* Posts by Dave K

263 posts • joined 25 Apr 2008

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'WHAT THE F*CK IS GOING ON?' Linus Torvalds explodes at Intel spinning Spectre fix as a security feature

Dave K

"I wonder if there's a compromise. Introduce another flag that shows it's not broken"

Isn't that the same as a flag to say it's secure? This is what Linus is wanting - future CPUs to state "I'm fixed" so that the performance-sapping workarounds aren't applied. Intel on the other hand is wanting the security fix to be opt-in, which as Linus rightfully states as insane.

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User had no webcam or mic, complained vid conference didn’t work

Dave K

Re: Your Network is broken!

My favourite one (and a familiar one to many) is the phone call from a user asking if "the system is down". This is of course for a company spread across the globe with probably neck end of a thousand different systems here and there...

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Sueball smacks AMD over processor chip security flaw silence

Dave K

Also, if this wins it will set in motion a dangerous precedent. What about software flaws? These are also typically not made public for several months to allow for patches to be developed. If a particularly nasty one crops up and MS's share price dips a little, will shareholders start trying to sue (if they believe they can win) - even though by the time it's made public patches are available?

Let's be honest, AMD's share price should recover. After all the Spectre flaws affect pretty much all current CPUs, and the patches for these are application level and should not really affect performance. It's a far different story with Intel where the Meltdown fixes can cause substantial performance losses for some workloads (particularly in data centres).

1
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PC lab in remote leper colony had wrong cables, no licences, and not much hope

Dave K

Re: Sounds perfectly normal

Yep, MIPSPro is indeed licensed software. GCC isn't too difficult to install however, check out Nekoware for a nice library of IRIX binaries, GCC 4.7 is amongst them.

0
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Hold on to your aaSes: Yup, Windows 10 'as a service' is incoming

Dave K

Re: Who didn't see this coming?

And yet Microsoft don't realise that many people don't want an endless stream of "improvements" - especially when these involve lengthy installations (during which time the PC is unusable), and a steady stream of issues when these "improvements" break other applications or fail to install properly.

The fact that Windows 7 is still doing so well should kind of hint that a sizable percentage of users don't care about "the latest features" and prefer long term stability over a steady stream of changes. Other vendors recognise this (for example, Ubuntu gives everyone the choice of the regularly updated version, or the more stable LTS version). Unfortunately MS seems to think that only very specific businesses might want a stable and dependable version of Windows, so the LTSB branch is out of reach for most home users.

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It gets worse: Microsoft’s Spectre-fixer wrecks some AMD PCs

Dave K

>>"Others have been able to do so, only to have their machines quickly download and install the problematic patch all over again"

And this milord is exactly why mandatory and forced updates are a BAD thing!

46
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Microsoft patches Windows to cool off Intel's Meltdown – wait, antivirus? Slow your roll

Dave K

Re: Huge Baby Huge

>> "I dont' see anything that looks like a microcode update from Intel to address the root cause."

That's because Meltdown is beyond the scope of a microcode fix.

As a result, the "fix" doesn't actually fix your CPU at all - it re-writes core parts of your OS so that the CPU flaw can no longer expose parts of kernel memory. That's why this fix involves lots of patched Windows files. Think of it more as a workaround than a resolution :)

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Kernel-memory-leaking Intel processor design flaw forces Linux, Windows redesign

Dave K

Re: Hmmm...

The other issue here is what MS does regarding Windows 7. It would not surprise me in the least if they tried a clever/efficient patch for Windows 10 and a simpler (and slower) bodge-job for Windows 7/8. Still, I guess we'll find out soon enough. They'd also better make sure that the changes only apply to Intel machines. I don't want MS to arbitrarily slow down my AMD PC as a result of this - you'll note that AMD submitted a Linux patch to ensure their CPUs weren't caught up in this, will MS do the same?

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Dave K

>>Intel has been the Gold standard in processors.....

>That was a joke, right ??

There have been other black marks too. The 3.8GHz Prescott P4s that throttle under repeated high load. The whole dirty Rambus saga, the 1.13GHz PIII that had to be recalled due to stability issues, the CPU serial number privacy scandal, etc.

Although Intel seemed to have turned a corner since Core 2 Duo came along, they've made loads of previous muck-ups.

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Oh, the weather outside is frightful, but the data centre temp's delightful

Dave K

Should add, I've also lost air-con to a server room at a later job due to the weather. This time I was working at a University and was in charge of a small server room for one of the departments. During winter, I came in one morning to find the room like a sauna and the air-con system pumping out warm air.

The reason was that the external air-con units had been mounted on the ground outside (this was a first-floor room) as it was cheaper than running chiller pipes up to the roof. The building had a sloped roof, and we'd had some snow a few days before. As the snow began to melt, a huge pile slid off the roof and buried the external units which promptly tripped out due to the sudden lack of airflow. And just like that, every air-con unit stopped and up rocketed the temps!

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Dave K

Had an issue with humidifiers many years ago myself. We rocked up at work one day (this was at a local council) to find the server room covered in puddles of water. It was dripping through ceiling tiles, all the vents, everything. Obviously the first thing we did was to immediately shut everything down and kill the power to the room to protect the servers and reduce the risk of electric shock.

After the maintenance guys had taken a look, we found out the problem. Turned out that the previous day, a new humidity control system had been installed for the building's central ventilation system. The job however had only been half done and the control unit for the humidity regulator wasn't set up properly. They'd then left the system pumping out maximum humidity overnight. Unfortunately, the main plant room was adjacent to our server room, and the first place this nicely humid air went was through the ducts/vents above the server room.

Of course, the server room is a cool room due to the air-con, so the moisture in the air immediately condensed and dripped out all over the place. My colleague's LCD screen had over a litre of water in it when we tipped it upside-down.

The solution was to install the proper control unit for the humidity system, and re-direct the vents so that the "central air" system no longer pumped through the vents above the server room. Amazingly we lost no servers due to this. The only casualty was a desktop PC that ended up with blue/green rust on the motherboard. Even the previously mentioned LCD screen worked fine once we took it apart, dried it out thoroughly and then re-assembled it.

22
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Hot chips crashed servers, but were still delicious

Dave K

Re: Power Cables...

>> "A classic is with the last couple of generations of Dell laptops. If the power cable is about 1-2mm from being fully plugged into the machine or dock, the machine will operate on AC power, but no battery charging will occur."

Yep, had the same thing a couple of times at my site. Also had to deal with a couple of cases where other techs had replaced the docking station (with the not-quite-plugged-in power cable), then declared the dock as dead when the replacement one worked with charging.

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Voda customers given green light by Ofcom to ditch contracts

Dave K

Glad to see people can get out of this. O2 introduced a similar change last year (back when roaming applied to Europe). Used to be that you could send texts and make calls for a certain fee per text/call, and activate data for £2 a day if you had O2 travel. Then they sneakily changed it so that everything was included. Result? Going away on holiday for a fortnight and sending the odd text suddenly meant I racked up an additional bill of £26.

At least with O2 I could turn off the "O2 travel" option and go back to 4p texts again, and after querying my bill, they refunded the £26 without too much argument as a "goodwill gesture". Guess I wasn't the first person to complain!

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Please, please, c'mon, just... please, pretty please, just, like, please use our AI – Microsoft

Dave K

Wrong priorities...

I would gladly trade "improved AI" and other such bollocks if MS could just consider finishing the core of Windows 10 and providing some better controls to users.

- Finish the Settings panel so there isn't a mis-mash of some settings in Control Panel and some in Settings. It's daft, it's messy, and it gives Windows 10 a really "unfinished" feel.

- Provide a proper "Off" switch for the telemetry. I don't even care if it's on by default, but stop the need for 3rd party apps and other such hacks for this.

- Provide proper controls for Windows Updates, and prevent reboots unless *explicitly* sanctioned by the end user.

I use Windows 7 or Ubuntu on my PCs, but do have Windows 10 on a test laptop. It's frankly baffling to me how MS keep on pissing around with low priority bumpf like this instead of fixing the key flaws with Windows 10 that put so many people off using it. Yes, I know MS don't want to do this, but the result isn't people just accepting it, it's people using different OSs or lots of 3rd party hacks.

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BOFH: The trouble with, er, windows installs

Dave K

Looks like falling out of a window is the new Halon. Always knew the BOFH would find an alternative!

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Phone fatigue takes hold: SIM-onlys now top UK market

Dave K

My reasons are as follows:

* SD cards are a *LOT* cheaper than additional built in memory.

* SD cards can be removed and connected to my PC for file synching with whatever software I choose.

* SD cards can be moved between handsets (my current SD card is from a previous phone originally, I swapped it over when I bought a newer phone and BAM - 60GB of music instantly available).

* SD cards survive if the phone dies - my LG G4 inherited the infamous boot-loop fault. Everything on internal storage was toast, SD card was fine.

* SD cards work when data isn't available, ie camping, poor signal areas, and especially when flying.

* SD cards also allow for a cheaper contract with less data required than if you try to stream everything from cloud services.

I could go on. Internal storage is inflexible and troublesome, streaming from the cloud is costly and not always available. SD cards are cheap, flexible and always available. What's not to like?

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Dave K

What it doesn't consider however is existing features that are being removed. For example, I didn't buy a Samsung Galaxy S6 a few years ago when I needed a new phone because they did away with the SD Card slot (albeit they brought it back on the S7). Similarly, these days more and more companies are dropping the 3.5mm headphone jack. Again, if I wanted a new phone today, I absolutely would refuse any handset without the jack.

Hence I do feel that a report showing the importance of existing features would also be interesting.

Saying that, the story is correct from a performance perspective. 3 years ago, I had a Samsung Galaxy S3. Towards the end, it felt stuttery and sluggish - even after I tried a custom ROM. It needed replacing, so I got an LG G4. Fast forward 2 1/2 years, my G4 is on a SIM-free contract, and is still performing absolutely fine. No slowdown, no stuttering, no performance issues at all. Why therefore would I replace it - especially since I may lose functionality if I did?

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Help desk declared code PEBCAK and therefore refused to help!

Dave K

I've seen PRATFO used before now. It's normally a medical one (Patient Reassured And Told to Fuck Off), but can be applied to IT calls to (replace Patient with Person). Often used when the person calls in about a complete none-event, such as a user calling because they've received a Windows Update message telling them they need to restart their computer - is it a virus? That sort of thing.

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BT boss: Yeah, making a business case for 5G is hard

Dave K

Also this. Both 3G and 4G suffer from patchy coverage and slow speeds in busy areas. Instead of faster, faster, faster from a theoretical perspective, I'd much more settle for 3G or (ideally) 4G coverage that covers more rural areas and can cope with demand in cities better.

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Firefox 57: Good news? It's nippy. Bad news? It'll also trash your add-ons

Dave K

Re: I always wanted to be an organ grinder's monkey

There are lots of ways this could have been better handled. If they have the telemetary to show addons that crash or slow down Firefox, why not implement some sort of blacklisting for them (with an override that warns of the issues). Or why not allow classic addons with a warning?

Fixing/extending the API for the new addons would also help as a number of popular classic addons are impossible to port due to the limitations of WebExtensions.

However you look at it, a powerful addons ecosystem has been replaced with a watered down and far weaker one. That's a risky move that will alienate some people.

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Dave K

But you see, this is the bit I struggle to understand. Firefox looks just like Chrome, and uses practically the same extensions as Chrome. So, what's the unique selling point?

Sorry, but I see Firefox as increasingly irrelevant these days because they don't seem to want to be any different from Chrome. I used to use Firefox because it had a powerful and flexible UI, and the best selection of addons. Now, both those advantages are gone.

I still hope Mozilla will do something genuinely interesting and different with Firefox, but right now their design approach seems to just be to mirror what Google is doing.

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Those IT gadget freebies you picked up this year? They make AWFUL Christmas presents

Dave K

"I've found it handy to keep a couple of these "inadequate capacity" sticks in the bag..."

Agreed, I've got half a dozen 2GB/4GB ones kicking around for the same purpose. It's always a risk when someone wants a copy of an urgent document and doesn't have a spare flash drive to hand.

I've been there before...

"Oh, I'll bring it back in 20 minutes" they say cheerily whilst you delicately hand over the only spare flash drive you can find in your drawer, a 128GB platinum-plated flash drive with go-faster LED that was given to you by a cherished relative just before their recent death. And you know within 5 minutes it'll be sticking out the front of their desktop PC with a dribble of coffee down one side - right before that moment when they shove their wheely chair back into it, thus bending the USB connector over at a 30 degree angle. That's if you ever get it back at all...

No, always better to give them a small, crap, flaky one that you don't care about one way or the other.

65
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Car trouble: Keyless and lockless is no match for brainless

Dave K

I don't mind the rotary knob on VWs. It does have the big advantage that it's mechanically impossible to have the fog lights on without the headlights (the button won't pull out for the fog lights unless it's in the "headlight" position).

This also means you're far less likely to see a VW being driven around 3 weeks after a bit of light mist with the fog light still blaring away at the back as you have to kill the fog light before you can switch the headlights back off.

4
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Dave K

Re: You ended up with a Nissan Puke? Unlucky!

>> My Juke is beautiful inside and out

You're welcome to your opinion, but I'm afraid the styling of your car has a decidedly Marmite effect on people. Only difference is that I don't make Marmite haters watch when I eat a slice of toast...

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Dave K
Trollface

You ended up with a Nissan Puke? Unlucky!

I would have just left it unlocked. Surely no thief would dare come close to such an appallingly ugly vehicle as the Puke...

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Roaming charges drop smacks O2 daddy Telefonica in the profits

Dave K

Losing customers

O2 are in the process of losing some customers though due to a recent knee-jerk reaction to this - they're dropping their "TU Go" app.

In short, TU Go allowed users such as myself to make/receive calls and texts via Wifi - kind of useful if you live in the North of Scotland in an area with lousy mobile coverage. Also handy abroad as well. Feedback on their forums to this decision has been less than brilliant it has to be said.

Given this, I'll likely be cancelling my O2 contract within the next month and moving to either EE or Three, seeing as they do cover my home a bit better, and Three do have much better call/text over Wifi options available.

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AMD sales soar, actually makes a profit, beats expectations, share price... decimated

Dave K
Thumb Up

Good news!

I'm another long-time AMD user who ended up switching to an Intel machine the last time I upgraded my PC due to AMD's poor performance at the time. Right now though, I'm awaiting delivery of my new Ryzen system which should hopefully arrive tomorrow.

Great to see AMD back and to see Intel with competition again. Long may it continue!

7
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Forget One Windows, Microsoft says it's time to modernize your apps

Dave K

Re: Dear Microsoft

Lucky you!

Office 2016 has improved thankfully but isn't perfect. When I first used it earlier this year, Outlook crashed once every day or two, and Excel would also crash at least 2-3 times a week. With some updates, it is more reliable now, but it still crashes more regularly than Office 2010 ever did for me.

6
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Misco UK chops majority of workforce, pulls down shutters

Dave K

Re: Isn't this just the same as we see with many boxshifters.....

Well, smartphones and the fact that PCs have plateaued massively in recent years. People don't need to replace them anywhere near as often.

In the 90s and up to the late 2000s, a PC that was 4 years old would be below the minimum specs for games, and would be increasingly struggling with other software too. It would be obsolete and in need of pretty much complete replacement. For example when Windows 98 came out, a high-end PC would have had a Pentium II 350 with maybe 128MB of RAM. 4 years later when XP comes along, such a system would have struggled to run even the latest OS, let alone much software on top of it.

Now, PCs that are 7 or 8 years old will happily run Windows 10 (well, as happily as anyone can run Windows 10...), and will still run the latest Office as well as most games (albeit with quality reduced). My own main PC at home is still a 1st gen Core i5 3.2GHz system from 2009, with just a bit more RAM and a new graphics card popped in over time.

Result is people replacing kit a lot less often, unless you happen to work for a company with a fixed refresh cycle.

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BOFH: Oh dear. Did someone get lost on the Audit Trail?

Dave K

Quality...

""Apparently there's some colour issue on one of the printers," I say, an excuse which is guaranteed to appeal to any pedant within hearing range."

Brilliant line, and disturbingly true as well...

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Microsoft silently fixes security holes in Windows 10 – dumps Win 7, 8 out in the cold

Dave K

Re: Gnome for Windows

"So why didn't they take advantage of it at W8 time, TIFKAM for mobiles and keep the W7 interface for desktops?"

Because MS wasn't expecting 8 to flop as badly as it did. I think they knew it would alienate a sizable bunch of people and would not receive universal acclaim, but hoped that it'd gain a reasonable level of acceptance amongst home users. And once people are used to Metro, they'd see a Windows Phone and think "Ooh, it's familiar and is just like my PC" - thus increasing chances of people buying Windows Phone devices to complement their PCs.

In short, it was a deliberate middle finger to MS's traditional PC userbase in the hope of allowing them to force their way into the mobile market. Windows 7 was only 3 years old, so MS knew they could gamble with Windows 8 to increase their share of the mobile market.

What they weren't expecting was that Metro would be as hated as it was, which had the opposite effect of turning people off Windows Phone devices instead. Well, that and its lousy number of store apps.

4
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Lenovo spits out retro ThinkPads for iconic laptop's 25th birthday

Dave K

Re: x220... slow to boot

Agreed. I have an even older X201 (also with Windows 7). With an SSD and an 8GB RAM upgrade, it boots to the Windows desktop in about 20 seconds. Not as fast as new machines, but certainly doesn't feel slow to me!

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Dave K

Missed opportunity

The problem is that Lenovo were talking about this being a retro Thinkpad, yet what they've actually released is just a T470 with a classic keyboard and a few transfers stuck on it.

No buttons on the trackpad.

No status LEDs.

No ThinkLight.

Nasty 16:9 screen.

Basically the only thing in its favour is the keyboard.

I was eagerly looking forward to this when Lenovo first mooted it some time back as a possible replacement for my X201 (last one Lenovo made with a 16:10 screen), but the actual product is a real let down.

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Vibrating walls shafted servers at a time the SUN couldn't shine

Dave K

Re: A current issue...

Would have been easy and of negligible cost if done from the off - cherry pickers were there already to install the APs, and power cabling had to be run to the APs as well. Would have been a minimal expense to run data cables at the same time.

Now, the cost is a lot higher as it means hiring new cherry pickers and getting cabling contractors back in for the job. That's why the APs have been left in their current configuration.

2
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User worked with wrong app for two weeks, then complained to IT that data had gone missing

Dave K

Re: Testing is complete?

I was meaning more that the process of testing is never complete. Yes of course you release a patch to the test system, get people's feedback and approval before pushing it to the live system. However, chances are within a few weeks there'll be another patch or update to implement.

Also, a lot of places use the test version for training and experimentation, seeing as it allows new users to play around with the program and learn the ropes without the risk of modifying crucial live data.

Overall, for these reasons, plus the fact that your test group are usually more experienced and key users means that it's rare to keep taking the test system down unless you're doing some active maintenance on it.

4
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Dave K

Testing is complete?

Testing is never complete. This emplies that the software that is deployed is perfect and will never need to be patched or updated.

In the real world, the vendor will continue to release patches from time to time to fix issues, and over time will release new versions of the software whilst dropping support for old versions. For any mission-critical software, it's important that every single patch and update is tested before being deployed - especially as lots of ERP apps have various customisations added for different customers, and you need to ensure that the patches/updates don't interfere with anything important.

For this reason, you always need a test version to be available to a specially chosen group of staff.

20
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Dave K

Re: TBH

To be fair, we don't know if it did. It's quite possible the app came up with a huge warning about being a test version when launched, but as the user had changed the colours then been to lunch, and had never restarted the app for 2 weeks, this could have been missed.

I agree that locking the colours of the test app would have been a good idea though.

35
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BOFH: We're only here because they said there would be biscuits

Dave K

More spying?

"I'm betting that 20 of the laptop cameras will have been destroyed by people trying to ensure they can't be snooped on by the invisible internet demon."

Simon's obviously visited our office recently. It's really quite staggering how many old laptops we get back with a piece of gaffer tape stuck over the laptop's webcam...

10
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AMD Ryzen beats Intel Core i7 as a heater (that's also a server)

Dave K

It's a good idea! IT equipment produces a lot of heat - especially in server rooms where there's a lot of kit packed in high density. I'm always amazed how few places try to utilise that heat to (for example) heat the building, rather than just using air-con to waste the heat outside. Good to see some companies at least using that heat for a beneficial purpose.

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User demanded PC be moved to move to a sunny desk – because it needed Windows

Dave K

Professionals can miss obvious things...

I did once have a professor when I worked at a University that didn't know about the "next page" / "previous page" buttons in Outlook Web Access, he thought that the webmail interface could only show his most recent 25 e-mails. For months when he needed to access older e-mails from different machines that didn't have Outlook set up for him, he'd delete items from his inbox to bring older e-mails onto the front page, do what he needed to do, then restored his e-mails again from Deleted Items.

You'd have thought he'd ask about this. I only spotted it after helping with a different issue on a lab PC that required him to open an old e-mail...

52
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Dude who claimed he invented email is told by judge: It's safe to say you didn't invent email

Dave K

If anyone would like to read a very detailed analysis of this whole mess, I recommend Thomas Haigh's analysis on SIGCIS - it's a fairly long read mind you, but does go through all of the claims very thoroughly indeed: http://www.sigcis.org/ayyadurai

2
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It's happening! Official retro Thinkpad lappy spotted in the wild

Dave K

Re: Sorry, keyboard fail

If you like the chiclet keyboards, you've got about a thousand different laptop models to choose from. However, plenty of people (myself included) prefer the classic style of keyboard, so this isn't a keyboard fail, it's simply a product aimed at someone that isn't you.

4
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Dave K

Check out the Dell Latitudes. Keyboards are a bit hit and miss, but they've largely stuck with proper buttons on the trackpad - which is a good thing!

1
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Dave K

Re: if only...

Yep, one of my work laptops is a T440 and the trackpad is just dreadful. It's impossible to use without a mouse essentially. To be honest, a lot of Lenovo trackpads have been pretty dire. There were previously the dimpled ones that felt cheap, nasty and had a similar cringing effect on me to dragging a nail across a blackboard.

My other work laptop is a Dell E5470 and I honestly applaud Dell for sticking with the traditional buttons at the bottom as it's a pleasure to use in comparison.

2
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Dave K

My main laptop is an X201 - primarily as it was one of the last 16:10 laptops Lenovo made, but does at least have a Core i5, and takes DDR3 RAM and an SSD (and so still runs modern stuff absolutely fine).

I'm honestly fine with 16:10 or 3:2, but 16:9 is awful. It doesn't help that laptops with 16:9 screens either have fat top/bottom bezels to try and cope with the fact that the screen is simply the wrong size for the chassis of the laptop. Oddly enough, I'd rather have more screen than a fat piece of plastic.

At both work and home, my screen setup is a 16:10 main monitor (1920x1200) with a pair of 20" 1600x1200 4:3 monitors. Plenty of screen space for lots of apps open at the same time, sufficient vertical space and resolution, and not so ridiculously wide that I get a sore neck from looking too far to the left/right all the time.

2
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Hell desk to user: 'I know you're wrong. I wrote the software. And the protocol it runs on'

Dave K

Re: Possible or easy?

The problem here though is the user seemed unwilling to listen and to try what Bob was suggesting. There's nothing wrong with not knowing about a particular function of some software, but there is something wrong with a user who is belligerently ignorant and who insists they are correct and refuses to listen and to try what is being suggested by the support person.

In order to expand your knowledge of a product, you have to be willing to listen and learn...

49
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Revealed: The naughty tricks used by web ads to bypass blockers

Dave K

Re: Hey Instart

I agree 100% - especially regarding auto-playing videos. The other part I'd add is that I do not want ads that significantly harm my viewing of the underlying content. I've seen some sites that load and scroll very quickly and simply with ad-blocking enabled, but which run awfully when I turn it off and allow the ads (pages taking 5-10 seconds to load, content jumping around as ads appear mid-article, sluggish and jerky scrolling due to masses of Javascript, etc). If you're making your site perform like crap with ads, then you're doing it wrong and are just inviting people to block them.

And to note, sites that use sensible and reasonable ads (such as GHacks), I do disable my ad blocker for these.

75
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Skype for Business is not Skype – realising that is half the battle

Dave K

This.

My place of work has recently started replacing Cisco Jabber with Skype for Business. I'm assuming this is a purely financial move.

Jabber is clean, simple and has a functional and professional interface. It works, it's reliable, and it's easy to use.

SFB looks like something you'd expect to find on a kid's tablet - it's an awful childish UI that looks as business-like as a box of Duplo. I also find that it's far less stable and regularly crashes every couple of days as well on my machine. Well, I suppose it's consistent reliability wise. Almost all parts of Office 2016 crash with alarming regularity...

10
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Sysadmin jeered in staff cafeteria as he climbed ladder to fix PC

Dave K

Re: So ...

You don't really give sysadmins a good name with such a militant and disruptive approach to things. There's better ways of dealing with such issues than bringing the place to its knees and firing people the moment someone plugs in an unauthorised laptop.

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BOFH: Oh go on. Strap me to your Hell Desk, PFY

Dave K
Thumb Up

Great episode, and always a welcome addition to any Friday!

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