* Posts by Marco van Beek

72 posts • joined 15 May 2008

Page:

Pre-checked cookie boxes don't count as valid consent, says adviser to top EU court

Marco van Beek
Boffin

Tracking already done by the time the popup is displayed

Cookies aren’t really the problem these days. It is the plethora of code included from third party sites including, but not limited to, Facebook icons, Google analytics and javascript / css libraries. All of these sites can, and do, track me without any consent being asked of me, let alone agreed. While they may claim to not be able to track me ‘personally’, we all know that eventually the dots form a large enough picture for me to be uniquely identified, and they do not need to know my name for this to fall under the GDPR, just the fact that I am unique.

Ever feel like all your prayers go unheard? The Catholic Church has an app for that

Marco van Beek

Re: Prayers by iPhone...

And how did Terry Pratchett not see this one coming?

Decoding the Chinese Super Micro super spy-chip super-scandal: What do we know – and who is telling the truth?

Marco van Beek

Right at the end of the Businessweek article it says "In the three years since the briefing in McLean, no commercially viable way to detect attacks like the one on Supermicro’s motherboards has emerged—or has looked likely to emerge"

Even based on the little we do know, that is bollocks. Elsewhere in the article they say "the implanted chips were designed to ping anonymous computers on the internet for further instructions, operatives could hack those computers to identify others who’d been affected". So there is a commercially viable way of detecting the chips. Good old-fashioned traffic monitoring.

Sounds more like all those old chain emails that used to go around about viruses that "nobody could detect", encouraging you to forward the email on to as many people as you could to warn them. GCHQ and NSA probably have enough taps on enough lines to do this for us.

Microsoft snubs alert over Exchange hole

Marco van Beek
Holmes

Re: So, in simple terms

And not to forget that all of the Exchange clients I have seen don't check the certificate name either. That list is currently:

• RIM-Q5-SQR100-2/10.3.1.2576

• Mac OS X/10.10.4 (14E46); ExchangeWebServices/5.0 (213); Mail/8.2 (2102)

• Android-SAMSUNG-SM-G900F/101.500

• Mac OS X/10.10.5 (14F27); ExchangeWebServices/5.0 (213);

AddressBookSourceSync/9.0 (1579)

• motorola-XT907/1.0

• MacOutlook/14.5.9.151119 (Intel Mac OS X 10.9.5)

• MacOutlook/0.0.0.160109 (Intel Mac OS X Version 10.11.3 (Build 15D21))

• MacOutlook/0.0.0.160212 (Intel Mac OS X Version 10.11.3 (Build 15D21))

• MacOutlook/f.16.0.160506 (Intel Mac OS X Version 10.11.4 (Build 15E65))

• Microsoft.Outlook.15

• MacOutlook/15.24.0.160709 (Intel Mac OS X Version 10.11.5 (Build 15F34))

• Mac OS X/10.10.3 (14D136); ExchangeWebServices/5.0 (213); Mail/8.2 (2098)

• HTC-EAS-HTCOne

• Mac OS X/10.10.5 (14F27); ExchangeWebServices/5.0 (213); Mail/8.2 (2104)

• HTC-EAS-HTCOnedualsim

• Apple-iPhone7C2/1306.69

• Apple-iPhone6C2/1304.15

Marco van Beek
Holmes

Re: So, in simple terms

"It sounds like MS expect you to control your domain and secure it. To me that doesn't sound massively unreasonable."

Not quite. It relies on HTTPS, not HTTP, so you might have a perfectly secure non-HTTPS website on a shared server (or even behind a firewall with port forwarding) and HTTPS is pointed at a control panel which you do not manage, or have any real sort of access. That's how I found it. We installed fail2ban on our shared web servers and one of our our clients got banned from their own website because someone was setting up a new iPhone and fail2ban was picking up failed login attempts on the control panel.

Marco van Beek

Re: It's not about Microsoft WANTING to fix it ..

" log files anyone ?"

Complete proof of concept and also verified by Microsoft themselves. May have found one version of Outlook (v15 on PC) that doesn't send credentials, but Outlook 15 on Mac does, and I have also seen iPhones, Blackberries and Android devices all display the behaviour.

There are two things that Microsoft should do immediately. 1) Change the order that autodiscover is supposed to use to check DNS first for a SRV record, then for autodiscover.<domain> and then the root domain, and 2) To issue a warning to all Exchange client developers to check the SSL certificate for a valid name and chain, along with the revised protocol.

Euro privacy warriors: You've got until January to fix safe harbor mess – or we unleash hell

Marco van Beek
Windows

It's all arse about tit

We are looking at the whole privacy thing the wrong way round. There are three main reasons for people wanting to know about me: Sales, theft and security. I believe that we should establish a theoretical value to private data, and every time my details are passed on to a third party without my explicit consent, the guilty company has to pay that fee, plus a share of any fines, to me. That in turn, may help me to cover some of the unrecoverable costs when my details reach the netherworld and somebody steals something from me. As to security, we already sold our souls decades ago. We are not going to get a refund now.

Streaming tears of laughter as Jay-Z (Tidal) waves goodbye to $56m

Marco van Beek

Re: Alan Dower Blumlein

Really? You slag off an article about someone who contributed to everything you listen to, with that excuse?

Tell me? Hired and female sound engineers recently?

Reg Oz chaps plot deep desert comms upgrade

Marco van Beek
Boffin

Silly question, maybe?

If you have a satelitte connection, why is it coming back down in Australia at all? Why not use a service with a downlink in a country with a decent connection to the rest of the world, as well as A few spare IP4 addresses for local businesses to use for remote access?

Norks' internet goes TITSUP in possible DDoS attack

Marco van Beek
Coat

Maybe it is the other way around?

In a sort of "storm in channel, Europe cut off" kinda way. Maybe, just maybe, they are denying us access to their world famous cookery site.

WTF is Net Neutrality, anyway? And how can we make everything better?

Marco van Beek
Flame

We need an alternative charging paradigm

I have long thought that the only fair way to charge for the Internet is for everybody to pay for the data they send. If I visit a web site I have not idea how many graphics are on that page until it has loaded, so if the website has to pay for the sending of the data, they have the option of put less images on their pages, and so on. If my server gets hacked and user for a ddos attack, I pay for my servers part in it, so I might be a bit more inclined to protect it better. Since legitimate streaming companies like Netflix are charging for access to their content, they have the revenue to pay for the data transfer.

On phone systems we are used to the idea that the initiator pays for the call, because it is the initiator's decision to dial the number, but on the Internet, I don't know what I am getting until I ask for it, and the other end can simply ignore or decline my request very easily, so if has to work the other way around.

I can't think of any other way that is both fair in monetary terms and in net neutrality terms.

CERN team uses GPUs to discover if antimatter falls up, not down

Marco van Beek
Happy

Woooo flying cars at last!

Or not. It did occur to me that if I had a pair of anti-gravity boots made of antimatter, and assuming my socks stop my feet from disappearimg in a puff of smoke, not only would they have to have a greater mass than my body does to work, I would also wind up upside down. Hmmm. Back to the drawing board.

Microsoft: Let's be clear, WE won't read your email – but the cops will

Marco van Beek
Windows

Re: I'm slow to notice things

Only the word is new. Frankly most things called Cloud are all 10 to 20 years old. Those that aren't are 30 to 40 years old.

Yes, why invent something new when you can just rebadge the old stuff with a shiny new name.

Not sure if you're STILL running Windows XP? AmIRunningXP.com to the rescue!

Marco van Beek
Windows

Re: Sigh

And there was me thinking that Windows 8 had been coded by web designers....

How Britain could have invented the iPhone: And how the Quangocracy cocked it up

Marco van Beek
Thumb Up

Re: funding for Startups

Yes I have, and I would agree. Those with spare money to invest have no imagination and no vision. If I had a pound for every time a VC wanted yet another variation on a business plan I wouldn't need their stupid money. They have no concept of the value of someone else's time.

Marco van Beek
Black Helicopters

Why did he wait so long?

<Copyright Notice>Anyone from the British Government reading this is, if you read past this point you will have agreed to pay me the sum of £10M sterling for each reading. (I will even pay tax on it, or at least I will once I have paid for my coffee beans from Switzerland...)</Copyright Notice>

What I don't get is why did he wait so long for any sort of response? It doesn't seem like he was tied into them until the contract was sorted, which took the best part of a year. I would have been long gone by then, taking my work with me, and keeping all the IP myself.

There is a lovely bit in Richard Noble's book about Thrust 2 and Thrust SSC, where he approached the DTI and asked if they would be interested in sponsoring the project. Flying the flag and all that. They asked him how many he thought they would build in their first year of production... It's not the lawyers who should be first against the wall...

OK, so we paid a bill late, but did BT have to do this?

Marco van Beek
Pirate

Bastard Tossers

I have a couple of clients who have had their http access cut off for non payment when they didn't actually owe any money. Email, ssh, etc was fine. Problem was that if you do not use BT's DNS (or maybe their router, not sure) you don't get the notice so it just seems to be a very weird broadband problem. Wasted hours on that one the first time it happened.

And yes, Openreach will always bill, and the ISP will always make you go through hoops to avoid sending an engineer out, even when you are happy to pay because some arse in the workshop has cut a cable somewhere...

US intelligence: Snowden's latest leaks 'road map' for adversaries

Marco van Beek
Windows

Re: Americans safe from... What?

I am sure there must be a equation that links the amount of money spent today on anti-terrorist operations and the increase in terrorism / freedom fighting in the future. After all, the OSS giving the North Vietnamese a few guns during the Second World War worked out really well for the US. Admittly the main problem there was supporting an oppressive and corrupt regime a few years later. Now that I think about it, that didn't work so well in Iran in the 70's. Or Iraq in the 80's.

There seems to be a tendency by inteligence agencies to believe that my enemies' enemy is my friend, when they rarely are. I suspect they cal it something fancy like Real Politik, but all they are doing is storing up problems for the future, which, let's face it, is good job security.

I often wonder if we would be better off as a society to take the money we invest in cameras and tapping equipment and surveillance satellites and used the money to pay 25% of the population to spy on the other 75%, like East Germany use to. We would have 100% employment, and we might actually have real criminals being caught in the act rather than the current trend of more and more of us being criminalised for minor offences like parking and box junctions as we are the easier target for a bit of extra revenue.

Given a real choice, I would rather not be spied on at all, but since that doesn't seem to be a choice any more, so the option of a few million nosy neighbours might actually be an acceptable alternative.

Looking more and more like not only was George Orwell right, but he wasn't that far off with the date either.

Nice of El Reg to have an icon for a typical surveillance operative...

Marco van Beek
Coat

Re: Any doubts?

"if you keep making the same mistake over and over and over". It's only madness if you expect a different outcome!

Microsoft warns of post-April zero day hack bonanza on Windows XP

Marco van Beek
Flame

Re: It was fun while it lasted

Right with you on this. Microsoft's blunder with Vista meant that we no longer blindly believed that newer was better. And with Windows 8 they have done it again. I have clients still running DOS applications because the amount of time and effort they invested in data entry cannot be replicated due to cost.

Personally I believe that it is well past time to have a CE mark for software like we do for hardware. All software would have to comply fully with all declared standards or the vendor\manufacturer would be required to fix the problem at their own cost, just like if the brakes don't work on your car. Software is so central to the survival of businesses that it is about time they got better protection than just "Caveat Emptor".

OWN GOAL! 100s of websites blocked after UK Premier League drops ball

Marco van Beek
Facepalm

Redirection site?

Am I the only person here wondering why anyone would use a redirection service? Have they never heard of rewrite rules? Or ServerAlias?

Beam me up? Not in the life of this universe

Marco van Beek

Re: obHHG2TG ref

"It's unpleasantly like being drunk" "what's unpleasant about being drunk?" "Ask a glass of water". Damn, the man was good.

Sysadmins: Keep YOUR data away from NSA spooks

Marco van Beek
Linux

Is it just me?

Or are the Emperor's clothes starting to look a bit see-through?

Yes, the Cloud is great for some things but it is not the answer to every single IT question. This is just another question that should have been asked first by every single business, rather than believing the hype. If you really, absolutely have to use a cloud service run by a third party, and data sovereignty is an issue, use servers based in Switzerland. At least for the moment they require a legal paper trail that cannot be gagged.

Have a look at Peter Houpermans' article on this very site on the subject from a few months ago.

I also have to say that expecting your average IT person to understand complex legal issues that confabulate the best legal minds in the world is expecting a bit much. The average lawyer charges a whole lot more than the average IT person, so I would suggest the next time someone asks if their data is safe in the cloud, tell them to ask their lawyer to read all the EULA's before letting you install any new software or connect them to any new service.

Tux because at least she understands me....

Why I'm sick of the new 'digital divide' between SMEs and the big boys

Marco van Beek
Facepalm

You have to laugh when...

Some virtual server solution salesman gets you on the phone and tries to explain the benefits of virtualising all a client's servers after finding out they only have one!

Paul Allen buys lovingly restored vintage V-2 Nazi ballistic missile

Marco van Beek
Boffin

First V2 to hit London

Landed, if that is this the right term, in Chiswick, near the bottom end of Staveley rd, which runs down the side of the grounds of Chiswick House. There is a small plaque next to an electricity transformer. It mortally wounded one person. Not the best ROI for a weapon of mass destruction.

Drilling into 3D printing: Gimmick, revolution or spooks' nightmare?

Marco van Beek

Re: Part of the process

Yes, already done. I have seen various ones on YouTube. It prints the sand mould layer by layer into a box, so can be far more intricate than a traditional wooden pattern, and you do not need to split the mould to remove it.

From stage to stream: The unseen tech at the BRIT Awards 2013

Marco van Beek
Coat

Nice to see the vidiots haven't caught up with the lampies yet

When I did the BRITS in 1987, the bit of the lighting rig I operated (the vari*lites) were run by a 6 processor control console. When I did the show in 1988 (Adele has nothing to complain about, Rick Astley never even made the stage for his award that year, and even then the Who ran into the News by at least a minute) every single one of our lights had a 68000 processor in them. It was a fully distributed control system capable of controlling 1000 moving head units. These days almost every piece of lighting equipment plugs directly into an Ethernet network, So the fact that the video industry is only 10 years behind is newsworthy?

The coat's for Mick Kluczynski, who went to advance the Big Gig in 2008.

PS A BRIT is an award given out by the British Phonographic Industry Aka BPI. As well as the BRIT Awards, the is also a BRIT Trust and a BRIT School.

Curiosity photographs mysterious metal object on Martian rock

Marco van Beek
Alien

It's life, Jim

But not as we know it... How much would we all freak out if it wasn't there the next time they looked?

Is this possibly the worst broadband in the world?

Marco van Beek
Black Helicopters

Re: Live in the sticks but have fibre running past my door. BT "no plans"

Ever thought of going down the dark fibre route? You just need to find a local ISP small enough to be helpful but big enough to have an open reach account. Unfortunately mine isn't quite there yet.

Marco van Beek
Pint

Test, test and then test some more....

I have a client in Bedfordshire, 5.9km from the exchange (according the the BT engineer's box of tricks), and I managed to get them up to 600kbit/s download and 400kbit/s upload. They had an old kilo stream line (256k/s) and to upgrade it to anything else was going to cost 75k of trench digging for a new fibre. For the same reason they still have an analogue phone system running with 12 analogue trunk lines. Our next step was going to be bonded adsl (up to four lines with the right ISP) but they found a company willing to sort out an 8km wireless link to Bedford, and now have 30Mb/s, at least when it isn't too windy...

Want to borrow my £500 adsl tester and do some real science? Cost you a pint...

Trust the cloud with my PRECIOUS? You gotta be joking

Marco van Beek
Thumb Up

Re: Already had my close call with the cloud

My only complaint about Unison is that it seems to need both ends to be running exactly the same version to run, and I have found that I really don't want my server running the same bleeding edge I am happy to run on my desktop. They could do with a bit of backwards compatibility, unless I am missing a trick somewhere.

Anyway, I have best of both worlds. We run small Linux servers for our clients, on our client's sites, which we back up to own own servers in a co-location farm. Mind you, I don't back up the 1TB (and growing) list of stuff I haven't yet watched on my MythTV box!

European Commission: Cloud will save us from economic doom

Marco van Beek
WTF?

New Jobs?

"2.5 million new jobs". What about the 3+ million old jobs that will get lost at the local level? This stuff doesn't create new jobs. If there wasn't a saving, nobody would do use, and the cheapest way of saving money is to save jobs. If we still used manual double-entry ledgers instead of accounts programs, there would be lots of jobs in accounting. But everything would cost a lot more, but then there would be lots more taxes raised so we wouldn't have to hand over so much, so would we actually notice the higher prices if our pockets still had the same cash in them at the end of the day?

People-powered Olympic shopping mall: A sign of utter tech illiteracy

Marco van Beek
Joke

"As Joules are very small people..."

Am I the only one who had to read this twice? I was starting to imagine lots of little people running around inside conductors carrying individual electrons....

LOHAN's flying truss: One orb or two?

Marco van Beek

Re: OK, probably stupid but.....

Just a thought. If you use three balloons, and assuming they are all the same size and tethered equally, there would probably be a gap between them that might be big enough to allow a vertical launch from a platform underneath.

Swiss space-cleaning bot grabs flying junk, hurls itself into furnace

Marco van Beek
Pint

Cash for scrap?

Can't we just send up a white Transit up there? Blink of an eye and the local scrapyard will be £50 lighter, and space will be a ton cleaner!

Seriously though, given the amount of money it takes to send stuff into space, surely it would be a better plan to re-use everything we can up there. Remember the old days of insurance companies having their own fire brigades? (not literally, but you know what I mean). Maybe someone should put a plan together for a small orbiting scrapyard, paid for by the satellites' insurance companies, that has sufficient manoeuvrability to change orbit and some sort of capture device to reel the debris in. If you could stick a small steerable rocket on the end of a long wire, with a grapple / net / magnet / sticky gum on the end, you could send it out and pull it all back in again. Weight isn't really much of an issue once you are up there, so it could be miles long. All you need is enough strength to get over the inertia, and if the item is only 10Kg, you could do that with a bit of wet string.

Once you have retrieved a bit of scrap, a grapple arm puts it in the appropriate bin, and you repeat the process with a new or refuelled rocket. The smaller the thing that needs to move, the less fuel you need, and winches can be electric, powered by solar panels and batteries.

Right. All we need know before we hand it over to Special Projects is a name... How about DEL BOY: Debris Engaging Lasso Based On (scrap)Yard.

After all that thinking I need a pint.

Demand for safety kitemark on software stepped up

Marco van Beek
Thumb Up

CE Marking

I have long believed that what we need is an equivalent to CE Marking for software. It starts very simply. You have to conform fully to whatever standards you claim to comply with. If it does, the whole product gets a recall. We need to address these issues at a higher level that a single user complaining. We need Trading Standards to be able to issue prohibition notices for "faulty" products. When I buy a phone that says it is IMAP compatible, that should mean it fully complies with the standard, not some marketing department's definition. We need to be able to return used software as "not fit for purpose". And as far as cost is concerned, self certification means just that. As long as someone at Mozilla can put their hand on their hearts and say that Thunderbird or Firefox is 100% standards compliant, then that is all it needs. It will mean better testing and better interaction. And even better, I do not have to buy a product any more to complain about it.

It is the grown up thing to do, and given how reliant we are on software these days, I want some accountability. It could be implemented tomorrow if the EU actually did something useful.

Japanese boffins crack arse-based ID recognizer

Marco van Beek
Windows

What about a webcam version...

Surely facial-recognition software could be modified to use your webcam more cheaply than buying a chair with 360 sensors?

And I can't think of a better way to start the day than mooning your PC... (and yours, and yours, and yours...)

And why is there no bum icon? Oh, there is.

Britain's Harrier jump-jets reprieved to fly and fight again

Marco van Beek
WTF?

The MOD never wanted them anyway

Didn't Hawker Siddeley fund the prototypes themselves, and then get some extra funding from the US, long before the MOD even considered them?

Can't we just cut the MOD, and save the armed forces instead?

Colossal dead black neo-sphere approaching Earth

Marco van Beek
Alien

It's quiet. Too quiet...

Maybe the image isn't low resolution, it just that all the faces have been pixelated out.... I knew there was a good reason for having a trenching tool in the back of my car.

Google lands patent for, um, estimating shipment time

Marco van Beek
Facepalm

...the bit they are really patenting

Is that only they will be able to set up a third party service. So presumably the idea is to add a function to Google Apps / Dashboard / browser that tracks all my packages. Which, of course will require me to tell them what I am shipping from where. At which point I will get diverted to an entirely different website that sells tries to sell me the same bit of kit, or more likely, something entirely different.

Apple sued over Mac OS X 'quick boot'

Marco van Beek
Pint

Prior Art

I see a potential revenue stream for the National Museum of Computing. Tons of prior art in there! All they need to do is to get Apple to pay for the rebuilding of whatever bit of decades old technology would prove prior art, and make a video of the relevant feature being used, and case closed. Apple would spend it's money on a worthy cause, instead of lawyers, the Museum would get a shiny new exhibit and OSS would be bankrupt.

By the way, shouldn't the CIA sue OSS for trademark infringement?

Insider says doom looms at RIM

Marco van Beek
Facepalm

Left field suggestion

How about building mobile phones? Not seen one of those in years.

These days they all seem to want to be better that the computer that ran the Apollo command and lunar modules. Only problem is, those computers were built almost 50 years ago, and probably still work perfectly...

Metro Bank in schoolboy email error snafu

Marco van Beek
Holmes

Why is a user sending what should be an automated email anyway

If all the email said was "your statement is ready", why was it being sent out by a human in the first place. Surely that should be done by a cron script, one email to each customer, one at a time?

Sounds to me like they do not have a proper grasp of their server back-end. Imagine how much admin time this must take to do by hand.

MIRACULOUS new AIRSHIP set to fly by 2013

Marco van Beek
Boffin

Adding Air...

Airship Industries had a method whereby they added outside air into a sealed sock inside the main envelope. This is a net gain in weight because it is adding something that wasn't there before. I suppose that recovering water from the exhaust is adding external weight, but it doesn't half seem like a long way to go about it, for something that can be done with a small pump.

Parliament's expenses body spent £2.2m on IT

Marco van Beek
FAIL

Cost per capita, anyone?

£2.2M on IT to manage the expenses of 650 MP's? Works out at around £3500 per MP. That's 10 cheap desktops, or a halfway decent workgroup server each. I wonder how many employees the IPSA have and what the spend per capita is?

And then they wonder why they have a budget deficit? Somehow I cannot help but think it would have been cheaper to let the expenses scam continue.

Wouldn't it be nice if we could pay our taxes into an escrow account, rather than the usual bottomless pit?

Boffins devise 'cyberweapon' to take down internet

Marco van Beek

Trust no one

Hasn't that been the basic fundamental of network security since IP Spoofing? Most of the time we don't even trust our own networks. In any other situation if you said it was okay for a device that you have no control over, that is external to your network, that could make fundamental changes to your system the rest of us would laugh and point and await the fun.

Red Hat exec proposes end to IT suckage

Marco van Beek
Flame

But is he part of the problem or part of the solution?

I am fed up with the likes of Nokia preaching to us that we only use 40% of our smartphones' abilities when only 40% actually works properly. Most sold software sucks because they need an ongoing revenue stream from upgrades. In order to persuade us to upgrade we get stick and carrot. "Shiny new features" and "End Of Life" messages assaulting us daily.

That does lead us to the question that if each new version is so much better than the last, just how bad was the first version and should they have been allowed to sell it in the first place?

There are effectively no consumer standards for software. If I buy some hardware, it has to comply with the low Voltage Directive, the EMC directive, and so on. However, I can buy a Nokia phone that claims IMAP4 compatibility, and find that it only supports half the commands in the standard. At best I can get my money back, but I cannot enforce full SMTP or IMAP or HTML4 compatibility. Doesn't matter whether this is cloud-based or hand-held. We all rely on software, and we are consistently sold short. Over-promised and under-delivered.

As to the cloud being the solution to everything, it isn't. Symmetric broadband speeds are only just getting to 10Mb for under 5 figures a year, yet LAN speeds are already looking at 10Gb/s, having left 10Mb/s behind a decade ago. Try telling a CAD or graphics company that the cloud is the answer to all their problems. I think not.

Spanish firm raided in logic-bomb backdoor probe

Marco van Beek

Not license expired...

Hi. I read the story in Spanish and the trick was done to all users of the software, but those who had paid for support had the "problem" fixed for free. Those who did have support had to pay, and were offered a new support contract.

Vulcan kept airborne by £400k refuel

Marco van Beek
Thumb Up

Barrel Roll

If anyone needs reminding of why the Vulcan is special, check these out on YouTube:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X4r0Kk-x

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T-BXhmGsRVA

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=17GfXQ2wCFU&NR=1

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R3iMw7Q7H68&feature=related

And if you want an idea of where the Avro engineers might have got the idea for a bomber that was as maneuverable as a fighter....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZLnOlaFGac

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kRGwfNrnWsc&NR=1

Desktops are seen as unimportant until...

Marco van Beek
Pirate

Damned if you do, damned if you don't...

The main problem I usually face is that the better a job I do, the less I appear to be of value. In most cases I am lucky enough to have inherited a sloppy job, and slowly spend the next year making sure it all works, and putting contingency plans in place, even if they are not explicitly asked for.

I always say that what the client wants and what the client needs are two totally different things, and often are mutually exclusive. My favourite was being asked to install Blackberry Enterprise software on a server (at a client's with a single server) back in the days it needed to run on a separate server. It doesn't matter how many times you refer them to the documentation, it is still your fault.

As far as desktops are concerned, it simply comes down to productivity. The more time their staff waste waiting for their desktop to respond, the less time they spend doing real work. With the better clients I eventually get to a rolling replacement program, swapping desktops every three or four years, but even then it is a fight to persuade them not to always give the newest computers to the bosses. Some poor buggers never get a brand new desktop.

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