* Posts by bazza

1950 posts • joined 23 Apr 2008

How to make the trains run on time? Satellites. That's how

bazza
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Re: Fail-Safe

The question is whether such tracking engenders fail-safe operation of the railways.

So long as it's done right, yes. Generally speaking you need everything to fail safe when the radio craps out, and not depend on radio to propagate the fail safe network-wide.

So if an emergency stop signal for a train is delivered by radio, that won't work. The signal may not arrive.

However if the train stops automatically if the radio craps out, that's better, so long as the signalling separation gives everything else time to realise there's a problem before one train hits another.

My biggest worry over things like this is that it's putting a lot of eggs in one basket. Lose the satellite and you're left with minimal train network capacity for years.

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FAA's 'drone smash risk to aircraft' is plane crazy

bazza
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Re: "Get real"

If you are so colossally retarded that you think the emergency services and commercial aviation fit into the category of 'leisure aircraft' then someone should take away your internet access for our protection.

If you can't understand that 'leisure aircraft' was a swipe at an unthinking idiot (you?) who thought that the only aircraft that should be in the sky is airliners at 39000ft, I suggest you seek lessons in sarcasm to save us from your poor comprehension.

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bazza
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Re: There should be MORE drones

"There should be more drones, and less leisure aircraft. Drones should replace most leisure aircraft.

There should be zero reason for flying a manned flight to take aerial photography."

Yeah, sure, because all 'leisure' aircraft are used solely for aerial photography and for looking at stuff for no good reason. I can't imagine why they'd paint "Air Ambulance", or "RN" or "RAF" or "Police" or "Small Local Turboprop Airline" or "ILS Beacon Calibration" or "Island Hopper" or "Post Office" or "Gliding Club" or "Pilot Training" or "Development Aircraft" on the side if all they're doing is taking photos for the fun of it.

Get real.

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bazza
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"Thing is that there does not need to be any new laws for "drones" which is simply another word jumping onto the hype train. Many countries already have laws governing hobby aircraft and where/when/how they can operate."

'Need' is a relative word. What's actually happened in the UK is that they added to the existing laws to account for the technical differences between ordinary RC model aircraft and drones. Basically, like RC model aircraft, drones were banned from being operated near people or built up areas.

What's new though is that you can apply for and get a license to operate one in town. This is actually quite permissive. Anyone can buy and fly one as per existing RC regulations, but a suitably trained, equipped and licensed person can also operate one in town or near people under their licensed conditions (and there's a whole bunch of rules as to when, how, where, how close, etc). That is, drones can be flown in more places than previously, but only by people who are on the list of licensees and who have something to lose (their license, fines, liberty, etc) if they break the rules, and not to the detriment of people living underneath them.

That is actually a good thing. The rules are clear, everyone wins, drones can be used in a good way, whilst transgressors get into trouble.

Compare that to the US where, AFAIK (corrections welcome), no one really knows what the rules are, and it's being decided retrospectively in a string of court cases which are merely seeking to apply existing law rather than change the law to suit the current circumstances.

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Here's what an Intel Broadwell Xeon with a built-in FPGA looks like

bazza
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Hmm, developing for FPGAs is pretty hard, and especially so if programming and starting the FPGA part means a power cycle of the whole computer. Any word on whether they've made that easy?

And unless every Intel chip from now on comes with one of these then it is going to remain very niche indeed. No mass market hardware sales, no mass market dev effort. And I can't see some killer application suddenly materialising out of thin air...

One thing I don't understand is, why? Everyone else from ARM to Oracle are busily doing specialised accelerated for functions relevant to the target market. An FPGA is the ultimate do anything DIY accelerator but they normally don't clock that fast; they're not as good as dedicated silicon. So unless Intel has improved the clock rate then it'll be not as good at doing the same things that everyone else is laying out gates for.

Nice experiment though, not so far from the FPGAs-in-an-AMD-socket that were doing the rounds a few years ago.

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Microsoft's done a terrible job with its Windows 10 nagware

bazza
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Re: What users want ...

Ranting isn't going to fix anything. What you can do is make purchase searches on Amazon (already common) and information searches on Wakipedia (probably the first useful link in search results anyway). If you take the users from Google/Bing, then the advertising revenue will wander off and Microsoft will have to rethink where their money will come from.

Ranting does help, it makes me feel better about it...

Whilst the measures you suggest may make MS sit up and pay attention, I'm not sure that they'd help in the long run. Sure, it would leave MS rethinking where their money comes from. But by then there may be no way back for them if they keep failing like this. That would leave no choice but to join the Borg, or something. MS and their shareholders should learn sooner rather than later that 'boring' is probably the best way of guaranteeing a future, and that rash "me too" experiments to grow an already vast business even further in ways that annoy the existing customers is asking for trouble.

With the ISPs beginning to wade in and get into the Ad blocking business, advertising funded IT may suddenly become impossible (commercially if not technically, or very messy). Getting a business onto a paid for and ad free footing now (you know, like they used to be) is probably going to be the smart thing to do right now. Amazon have that (Amazon Prime), Google don't, MS could, Apple sell hardware. Anyone left depending on frames downloaded from ad brokers Web sites for their revenue could find their business being held to ransom by the ISPs.

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bazza
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The Terrible...

...thing they've done is to not recognise what their users wanted, namely Windows 7 with modest technical improvements. I actually paid for Windows 7 retail licenses, and would do the same for something similar.

Instead they've got off on the idea that we'd want to put our data in their cloud, be profiled in our usage and turned into lumps of meat for sale in the advertising market to the highest bidder, admire the toy land look of the remaining vestiges of Metro, buy apps from their store, etc, etc, all just to make the OS 'free'.

Bollocks.

The sooner they realise that the old way worked and the new way doesn't, the better for them and their bottom line. The PC market is dead-ish because of Windows 8/8.1, and 10 is demonstrably not the thing to revive it. 14% share and it's free? If anyone wanted it, craved it it'd be closer to 90%.

I'm seeing friends and colleagues drifting of to Mac who were previously the most ardent Windows users. I may go Linux, and if they ever do Office / Outlook for Linux then I'm outahere. (Open Office is just not very good).

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Feds tell court: Apple 'deliberately raised technological barriers' to thwart iPhone warrant

bazza
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Re: FBI doesn't need the code

Your concern is misplaced.

Every iPhone has a unique serial number. It is trivial for Apple to produce a version of the firmware that does what the FBI wants on one specific phone, and have no effect on all others. And because the firmware is signed the FBI cannot successfully edit it.

Apple are scaremongering about the wider impact of this, but that's a risky strategy. If Apple do what has been asked for them they remain in complete control and no phone gets accessed without their say so. Individual warrants would be accommodated and everyone else is happy with privacy intact, guaranteed by Apple. However their chosen strategy of refusing this is risking a far wider ultimate consequence; being ordered by the Supreme Court to hand over the whole dev environment, source code and signing keys. Then Apple would not be in control at all.

If the supremes do make such an order then presumably everyone would welcome the decision? Isn't that what the Supreme Court for, handing down decisions that everyone accepts?

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bazza
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Re: There Is No Freedom In China

Hmmmm, and what do you suppose it is that makes America the land of the free and home of the brave? What is it that guarantees that?

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Big-screen Skype gets small farewell note

bazza
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Ahead of the Curve

I bought my dumb Samsung TV just before "Smart" came as standard. Seems like there's now no reason to buy a new one at all.

My proactive skinflintedness has paid dividends - I've missed out an entire upgrade cycle and ended up in the same place as everyone else.

Abandoning a Platform?

Even if not many people used Skype on TVs, it was more or less MS's only presence on TVs. Now they'll not be there at all. That's a lack of ambition if ever I saw it.

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Microsoft has made SQL Server for Linux. Repeat, Microsoft has made SQL Server 2016 for Linux

bazza
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Re: Nice to see.

@thames,

"Sybase and Microsoft later parted ways, but Microsoft bought a source code license, and the rights to market the product on Windows, while Sybase retained the rights to all other markets. Sybase changed the name of Sybase SQL Server to better differentiate it from what Microsoft was selling (MS also licensed the rights to use the SQL Server name).

That raises the fascinating possibility that MS doesn't have a license to sell it on anything other than Windows. I wonder if the current MS management have forgotten its origins and is operating under a false assumption? I know I was.

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bazza
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Re: Nice to see.

@Stuart Longland,

"and might produce very different results to taking an application written for Windows and re-writing parts to make it compile and run on Linux."

Of course one of the problems they'd have to contend with if they rewrote it for Linux is that they'd then have two code bases to support, maintain, upgrade. Perhaps they can get away with making the important bits of code portable. Who knows. MS haven't exactly done that well keeping Windows and Mac Office in sync and up to date. I guess that's a very different problem though - Office has a lot of GUI stuff going on.

What Else?

If MS get a taste for this kind of thing, it could start making the desktop interesting. Office for Linux? Outlook for Linux? I'm not sure anyone should inflict Visio on to poor unsuspecting Linux users...

Where might it end?! That could start being dangerous for the existence of desktop Windows. And that in turn could be a real nuisance. A Windows desktop being controlled by a set of group policies dished out from a domain controller is a very useful enterprise tool. Doing the same thing on Linux is a whole lot harder (though there are solutions out there like PowerBroker or whatever it's called now, but they're not going to penetrate through to the innards of things like a web browser). Of course, this is all wild and deeply premature speculation.

Port the Runtime - it's Less Work!

I'm wondering more and more about MS and WINE. They're tinkering a lot with iOS and Android runtimes on Windows mobile. .NET core has been open sourced and Mono is practically official. WINE is a mostly complete thing in a similar vein. MS 'finishing' WINE is certainly more imaginable than it was 5 years ago.

If MS and other companies were to start getting used to the idea of ensuring application portability by porting the runtime environments and not the applications themselves, it's going to make things very confusing!

So What About ARM

If MS have re-written MS SQL Server for Linux, does it recompile for Linux on ARM? Now that could really be interesting!

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bazza
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Re: Nice to see.

I guess we could gauge possible performance by seeing how well WINE or Mono works. They both replicate large chunks of the Windows runtime environment. Anyone got any benchmarks lurking anywhere?

In fact, MS could do worse than put some decent effort into WINE, that'd make all their software available on Linux...

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AMD to fix slippery hypervisor-busting bug in its CPU microcode

bazza
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Re: Learnt something new today

AFAIK no one has ever successfully tinkered with microcode. It's a security through obscurity thing on a very large scale.

Pity though. It'd be cool to be able to load up microcode onto an x86 and make it execute, say, PowerPC instructions!

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bazza
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Re: Learnt something new today

"And not only the CPU At Linux boot time, there may be several "firmware updates" of various stuff of the machine innards."

It's certainly quite astonishing to see just how many files are lurking in /lib/firmware. Makes one wonder if there's any such thing as a real piece of hardware these days. Seems like "hardware" is now firmware running on some sort of micro / cpu / etc. I guess the best I can hope for is that some of it is FPGA or CPLD images, but even that doesn't feel like a good old fashioned collection of dedicated transistors.

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bazza
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Re: Learnt something new today

It gets loaded at boot time. CPUs have been like this for a veeeery long time.

The advantage is that bugs in the microcode (such as this) can be fixed. If the CPU didn't use microcode and suffered from this bug, the only fix would be a new CPU.

Disadvantages - microcode means having instruction translation units in one's CPU, which require a bunch of transistors, which take power to run them. ARMs don't use microcode, which is one of the many architectural features that help them beat x86 CPUs on power consumption.

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How the FBI will lose its iPhone fight, thanks to 'West Coast Law'

bazza
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Re: Hyperbole

@gnasher729.

"The problem is that while there is pretty good protection so that you can't install new software on your iPhone unless it is signed by Apple, there is no protection against somebody making a copy of that firmware. And since it is signed by Apple, it can be then installed on any computer."

Your concern is misplaced. Yes, the modded firmware might leak and find its way onto any compatible iPhone, where it will have absolutely no effect. The FBI have asked for a remedy for one specific phone, and indeed the court order specifically limits the effect of that remedy to that phone. From a technical standpoint Apple can very easily brew up a version of the firmware that will have no effect at all except on that specific phone; they all have unique serial numbers. Apple could even make it so the effect was time limited, giving the FBI a limited opportunity to make use of the remedy.

It would be impossible for anyone except Apple to modify the "special" firmware to make it work on another phone. The change would affect the cryptographic hash of the firmware and no iPhone would install it.

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bazza
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Re: Hyperbole / bazza

@ allthecoolshortnamesweretaken,

"In a free country, ruled by a government of the people, by the people, for the people this shouldn't be an issue, surely?"

It depends on your point of view. The elected politicians, who are of the people, are people themselves, and serve the people, may decide to pass a law in furtherance of "better" law and order. If the government makes a decision and can get a political consensus it will, and indeed is required by its democratic mandate, to act on it. There'd not be a whole lot that anyone could do about it then, not even Apple.

There's always immense pressure on governments to do whatever is appropriate to preserve law and order. They fall down on the job, they will get kicked out. Mostly they try to prevent that outcome.

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bazza
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Re: Hyperbole

@chris 17,

"How do you remove the knowledge learnt from engineers heads? The ability to do as the Fbi ask does not exist"

You can't, and it's already there. On reading the newspapers some coder somewhere in Apple's employ has already involuntarily thought it through. And for all intents and purposes it does exist, it simply hasn't been typed in yet.

Apple have their source code and their own signing keys. They can make any change they like and have any iPhone anywhere on the planet accept it. That's the whole purpose of signing keys. The source code changes are almost certainly trivial, something like:

if (PINRetries > 10) {

wipe_phone();

}

Becomes:

if ((serialnum != <Farook's phone serial number>) && (PINRetires > 10)) {

wipe_phone();

}

No matter what side of the debate one is on, we have to recognise that it can be done.

@Richard 12,

"And the other hundred or so requests currently pending? And the millions of requests this would unleash? And the fact that every other country in the world would immediately demand the same ability?"

It is important to acknowledge that whether or not Apple do this for the FBI is irrelevant to the rest of the world. The rest of the world does not need to wait for Apple to satisfy the FBI's request. They can, within whatever the local legal framework permits, apply varying degrees of pressure on Apple and their business in that country. Unfortunately in some countries that pressure may be applied for reasons not generally compatible with a harmonious and peaceful democratic society.

As you implicitly acknowledging everyone now knows it can happen. It is public knowledge. It may (and almost certainly will in some counties) as you say result in millions of requests flooding in. If Apple really, really, didn't want to become the focus of that then it was in their best interests to keep every hint of the possibility as quiet as possible.

However the relationship between the FBI and Apple (and the whole tech industry) has clearly broken down to the extent that the FBI decided to go public. That was never going to be in Apple's interest, and who knows, it may have been wiser to have caved in whilst it was still a private matter. The FBI have clearly wrong-footed Apple in this dispute; Apple clearly did not anticipate it becoming a public matter.

Don't for one moment think that I consider the FBI, politicians or anyone else to be angels in all this. The FBI are acting crazily with FBI vs. MS and their Irish data centre. Politicians in the US and elsewhere have failed to lead and inspire a proper public debate about just how high tech industry should, for the benefit of society as a whole, interact with law enforcement. This whole thing may (and I sincerely hope not) result in a significant increase in successful terrorist plots, a decrease in successful criminal prosecutions, etc. This kind of thing is what happens when lazy politicians fail to properly consider changes in industry and society.

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bazza
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Re: Hyperbole

"But as part of the trial process that's what they'll have to do to anyway show that the procedure they used to get the data off it is reliable."

No, the FBI have asked that this all be done on Apple's premises.

The FBI have been careful to ask for nothing to leave Apple's premises. Apple cannot show why that is less safe than their own signing keys.

The phone itself need never leave Apple ever again, even if it turns out to contain useful information. Once unlocked the whole mobile forensics thing can happen in their office, with only the results of the examination being permitted off-site.

Something has gone seriously wrong in the relationship between Apple and law enforcement agencies in th US. There's certainly fault on both sides (e.g FBI vs MS - the FBI are being crazy there), but Apple has clearly done something to irk them sufficiently for the FBI to choose to go public with this.

It sounds dangerous to upset one's own government and law enforcement agencies when there clearly isn't a political majority likely to support one's point of view. If Uncle Sam wants to, Uncle Sam can pass a law making the FBI's request un-ignorable.

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bazza
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Re: Hyperbole

"They're going to say "if you want to do business here, you'll be unlocking phones for us or GTFO"

And they won't need wait until it's been done in the US. Everyone now knows it can be done, so it's going to be difficult for Apple to argue that it is impossible.

The article quoted:

If the FBI gets its way and forces companies to weaken encryption, all of us – our data, our networks, our infrastructure, our society – will be at risk."

But that's bollocks. The FBI aren't asking Apple to release firmware to them, they’re not asking for a universal solution, and all of this can be done on Apple's premises with none of it leaving the building. There's no reason why any of this will be less private than Apple's own signing keys. So if it is looked after to the same standard as Apple's own keys, why would it be riskier?

If one wants to assess risk, one should enquire as to how Apple safeguard their keys. They'd be far more dangerous if they ever got out.

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Hardcoded god-mode code found in RSA 2016 badge-scanning app

bazza
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FAIL

Whooopsie!

There's a lesson for us all, again...

Once again Douglas Adams is proved right. Always know where your towel is.

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Bruce Schneier: We're sleepwalking towards digital disaster and are too dumb to stop

bazza
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Re: @AC - It's gonna be difficult...

"Actually those retailers and importers are right, it's not their problem. They're doing business, they're not a charity to care for something that is non-profit related."

Er, it is their problem if they get caught doing it. The trouble is that the trade arrangements we have these days assume that manufacturers and traders are trustworthy, but there's very little going on to check up on them. With no real chance of being caught, the greedier types get away with it. A CE badge is meant to mean something but in practice it doesn't.

Looking at the debacle over hoverboards one wonders whether anyone anywhere cares about product standards compliance at all.

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We survived a five-hour butt-numbing Congress hearing on FBI-Apple ... so you don't have to

bazza
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Re: Trey

Yes I was thinking that too. It's an extreme analogy from Trey, but it is valid. Everyone is used to the idea of investigators looking in a murder's wallet, house, papers, bank accounts, phone bill, corpse, etc. Why should their phone be any different?

To extend Trey's analogy, Apple's argument amounts to saying that surgical tools used in autopsies should be band.

It's not like the FBI are asking for warrantless or universal access. With a warrant (which indicates one off necessity) they can already look in one's wallet, house, papers, bank accounts, phone bill, iCloud, etc, and everyone thinks that's ok. Oneself need not be dead, they simply have to show a reason to justify suspicion.

However, they aren't doing themselves any favours in stretching what a warrant should empower with FBI vs Microsoft.

Safes that can defeat a real expert armed with the right equipment are pretty rare and expensive.

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Computers abort SpaceX Falcon 9 launch

bazza
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Re: Quite positive really

"The other issue is in disseminating the information regarding restricted zones to all craft. How would you inform the skipper of a sailboat inbound from Jamaica - bearing in mind that he is not required to keep any sort of radio watch,"

Well, if they can't be bothered to pay attention to charts like this and the abundant warning notices and information therein, then they shouldn't be entirely surprised if on launch day some extremely grumpy coastguards turn up or bits of rocket start landing on their boat.

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bazza
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Re: Quite positive really

Yup. Once the SRBs were lit, it was no longer a case of "are we going?" but one of "which direction are we going?"

And if the range safety officer pressed their button, it would be been going in all directions all at once, very quickly!

It's a real shame that boat got in the way. I hope it was identified and the owner given a thorough explanation of the rules of the sea and how waters can be closed when needed. They literally are a waste of oxygen.

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Canonical accused of violating GPL with ZFS-in-Ubuntu 16.04 plan

bazza
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Re: bazza @HCV - I don't quite get your point

Er. no. It's the people wanting to use Ubuntu-based distros for commercial products that will care, as it opens them up to Oracle later coming along and either demanding a license fee for every instance, or - if they are a competitor to an Oracle product - being bankrupted in court by Oracle's legal arm.

Sigh. Then that would be a matter for them to worry about, not a matter for Canonical and certainly not the FSF, etc. The rest of us mere mortals would simply like to be able to use a modern fs based on open source code in a convenient way without having to mess around with making one's own kernel modules (trivial though that may be).

And as others have pointed out here are plenty of distributions that are pushing out the closed source Nvidia drivers, and no one is suing anyone about that. The people getting hot under the collar about the addition of the open source ZFS are being mightily inconsistent.

Do you prefer Btrfs?

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bazza
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Re: @HCV - I don't quite get your point

Not the same by a long shot, and careful what you wish for introducing changes here.

You miss the point. Both the US constitution and Magna Carta have already been partially or extensively modified by politicians. Documents that are far more significant to humanity than a poxy software license have, by common agreement, been modified. They are sacrosanct, but not unmodifiable.

So considering GPL to be unmodifiable is the height of conceit. Even politicians have managed to get their shit together more often than software devs. That's a pretty poor situation for the industry.

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bazza
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Re: @HCV - I don't quite get your point

I hope you agree with me that Canonical is naive to think they can commit this violation and get away with it. Oracle's lawyers will tear them into pieces.

Nope, you've got the wrong end of the stick entirely. Oracle don't and won't give a damn. They didn't when FreeBSD incorporated ZFS, and they won't here.

No, it's the GPListas and the kernel devs who may get cross, but Canonical's lawyers think that they have no reason to do so. The trouble lies partly in the fact that GPL2 has not really been tested conclusively in a court case in this area.

Anyway the whole thing is nuts, and it's only the foamy mouthed zealots who care. ZFS is a fine bit of code that everyone wants to use, and it is open source.

The Linux crowd's normal response to this sort of problem is to reproduce the software; they did this with DTRACE, creating FTRACE. However they have failed to reproduce ZFS satisfactorily. The ongoing lack of ZFS or a decent reproduction of it in Linux is making Linux look bad.

I think Canonical are being quite brave and are trying to move Linux on for the benefit of all. We should applaud that. Incorporating ZFS will not harm anyone or make any existing or future code more or less open. There's loads of people who are compiling their own ZFS.ko anyway, and obstructing Canonical would be peevishness itself.

Personally I think that the clauses in GPL2 that force GPL2 onto derivative works have become a big obstacle to progress. If they were updated to permit use of other acceptable open source licenses too then there'd be no real problems. The GPL2 is just words, not a sacrosanct document that mere mortals cannot change.

The same goes for any other restrictive document such as the US constitution and magna carta, both of which have been amended and or partly repealed. Good grief, if even US politicians can occasionally agree on amending the constitution, how bad does that make the GPListas look?

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Microsoft scraps Android Windows 10 bridge, but says yes to Objective-C compiler

bazza
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Re: Tools for porting IOS applications?

"Does anyone other than MS want this?"

Absolutely yes, though not because I'm a iOS or MS proponent.

I want it because with any luck it will help break down the crazy barriers that exist in the software world and start getting rid of walled gardens.

Software source code portability can be a tremendous boon (take a look at Linux for example) - why shouldn't mobile and other platforms benefit too?

Especially in the mobile space the major players have been allowed to construct their un-portable ecosystems and they've gone out of their way to make it very hard for anyone to have a common source code base for the applications they're writing. If someone, even MS, starts making it less important what ecosystem (iOS, Android, etc) one chooses to write for, that can be only a good thing.

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Linux lads lambast sorry state of Skype service

bazza
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"We do understand that Linux is a competitor of Microsoft's Windows. But we do not understand why this results in a lack of support for Skype," the pair's online protest states.

Err, unfortunately Linux doesn't really compete against Windows on the desktop. That's why MS aren't interested. It's not like they pathologically hate anything non-Windows, they do support Android, OS X, iOS. Like anyone else trying to make money out of software they have to go with the flow.

Having said that, MS joining up with the Wine guys and making that better would be a low cost and effective plan B for MS, and ought to please those who do use Linux as a desktop.

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US DoJ files motion to compel Apple to obey FBI iPhone crack order

bazza
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Re: Something doesn't compute

An arguments based on emotion.

In all jurisdictions a murder investigation is a legal obligation. They don't happen simply because someone is a bit upset about it.

OK, so murder is practically a national past time, and the terrorists are going to have to really go for it to make a significant contribution to homicide statistics, but I'm not aware of any state where an investigation is somehow optional.

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bazza
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Er, Apple kinda have confirmed it. They do so every time they put out an update.

The whole point of signed firmware updates is that the existing firmware will trust them implicitly. Putting down a signed update that does what the FBI wants is easy for Apple. They have the source code and signing keys.

There's fiddly bits and pieces concerning what user input is required to start the installation running, but the user plays no role in deciding whether the update is legitimate and from Apple. And unless Apple has used a mask ROM for the secure enclave on later phones (which seems unlikely - unupgradeable firmware can't be bug fixed), that too could probably be circumvented in a similar way.

Signed updates are used by everything - Windows, Linux, OS X, BlackBerry, etc.

The whole thing is fine so long as Apple or anyone else don't leak their signing keys. Apple are not being asked for those in this court order. They're being asked for a special update that works on this specific iPhone and no other (so it won't work on yours).

Of course if they do leak the keys then there's no defence left. Keeping such keys on an Internet connected computer is asking for trouble.

Unless NSA have got something really good (which I doubt) they can't realistically hack the keys either.

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Confused as to WTF is happening with Apple, the FBI and a killer's iPhone? Let's fix that

bazza
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Re: And the point is?

Indeed, the only police force that needs a warrant is the ordinary coppers. The MoD, British Transport and UKAEA (I think they're still around) Police can just walk in anywhere they want.

The balancing control is that they have to be acting in accordance with their remit. For a British Transport policeman to enter a property there a has to be a live investigation related to the transport system and a good reason to believe that there is a connection. The UKAEA police can't do anything unless there is actually some nuclear material missing, etc. etc.

What makes Customs and Excise different is that there is almost always something in the tax laws they can pin on almost anyone!

I've never heard of anyone complaining about abuse of these powers of entry, so it's surprising that there was a review started.

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Patch ASAP: Tons of Linux apps can be hijacked by evil DNS servers, man-in-the-middle miscreants

bazza
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Re: ASN.1

There's a lot to be said for using a common representation format (it makes analysis easier and bugs can be fixed once rather than multiple times in different software), but there's a lot of bloat in ASN.1-based implementations that exists only to deal with rarely used features - and having large chunks of code that are rarely exercised is not an ideal basis for reliability either.

ASN.1 is still the only thing we have like this that has a binary wire format and does constraints checking. It is the closest thing we have to a common representation format that doesn't miss out constraints specification and checking. It also does types and extents tagging too.

If Google added constraints, message type and extents tagging to GPBs it would useful. It would be a clone of ASN.1. As it stands you cannot stream read GPB's wire format, you have to have a-priori knowledge of what message is being sent, and you're reliant on devs writing extra code to check constraints.

The commercial ASN.1 tool sets I've used has been pretty good. If only someone like Google would do a decent open source implementation.

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iPhones clock-blocked and crocked by setting date to Jan 1, 1970

bazza
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Re: The 1970s...

err.......no

during the Standard time experiment we were an hour ahead, not a minute so the time was 01:00:00

My bad. Er, good to see someone was paying attention even if it wasn't me...

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bazza
Silver badge

Re: The 1970s...

I minor observation is that the at 00:00:00 01/01/1970 UTC, the local time in the UK was 00:01:00, for the UK was then on British Standard Time. Thus whilst PST then was 8 hours behind UTC, it was 9 hours behind London.

Timezones are, and always have been, a nightmare.

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Get out of mi casa, Picasa: Google photo site to join Wave, Code, Reader in silicon hell

bazza
Silver badge

Re: My Tracks too

Seriously, how long before they decide to shut down Gmail with two months' warning?

I've long since stopped using Google Services for this and many other reasons. It's hard though. I used to use Postini for spam filtering (indirectly through my mail provider). Google bought it, migrated users to gmail, changed the terms and conditions (they now snoop for advertising purposes, even though it's still a paid-for service!) and made it worse (you now cannot integrate it into Outlook). Bastards.

The problem with Google is that they're big enough to buy anything else they like or compete against. The competition authorities are too technically ignorant to see what's happening. Truly they own too much stuff. Avoiding being forced to become part of the Borg is hard work.

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Uber, Taskrabbit, other Silicon Valley darlings urge Europe not to screw their business

bazza
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I've just taken a look at this page - it doesn't even say that they take any steps to verify the identity of a driver.

Also there's something for the ASA there too. They claim to make safer cities. They cannot substantiate that. And judging by the videos online of fights between Uber drivers and passengers, the complete opposite would seem to be the case.

This page has a list of bad Uber stories...

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bazza
Silver badge

Laws work both ways.

If a taxi company is properly licensed, it's cars and it's drivers properly registered and checked, it is not really the company's fault if something goes wrong. Their liability is limited.

If a taxi company isn't licensed, it's cars are an unknown quantity and it's drivers are simply someone at the end of an email address, who is to blame if something goes wrong? And if the money flows through Uber's systems then the customer's contract is with Uber, not the driver. That sounds like it should attract full liability.

To dodge such liability they'd have to use some pretty strong arm legal shenanigans to deter litigation. As a victim you'd not want to be dealing with that too at a time when you want some redress.

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Met Police wants to keep billions of number plate scans after cutoff date

bazza
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Re: Show us evidence..

No problem, just S172 the guy for a Thursday afternoon a few years ago, when he can't possibly give a correct answer.

The law guards against that kind of thing. That's why speeding tickets have to be issued within 2weeks.

The law got changed when the Hamiltons got caught speeding but nothing was done for 6 months. They argued, quite reasonably, in court that they could not be expected to remember who was driving that long ago. Law got changed.

The 'reasonable doubt' thing applies.

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Picking apart the circuits in the ARM1 – the ancestor of your smartphone's brain

bazza
Silver badge

Re: Dynamic logic?

For instance, one design I did back in the late 70s used an RCA processor which normally ticked over at about 10kHz waiting for keypad input. When it sensed a key it went to 2MHz until processing was complete. The whole unit ran for weeks off 3 C cells.

The RCA1802? Great chip. The original low power micro. Got used in all sorts of things - cruise missiles (where I think they did an entire terrain following radar guidance system on it, which would have been a monumental achievement), British Telecom payphones used them.

Another thing I miss is 4000 series CMOS logic. Want to run it off 24V? No problems. Fiddly to use (don't dare leave an input undefined), not fast, but great power consumption and good noise immunity. I don't think the 1802 went quite that high, but it was good noise immunity that made is suitable for amateur satellites back in the 1970s.

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AdBlock Plus, websites draft peace deal so ads can bypass blockade

bazza
Silver badge

This is a really bad idea on the part of the advertising industry.

We all now know that they'll cave in to this kind of thing.

There's a ton of alternative ad blockers, all of whom now know that the better their blockers the sooner the ad industry will flourish the cash.

On top of that the network operators now know that blocking adverts at the network level will be popular and renumerative. They've been thinking of doing this anyway to reduce their operating costs, and now it makes double sense.

The fundamental problem with ad funded services is that everyone who lies between the service and the user can cream off the top. And whilst a website might have links to ads, there's no way to actually force the web browser to open them. Unless you write the web browser too.

It's only a matter of time before Chrome stops supporting ad blockers I think. But that would guarantee that people would stop using it.

Online advertising was always going to be a cash cow that could be milked only so much.

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Submarine cable cut lops Terabits off Australia's data bridge

bazza
Silver badge

Re: Microwave?

Microwave links need line of sight. Oceans are the reason we started building satellites...

Also, microwave data links simply cannot carry as much data as a decent fibre optic cable. The bandwidth is not available. That's why microwave links have mostly gone out of fashion.

They've come back into fashion a little bit in the USA. A financial institution in Chicago built a private microwave relay chain all the way to New York. Why? The latency on a microwave link is a lot lower than on a fibre (microwaves travel at c, light in a fibre travels at 0.6c). That matters if you're in the high speed share trading business. This link knocks approx 2milliseconds off the time taken to make a trade.

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The Mad Men's monster is losing the botnet fight: Fewer humans are seeing web ads

bazza
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Re: Look at all the people that care

Do mean, the customers?

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Assange will 'accept arrest' on Friday if found guilty

bazza
Silver badge

Re: I'll believe it when I see it.....

This is going to make the Ecuadorian authorities look ridiculous. They chose to shelter him to make what must have been in their eyes some kind of point of principle. By leaving he would in effect be saying that he no longer believes in that principle himself. It goes something like this:

Assange: "I'm being illegally hounded by the UK and Sweden"

Ecuador: "We agree, have a comfy sofa"

<Divers alarums>

Assange: "I've changed my mind, I'm throwing in my lot with the UK and Sweden"

Ecuador: "So you actually don't mind being hounded after all?"

Of course, one way out of that would be to not let him out of the embassy at all. Sort of like:

Assange: "I've changed my mind"

Ecuador: "We haven't..."

Assange: "Er, can I go now?"

Ecuador: "Nope"

Assange, through a window: "The UK government must forcibly enter the embassy and rescue me"

<Divers alarums>

If he does quit their embassy, they should at the very least bill him for the accommodation.

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bazza
Silver badge

Re: WTF?

I imagine that whatever UK judge takes the contempt of court hearing would say "United What?" and ignore the UN completely. If they're feeling particularly grumpy they may hold the relevant bods in the UN in contempt too.

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bazza
Silver badge

Re: Don't like his chances

We have no business with him, we merely have to extradite him as per the EU arrest warrant Sweden issued.

Yes we do. He skipped bail (costing his chums a fortune) and is in contempt of court. There's no way the English judiciary will want him to get away with that without a hearing, verdict and almost certainly a prison sentence. They will want to deal with that first before packing him off to Sweden. Doing otherwise hints at setting an undesirable precedent.

The Americans have already said publicly that they don't have a case against him. Stands to reason - he's not a US citizen and he handled the leaked material whilst not on US territory. It would be hard even for them to show that an offence in US jurisdiction had been committed.

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Google licks its lips at sight of Qualcomm's 64-bit server ARM chips

bazza
Silver badge

Re: Feature

Exchange is far better than the mess that is its equivalent on Linux.

Several years ago MS showed off Windows 7 running Office running on an ARM, printing to an Epson. They achieved this by writing the required hardware abstraction layer for ARM and simply recompiled Windows 7, Office and a set of drivers. It worked no trouble at all.

They could do that for any of their software and ship it. The barrier is testing, and whatever commercial loyalty they're contractually obliged to show to Intel. Delay too long and they might find themselves without a market. I think that the company has wasted the 7ish years since they did that demonstration. They had everything they needed to lead the establishment of an ARM based ecosystem for servers and desktops, even buying an ARM foundry license. Seven years later they have a nearly dead mobile platform and nothing else to show for it. Meanwhile their strongest customer base is or soon will be itching to transition servers to ARM so as to remain cost competitive with their rivals who use Linux (who can and will make the jump at the earliest opportunity).

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