* Posts by Dave K

390 posts • joined 25 Apr 2008

Page:

Microsoft lobs Windows 10, Server Oct 2018 update at world (minus file-nuking 'feature') after actually doing some testing

Dave K
Silver badge

MS deserve criticism for two reasons here:

1) Killing off internal QA that probably would have caught this bug prior to release.

2) The bug *was* reported in the feedback hub, and MS missed it. Hence, the feedback hub is clearly not fit for purpose and needs revising (something MS have admitted).

When you remove proper QA, then implement a "crowdsourcing" alternative that allows critical bugs to slip through despite being reported, you deserve some criticism. Especially when you "force" the buggy update onto people's computers because you've massively restricted users' control over updates.

Updating software to guard against security issues is very important. This is why it's important that users have trust and faith in the quality of updates. Regularly releasing buggy code and forcing it onto your customers machines is a great way to destroy trust in software updates in general, and that's dangerous territory if users start to increasingly see updates as something to fear...

10
0

This just in: What? No, I can't believe it. The 2018 MacBook Air still a huge pain to have repaired

Dave K
Silver badge

"You can't have thin and lightweight without glue."

Disagree entirely. My wife's laptop is a Samsung Series 9. Very thin ultrabook on a par with a Macbook Air. Opening it up involves removing half a dozen small screws, inside the battery is held down with two more screws (not a drop of glue in sight), and the SSD is replaceable. Unfortunately the RAM is soldered down, so it isn't perfect, but it's a lot more easy to service than an Air - despite being no thicker.

Alternatively, pop open a Lenovo X1 Carbon and there's also no glue, plus the RAM is also replaceable.

You can build an ultralight without lots of glue, and without soldering everything in sight - if you want to. Face it, Apple doesn't want to. They want their products to be disposable so that users keep buying replacements every few years.

20
0

Solid state of fear: Euro boffins bust open SSD, Bitlocker encryption (it's really, really dumb)

Dave K
Silver badge

Re: "Because MS was just blindly trusting them all, they have to take some of the blame."

Many other suppliers of encryption software don't just trust all 3rd party hardware implementations however. If you encrypt your system disk with VeraCrypt (for example), it uses its own encryption algorithm. Hence the only way your disk can be compromised is if VeraCrypt's own encryption is compromised.

It would be interesting to know if MS was testing and vetting SSD encryption from various vendors before approving BitLocker to utilise it, or whether they were just allowing any device that stated that it supported hardware encryption to go ahead. If it's the former, their testing clearly could have been better. If it's the latter, it's a major risk if Bitlocker is allowing untested and potentially insecure hardware encryption to take the place of its own encryption capabilities.

7
0
Dave K
Silver badge

Because what MS have done is to effectively "outsource" the encryption. Any SSD that says "Hey, I can encrypt myself", Bitlocker just says "OK, sure thing!" without any further checking.

End result, companies have enabled BitLocker to ensure that their data is safe, without realising that BitLocker is just allowing the drive to use its own encryption capabilities. And now many of those drives' encryption capabilities have turned out to be a bit shit. Because MS was just blindly trusting them all, they have to take some of the blame.

When you allow everyone who claims to be a locksmith to fit their own lock, you're going to be broken into eventually...

38
11

Mourning Apple's war against sockets? The 2018 Mac mini should be your first port of call

Dave K
Silver badge

Re: Macs typically have a longer usable life than Windows PCs ...

> Macs typically have a longer usable life than Windows PCs

Hmm, they used to have a longer usable life, but I doubt that's the case any more. My old Mac Mini (2008) also ran great until I retired it last year, but one of the primary reasons it lasted so long is that I could upgrade it. If it was stuck with 1GB of RAM and the 180GB HDD it originally came with, it would have been obsolete several years earlier. Thankfully with an upgrade to 4GB of RAM and a 750GB drive, it kept me going for a few years more.

These days? I'm not so sure. Apple's hardware is pretty reliable, but the fact that modern Macs are increasingly soldered together and unupgradable means that "planned obsolescence" is increasingly built into them. Decent PCs are also pretty reliable these days (just recently retired my previous PC which was from 2010), so it's not that clear cut any more. Saying that, I'd be interested to confirm just how upgradable (or not) the new Mac Mini is...

4
1
Dave K
Silver badge

Re: Tempting...

Yes, they did. I've had a couple of Mac Minis in the past, my most recent was one of the first Core 2 Duo ones they released. Decent little machine, and lasted me a long time due to RAM/HDD upgrades. Last year it was really showing its age and I decided to replace it with another mini system. I had the choice of an outdated Mac Mini with 3-year old components and zero upgradability, or an Intel NUC where everything is upgradable, it used modern parts, and it was cheaper to boot.

End result, the little mini server running under my desk is now a NUC. Sorry Apple, too little, too late (and too expensive). On the plus side, I have seen some pictures that suggest the RAM is upgradable again. Anyone know for sure?

9
0

Techie was bigged up by boss… only to cause mass Microsoft Exchange outage

Dave K
Silver badge

Re: Note to Microsoft

At least on later versions of Windows Server (from 2008 onwards I believe), you're required to provide a reason for the shutdown/restart that goes into the event log. This is usually about the same time that you realise you hit the wrong option when trying to select "Log off", and does at least give you chance to cancel the impending doom you've initiated.

29
0

We asked 100 people to name a backdoored router. You said 'EE's 4GEE HH70'. Our survey says... Top answer!

Dave K
Silver badge

Sometimes going public with these vulnerabilities is the only way to finally put some urgency into a fix. Really quite shocking how companies like EE drag their heels over these issues until they feel sufficient public pressure to fix them.

17
0

Memo to Microsoft: Windows 10 is broken, and the fixes can't wait

Dave K
Silver badge

"Enterprise is their core market"

Quite right, which is why there is one additional round of testing that the article didn't go into - end users. Once the update has been through the Insider program and is considered ready for release, it's important to note that it is only considered ready to release to home/small business users. Enterprises on the Current Branch for Business (as it used to be known) get the updates a bit later once the update has been unleashed on home users and any final major bugs have been called out and patched.

Hence, these testing issues aren't a major concern for enterprise - they know that they'll only get the update once millions of other people have received it without major issue. It is however a big problem for home and small business users that are now being treated as a final round of testers for enterprise. It also means that instead of these bugs being caught and quietly patched during internal testing, they're now showing up on end-user systems and are causing much more noise and stink.

Ultimately, I fully agree with the article. MS's development approach to Windows 10 is broken and changes need to be made if end users are to see Windows 10 as anything other than constantly flaky and beta software.

22
0

Silent running: Computer sounds are so '90s

Dave K
Silver badge

At my school, it was common for the kids to synchronise their Casio watches to try to match the exact timing of the school bell. Result was a quiet assembly in the morning, then as 9 o'clock rolls by, about 100 watches all give off the "beep-beep" within about 5 seconds of each other. Was fun seeing the head developing a nervous twitch in his eye as the years rolled by and all the kids ignored his pleas to silence their watches...

20
0
Dave K
Silver badge

Worst one for me at the moment is Windows 10. Most of Windows 7's notification noises are pretty short, quiet and sweet, but for Windows 10 they decided to create about 20 incredibly similar yet bland "bingy-bong" sounds and attach them to every single possible event imaginable.

Result is a workplace chock-full of "bingy-bong" "bong-bingy-bong" "bingy-bingy-bing-bing" etc. sounds firing out all over the place. Gah!

19
0

Microsoft points to a golden future where you can make Windows 10 your own

Dave K
Silver badge

Re: Deinstall parts of W10?

As a Windows 7 user, I'm playing it by ear at the moment. I do continue to play around with test builds of Windows 10 from time to time on a spare laptop, so options are (if you need to stick with Windows):

* Windows 10 LTSB with hacks to remove the telemetry - might be good as it automatically doesn't include most of the crap and doesn't get the "feature" updates, but some apps won't play ball with it (MS famously blocks later Office from LTSB), plus it's only available in pirated form because MS won't sell it to none-VL customers.

* Windows 10 standard with various 3rd party tools to wrestle control of updates, block telemetry, replace the awful Start Menu with one that doesn't suck etc. A possible option, but an almighty faf, and will still involve dreaded feature updates from time to time.

* Windows 8.1 - it's supported until 2023, but does look awfully flat, and requires 3rd party tools to replace the godawful Start screen.

It's a toughy as there isn't really a good option. But for now, I've still got 14 months of support for Windows 7, hence I intend to enjoy 14 more months of having a clean, dependable and well-designed OS until I'm forced into the painful world of MS's later offerings.

41
4

Once more with feeling: Windows 10 October 2018 Update inches closer to relaunch

Dave K
Silver badge

Re: insiders

You seem to forget that this version was released to the general public, only for it to cause numerous issues resulting in MS pulling it, fixing it, then running it back through the insider rings.

That's the main problem here. Major bugs are not being caught during insider testing (or if they are, MS aren't spotting them all in their Feedback hub). The more this keeps happening, the more people will continue to shout at MS due to their QA being hopeless. Right now, MS are up against the clock because this release was supposed to be good enough for general release. I wonder if the rushed rounds of insider testing will leave more issues to emerge once it's pushed out onto the general public's PCs...

12
0

Web browsers sharpen knives for TLS 1.0, 1.1, tell protocols to dig their own graves for 2019

Dave K
Silver badge

Re: Web browsers are not the problem

Similar issue here when managing an old CUCM system. I'd generally be in favour of either a big screamy warning, or a whitelist for these type of sites. I'm all in favour of ditching obsolete technologies such as this, but some company-internal and other embedded stuff will be caught up in it.

8
1

In Windows 10 Update land, nobody can hear you scream

Dave K
Silver badge

Re: I guess I got lucky

Windows 7 will install onto a Kaby Lake system. I had it working fine on my Intel NUC last year. It's a sod to install due to driver support, but with perseverance I was able to get everything working and all drivers for all hardware working correctly. Admittedly I did this as a test because the NUC was earmarked for Ubuntu, but I just wanted to prove to myself that it was possible - and it was!

Windows 7 on Ryzen is a bit more simple as drivers are available for most things. My main PC is a Ryzen and Windows 7 runs fine on it (with the wufuc tool to override the Windows update block of course).

3
0
Dave K
Silver badge

Re: Installing Windows 7 on Sky/Kaby Lake CPUs

There's nothing wrong with a new OS being different. However, there's a lot wrong when an OS is an incoherent and unreliable mess. And many people see Windows 10 as exactly that.

I use Windows 7 because it works, it's reliable, and it allows me to run all the programs I need. And lets face it, the job of an OS is to be available when I need it, and to run all the stuff I need to run.

Windows 10's issues fall into three main camps:

1) The UI is a mess. Despite releasing numerous updates, there's still the mis-mash of "Settings" and "Control Panel" with no consistency at all. Some dialogs are old-school style, some are Metro style, it's just an inconsistent mess. In comparison, Windows 7 has a single Control Panel with everything in one place. Sounds better to me!

2) The telemetry that cannot easily be turned off. Sure, it you know what you're doing you can block most of it, but it's still something that unnerves a lot of people when their PC is snooping on everything they do. With Windows 7, you just block the telemetry updates and voila! No telemetry. Again, a tick for Windows 7.

3) Big "feature" updates that offer sod all of any value, but which make a PC unusable for ages whilst it installs, and cause numerous issues for people (hence all these news articles). I don't get feature updates for Windows 7, and as a result update-reboots happen when I want them to happen, they take a couple of minutes instead of a couple of hours, and the chances of anything breaking are noticeably reduced. Again, a tick for Windows 7.

Windows 10 could be good. If MS could offer a proper "off" switch for the telemetry, finish the damn thing so that the UI is coherent and consistent, and offer an LTSB version to the masses, Windows 10 would find far more acceptance. Right now, why should I install a messy OS I cannot rely on just because it is "newer" when I have a clean and reliable OS that does all I need it to?

70
0

Powerful forces, bodily fluids – it's all in a day's work

Dave K
Silver badge

Re: Just the Usual...

We have a lot of desktop PCs in our shop floor area that sit quite close to CNC machines. The air is very oily, and over the course of 3 years of use, these machines steadily become caked in the stuff - such that we need to wear rubber gloves when removing them for refresh.

However, the fun part is that they are under lease. And I've been through all the various charges that can be levied, and there's nothing on there for a working PC that is smothered inside and out in oil. Of course, good luck to the leasing firm for cleaning these up for reuse!

10
0

Microsoft Windows 10 October update giving HP users BSOD

Dave K
Silver badge

Re: So who you gonna believe?

Barton and Alex miss two major points:

1) Earlier Windows versions received mainly small security updates and the odd bug-fix. Windows 10 receives huge "feature" updates every few months. There is no security benefit to new features, just the chance of disruption.

2) Modern Windows 10 updates do not have the same stringent testing and QA that updates for earlier Windows enjoyed. Not saying MS never released buggy updates previously, but you have to admit that problems are more common now.

Nobody is arguing much about security updates. The issues being faced by the majority of people however are coming about when big "Feature" updates are forced upon them. These don't provide security, but do leave a trail of borkage in their wake.

35
0

Microsoft deletes deleterious file deletion bug from Windows 10 October 2018 Update

Dave K
Silver badge

One of the biggest laughs about this is that whilst a big, pointless "feature" update is installing, MS likes to display a montage of messages to the user, you know the usual "Please don't turn off your computer", "We're getting things ready for you", etc.

Unfortunately, one of the messages they display during the update is "All your files are exactly where you left them"

...

40
0

Where can I hide this mic? I know, shove it down my urethra

Dave K
Silver badge

@Nick Kew: Oh no they weren't!

My first flash drive was 256MB. At the time, it was still great coming from a world of floppy disks and the occasional Zip drive.

4
0
Dave K
Silver badge

"512KB"

Wow, a flash drive with less than half the capacity of a 3.5" floppy, technology really has advanced over the years hasn't it...

</sarcasm - yes I know it's supposed to be 512MB>

23
1

Day two – and Windows 10 October 2018 Update trips over Intel audio

Dave K
Silver badge

And yet still MS believes that this constant stream of disruption and issues is what users and businesses want from an OS...

69
3

Microsoft gets ready to kill Skype Classic once again: 'This time we mean it'

Dave K
Silver badge

Pretty much spot on, but I will add one more reason that Vista flopped - it was too CPU and memory intensive for hardware of the time. When Vista came out, PCs were single-core systems with 1-2GB of RAM, plus onboard graphics were quite shonky back then. XP ran fine on these systems, Vista did not. Hence it immediately developed a reputation for being slow (in addition to the messy UI and flaky driver support).

Saying that, Windows 7 will also run like crap on a single-core PC with 1GB of RAM. Only difference is that by the time Windows 7 was released, 4GB of RAM and a dual core CPU were now pretty-much standard issue, on-board graphics could now handle Aero with ease, hence Windows 7 ran very nicely and everyone was happy.

4
0

Intel boss admits chips in short supply, lobs cash into the quagmire

Dave K
Silver badge

Re: What was that ?

I presume they mean Skylake chips. As you may recall, MS blocks later silicon from receiving Windows updates. Of course, that didn't stop me building a Ryzen system last year (with what MS considers "blacklisted" silicon), popping Windows 7 onto it, then using wufuc to get around MS's idiotic block. However, companies generally won't do this, and hence there is still a market for devices with Skylake chips that are officially supported by MS under Windows 7 still.

10
0

Attempt to clean up tech area has shocking effect on kit

Dave K
Silver badge

Reminds me of a good one on Computer Stupidities some time ago (note, not my anecdote):

A customer logged a call that he occasionally finds his VAX 11/725 (one of the few of that model in The Netherlands) powered down when he comes in in the morning. As I was the site responsible engineer for that customer, I went over to investigate the problem. Didn't seem to be one of the usual: of course I'd read about janitors and cleaners unplugging power cords to run their vacuum cleaners or floor mops or what not. But in this case the machine was in a recess, side by side with a printer, and there was a perfectly good, unused wall socket in plain view, in the wall to the left of the recess. They'd have to stoop over the machine and unplug its power cord from the barely visible wall socket behind it to do that trick, and also plug it back in afterwards. Also, the power cord was snug; you couldn't trip the machine just by bumping into it.

But the machine did just power down occasionally, as evidenced by the console printout. No bug check or machine check, just opcom messages being printed, followed straight by the power up sequence the next morning when the customer came in and powered it up again. Timestamps showed the machine quitting early evening, between 18:00 and 19:00. If it did, that is; it didn't do it every day.

Ok, it's flaky somehow. But why that particular time? I put in a new power supply, as that'd be the most probable cause. Nope, that's not it. A couple of days later, the customer logged a repeat call, with the exact same symptom. I went on site again, exercised the machine, measured supply voltages. It ran without any sign of any problem. Looking over the possibilities, I wondered if it was an overheating or airflow condition. There's more than one sensor that can trip the machine the way it is tripped, and we hooked up a small logic probe that would show which one it actually was. And sure enough, a few days later it got tripped with an airflow problem. Now, I had already cleaned out the filters and the fans when I replaced the PSU -- pretty standard procedure to do whatever preventive maintenance you can when you go on site for a hardware call. So I couldn't imagine there would be a real airflow condition. But the sensor might have been woky, so I checked it. It was a pair of thermal sensors, one exposed to the airflow, the other not. Pretty simple. No mechanical parts that might have binded or gotten stuck. So no problem there. For good measure I replaced a power harness that showed vague signs of chafing, and I also replaced the monitoring logic.

Didn't help. The customer called once more, and sure enough the probe showed an airflow condition. Support is still on the case, and they authorize a swap unit to be brought on site, so that I can take the ailing 725 to our product repair center and go over it with a fine-toothed comb. Which I did. Stripped it down to the bare chassis, cleaned every sensor, every connector, every slot, every everything. It was the squeaky-cleanest 11/725 in the Western hemisphere that wasn't fresh out of the factory. I inspected every wire, checked every fan, and replaced anything that wasn't to my liking. It was arranged that it could sit in the PRC for a few weeks, running, with power monitoring probes hooked up. It passed without a hitch. In the meantime the replacement unit is humming along nicely too, without any problems whatsoever. Quite a bit of head-scratching happens. The temporary replacement was an 11/730, basically the same hardware in a different cabinet, so maybe that was a clue. In the meantime, a power logger had been running at the customer site, to check whether the flakiness is coming in from the main power supply. It wasn't. So, we handed back the 11/725 to its rightful owner.

And sure enough, it tripped a few days later. Yes, early evening yet again.

Running out of ideas, one of us decided to go on site every day at closing time and just sit there to see it go. And sure enough, he observed the problem right the first evening.

The cleaning crew came in. The vacuum cleaner was not the problem. The floor mop was not the problem. One of them took the waste bag from the paper shredder, tied it closed, and set it aside -- right in front of the air intake of the 11/725.

Floooomph. TRIP.

24
0

Office 2019 lumbers to the stage once more as Microsoft promises future releases

Dave K
Silver badge

Re: Commitment

Same here. Office 2016 is remarkably crash-prone. I get 2-3 crashes a week from Excel, Outlook has a habit of randomly crashing every day or so as well. It's also bloody slow as well as times. Given the availability of modern processing power, it's quite startling how sluggish various actions are in Office 2016

But still, this is the modern Microsoft. Keep pushing out pointless new features that nobody really cares about whilst ignoring existing usability, reliability and quality issues.

6
0

HP Ink should cough up $1.5m for bricking printers using unofficial cartridges – lawsuit

Dave K
Silver badge

Re: Lexmark next

It's not just inkjets with the issue. Laser printers do this as well, plus other naughty tricks.

One of the big beefs I have with lots of different laser printer manufacturers is how they falsely state that the toner is empty even when there's tons of toner left. HP used to make it increasingly difficult to override this. I remember at my last job a colour HP printer that claimed the black toner was out (4,500 page toner). After managing to delve into the super-hidden-ultra-advanced menu (17 sub-menus down), I managed to find the override toggle to allow the printer to continue printing.

It managed about another 3,500 pages before the printing became patchy. Hence that so-called "empty" toner was actually about 40% full still when the printer decided to display the "toner out" light and stop working.

Similar story at home with our little Brother laser printer. That claimed the toner had run out ages ago. A bit of gaffer-tape over the perspex window on the side and it is still printing away perfectly fine over 5 years later.

My opinion on printer manufacturers in general? Dishonest crooks, the lot of them.

11
0

UKIP flogs latex love gloves: Because Brexit means Brexit

Dave K
Silver badge

Re: Don't need a condom.....

On the other hand, giving everyone a good fucking and Nigel Farage do go together nicely...

5
1

Remember when Apple's FaceTime stopped working years ago? Yeah, that was deliberate

Dave K
Silver badge

Sorry, they deserve it this time for trying to throw out the lawsuit with their "We can do what we want because you accepted the T&Cs" argument.

Idiots.

29
0
Dave K
Silver badge

Re: Give and Take

Not everyone likes updates. I've had too many phones that have been super speedy when new, yet have become slower and more stuttery with every update. Nowerdays, I often avoid major OS updates on my phone and have a 3 year phone which feels as speedy as when I bought it as a result. Seriously, what does Oreo (for example) do so wonderfully that I'm missing out on with Marshmallow except (inevitably) run slower?

Back with iOS, when I had an iPhone 3G, I deliberately kept it on iOS 3.1.2 as it ran like an absolute turd with 4.0.

And anyway, this is about Apple taking functionality that worked under iOS 6 and disabling it not long after iOS 7 came along. I don't recall Google disabling features on earlier Android phones the moment they release a new version?

16
2

How an augmented reality tourist guide tried to break my balls

Dave K
Silver badge

There's nothing quite like an enlarged photo of your nads to add authenticity to the article. Of course, quite what other tourists thought whilst Mrs D was taking a photo of you in that state is another story...

12
0

Lenovo Thinkpad X280: Choosing a light luggable isn't so easy

Dave K
Silver badge

Seems they're going backwards with each new model. Even the lauded X220 was a downgrade on the earlier X201 (16:10 screen with thinner bezels, trackpad with proper buttons), then with each new version the keyboard has got worse, the trackpad has been poor for a while, removal of status LEDs, lousy screen with awful fat bezels for a while now, then they go and kill the removable battery as well.

Such a disappointment to see what has happened to the X range over the last 8 years. Sorry Lenovo, I'll be sticking with my trusty X201 for a while yet! Love it for long-distance traveling due to being able to swap the battery over once the first one starts to run low

6
0

You know all those movies you bought from Apple? Um, well, think different: You didn't

Dave K
Silver badge

Re: Do the right thing

Have to admit to doing the same. New games? I'll often pirate a copy initially to see what I think. Is the game enjoyable, available with no DRM (ideally) or at least none-intrusive DRM? Does it allow me to skip those infuriating into logos after the first run? Does it have a proper save-game system (no god-awful "Checkpoint only" system) If so, I will pull out my wallet and will buy a copy to support the developer.

Of course, if it is only available with some draconian always-online DRM crap, forces a dozen unskippable into logos down your throat every time you launch it and has a lazy and console-derived Checkpoint system, I'll usually keep my money in my pocket and will send the game to Davy-Jones locker courtesy of the Uninstall option.

The ball is in the developers court here. If you make a good game and do your best to make an enjoyable experience for the gamer, I will reward you by buying your game. If however you make every possible attempt to piss off and irritate your customers, I'll vote with my feet.

Unfortunately, finding out how the dev had approached the game does necessitate trying the game first, and it's amazing how few demos exist these days...

18
3

Microsoft: You don't want to use Edge? Are you sure? Really sure?

Dave K
Silver badge

Re: Dear Microsoft

If it were aimed purely at testing, Microsoft would have said so in the pop-up. Or are you trying to say that Insiders don't know what Edge is? If so, MS really is in trouble...

15
1

A flash of inspiration sees techie get dirty to fix hospital's woes

Dave K
Silver badge

Re: Noisy phone lines in building

Ahh the problems when people don't take into account cable lengths. Couple of years ago we had some major building work done at one of our sites. As part of this, they shifted the access gate for the car park and planned to move the security hut (small building with a couple of PCs and IP phones in it). Everything was planned to shift the hut and have a cabling firm in the same day to run new data feeds.

Except that later that day, the site called to say that the connectors looked different. Upon investigating, the old location for the hut was 80m from the nearest comms room, so just had a couple of lengths of CAT5e run to it. New location is 125m away, so the cabling firm ran a fibre feed instead.

And of course, nobody had budgeted or planned for an extra switch. The hut was without phones and PCs for a couple of weeks whilst everyone scrabbled around for more budget to purchase a switch and fibre GBIC for it...

6
0

Microsoft takes a pruning axe to Skype's forest of features

Dave K
Silver badge

Re: 'overcomplicated some of our core scenarios'

I agree with you about Skype, but have to disagree about Skype for Business. Leaving aside the similar name but lack of compatibility with desktop Skype, I personally find SFB's interface awful. It just looks too cartoony with awful, circular blobby icons. In fact, it looks about a "business" like as a Fisher Price toy.

We used to use Cicso Jabber for IM and that had a far cleaner and more professional-looking user interface. It also didn't randomly log you out every now and then and didn't crash for no good reason every few days like SFB does...

11
0

Golden State passes gold-standard net neutrality bill by 58-17

Dave K
Silver badge

No differences? Well in that case, why have the ISPs spent millions trying to thwart NN? You wouldn't spend time and money trying to block a law that makes no difference to your business operations would you?

50
2

GlobalFoundries scuttles 7nm chip plans claiming no demand

Dave K
Silver badge

Re: Not a complete surprise

It makes plenty of sense for GPUs though. Smaller process means more execution units, and that means more performance. Unlike CPUs where per-core performance is important, GPUs are all about massive parellism.

15
0

HP Inc strips off, rolls around as Windows 10 money pours down

Dave K
Silver badge

"Weisler added that customers were aware of the "Windows 7 sunset" – Microsoft ends support for the OS next year"

Technically the year after next. Support ends January 2020.

6
0

Abracadabra! Tales of unexpected sysadmagic and dabbling in dark arts

Dave K
Silver badge

Re: For those in the UK...

I have the benefit of working in Scotland for an England based company, so I do get the Monday off. Most others don't though

</smug mode>

19
0

EU wants one phone plug to rule them all. But we've got a better idea.

Dave K
Silver badge

Re: Just add wireless charging

Interestingly, I have more problems with Apple/Lightning cables.

I agree that USB Micro is flawed as a connector and USB-C is a nice improvement. However at my place of work, I rarely am asked for replacement USB Micro cables for the Android users. However almost every week someone comes along with a disintegrating Lightning cable asking for a replacement. The standard Apple ones almost seem to be deliberately designed to disintegrate after a year or so.

15
2

CADs and boffins get some ThinkPad love

Dave K
Silver badge

Nobody is suggesting 4:3. However, look at those pictures and of the display in-particular. First thing you notice? The massive bezel at the bottom of the screen. On a Macbook Pro (with its 16:10 screen), that space contains extra screen instead of plastic. Would you rather have a fatter plastic bezel, or more screen real-estate? 16:10 is still widescreen, can handle side-by-side pages fine, and often has the same horizontal resolution as 16:9 panels, but has more vertical space and resolution. Given that vertical space is often chomped up by the task bar, title bar, menu/toolbars etc, an extra chunk of vertical space there makes a *big* difference to usability.

Sorry, but every time I see a supposedly professional machine with a 16:9 screen, all I see is a laptop display chosen for its cheapness rather than for its functionality. That's why 16:9 screens have taken over most laptops - because they are cheaper to produce (due to being the same aspect ratio as a TV), that's the only reason. And if I'm splashing 2 grand on a professional machine, I want a display chosen for its quality and suitability, not its cheapness. Something that Lenovo, Dell, HP etc. all fail to grasp still...

12
0

Microsoft's cheapo Surface: Like a netbook you can't upgrade

Dave K
Silver badge

Software has changed a lot in those times however. Windows 10 is a lot more demanding than XP/Linux distros on old netbooks, plus web pages now require a lot more grunt to render as well. It's not necessarily how fast something is in equal benchmarks, but how quick it feels in daily life doing basic tasks of today.

3
0

Span hits F#, LinkedIn gets mumbly, and UWP (yes, it's still clinging on) furnished with new toys

Dave K
Silver badge

Re: Perfect...

If you're Microsoft, the only correct thing to do is to keep changing your mind about which pier you use. Then once people are used to it being at least one of Brighton's piers, switch again and start using the pier at Weston Super Mare. Because that's the Microsoft way...

9
0

Official: AMD now stands for All the Money, Dudes!

Dave K
Silver badge

Great news to see AMD back in the black. Ryzen is a very nice range of hardware - I've been very impressed with mine since getting it late last year. Also great to see Intel being given some real competition again. Long may it continue!

10
0

From toothbrushes to coffee makers to computers: Europe fines Asus, Pioneer, Philips for rigging prices of kit

Dave K
Silver badge

Yep, where I work, shonky mouse and tattered USB Micro cable = always on desk. Shiny mouse and Lightning cable = nicked within a week if you forget to lock them in your drawer at night.

8
0

Core blimey! Apple macOS update lifts boot from MacBook Pro neck

Dave K
Silver badge

Re: They missed that one bit of code...

Quite understandable. We have a lot of mobile engineers running ProE and other CAD software on laptops - in our case Dell Precision and HP ZBook machines. We dont expect the same performance as a dedicated tower workstation, however a mobile workstation with Quarto or FirePro graphics should be able to handle moderate workloads without crashing and burning. Glad to see Apple has admitted the issue and pushed a fix, rather than just blaming it on their customers as usual...

2
0

Boss helped sysadmin take down horrible client with swift kick to the nether regions

Dave K
Silver badge

Many thanks for adding further smiles to Fridays, and enjoy your future position. On-Call, BOFH etc. are a great way to wind down to the weekend, glad to see it's continuing under Rebecca's watchful eye!

11
0

LG G7 ThinkQ: Ropey AI, but a feast for sore eyes and ears

Dave K
Silver badge

Re: LG? Never again

I have a G4 still and love it. Battery life is ok for me, and I love that the battery is changeable. However what I like most is that after 3 years of use, it's still slick and speedy. I've grown tired of Samsung phones that work great for a year or so before becoming stuttery and sluggish, the G4 is lovely at maintaining its performance over time. Updates could be better, but seeing as every Samsung update in the past drove my phone to slower and slower performance levels, I'd gladly take an older OS that remains fast.

2
0

Security guard cost bank millions by hitting emergency Off button

Dave K
Silver badge

A number of years ago I worked in IT support for a local council authority. A new guy started (working for one of the systems guys next door) and immediately set a bad impression by asking how he could get copies of some of the software we had.

After a few days, he was tasked with installing some monitoring software for the UPS systems in our server racks. A short while later, PowerChute broadcast messages started being sent out to every PC in the building warning of a system shutdown. New guy insists to my boss that these are in error, nothing is being shut down, it's just a test of the messaging system. My boss is still annoyed about the fact that these broadcasts are being sent every few minutes to all 400+ machines on the domain.

Ten minutes later however, we have a strangely quiet rack, plus a lot of phones ringing due to our mail system, file server, plus several other systems all being down. My boss is fuming, new guy is suddenly very quiet, and about 10 minutes later the new guy is suddenly very unemployed.

42
0

Page:

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2018