-f**k.

Incidentally the Pima County Air and Space Museum is well worth a visit, it's right next to the desert boneyard where they store retired warplanes and has an example of everything that's been through there, one offs like the F-107, and some oddities like a Shackleton and Gannet which I didn't expect to see. You can also get a bus tour of the boneyard from the museum.

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Leeds hospital launches campaign to 'axe the fax'

SkippyBing
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Re: and on the recieving end...

'(2) walk into office, boot computer, sign in to any number of systems, open email, identify job emails, print each one via whatever convoluted how to find the printer system, then start from above.'

Why do you have to find the printer? My work computer remembers which printers I've used from one day to the next.

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SkippyBing
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'1. Place document on fax machine, type in extension number, send. ... Get receipt.'

You've got a receipt saying a fax machine has received your fax. Brilliant. It's now sat in a tray with whatever anyone else has sent to that number. With an email delivery/read receipt you have a receipt saying the right person has your message and even if they've read it.

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How an augmented reality tourist guide tried to break my balls

SkippyBing
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Re: Dead trees never failed anyone

' In reality I suspect its an opportunity to enjoy the journey while you are stuck in the flying cattle truck because its safe.'

I'm generally stuck in the flying cattle truck because I'm f***ed if I'm driving to the middle east or the USA.

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NHS smacks down hundreds of staffers for dodgy use of social media, messaging apps

SkippyBing
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Re: Wow

'On a weird note. My local GP surgery has a notice up saying that anyone discussing the practice (or staff) on Facebook or Twitter does so under threat of expulsion from their register.'

Genuine question, is that even legal? What about discussing the practice with my friends while sat in a public space?

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