* Posts by Dave K

235 posts • joined 25 Apr 2008

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Misco UK chops majority of workforce, pulls down shutters

Dave K

Re: Isn't this just the same as we see with many boxshifters.....

Well, smartphones and the fact that PCs have plateaued massively in recent years. People don't need to replace them anywhere near as often.

In the 90s and up to the late 2000s, a PC that was 4 years old would be below the minimum specs for games, and would be increasingly struggling with other software too. It would be obsolete and in need of pretty much complete replacement. For example when Windows 98 came out, a high-end PC would have had a Pentium II 350 with maybe 128MB of RAM. 4 years later when XP comes along, such a system would have struggled to run even the latest OS, let alone much software on top of it.

Now, PCs that are 7 or 8 years old will happily run Windows 10 (well, as happily as anyone can run Windows 10...), and will still run the latest Office as well as most games (albeit with quality reduced). My own main PC at home is still a 1st gen Core i5 3.2GHz system from 2009, with just a bit more RAM and a new graphics card popped in over time.

Result is people replacing kit a lot less often, unless you happen to work for a company with a fixed refresh cycle.

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BOFH: Oh dear. Did someone get lost on the Audit Trail?

Dave K

Quality...

""Apparently there's some colour issue on one of the printers," I say, an excuse which is guaranteed to appeal to any pedant within hearing range."

Brilliant line, and disturbingly true as well...

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Microsoft silently fixes security holes in Windows 10 – dumps Win 7, 8 out in the cold

Dave K

Re: Gnome for Windows

"So why didn't they take advantage of it at W8 time, TIFKAM for mobiles and keep the W7 interface for desktops?"

Because MS wasn't expecting 8 to flop as badly as it did. I think they knew it would alienate a sizable bunch of people and would not receive universal acclaim, but hoped that it'd gain a reasonable level of acceptance amongst home users. And once people are used to Metro, they'd see a Windows Phone and think "Ooh, it's familiar and is just like my PC" - thus increasing chances of people buying Windows Phone devices to complement their PCs.

In short, it was a deliberate middle finger to MS's traditional PC userbase in the hope of allowing them to force their way into the mobile market. Windows 7 was only 3 years old, so MS knew they could gamble with Windows 8 to increase their share of the mobile market.

What they weren't expecting was that Metro would be as hated as it was, which had the opposite effect of turning people off Windows Phone devices instead. Well, that and its lousy number of store apps.

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Lenovo spits out retro ThinkPads for iconic laptop's 25th birthday

Dave K

Re: x220... slow to boot

Agreed. I have an even older X201 (also with Windows 7). With an SSD and an 8GB RAM upgrade, it boots to the Windows desktop in about 20 seconds. Not as fast as new machines, but certainly doesn't feel slow to me!

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Dave K

Missed opportunity

The problem is that Lenovo were talking about this being a retro Thinkpad, yet what they've actually released is just a T470 with a classic keyboard and a few transfers stuck on it.

No buttons on the trackpad.

No status LEDs.

No ThinkLight.

Nasty 16:9 screen.

Basically the only thing in its favour is the keyboard.

I was eagerly looking forward to this when Lenovo first mooted it some time back as a possible replacement for my X201 (last one Lenovo made with a 16:10 screen), but the actual product is a real let down.

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Vibrating walls shafted servers at a time the SUN couldn't shine

Dave K

Re: A current issue...

Would have been easy and of negligible cost if done from the off - cherry pickers were there already to install the APs, and power cabling had to be run to the APs as well. Would have been a minimal expense to run data cables at the same time.

Now, the cost is a lot higher as it means hiring new cherry pickers and getting cabling contractors back in for the job. That's why the APs have been left in their current configuration.

2
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User worked with wrong app for two weeks, then complained to IT that data had gone missing

Dave K

Re: Testing is complete?

I was meaning more that the process of testing is never complete. Yes of course you release a patch to the test system, get people's feedback and approval before pushing it to the live system. However, chances are within a few weeks there'll be another patch or update to implement.

Also, a lot of places use the test version for training and experimentation, seeing as it allows new users to play around with the program and learn the ropes without the risk of modifying crucial live data.

Overall, for these reasons, plus the fact that your test group are usually more experienced and key users means that it's rare to keep taking the test system down unless you're doing some active maintenance on it.

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Dave K

Testing is complete?

Testing is never complete. This emplies that the software that is deployed is perfect and will never need to be patched or updated.

In the real world, the vendor will continue to release patches from time to time to fix issues, and over time will release new versions of the software whilst dropping support for old versions. For any mission-critical software, it's important that every single patch and update is tested before being deployed - especially as lots of ERP apps have various customisations added for different customers, and you need to ensure that the patches/updates don't interfere with anything important.

For this reason, you always need a test version to be available to a specially chosen group of staff.

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Dave K

Re: TBH

To be fair, we don't know if it did. It's quite possible the app came up with a huge warning about being a test version when launched, but as the user had changed the colours then been to lunch, and had never restarted the app for 2 weeks, this could have been missed.

I agree that locking the colours of the test app would have been a good idea though.

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BOFH: We're only here because they said there would be biscuits

Dave K

More spying?

"I'm betting that 20 of the laptop cameras will have been destroyed by people trying to ensure they can't be snooped on by the invisible internet demon."

Simon's obviously visited our office recently. It's really quite staggering how many old laptops we get back with a piece of gaffer tape stuck over the laptop's webcam...

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AMD Ryzen beats Intel Core i7 as a heater (that's also a server)

Dave K

It's a good idea! IT equipment produces a lot of heat - especially in server rooms where there's a lot of kit packed in high density. I'm always amazed how few places try to utilise that heat to (for example) heat the building, rather than just using air-con to waste the heat outside. Good to see some companies at least using that heat for a beneficial purpose.

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User demanded PC be moved to move to a sunny desk – because it needed Windows

Dave K

Professionals can miss obvious things...

I did once have a professor when I worked at a University that didn't know about the "next page" / "previous page" buttons in Outlook Web Access, he thought that the webmail interface could only show his most recent 25 e-mails. For months when he needed to access older e-mails from different machines that didn't have Outlook set up for him, he'd delete items from his inbox to bring older e-mails onto the front page, do what he needed to do, then restored his e-mails again from Deleted Items.

You'd have thought he'd ask about this. I only spotted it after helping with a different issue on a lab PC that required him to open an old e-mail...

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Dude who claimed he invented email is told by judge: It's safe to say you didn't invent email

Dave K

If anyone would like to read a very detailed analysis of this whole mess, I recommend Thomas Haigh's analysis on SIGCIS - it's a fairly long read mind you, but does go through all of the claims very thoroughly indeed: http://www.sigcis.org/ayyadurai

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It's happening! Official retro Thinkpad lappy spotted in the wild

Dave K

Re: Sorry, keyboard fail

If you like the chiclet keyboards, you've got about a thousand different laptop models to choose from. However, plenty of people (myself included) prefer the classic style of keyboard, so this isn't a keyboard fail, it's simply a product aimed at someone that isn't you.

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Dave K

Check out the Dell Latitudes. Keyboards are a bit hit and miss, but they've largely stuck with proper buttons on the trackpad - which is a good thing!

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Dave K

Re: if only...

Yep, one of my work laptops is a T440 and the trackpad is just dreadful. It's impossible to use without a mouse essentially. To be honest, a lot of Lenovo trackpads have been pretty dire. There were previously the dimpled ones that felt cheap, nasty and had a similar cringing effect on me to dragging a nail across a blackboard.

My other work laptop is a Dell E5470 and I honestly applaud Dell for sticking with the traditional buttons at the bottom as it's a pleasure to use in comparison.

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Dave K

My main laptop is an X201 - primarily as it was one of the last 16:10 laptops Lenovo made, but does at least have a Core i5, and takes DDR3 RAM and an SSD (and so still runs modern stuff absolutely fine).

I'm honestly fine with 16:10 or 3:2, but 16:9 is awful. It doesn't help that laptops with 16:9 screens either have fat top/bottom bezels to try and cope with the fact that the screen is simply the wrong size for the chassis of the laptop. Oddly enough, I'd rather have more screen than a fat piece of plastic.

At both work and home, my screen setup is a 16:10 main monitor (1920x1200) with a pair of 20" 1600x1200 4:3 monitors. Plenty of screen space for lots of apps open at the same time, sufficient vertical space and resolution, and not so ridiculously wide that I get a sore neck from looking too far to the left/right all the time.

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Hell desk to user: 'I know you're wrong. I wrote the software. And the protocol it runs on'

Dave K

Re: Possible or easy?

The problem here though is the user seemed unwilling to listen and to try what Bob was suggesting. There's nothing wrong with not knowing about a particular function of some software, but there is something wrong with a user who is belligerently ignorant and who insists they are correct and refuses to listen and to try what is being suggested by the support person.

In order to expand your knowledge of a product, you have to be willing to listen and learn...

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Revealed: The naughty tricks used by web ads to bypass blockers

Dave K

Re: Hey Instart

I agree 100% - especially regarding auto-playing videos. The other part I'd add is that I do not want ads that significantly harm my viewing of the underlying content. I've seen some sites that load and scroll very quickly and simply with ad-blocking enabled, but which run awfully when I turn it off and allow the ads (pages taking 5-10 seconds to load, content jumping around as ads appear mid-article, sluggish and jerky scrolling due to masses of Javascript, etc). If you're making your site perform like crap with ads, then you're doing it wrong and are just inviting people to block them.

And to note, sites that use sensible and reasonable ads (such as GHacks), I do disable my ad blocker for these.

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Skype for Business is not Skype – realising that is half the battle

Dave K

This.

My place of work has recently started replacing Cisco Jabber with Skype for Business. I'm assuming this is a purely financial move.

Jabber is clean, simple and has a functional and professional interface. It works, it's reliable, and it's easy to use.

SFB looks like something you'd expect to find on a kid's tablet - it's an awful childish UI that looks as business-like as a box of Duplo. I also find that it's far less stable and regularly crashes every couple of days as well on my machine. Well, I suppose it's consistent reliability wise. Almost all parts of Office 2016 crash with alarming regularity...

10
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Sysadmin jeered in staff cafeteria as he climbed ladder to fix PC

Dave K

Re: So ...

You don't really give sysadmins a good name with such a militant and disruptive approach to things. There's better ways of dealing with such issues than bringing the place to its knees and firing people the moment someone plugs in an unauthorised laptop.

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BOFH: Oh go on. Strap me to your Hell Desk, PFY

Dave K
Thumb Up

Great episode, and always a welcome addition to any Friday!

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Hackers can turn web-connected car washes into horrible death traps

Dave K
WTF?

Pathetic!

"The duo said they shared their findings with PDQ in February 2015, and kept trying to warn the biz for two years. It was only when their talk was accepted for Black Hat this year that the manufacturer replied to their emails"

Attitudes like this absolutely stink. The company has been aware of this flaw for over 2 years and never bothered to respond, never bothered to take it seriously, or contact customers to advise them on remediation etc.

I honestly feel that companies that treat disclosures like this in such a cavalier and dismissive matter deserve to be sued into oblivion - should anyone exploit the flaw that they've been fully aware of and have done nothing to guard against. Maybe even some legislation to make it clearly a criminal matter to ignore disclosures of security flaws would be a good idea.

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Firefox doesn't need to be No 1 – and that's OK, 'cos it's falling off a cliff

Dave K

Re: did you know....?

That's the problem with Australis.

Now, the navigation buttons are fixed, and the stop/reload button is also fixed at the end of the address bar. Only way around it for now is to use an addon that gives you the ability to move these, but these will stop working once Firefox 57 lands (ClassicThemeRestorer being a major addon rendered useless by Mozilla dropping their old addon system as the new addon system simply doesn't support what CTR does).

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Dave K

Re: Finally!

Mozilla have done a huge amount lately to alienate a lot of their long time users, and this is another of the reasons for their steadily declining market share. Numerous decisions such as to push the awful Australis makeover, constantly strip out more and more customisability, bundling Pocket, and the impending ditching of their powerful addon ecosystem are all decisions which have helped to drive people away from the browser - whilst failing to draw new users to it.

I agree that Firefox can flourish without being the most popular browser, but Mozilla needs to start focusing on what their users want and how to carve out a niche in the browser market, rather than pushing one dumb decision after another onto their user base whilst turning Firefox more and more into a simple clone of Chrome. Once Firefox 57 lands, it'll just be a browser that looks like Chrome and uses lightweight addons like Chrome .

For the record, I ditched Firefox around 3 years ago after the Australis turd landed and have been a happy Pale Moon user since.

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Intel is upset that Qualcomm is treating it like Intel treated AMD for years and years

Dave K

Re: Uh, *raises hand*

So, DEC developed x86-64? No.

Nobody is saying "AMD was the first to develop a 64bit architecture", what they are saying is that it was AMD that developed the 64bit extensions to the x86 architecture.

In fact, there was plenty of suggestion at the time that Intel wanted to use a different (and incompatible) set of their own x86-64 instructions, but were shot down by MS who were already developing Windows XP for AMD64 - (as well as Itanium at the time, plus x86), and told Intel they would not develop for yet another instruction set. That's what El Reg suggested here at the time: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2004/01/29/intel_likely_to_offer_64bit/

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User filed fake trouble tickets to take helpful sysadmin to lunches

Dave K

Went further than lunch!

I have had more than a free lunch. Whilst working at a University, I was tasked with helping with an intermittent issue with the serial port on a workstation used for experimental research. Spent ages trying to figure out why the serial port kept misbehaving, before finally deciding to replace the motherboard (it was an older workstation with built-in serial port, and I had a couple of spares in my storage room). The female post-doc researcher for once seemed interested in the work I was doing, and we chatted for a while as I swapped components around in the system.

After doing this, the system worked fine. The next day, the nice post-doc researcher brought me a thank-you card and a box of chocolates for my time - which was great! I was then invited a few weeks later to play badminton after work with her. One thing led to another, and well - she's my wife now!

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UK government's war on e-cigs is over

Dave K

Re: Ex-smoker, vaper here

This as well. I used to smoke casually but quit a couple of years ago and now vape. I don't have some ridiculous sub-ohm mod that kicks out massive clouds of vapour, just a fairly standard small tank that produces a very small vapour cloud that dissipates within a few seconds. I also cannot stand the sickly smell of some liquids and vape a decent quality and mild tobacco liquid that produces next to no smell at all.

I've never set off a single fire alarm, had any objections from anyone, and none of the visitors to our house can smell a thing - even when I may have vaped just a minute or so earlier - and I don't vape in-front of visitors anyway.

Ultimately, it's about doing it in a courteous manner, and not blowing ginormous clouds of stink in busy areas. Typically, there's always a minority of idiots that give vaping a bad imagine, and it's a pity.

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European MPs push for right to repair rules

Dave K

>> There are good reasons why batteries often cannot be replaced easily.

Fair enough, but there's no excuse for sealing the device shut with glue and plastic spot welds (hello Microsoft), and holding the batteries in place with huge quantities of glue either. Plenty of manufacturers have proved that it's easy to make a super-slim device that's held together with screws, and similarly it's possible to hold batteries in place inside with screws as well.

I don't care if the battery is a weird shape, or several different cells, so long as it's feasible to replace it either yourself, or at a simple third-party shop without having to destroy the product in the process.

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Concorde without the cacophony: NASA thinks it's cracked quiet supersonic flight

Dave K

Re: A luddite writes...

>> Gotta say the argument about how regular flying is so terribly exhausting and tiresome for poor, downtrodden execs that they really can't live without supersonic flight / a new, more convenient airport / an extra runway etc etc *really* grates.

I fly regularly on business, and I'm not an exec. Nor even a senior manager. I'm a lead tech. I fly a lot on business because I'm good at my job, and my company uses my expertise as a technical lead for major projects, and also to provide support/training in various areas. As such, I am restricted to bog-standard economy flights and budget hotels.

However, in the early days of flying, there was no such thing as an economy flight. It's only because technology improved and more and more people flew that planes became cheaper and more efficient, and prices dropped as a whole. Early cars were also expensive, so were early computers. Should we therefore ignore future technological improvements just because initially they're priced out-of-reach of normal folk? Or should we pursue them and accept that with continued development, the price will drop in due course?

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Dave K

Re: A luddite writes...

Whilst you are correct that you can meet with people via Skype etc (no need to jet across the Atlantic), there's a number of things you've missed.

1) Visiting a country to actually sight-see (rather than just lay on the beach).

2) Visiting friends/relatives

3) Business trips that actually require physical input. I regularly fly on business, and not just "for a meeting", we use telepresence/conferencing for those.

If you regularly take 7-11 hour flights, you quickly realise how much of a tedious drag they are. Furthermore, all technology starts at prices which are "for the privileged few". It's increasing adoption, more mass production and improvements in technology that allow these things to filter down to ordinary folk. And if in the future I could fly supersonic at a respectable price, I would do so.

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'OK, everyone. Stop typing, this software is DONE,' said no one ever

Dave K

How to maintain revenue

The big difference is that software doesn't wear out from usage, but real-world items typically do.

Take that hammer, if you hit enough nails with it, eventually the head will likely come loose and the shaft may crack, meaning you have to repair or replace it. Use your office chair enough, and eventually the cover and padding will begin to disintegrate and you'll need to replace it.

A lot of physical items therefore have a guaranteed revenue stream as you'll need to buy new ones when the old ones fail (more and more items are *designed* to fail after a while of course, but this is another story).

Software doesn't do this though. You don't wear out a loop by iterating through it too many times, hence the software writers have to come up with new methods to maintain revenue. Typically you either keep upgrading the software and depreciating old versions to force people to upgrade, or you charge for expensive support contracts (and make sure your software breaks in complicated ways from time to time to justify the support), or of course the latest method is the dreaded "subscription" approach, or annual license.

Maybe with subscription approaches, some software could increasingly be considered as "finished", in that you get revenue regardless of whether you create new versions. The only issue is whether a competitor releases something better and pinches your customers.

From here, we're back to physical products, where improvements are simply meant to ensure people continue buying your company's stuff when their old items break. Like that nice tungsten-tipped hammer with the comfort-grip handle...

13
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Microsoft's new Surface laptop defeats teardown – with glue

Dave K
Thumb Down

Recycling also difficult

Of course, some will point out that they're happy to just use a laptop for a few years, then replace it. Hence, they don't need replaceable parts. However, another downside of sealing the laptop together with glue and plastic spot-welds is that it also becomes a nightmare to recycle as well once you decide to replace it.

I'm not saying that ultra-portables should necessarily be as upgradable and flexible as a full laptop, but I've seen plenty of ultra-portables (Samsung Series 9, X1 Carbon, Dell XPS) that can be easily un-screwed and repaired/upgraded to at least some degree. Not good MS, not good.

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Samsung releases 49-inch desktop monitor with 32:9 aspect ratio

Dave K

Re: Optional

I use three screens, occasionally 4 if I have my laptop screen open as well. Snapping 3-4 apps into place is a doddle with this (drag to the screen I want, then to the top to maximise to that screen). However with a single monitor, I'd either be restricted to two apps snapped at a time, or I'd have the faf and palaver of manually resizing multiple windows to fit - not ideal when you've got Outlook, a web browser, 7 copies of Excel, two copies of Word, an RDP session and two remote apps running via Citrix all open at once :)

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Dave K

Re: Only 1080 high?

As I'm lucky enough to work in IT at my company, I was pleased to find one of the last 1920x1200 screens left in our stock which I promptly snaffled for myself. As you say, all new ones now are 1920x1080, and they just feel cramped and unpleasant for working on.

For my home office, my company sent over a 24" 1920x1080 screen. I don't use it, I prefer to use my own 16:10 screen via KVM.

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Dave K

Huh?

>> "most monitors these days are 16:9 to deliver HD images at 1080 x 720"

You mean 1920x1080.

Even then, I'll be giving this a miss as it still has less vertical resolution than my main (and aging) 1920x1200 monitor. As for work, I'd rather have multiple monitors as it's far easier to snap multiple apps in place that way (I actually use a 1920x1200 main screen with a 1600x1200 monitor either side of it).

And just imagine the fun of browsing web pages down a miniscule column in the middle...

I'm sure some people will like this, but it's not for me.

16
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Microsoft totters from time machine clutching Windows 10 Workstation

Dave K

Re: Desperation

If I'm a dinosaur for wanting an OS with a clean, coherent, consistent and friendly UI then so be it.

Windows 10 has decent technical underpinnings, but the UI is an unfocussed mess (some bits Metro, some bits classic, two different control/settings panels, designed to be mobile friendly - despite the collapse of Windows on phones, etc). Bin all of that and give me a clean and consistent desktop UI that's designed for a desktop PC please.

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Bye bye MP3: You sucked the life out of music. But vinyl is just as warped

Dave K

Re: On air compression

>>"And it's particularly jarring when I'm listening to my music collection - the old stuff (Genesis, Yes, Camel, some of the classical stuff) is all mastered at lower apparent volume than the newer stuff. So, on shuffle, I'm either deafened or I can't hear the music properly."

You need a tool such as MP3Gain (there's also some out there for AAC and other such formats). They analyse the loudness of each song and apply ReplayGain to it so that the volume level is consistent (basically by cranking down the volume of newer stuff). Result is that the Beatles sound just as loud as current music. I have it applied to my library and all my songs now sound consistent.

I particularly like MP3Gain against some other tools that apply ReplayGain as it edits the MP3s themselves (losslessly and reversably, it just tweaks the internal MP3 gain headers for each frame) so that it works even on devices/players that don't support ReplayGain ID3 tags.

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Dave K

Re: On air compression

Fully agree. To show the level of the issue, here's two zoomed-in snips taken from CD rips (both show about 10 seconds of the song).

This is Nirvana - Smells Like Teen Spirit from 1991 (chosen as it's a heavyish, grunge song):

https://imgur.com/a/NI020

Decent dynamics, loud and quiet clearly visible, as are the peaks from the drums. Result, song sounds good - especially through decent speakers.

And in comparison, here's Muse - Map of the Problematique from 2005 (again, a fairly guitar-heavy song):

https://imgur.com/a/XIlKe

You don't have to be an audiophile to see that it's just a solid wall of distorted noise with zero dynamic range and everything brickwalled up to peak level. Result, it sounds like crap, no matter what equipment you play it on.

For most music, radio has nothing to do with it, even the original CDs are produced in a simply dreadful way with no regard whatsoever for the quality of the sound.

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Dave K

The music industry has to take a lot of the blame. Since the mid 90s, sound quality has basically been disregarded with the only focus being on volume. Heading into the 2000s, it didn't matter whether you used CDs on a high-end Hifi, or a tin can at the end of a piece of string. The production quality of modern music is simply awful.

The result is that when the sound quality of modern music is dreadful no matter what the medium, it's easy to see why so many people are satisfied with low-quality streams, tinny iPhone speakers and the likes.

I think MP3 often gets a bum rap. Well encoded MP3s can sound virtually indistinguishable from the original CDs in blind tests, even for earlier and well-mastered music. The fault isn't the audio format being used, it's the quality of the original source material - and only the music industry can fix that by abandoning the pursuit of volume above all else and returning to sound quality as the top production priority. However even with volume normalisation becoming increasingly prevalent, most music is still mastered for volume over quality...

66
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Take a sneak peek at Google's Android replacement, Fuchsia

Dave K
WTF?

Itanium??

"Fuchsia runs on x86/IA-64 hardware"

IA-64 is Itanium, sure you don't mean ARM64?

8
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Hasta la Windows Vista, baby! It's now officially dead – good riddance

Dave K

Mixed opinions

There were a few issues with Vista. Not least of which is that it was too bloated for the PCs of the time. When Vista came along, PCs typically only had 2GB of RAM, sometimes only 1GB, plus they often only had single core CPUs. And Vista crawled along on such systems, compared with XP that ran pretty quick on the same hardware. Hence Vista gained a reputation for being slow.

Windows 7 is a similar size, but by the time it was released, 4GB was the norm, as were dual/quad core CPUs. Hence on the PCs of the time, Windows 7 ran pretty well and automatically gained a reputation of being quicker. Run Windows 7 on a single core system with 1-2GB of RAM and it'll also run sluggishly.

UAC was a good idea, but was quite annoying and popped up a bit too often. Windows 7 fixed this simply by toning down the prompts to areas where they were necessary. Of course, XP-style apps that expected admin rights and full write access to the whole hard drive definitely helped exacerbate the problem.

Lastly IMO, the main other issue of Vista was that it felt messy. 7 different shutdown options (with Sleep as the default - even on laptops). A default wallpaper that was a smorgasbord of too many colours, the side-bar that didn't do that much but which added more clutter. Windows 7 in comparison did a good job of streamlining and tidying the UI up.

Overall, I didn't personally like Vista. It was a bit too bloated for hardware of the time, the UI was messy, and it didn't offer much to the end user over XP, whereas Windows 7 introduced the new task bar, the ability to snap windows side-by-side, plus other genuinely useful tweaks.

0
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Why do GUIs jump around like a demented terrier while starting up? Am I on my own?

Dave K

My big beef is also with web pages that have a "scroll to the top" trigger once the last element is loaded. So, you open the page, most of it displays - including the text. You start to read and scroll down, but then that small irrelevant icon finishes loading 5 seconds later and suddenly you're jolted back to the top of the page.

ServiceNow is notorious for this. Some of our pages have more than one of these, and every page load is a constant struggle between what I want to view and what the dumb-ass developer feels I should be viewing as the various elements finish loading. Pain in the absolute bum it is!

6
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Microsoft kills Windows Vista on April 11: No security patches, no hot fixes, no support, nada

Dave K

Re: ME Hated?

It had software compatibility issues due to MS hiding DOS mode which a lot of utilities still required, System Restore was poorly implemented and would often back-up viruses and then restore them to your system if you used it. It was incredibly flaky and a lot less stable than Windows 98 (and that's saying something).

In short, It didn't really bring that much to the table, but cost a lot in terms of compatibility and stability. And that is why it was widely disliked.

17
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Intel's dying Atom chips strike again: Netgear recalls four ReadyNAS, Wi-Fi management lines

Dave K

Re: Gimme an "A"....

Ahh yes, whereas Intel with the processor serial number scandal, dodgy dealings with Rambus, P3 1.13GHz recall, the whole of the terrible P4 line-up etc. was just doing superbly all along right?

Oh, and the Athlon XP for a sizeable chunk of its lifespan was the fastest x86 CPU available...

1
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Lap(top) of luxury: Porsche Design revs up 2-in-1 Windows 10 slab

Dave K

I'd still take the Surface Book

If I *had* to have a Windows 10 laptop/tablet hybrid, I'm afraid I'd still take the Surface Book for one reason - a 3:2 screen. I just couldn't justify £2,000 for a cheapo, cramped 16:9 screen.

0
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BOFH: Elf of Safety? Orc of Admin. Pleased to meet you

Dave K

Nice twist!

Excellent episode! Must admit, I wasn't expecting there to be a sweepstake running, I wonder who chose over-voltaged cattle-prod...

71
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Two words, Mozilla: SPEED! NOW! Quit fiddling and get serious

Dave K

Re: Oh woe is me

> I cannot for the life of me figure out how space is being wasted.

I often have a lot of tabs open, with the size of tabs reduced via an addon. With Australis, I could fit far less tabs on my screen before the names and icons started being truncated.

> Well, hard to comment since we dont know what those "Things" are

Speaking personally - and these are removed, not just hidden...

Tabs On Bottom is removed (I use it as it gives more space for tabs).

Status Bar is removed (and I find it useful, and put some addons down there to keep my main control bar tidy)

You cannot move the Back/forwards buttons any more.

You cannot move the Stop/Reload buttons or separate them (this is a big beef for me as they're now anchored at the opposite end of the address bar. I like my navigation controls to be together, not spread out at opposite ends of my screen).

In short, Australis removed a huge amount of customisability. I don't necessarily have a problem with changing defaults, so long as I can tweak things so that the browser suits my way of working. Firefox's customisability was a key feature, and Australis undermined some of the core founding principles of Firefox.

>> Entirely subjective and not worth wasting effort commenting on

I'll re-phrase then. It looks just like Chrome. And if I wanted a browser that looked like Chrome, I'd just use Chrome. The fact that one of the most popular addons is a tool that reverts the UI should tell you how well received Australis has been. That and the additional decline of Firefox's market share once Mozilla pushed it out the door...

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Dave K
Thumb Up

Spot. On.

If I could give you a dozen up-votes for that post, I would. You've hit the nail right on the head when it comes to Mozilla's problems!

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Dave K

Re: Still using Firefox

Agreed. Australis was an abomination and it resulted in me ditching Firefox for Pale Moon - a pity since I'd been using Firefox since it was Firebird 0.6. It wasn't just the rounded tabs that I hated, it was all the other customisability they removed when they introduced it.

I've said it before and I'll say it again, Mozilla needs to focus on their USPs. Firefox was always slower than Chrome, but it had a powerful and very customisable UI, plus a much deeper and richer add-on ecosystem. Mozilla need to find ways to keep these powerful features whilst improving other areas of the browser. Instead, Mozilla's recent approach has just been to mimic Chrome. The UI looks like Chrome, the customisability is steadily disappearing, and Mozilla will soon be migrating to Chrome-style addons too (which are a lot less powerful).

I don't understand why to be honest. If I wanted to use a browser that looked and worked like Chrome, I'd use Chrome. Mozilla need to keep Firefox different, retain its strengths and improve its weaknesses.

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