* Posts by Blitheringeejit

339 posts • joined 25 Apr 2008

Page:

Openreach offers duct-off providers 'OSA Filter' instead of Dark Fibre Access

Blitheringeejit
Holmes

>>Wallington said so far CPs have been "very positive" about the plans

Well he would say that wouldn't he. It would be interesting (and I would have thought basic journalistic practice on your part, El Reg) to get an actual statement from a few CPs before going to press with this. Somewhat disappointing to see you just spouting whatever self-serving speculation you hear emanating from the mouth of an Openreach-droid.

Somehow I don't think that CPs will agree that buying bandwidth on existing OR fibre gives them as much market freedom and investment opportunity as being able to put their own kit in the ducts.

5
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Rejecting Sonos' private data slurp basically bricks bloke's boombox

Blitheringeejit
Megaphone

Re: Crap like this...

My volume knob goes up to 11, and with my modest 125dB speakers, it all works beautifully as a multi-room system. Even the neighbours get the benefit!

Icon, obviously -----------------------------------------------------------------------------^

21
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You've been baffled by its smart thermostat. Now strap in for Nest's IoT doorbell, alarm gear

Blitheringeejit
Facepalm

Fundamental design flaw

The thing about doors and people is, the people who stand outside the doors tend to be of varying height. So when you combine camera and push-button, you end up seeing a tall visitor's midriff instead of their face - or you put the bell so high that smaller kids can't reach it at all, or if they can, they can't get their face high enough for you to see anything more than a disembodied waving hand.

And given the price. it would probably be cheaper to employ a full-time butler to answer the bloody door in the first place.

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WordPress has adverse reaction to Facebook's React.js licence

Blitheringeejit
Mushroom

Re: re zero respect for WordPress as a product

"...ENABLED scores of dodgy website salesmen to rip off unsuspecting business owners who just wanted a simple website and cms?"

FTFY

3
2

Farewell Cassini! NASA's Saturnian spacecraft waves goodbye for its Grand Finale

Blitheringeejit
WTF?

"Jupiter’s moon Titan"

Errr - wot? Subs been at the liquid lunch again?

6
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It's official: Users navigate flat UI designs 22 per cent slower

Blitheringeejit
Facepalm

@artem

I know what you mean about Windows 8 - but I think it was more of a convergence thing than a real design decision about an effective UI for computer users. IMHO the rot set in when someone decided that what works best on a low-res 4-inch phone screen would also be the right UI styling for desktops, laptops, TVs, and every other human-computer interface under the sun. Because, you know, smartphones are really popular, and at the time Microsoft desperately wanted to be Apple (as opposed to now, when they desperately want to be Google). So it made perfect sense to remove all the visual cues which enabled people to use a point-and-click interface intuitively.

On the same basis, I look forward to bicycles with steering wheels, trains with off-road capabilities, and tinned horse-food.

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Blitheringeejit
Holmes

Re: Putting a tinfoil hat on my tinfoil hat ...

And never attribute to stupidity that which is adequately explained by a revenue motive. Especially when it's something Microsoft are doing.

11
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China: Cute Hyperloop Elon, now watch how it's really done

Blitheringeejit
Boffin

@AC

Electric buses are lovely, but not really environmentally sound when most of their power is generated initially by dirty coal, which I understand is currently the case in China.

When are they going to start trotting out the thorium / liquid salt reactors they were supposed to be working on?

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Police deny Notting Hill Carnival face recog tech led to wrongful arrest

Blitheringeejit
FAIL

Call Abby Sciuto!

Facial recognition never makes mistakes on NCIS. They must be using it wrong.

14
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Sonos will deny updates to those who snub rewritten privacy terms

Blitheringeejit
Boffin

"Couldn't see the point of getting a Sonos. "

In two words, sound quality. Not that I bought into the whole enchilada, but I heard a PLAY1 at a mate's house and was most impressed by the noise it made, so I bought one. It does indeed make a nice noise, and is the best portable speaker I've tried (not that I've tried spending over £250).

But it doesn't get iPlayer, it doesn't bluetooth, and it doesn't have a line in - so the use-case was getting flaky even before this, which is the final straw. So after it's gathered dust for a while, I'll have it to bits, find the bit where the audio goes into the power/speaker stage, and hotwire a bluetooth audio receiver in there instead.

The point being that the article is right about ownership - I own the hardware so I can fuck with it if I want, and I don't own the app or the data it wants to slurp, so I choose not to use it.

13
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IT reseller Misco UK shutters warehouse and distie centre

Blitheringeejit
FAIL

Dropping the shipping pilot

My experience with Misco was that they were good when they operated a decent warehouse system, and the "in stock" indicator on their website had some meaning. But over the last five years or so, an increasing amount of their "in stock" stuff was actually drop-shipped by their supplier, who turned out not to really have it in stock at all. So I'd order stuff which was "in stock", then find that it didn't arrive, chase it with Misco, and be told that their supplier had failed to ship it, and that this was not Misco's fault.

Broken model, I'm gone - but not to bloody Amazon, who only manage to be cheaper by evading their corporation tax liabilities.

3
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UK taxmen slammed for tech glitches rampant on child benefits website

Blitheringeejit
WTF?

Err...

I'm a freelancer - what's "retire"?

3
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Universal Service Oh... forget the Obligation. BT offers to stump up £600m for 10Mbps

Blitheringeejit
FAIL

Same Old...

The government said it will work with BT over the coming months to develop the proposal bend over accommodatingly and let BT dictate the technical detail in which the devil will live - which , if it is accepted, when the gummint accepts it (however awful it is), will be legally binding.

FTFY

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Profits plunge 40% as BT coughs up £225m to avoid court battle

Blitheringeejit
Flame

@peterm3

Since you admit to being a shareholder, I therefore hold you and those like you responsible for the madness and havoc which BT has wreaked on our nation's communications infrastructure for a generation.

If you're disappointed with BT, stop encouraging their bad behaviour by taking their dividends, and sell your bloody shares.

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Pre-order your early-bird pre-sale product today! (Oh did we mention the shipping date has slipped AGAIN?)

Blitheringeejit
Thumb Up

Excellent HHGTG reference

Brings back nostalgia-inducing memories of recording it (on VHS tape), and playing it back frame by grainy frame to read all the detail (and thus the gags) in the animated bits.

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We're into lap 21 and Node.js features have again overtaken those attempting to teach it

Blitheringeejit
Trollface

If you only have a hammer, every job looks like a nail

>>Go learn Java.

Why would I do that? It takes hundreds of lines of code and a massively complicated build/link environment just to say "Hello World", it is pointlessly obsessed with everything being an object even for tasks when a procedural approach would be WAAY more efficient, and I can't run Java programs on my budget web hosting service.

If you want to work in Big Corporate Data Land, sure, go learn Java. That's not the market that Node and other web-type technologies are trying to address - as is well explained in the article. If Java really was the ideal solution for all programming jobs, it would have replaced everything else by now - gawd knows it's had long enough. The fact that alternatives proliferate indicates the flaw in your argument.

I don't use Node, precisely because of the bootstrap-learning issues which the article highlights. But because of the kind of work I do, I'm far more likely to use Node at some point in the future than Java.

<dons tin hat in anticipation of many downvotes>

8
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UK ministers' Broadband '2.0' report confuses superfast with 10Mbps

Blitheringeejit
Boffin

Re: Super Fast Broadband != "fibre"

But they *are* alllowed to called it fibre if the cabinet is fibred - even if the cabinet is so far from the premises that the fibre element brings no benefit. I have certainly been told by Openreach engineers that ADSL2+ sync with an exchange 4Km away can be faster than VDSL sync with a cabinet 1.5Km away, so you might get a faster connection by sticking with your ADSL2+ account than "upgrading" to fibre.

Chloe Cresswell and rh587 above are exactly right - the devil is in the geographical detail. And most of this (eg locations of the cabinet serving your line, copper cable lengths etc) is not made public by OR.

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Blitheringeejit
Boffin

Re: Super Fast Broadband != "fibre"

Agreed - but the annoyance for many is that Openreach seem unwilling to add new cabinets in locations which are currently at the end of long copper runs, even though they are not geographically isolated. FTTC is fine if your final copper hop is a foot, or indeed a kilometre or so - the places which really suffer are those with copper runs of 3Km+ to their "local" cabinet or exchange, for reasons dating back more than half a century. And many of these are not isolcated rural areas - I work on one site which gets a flaky 2Mb down sync while being less than 1Km from a city boundary, and I've read many similar reports from folks located inside the M25.

OfCom could usefully force Openreach to install a new, fibred-up cabinet at any location which is, say, >2Km from an existing cabinet/exchange, and which could replace copper connections to >25 properties within 1Km of the location. (Not sure of exact numbers, but you get the general idea.) That would improve life for a great many people, without costing anywhere near as much as FTTP.

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Repairable-by-design Fairphone runs out of spare parts

Blitheringeejit
Holmes

Re: Why on earth didn't they just use standard components?

Multiple manufacturers != long manufacturing life. Batteries are particularly awkward for the Fairphone project, I suspect - they deteriorate progressively rather than just working or failing, so they will always need replacing eventually - but no-one (other than Fairphone themselves) have any commercial incentive to keep making them in the same form factor indefinitely.

Fairphone have had a serious crack at addressing the obsolescence problem inherent in devices like phones, and I applaud them for it - I have a Fairphone2 which works very nicely. But there are limitations on how much it's possible to achieve, partly because ethical trading practices are always undermined by the nature of raw capitalism, and partly because not everyone is lucky enough to be able to pay a premium for a sustainable and/or ethically-sourced product.

So we pick and choose our allegiances and priorities to suit our whim - I buy my organic veg from Waitrose and my electrickery from Ecotricity, but my beer comes from Lidl. :)

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Q. What's today's top language? A. Python... no, wait, Java... no, C

Blitheringeejit
Holmes

@Jim 59

"if you are choosing a language in a commercial situation, a ready supply of people who know it will aid success of the project and reduce its future support costs. Hence, choosing on popularity makes sense."

Isn't that exactly why so many organisations continue to use Windows, in spite of all the grief they incur by doing so?

And does it really, honestly, cost less in the long run?

5
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User filed fake trouble tickets to take helpful sysadmin to lunches

Blitheringeejit
Coat

A university education is wasted...

I recall the time I spent wasted while getting a degree with considerable affection.

<ahem>

5
0

Ten new tech terms I learnt this summer: Do you know them all?

Blitheringeejit
Headmaster

@Steve the Cynic

Since it appears to be National Pedantry day...

"There ARE also the people..."

FTFY, albeit with my own teeth afire.

10
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UK.gov snaps on rubber gloves, prepares for mandatory porn checks

Blitheringeejit
Facepalm

"The government is also expected to ... appoint a regulator to police the sex websites"..?

I wonder what kind of qualifications they'll be looking for ...

2
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Bonkers call to boycott Raspberry Pi Foundation over 'gay agenda'

Blitheringeejit
Boffin

@Bob and John

That's OK as long as they are connected via a switch, which should be called Janet for obvious academic reasons. She's super.

But if you connect Bob and John directly using a crossover cable, you will toast in firey torment for eternity.

10
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Blitheringeejit
Joke

@Wolftone - the whole bible?

Not so sure that the ultimate take-home message from the *bible* is "don't be a dick". The New Testament, maybe - but isn't the ultimate take-home message from the Old Testament something to do with not eating shellfish?

Or perhaps I'm getting confused - I've been having some very odd thoughts since I dropped those two tablets on my way down the mountain...

7
2

Oh my Word... Microsoft Office 365 unlatched after morning lockout

Blitheringeejit
Holmes

Re: Please explain to me ...

"Please explain to me ... how running an important application ''out in the cloud'' is better than running on your own machines ?"

It's better because it makes a larger profit margin for Microsoft than a one-off charge for a software licence you can use for as long as you can keep it running. And for Google and Amazon, it's better because they can sell you something which they couldn't sell you before.

If you're asking what the benefit is *to you*, you're asking the wrong question. People don't develop software or web services your benefit.

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Ubuntu 'weaponised' to cure NHS of its addiction to Microsoft Windows

Blitheringeejit
Holmes

Re: Pipe Dream

"The Government - and I won't name names, but both the Conservatives and Labour are infested with these parasites - don't want there to be an NHS in the way that it's free for the people of the UK to use."

You're right to castigate Labour for their role in this during the Blair/Brown/Mandleson years - they drank the free-market kool-aid, and became indistinguishable from the Tories. And many of those people are still powerful in the Parliamentary party.

But I sense that Corbyn's Labour party is a different animal, with a genuine commitment to social welfare and the NHS.

Though of course commitment in itself isn't enough - they have to take the huge step of finally breaking to the voters the bad news that Blair always concealed: that we can only have better public services and safer housing if we actually pay more tax. Not just have Them pay more tax, but We pay more too. And they have to get Us to vote for it - a tall order.

But then again, an increase in the Labour vote under Corbyn's leadership was a tall order, until a couple of weeks ago...

7
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UK.gov leaves data dashboard users' details on publicly accessible site

Blitheringeejit
WTF?

Anyone know which gov sites are affected?

Scuse ignorance but I'm endlessly confused by the plethora of different logins, current and historical, that I have for various HMG services. Is the "Dashboard" to which this refers connected in any way with the HMRC logins for company services, or the Land Registry site, or indeed the DVLA site? Or is it a separate, new thing that I haven't yet been forced to subscribe to?

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Ex-NASA bod on Gwyneth Paltrow site's 'healing' stickers: 'Wow. What a load of BS'

Blitheringeejit
Pint

You missed out the French...

...who brew a rather lovely single malt in Brittany. Apparently after the Roman retreat, a largely empty Brittany was repopulated by celts from Wales, who brought not only their language (which evolved into Breton), but also their distilling skills.

Because it's Friday, and there's no single malt icon ---------------^

3
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BOFH: Putting the commitment into committee

Blitheringeejit
Mushroom

Exactly

"...they want a "good" design and "intuitive" navigation - yardsticks which become weapons in the hands of idiots."

And meaningless bollocks in the hands of sales wonks who commission website designers. Which is exactly why I moved carefully away from "web design", and now concentrate on finding customers who want to have complex data delivered in plain-looking pages from a well-built backend database, with no unnecessary bells, whistles, or JQuery - and especially no JS predictive typing which spends so long searching for predictions that it stops users from actually typing what they want to type.

Company motto: "We'll make it work, but don't ask us what colour it should be."

48
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Small carriers aren't showing up to IPv6 standards chats, consultant warns

Blitheringeejit
Stop

Re: There are fundamental technical reasons for it

If you have your own mailserver, presumably you also have the smarts to program up a router with port-forwarding to make it work..?

And meanwhile, do you really need your fridge to have direct public address access to my fridge? That's a surefire recipe for a Terminator scenario...

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3
Blitheringeejit
Thumb Up

@V'sRH: +lots, and furthermore...

The IP4 address scarcity would be much eased if large North American address space users (DoD, colleges, gov etc, not to mention large corporations) would desist from giving every machine on their LAN a public IP address. This could free up massive amounts of address space for the more recent arrivals to the table.

And NAT doesn't just solve the address scarcity problem, it also protects (to some degree) against direct port hacking, and is generally a Good Thing - especially given your well-made point 3.

Disclaimer - I understand v4, but try as I might for a decade or so, I've been unable to get my head around the basic mechanisms of v6. I don't claim to be the sharpest tool in the box, but it does feel like an over-complicated solution to problems which don't need to exist in the first place. ICANN just needs to get tough with IP4-hoggers.

2
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Raspberry Pi sours thanks to mining malware

Blitheringeejit
Holmes

Re: I just hooked it to the DMZ, and it's fine...

>>How many people do this? Really? Buy something, and then just throw it open to world+dog, and think it's all just fine and dandy.

Apparently there's this new-fangled teckernology called "The Internet of Things" which is all the rage...?

5
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NSA leaker bust gets weirder: Senator claims hacking is wider than leak revealed

Blitheringeejit
Coat

Re: OTT

It's a rare outbreak of reverse nominative determinism - Chelsea Manning transitioned to woman, and now Reality Winner has lost bigtime.

Perhaps the next one will be Putin's electioneering shenanigans getting fully rumbled, leaving him feeling extremely put out.

Of course something similar might at some point happen to Trump - but I really don't want to go there.

<Ahem>

7
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Customer satisfaction is our highest priority… OK, maybe second-highest… or third...

Blitheringeejit
Flame

You lost my sympathy right here:

"I am trying to pay for my extra-hot fair trade soya decaf caramel mint chocka mocha focka carbonated Bulgarian snow forest chai espresso latte plus vegan sprinkles and a twist of lemming with my handset".

Why the fucketty fuck would you do that when you had cash in your pocket? What about all the poor saps waiting behind you for your app/card/touch transaction to authorise, when you could slap cash on the counter and get the fuck out of the way. Money works, and places which don't like being paid with money won't get paid by me - not petrol stations, not <insert preferred supermarket chain name here /> and most definitely of all, not pubs. (Being of a sensible disposition, I never buy coffee from coffee shops in the first place, because it's five times the price of making it at home and isn't as nice.)

Phew, glad to get that off my chest. And of course I agree with the main thrust of the piece - being ancient, my favourite stupid error message is still that old chestnut:

"Keyboard missing - press F1 to resume".

They don't write 'em like that any more. No, wait ...

13
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Sources: Misco sold to Hilco Capital, care home for the distressed

Blitheringeejit
Trollface

Re: Ok fine, but don't get rid of...

Surely your markup when reselling from Amazon / C2K is the UK rate of Corporation Tax?

0
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Blitheringeejit
Headmaster

D'Oh

So Systemax in the US sell "office stationary"..? Haven't they realised eveything has to be mobile these days?

C'mon El Reg, I know it's Monday morning but you're supposed to be journalists - you should be able to spell simple words correctly even with a crashing hangover.

2
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BT hit with £42m fine for Ethernet compensation delays to competitors

Blitheringeejit
Holmes

Re: Which reminds me...

Have you not heard the phrase "policy-based evidence-making"..?

1
0

Ofcom wants automatic compensation for the people when ISPs fail

Blitheringeejit
Facepalm

OfCOM OfTarget again

If this applies to fixed broadband and landline telephone services only, then it's not about ISPs - it's about Openreach. ISPs (including BT Retail) order installations from Openreach, via Openreach's work management system, and Openreach frequently fail to show up at the appointed time/day. You can't hold ISPs responsible or penalise them for Openreach's failures.

It's depressing that policy makers, and especially OfCOM, seem to be endlessly unable to take into account how the infrastructure and workflow actually operates when making stupid STBDS policies.

3
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Today's WWW is built on pillars of sand: Buggy, exploitable JavaScript libs are everywhere

Blitheringeejit
Boffin

Re: choices

"If the plan is to make good web sites then *WRITING YOUR OWN* JavaScript (which does exactly and only what you need it to do) instead of importing some huge and potentially vulnerable 3rd-party Javascript library (just to do a bit of pointless whizzy UI effectery) is the RIGHT solution."

FTFY

9
1
Blitheringeejit
Facepalm

I've tried

As a "conscientious web developer", I've tried this. But you're telling people something they don't understand, and don't want to hear - while the cowboys are saying "There's no need to spend that extra money, it's all fine, and people who say this sort of thing are just trying to fleece you for extra monthly fees." So who are they going to listen to?

Also, the site owner rarely gets punished for poor security, because the payload is most often activated on an end-user's computer. The end-user gets their bank account emptied and/or their files ransomewared, but has no idea which site caused the initial malware infection - so there's no little or no incentive for the site owner to secure the site.

15
0

London Internet Exchange members vote no to constitution tweak

Blitheringeejit
Big Brother

Oo'da thortit, eh?

So BT, O2 and Vodafone were already in cahoots with PRESTON. But not Orange/EE, apparently - at least until it was bought by BT, with nary a peep from the Competition Commission.

Funny that.

8
0

Who do you want to be Who? VOTE for the BBC's next Time Lord

Blitheringeejit
Happy

Just like last time there was a vote on this...

...I despair that Maggie Smith is not included in the shortlist. Or Benjamin Zephaniah.

But if we have to stick with white males, isn't it about time Billy Connolly got a go? He's done every other bloody thing.

3
0

David Hockney creates new Sun masthead. Now for The Reg...

Blitheringeejit
Coat

Re: this area

Good god, you mean El Reg is so minted that it has offices in that London? I always thought it was a shoestring startup based out of a garden shed in Middlesborough. But now that I realise they are so wealthy, I shall cancel my subscription immediately ... no, er.. wait a minute...

8
0

'Completely offended' Sheila calls cops over price-gouging ganja dealer

Blitheringeejit
Childcatcher

@Mr Damage Re: legalise it

"parents who love pizza"

Haven't you heard that there's an epidemic of childhood obesity? The last thing we need is parents with the munchies setting them a bad example!

1
0

We don't want to alarm you, but PostScript makes your printer an attack vector

Blitheringeejit
Boffin

@Pompous Git - Maybe I'm thick too, but ...

...it looks to me from the diagram in the article as though the printer is only connected to the LAN, presumably behind a firewall and NAT. The attack works by a client PC in the LAN hitting an infected website and executing a malicious JS payload locally. That payload exploits the vulnerability in the printer and posts the results back to the attacker.

At least I think that's what the diagram indicates.

14
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Naughty sysadmins use dark magic to fix PCs for clueless users

Blitheringeejit
Megaphone

It's all about "So how does that make you feel?"

I've always found that most computer problems are usually best solved by the vigorous application of a copious amount of swearing.

The shoutier the better ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------->

5
0

Boffins link ALIEN STRUCTURE ON VENUS to Solar System's biggest ever grav wave

Blitheringeejit
Thumb Up

Re: gravity wave

Of course you can...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=luaRtGn2tsI

(You might want to skip to about 7 minutes in.)

0
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Well, that sucks: China's Tencent so sorry after vid emerges of faux blowjob office game

Blitheringeejit
Pint

It's at moments like this...

...that I feel immensely privileged to have enjoyed a lifetime of self-employment. Not one office party in over 30 years. Pint for me!

6
0

Dodgy Dutch developer built backdoors into thousands of sites

Blitheringeejit
Trollface

My arse is indeed smart...

..because I know that it's just as easy to put a backdoor/logger capability into a Wordpress or Joomla site as it is into a custom store-front, if you're the one building the site.

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