* Posts by John Robson

1700 posts • joined 19 May 2008

Galaxy S7 Active can't swim, claims site. But it can, vendor retorts

John Robson
Silver badge

Re: Metric converstion

What is this metric of which you speak.

We have El Reg units here.

16
0

Linus Torvalds in sweary rant about punctuation in kernel comments

John Robson
Silver badge

I used to have pretty squares around comments...

But then I worked somewhere with a mandated editor and a metric crapload of macros baked in.

You'd type virtually any keyword and about 15 lines of stuff would appear - the appropriate statement, formatted according to style, a comment box, custom logging options etc etc.

It was actually really nice - because you could just write the code, and the house style just happened around you - and it made it really easy to fill in the logging details and comments.

Never had to worry about aligning the stars though - the macros handled it for me.

3
0

'We shall overcome' net neutrality, sing Euro telcos in the key of 5Gs

John Robson
Silver badge

Services...

Surely Net Neutrality....

Is all about being allowed to prioritise a service - just not a specific provider...

2
0

Loose wrists shake chips: Your wrist-job could be a PIN-snitch

John Robson
Silver badge

Re: Pretty neat

Dyslexia is one reason to set the flag to regularise the buttons.

No branch should require your PIN, your account details and any reasonable form of ID should suffice.

2
0
John Robson
Silver badge

Pretty neat

attack vector.

Who will call for touchscreen grids which change randomly each entry?

Or at least variably labelled buttons

(And yes I know that would be havoc for disability reasons - no reason not to have a flag on the card that regularises the keypad though)

3
1

Debian founder Ian Murdock killed himself – SF medical examiner

John Robson
Silver badge

Re: With friends like that ...

"Not the cops, for sure."

Not the question asked - who *do* you call to a friend who you think is suicidal, and who lives hundreds of miles away?

19
2
John Robson
Silver badge

Re: With friends like that ...

Who would you send round if you didn't live within range?

13
4

TP-Link abandons 'forgotten' router config domains

John Robson
Silver badge

Re: Why?

So that they can put the name resolution in the router perhaps?

If you mean - so that they can use it to connect you to your router then isn't that what the .lan or .local versions were for?

Please tell me those aren't now valid TLDs...

Of course they could always use config.netgear.com anyway - since they own the domain it's not problematic - then just put a page saying that you need to connect to your router's LAN, using it's DHCP and DNS for this link to work...

0
0
John Robson
Silver badge

Why?

Do they not use subdomains?

Why does everything have to have it's own main domain.

config.tplink.com <- there, see...

Easy to type, and not going to go away any time soon.

3
0

5 years, 2,300 data breaches. What'll police do with our Internet Connection Records?

John Robson
Silver badge

They'll put them on the internet

But it's OK - because they'll know who has looked at them with the next round of data...

3
0

By Jove! NASA's Juno prepares to slip into orbit around Jupiter

John Robson
Silver badge

Orbit - not clouds...

At least not for a while.

The final plan is for aero braking and destruction in the arms of Jupiter, but that's a while after orbital insertion.

No mention of the three plucky lego figures?

4
0

We'll smash probe into comet 300 million miles away for kicks, er, sorry, ... for science

John Robson
Silver badge

IIRC it completed it's primary aims - that's why it had a battery after all.

It was the 'bonus' science it couldn't get.

It was a shame, but even a dead loss would have yielded good science. We know a lot more about space faring objects as a result of this mission than we did before.

8
0

NVMe SSDs tormented for months in some kind of sick review game

John Robson
Silver badge

So basically...

These are fast enough to make the bottleneck be somewhere else for most loads.

To suggest that other bottlenecks will appear is hardly groundbreaking. It's what a bottleneck is, that thing you concentrate on until something else takes it's place...

0
0

Bezos' Blue Origin's first live Webcast a no-explosion yawnfest

John Robson
Silver badge

Re: No explosions, no failures, and no rapid unscheduled disassembly?

"Nothing launched into space, either. <Musk fanboy mode off>"

It got launched into space, it just didn't stay there...

1
0
John Robson
Silver badge

" I'd be interested to know if they can still land like that after doing an orbital boost with a full payload."

Of course not - but then again the entire rocket is what SpaceX consider to be a first stage payload (i.e. it's less than the mass of the Falcon second stage and it's payload (the sat).

This is a strictly 'hop above the atmosphere' rocket. Cool, and really useful as a technology demonstrator, and for getting funds by selling trips to the rich... but the serious business takes a whole lot more rocket!

0
0

Space Data dudes say Google lifted Loon balloon tune

John Robson
Silver badge

Re: I just forked your ballon, guy!

They could just buy the company and fire everyone...

0
0

SpaceX winning streak meets explosive end

John Robson
Silver badge

Re: So random...

To be fair this wasn't from orbit - far too slow for that.

It was from an orbital injection flight though, and a geostationary one at that...

6
0

Tinder bans under-18s: Moral panic averted

John Robson
Silver badge

Re: Why is 18 improbably old?

"I know of no-one who has regretted waiting"

A lot of youngsters before the 1960s got married because that was the only way UK society allowed you to have sex. Sex education was almost non-existent - basically "just say no" - and contraception was a taboo subject. So the result was a quick couple of kids, or more, and often a loveless marriage when the lust was satiated. Divorce was also nigh on impossible for most people.

Again - that's a different problem.

The lack of decent sex education is an issue - and frankly I don't envy anyone charged with providing that (and am not particularly looking forward to those discussions at home either) because most of the current generations never had a decent education it makes it much harder for us to talk about - and therefore harder to educate the next generation... ad nauseam...

Don't get me wrong, sex is great - but the general presentation from the media is absurd.

0
1
John Robson
Silver badge

Re: Why is 18 improbably old?

"I know of no-one who has regretted waiting"

I'm another who regretted waiting. It built up sex in my head until it seemed one of the most important things in the world, which then caused problems in later relationships.

That's a genuine response, and deserves a reply.

Were the problems caused by waiting or by the unhealthy presentation of sex in the media* used in the meantime?

*Mainstream or otherwise

Because an unrealistic expectation isn't the sole preserve of the patient - would those problems have happened in earlier relationships? that might have been less able to deal with them?

I don't know the answers to the above, they are just 'as thought' after reading your post, which obviously deserved a reply.

2
1
John Robson
Silver badge

Re: Why is 18 improbably old?

"I know of no-one who has regretted waiting."

Me, I'd have like to have started earlier.

So that's one for you.

Says someone who won't introduce themselves. No I don't know you.

Also that sounds more like 'wasn't offered' rather than 'waited'

7
3
John Robson
Silver badge

Re: Why is 18 improbably old?

@AC - Emotional maturity doesn't magically happen at a certain age or at the same age for everyone. Trying to tie the legal age to something like that is pointless.

So why have a limit at all?

@AC - The legal age is to protect against exploitation not teenage regrets.

Actually it's there for protection of all sorts, not just exploitation. Teenage regrets are nothing compared with unplanned children in an unstable (or non existent) family.

The limit is in place because there are consequences which cannot be reasonably accounted for by most teenagers - and we really ought to be protecting the less able teenagers. Sex isn't something that is required for life to continue, there is no significant detriment to having teenagers wait (I know of no-one who has regretted waiting).

4
8
John Robson
Silver badge

Why is 18 improbably old?

Physical and emotional maturity are not attained at the same time...

I know/knew far more people who had serious regrets about early sexual encounters than people who celebrated them unconditionally. The difference is more pronounced for one gender - but that's where emotional maturity is particularly important for the other...

10
3

Freeze, lastholes: USB-C and Thunderbolt are the ultimate physical ports

John Robson
Silver badge

Re: Smaller network plug than RJ45 please!

Don't know if you ever had an X-Jack (I think) PCMCIA network card.

It had a sort of tray that popped out to accept a vertically oriented rj45 cable.

Bit flimsy though.

RJ45 has to support the weight of a cat5/6 cable, so some mechanical rigidity is required for most places.

1
0
John Robson
Silver badge

I'm sure thunderbolt is great...

but the cost is prohibitive at the moment - the cables alone cost a fortune.

HDMI/DisplayPort/DVI will be around for a while. Ethernet will certainly remain.

Space division multiplexing is far easier when you have wave guides available...

1
0

Android might be on the way to the Raspberry Pi

John Robson
Silver badge

Not sure...

how I feel about this, except that I have one application that I'd love to use a Pi for, but it needs android (or me to do a whole pile of porting)

2
0

US nuke arsenal runs on 1970s IBM 'puter waving 8-inch floppies

John Robson
Silver badge

So we complain

when the develop new stuff,

and we complain when they keep systems running for decades. Whatever the budget overrun back then it's probably still cheaper than they thought it was in terms of years of operation...

3
0

Microsoft bans common passwords that appear in breach lists

John Robson
Silver badge

Re: Only one soluion...

threeandsix?

They are two factors of eighteen after all...

7
0
John Robson
Silver badge
Joke

Re: Microsoft what?

"remember to backspace the last four when I try and log in."

So now it's a 24 key password - more secure, see....

15
0

Former Sun CEO Scott McNealy has data on 1/14th of humanity

John Robson
Silver badge

Re: Dataless/stateless thin client

"the problem there is they can't run anything phones and tablets can't"

Yes they can: anything that needs a real keyboard. You can, of course, tote a separate keyboard around to plug into your phone or tablet but you then have a netbook in two parts.

Except of course that that is actually a convenient form factor for many people.

I have an iPad which I use for almost everything - I also have a couple of bluetooth keyboards - one folding one, and one Apple one in a decent case (which also supports the iPad should I need it)

Most of the time I just use the iPad mini, when travelling I'll take the small keyboard with me. It's about the size of a mobile phone or a wallet, and fits nicely in my case. IF I need it then it's there, but in general I don't need it when I'm out and about.

If I'm going somewhere to work seriously then I'll take the slightly larger keyboard in my case (it still fits) and that gives me a full sized keyboard. If I RDP/Citrix/VNC then all I really want is to be able to turn my phone into a wireless connected trackpad...

No plugging in required, I just open the keyboard and it automagically connects and I can type away. Of course for most things (where I'm on a conference call and screen sharing) then the iPad does it just fine, and I can take notes etc in the time honoured fashion - or, you know, pay attention.

Who am I kidding - I'll fire up the laptop to do some browsing whilst the iPad handles the work of making it look like I'm paying attention...

1
0

British cops to film you with 59k body-worn cameras by end of year

John Robson
Silver badge

Not 59,000 each then?

I was worried for a moment...

6
1

Apple hires crypto-wizard Jon Callas to beef up security

John Robson
Silver badge

Re: There are simple ways to recover from bricked phones

Add in optional authentication to charge (which is a fairly minor inconvenience) and you get to DFU pretty fast as well...

1
0

India launches hypersonic space shuttle precursor

John Robson
Silver badge

Because...

We've cured poverty over here - noone lives on the streets...

6
2

Three UK: Our MMS prices are up. Get around us with WhatsApp or Skype

John Robson
Silver badge

Can I disable MMS?

since I've never actually wanted to send an MMS...

2
0

Smartmobes in spaaace: NASA deploys Android nanosats

John Robson
Silver badge

Re: I know very little about space...

https://spaceflightnow.com/2015/07/30/nasa-tracking-cubesats-is-easy-but-many-stay-in-orbit-too-long/

"CubeSats launched inside pressurized cargo vessels and released outside the International Space Station are of little concern to space debris experts. The space station orbits at an altitude of about 260 miles, or 420 kilometers, where aerodynamic drag from the outer wisps of Earth’s atmosphere often brings CubeSats down within months.

For CubeSats sent to higher altitudes, the orbital lifetime is much longer, and most are not equipped with rocket thrusters to move out of the way of other satellites or lower their orbits at end-of-life.

The altitude cutoff for a 25-year lifetime is between 600 and 700 kilometers (373 to 435 miles), according to NASA’s orbital debris report."

Short version:

Ones chucked out of the ISS window will last months, but get 3 times higher and it could be 25 years before they burn up.

Given that, and the predicted rate of deployment they could be numerous, but they are still not a significant hazard due to our ability to track them

1
0
John Robson
Silver badge

Re: I know very little about space...

They are only in low obit, so they will deorbit of their own accord reasonably quickly. They are nudged away from the ISS, and the difference in drag between the two bodies, along with their newly changed orbital path, will mean they stay apart.

The relatively low altitude will ensure that they fall back to produce a small fireball...

2
0

Art heist 'pranksters' sent down for six months

John Robson
Silver badge

Re: "it seems a little imbalanced to me to bang them up"

"If the sun gets in to your eyes, what should you do? Immediately emergency stop? Maybe that will kill the person behind you who has also just driven in to glare? Back off the throttle and coast in to a space which just before the glare hit you saw to be empty? It's not an easy decision and it will depend on the exact situation."

You should "drive at a speed that will allow you to stop well within the distance you can see to be clear" (HC126). I've never known the sun be particularly unpredictable, that's not to say I've never been dazzled by it, but I generally know when it's coming. The sun doesn't dance around the sky, it doesn't jump out.

Also see HC93: "Slow down, and if necessary stop, if you are dazzled by bright sunlight."

You should be slowing down *into* that situation, and then slowing further. The vehicle behind you should be doing the same. You shouldn't be driving onto any piece of tarmac that you haven't actively confirmed is clear of other road users.

http://beyondthekerb.org.uk/2014/01/31/at-the-going-down-of-the-sun/

The difference is that these all resulted in death an no prosecution - because this is tolerated:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-kent-23970047

The vast majority of people simply ignore the requirement to be able to see where you are going - and it's that simple fact that contributes to many lives being taken each year.

2
0
John Robson
Silver badge

Re: "it seems a little imbalanced to me to bang them up"

"Basically there were lots of easily foreseeable ways in which this could have killed someone. Quite rightly, you are not allowed to be so reckless with the lives and mental health of strangers."

Unless you do with a lethal weapon - in which case it's "just an accident" or "the sun got in my eyes, so I carried on driving a metal box at 30mph into a space I couldn't see".

People who kill others are frequently let off entirely, or given a pittance of a fine. These people filmed some acting, ok they did it to film the reaction of the public, but as far as I can tell the most dangerous thing they did was drive away...

3
2

Raspberry Pi Zero gains a camera connector

John Robson
Silver badge

Damn

Now I need another PiZero....

0
0

A cracked window on the International Space Station? That's not good

John Robson
Silver badge

Holes

There are 7 holes all the way through the cupola walls. Used to close the debris shields...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KSzuiqVjJg4

An eighth wouldn't be good

5
0

Banning computers makes students do better on exams – MIT

John Robson
Silver badge

I suspect my daughter will be using her laptop in alot of classes very soon...

But then she is quite severely dyslexic, so I am going to spend half term starting her touch typing - which apparently does wonders for their language processing by using different bits of the brain.

Finding an appropriately sized keyboard was relatively hard work though - and at least the staff at school are supportive.

In the general case I suspect it depends far more on the attitude towards the machine than on the machine itself. Deny oneself internet access is a simple switch on most devices - it just needs to be applied for appropriate times.

Airplane mode in meetings is always good - you come out and people ask why you haven't replied to some inane email...

1
0

TalkTalk customers decide to StayStay after £3m in free upgrades

John Robson
Silver badge

Re: If Only...

And what the heck does "our learnings" mean, anyway?

I think it means "I failed my SAT, but because I'm a greedy fuckwit with no regard for ethics I'll do OK"

9
0

First successful Hyperloop test module hits 100mph in four seconds

John Robson
Silver badge

Re: So many luddites...

"Because we don't believe in an overhyped technology with a lot of obvious unresolved engineering and logistical issues (that bazza outlined better than I could earlier in this thread) we're Luddites?"

Engineering issues like hot landing a first stage booster stage on a floating barge having delivered the second stage to a geosynchronous transfer orbit?

Or like building an electric car which will do more miles to the charge than many of the petrol cars I've ever driven - and can have their battery swapped in less time than it takes to fill a tank?

Good thing we don't have the same person trying to change too many forms of transport. I mean a consistent approach can't possibly work on a third transport mode can it?

Is sanity doing the same thing that has worked before and expecting it work again?

10
2

Windows 10 build 14342: No more friendly Wi-Fi sharing

John Robson
Silver badge

Good

Automated WiFi key sharing was always really stupid.

96
1

Kepler space telescope spots 1,284 new planets

John Robson
Silver badge

"FTL"

1) Do this

2) Oh, and the instructions you'll receive in about 2 weeks - ignore them, sent them before FTL comms...

1
0
John Robson
Silver badge

Re: I'm calling it !!!!

The gaps aren't where God is...

2
1

Can ad biz’s LEAN avert ADPOCALYPSE?

John Robson
Silver badge

"I think it's pretty funny when advertisers get so far up their own arses that they think people LIKE ads."

VERY occasionally they get it right...

Honda Cog for example...

0
0
John Robson
Silver badge

"Untrue. You might like to believe that the adverts do not influence you, but every day millions of people will buy "Kellogg's" instead of an unbranded box of cornflakes at half the price, and your teenagers will choose "Nike" trainers over similar footwear simply because of the branding. And I wonder whether, like most people, you call your vacuum cleaner a "Hoover"?"

Well, I tend to buy the unbranded cornflakes, and choose trainers that fit my feet.

I do call the vacuum cleaner a hoover, but it isn't, it's a SEBO. That's brand genericide, not a good thing.

My sellotape isn't, my post-it notes aren't 3M...

I'm sure I am influenced by adverts - but the main effect has been to cancel my TV license and install ad blockers.

1
0

Sic transit Mercury Monday

John Robson
Silver badge

Re: Am I missing something?

You could take measurements yourself and use them to estimate the distance to the sun.

The real science is generally being done from orbitting observatories today, but schools can always use these events for an "interesting lesson"...

2
0

Brit polar vessel christened RRS Sir David Attenborough

John Robson
Silver badge

Re: Fair compromise

"Attenborough ... won a scholarship to Clare College, Cambridge in 1945, where he studied geology and zoology and obtained a degree in natural sciences"

Not 'just a TV presenter', he actually knows his stuff as well.

He has done more for environmental protection than most people can ever hope to achieve.

39
3

The 'new' Microsoft? I still wouldn't touch them with a barge pole

John Robson
Silver badge

Re: I stopped using Redmond products in the year 2000.

They make good mice and keyboards...

As for software - yeah - I can do without it.

29
0

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017