* Posts by Guus Leeuw

259 posts • joined 27 Mar 2008

Page:

US spanks EU businesses in race to detect p0wned servers

Guus Leeuw

Seriously...

Dear Sir,

"Organisations in EMEA are taking almost six months (175 days) to detect an intruder in their networks, which is rather more than the 102 days that the firm found when asking the same questions last year. In contrast, the median dwell time in the Americas has improved from at 76 days in 2017, compared with 99 in 2016. Globally it stands at 101 days."

Stone-editor... Again!

Regards,

Guus

0
0

US cops go all Minority Report: Google told to cough up info on anyone near a crime scene

Guus Leeuw

As the case is here in the Republic of Ireland, it is very much different... Back in the day, police people got recruited because of their physical appearance... You'd have to be 6 ft something, strong, and large... A Jack Reacher kinda guy...

Nowadays, they hire Tom Cruise type people for the police force, even as beat cops. I'm all for equal rights and all that stuff, but a hammer is just not a good tool to cut a piece into two pieces...

That difference in appearance is already putting a target on their back. Also it makes for those people not wanting to go out on the beat, because, well, they are attackable, I would assume. Would you put yourself in a dangerous position? Neither would a cop. ;-) But "dangerous" is relative.

It's not an easy situation to sort out / deal with, for sure, and the sword cuts both ways, I would still argue, though, that visible presence is everything...

1997/1998, Santa Barbara CA: A cop in a cruiser along turnpikes and highways... not everywhere, but often enough you saw one sitting at the curb monitoring traffic... Also, in Goleta, you wouldn't have to wait for campus cops to come to a phoned-in publicly drunk situation... the cops would arrive faster than you walk to the end of the block... That alone will keep a lot of folks in check...

1
0
Guus Leeuw

Dear Sir,

this is a difficult one on the face of it.

However I would wholeheartedly argue that the police should do more in the public eye. An investigation using electronic data to find people provides for a situation where the police is not visibly on the street trying to find witnesses. That in itself cannot be good. Feeling protected and secure can only be achieved when those who are supposed to provide that protection and securety are visible and are around.

The village constable, in my day, knew what you were doing day in day out, because he walked the streets, and he talked to the people that he met. Poeple knew him, and he was approachable. Stuff got sorted out that way.

Nowadays, I don't see police other than when they use their siren to jump a traffic queue at a busy crossing so that they can get to the chipper before you.

Best regards,

Guus

6
0
Guus Leeuw

Dear Sir,

the problem is, in fact, not so much with the police finding out your whereabouts at the time indicated in the warrant. The problem is, I would suppose, much more with the police having a lot of data that they have no obligation to delete after the criminal case was finished. So they hold this data forever. Which, in itself, is not a problem. However, as happens so often, since they are holding that data (albeit for a very singular purpose), somebody else (even within the police) might use that data for a whole different case / cause, and thereby simply misusing the data, the warrant and the system.

CCTV to keep us secure, fair enough, catch the thief. But do not use that footage to go after people that don't pick up dog poo.

As with any data, the access rights should be farily tightly controlled, however that is still a non-consideration for most people in the enforcing and judging branches of government.

Regards,

Guus

5
1

Uber breaks self-driving car record: First robo-ride to kill a pedestrian

Guus Leeuw

Dear Sir,

How do you, uhm, recruit people whose job title will be "accident enhancement manager" and whose job will be to randomly run into the road at night wearing dark cloths?

Seriously: Who defines what comprehensive means for a test center like that?

Regards,

Guus

3
0

FYI: There's a cop tool called GrayKey that force unlocks iPhones. Let's hope it doesn't fall into the wrong hands!

Guus Leeuw

Re: "Thanks for that excellent example of 'False dichotomy'."

Dear Sir,

The problem in not so much that there is such a device. The problem is that the police has access to it.

Now, I agree, that they need to be able to do their job, but even with the limited information they have today, they fail to do most of their job. Increasing the amount of information isn't going to make that better.

Also, if the police really thinks that this person is the perpertrator, it is indeed quite handy for them to be able to plant evidence on a device once they have unlocked it.

I do not know what the best solution for society is, however I do feel that unfeathered access to people's belongings is not something that the police or indeed the government should have.

Best regards,

Guus

10
2

Blackout at Samsung NAND factory destroys chunk of global supply

Guus Leeuw

The maths don't add up...

Dear Sir,

could you kindly get in touch with Samsung and ask them how it is possible that a 30 minute outage caused 11% of their monthly output in ruins?

11% of a month (in time) is roughly 3.3481 days, which is roughly 4821.30 minutes... Since it's a plant, I am assuming 24x7 operations...

Maybe they operate 8 hours a (a third - still leaves 1607.10 minutes in 11%) and only during the week (so operating on 5/7 - still leaves 1147.9286 minutes).

Even with 8-hour week-day-only shifts, 30 minutes is only 2.6134% of the 11% that Samsung claim is now in ruin. What is Samsung doing with its NAND Flash plant?

Reasoning it the other way around:

11% of production in ruins whilst off-line for 30 minutes means that 100% of production can be created in roughly 270 minutes (9 x 11 = 100; 9 x 30 = 270). 270 minutes is slightly more than half a day (8 hour working day). There's, on average, still more than 29 days left in the month after that half a day has been taken away from an average month 30.odd days...

It does not make any sense whatsoever...

Regards,

Guus

5
28

Super Cali neutral traffic bill makes web throttling bogus

Guus Leeuw

Re: Doubling down?

Dear Sir,

doubling down (in blackjack) is doubling the bet in exchange for 1 additional card. So it is similar to upping the ante...

Doubling down in political context normally means that a policitian keeps on telling lies even when faced with hard facts that tell the truth / reality.

Doubling down, therefore, has nothing to do with either what the Senator is doing, nor with halving any effort.

Does language not mean anything anymore these days? Can I just use random words that I like the sounds of in order to look more hip? What if I called you a cat, but really you're a dog? Is that OK? Or calling satellites "artifical" in the context of a story about the Keppler Satellite, as if there were naturally occurring man-made f*ing satellites...

Best regards,

Guus

2
5

Bad blood: Theranos CEO charged with massive fraud

Guus Leeuw

Re: Buh-bye

Dear Sir,

do you really wonder?

Can I just say that I read 3 articles on ElReg this morning, and I've had my share of bad English for the day... Outfits like ElReg simply regurgitate news (whether that news was already regurgitated or not) for us to swallow. I mean, why in the world would one use the word "artificial" as an adjective to the word "satellite"? Is it to indicate that there are also naturally occuring satellites? In a story about the Keppler Satellite??

It's clear that random people ran write for these media outfits. Nobody needs journalism training anymore... Any twat can write whatever he/she wants and publish it as well (I mean, look at me)... No need for making sure that, at least, the language is sound, never mind the actual contents of the publication.

So old-school journalism *still* is vital to the world, and I for one am happy to see it!

Regards,

Guus

0
10

Next; tech; meltdown..? Mandatory; semicolons; in; JavaScript; mulled;

Guus Leeuw

Re: Tabs v spaces

Dear Sir,

languages that need whitespace to decide the structure of a program should be similarly taken around the back of the shed.

Regards,

Guus

110
16

IBM opens emergency escape hatch to TSS volunteers

This post has been deleted by a moderator

Facebook Messenger ... for who now? Zuck points his digital crack at ever younger kids

Guus Leeuw

Re: As a childless curmudgeon.

Dear sir,

Quote:

Having children is biology, it's not a right, or a privilege

More and more that biology is helped along by medicine (rightly or wrongly). So privilege sounds more correct than pure biology.

Best regards,

Guus

9
3

WordPress 4.9: This one's for you, developers!

Guus Leeuw

Bad bad bad

Dear sir,

The English in the article is appalling.

Is it that you guys just write things and hit the publish button?

I thought so.

Regards,

Guus

0
0

White House plan to nuke social security numbers is backed by Equifax's ex-top boss

Guus Leeuw

Re: Obscure number

Dear Sir,

luckily Brits now think with their brain, rather than their naughty bits. It also seems that Brits have grown out of a juvenile state of mind.

From the Dutch Overlord,

Guus

1
1

Not another Linux desktop! Robots cross the Uncanny Valley

Guus Leeuw

Re: Been there, done that

Dear Sir,

the picked-up lastname of "Coward" is about right... ;)

Regards,

Guus

0
0

'My dream job at Oracle left me homeless!' – A techie's relocation horror tale

Guus Leeuw

Re: 150/night?

"I think this guy put too much faith in things being sorted out for him when he should have been nagging everyone in the chain to ensure stuff was happening as and when it should have."

Ah, but he's German (presumably) and therefore the rest of the Europeans should be voluntarily doing what needs to be done for Herr Obersturmtruppenfuerhermueller.

:-D

Regards,

Guus

2
5
Guus Leeuw

Re: If he had been in the UK

Even though the guy was in Holland, Noord-Holland to be precise, Holland (as the combo-province of Noord- and Zuid-Holland is known, which is not even a legal entity in the Netherlands) in and of itself does not exist, other than it being a geographical area.

Just wanted to make sure you know about the local geography...

2
5
Guus Leeuw

Dear Sir,

On top of that, and assuming Bernd Obermueller is actually German / Austrian / Swiss, he would have done his own heritage proud, if he could have been bothered to check and make sure...

What is the saying again? Gründlichkeit ist eine Deutsche Tugend? Not for Bernd... Serves him right!

Gimme some thumbs-down ;-)

Regards,

Guus

2
2
Guus Leeuw

Hey Rich,

"Which whisky bottle did you empty last night?"

The full one ;-)

Regards,

Guus

9
0

Brit prosecutors ask IT suppliers to fight over £3 USB cable tender

Guus Leeuw

@d3vy

Dear Sir,

you are not legally obliged to proof any of these things unless you have at least 5 employees in total (including you, if you're on the payroll).

I'm surprised your client wasn't aware of the size of your organisation and that therefore such questions, really, aren't relevant.

Regards,

Guus

2
0

One-third of Brit IT projects on track to fail

Guus Leeuw

Re: @Rocket Rabbit ... With maths and syntax like that

Dear Mr Sitkowski,

As a trained-software-developer-turned-project-manager, I can say that you are quite wrong.

You see, before something is a project that is being executed, there's a bit that is called "sales". Very often there are market pressure that sales people have to adhere to, and that means that often enough that a service is sold for less than what is effectively necessary to come in on budget. This is called "discounts". You then see that the end result of the discounting process is the project budget. This is incorrect accounting, however the project manager is then ultimately responsible for cost overruns, even though it was the business who decided to give the customer a large discount.

There's also unrealistic expectations set by clients, whereby clients cause project starts to be delayed (due to contract negotiation or holidays), but the same clients forget that that automagically means that the end date is shifting as well. Such clients are then normally very adamant that the end date stays the same, even though we're now 3 or 4 months delayed from a project start point of view only of themselves.

Only then are we starting to get into the game where a project manager can really influence the course of action.

And even if a project manager understands the technology (because he is / was a software developer), I've seen some very very bad examples, and I'll give you two:

1) Shit is hitting the fan, project manager states: I knew this was going to happen; yet "this" failed to registered on any risk log and was never mentioned to senior / programme management - so there never was adequate risk management. But clearly "I knew this was going to happen" means that the project manager understood very well what problems could arise

2) Multiple 3rd parties involved where the customer is not efficiently participating in multi-vendor management. This may mean that delays by one of the 3rd parties causes budget overruns for another 3rd party, as the customer still wants to stick to the project schedule. This might come to play when you *think* the other 3rd party is going to respond within 3 business days, you confirm this with the client, and the other 3rd party turns around and says that their contract stipulates 2 business weeks... Lots of delays, nothing to do with understanding technology...

So your statement is a bit sporty, and not always correct.

Best regards,

Guus

3
0

UK.gov leaves data dashboard users' details on publicly accessible site

Guus Leeuw

Computer Misuse Act, anybody?

Dear Sir,

is the perpetrator known? Can that person be prosecuted, please?

Or is this ordeal going into the great Nirvana? And will it be forgotten about?

Regards,

Guus

3
0

America throws down gauntlet: Accept extra security checks or don't carry laptops on flights

Guus Leeuw

Increased Security Protocols

Dear Mr Kelly,

can we please have increased security protocols on the internet as well, please?

Thank you so much!

Best regards,

Guus

0
0
Guus Leeuw

Re: Last I read...

@ Voland's right hand

Dear Sir,

if the container is airtight, any there-in contained needs no suppression system. The lack of oxygen will eventually remove the fire...

Regards,

Guus

0
7

123-reg resolves secure database access snafu

Guus Leeuw

Said memo reached TheRegister as well!

Dear Sir,

with great pleasure I see that theregister.co.uk defaults to HTTPS as well nowadays!

Best regards,

Guus

6
1

In the week Uber blew up, Netflix restates 'No brilliant jerks' policy

Guus Leeuw

Re: Well they already cut themselves off from a big portion of the "market"

Dear Mr Berger,

DRM, by definition, protects copyrighted works (amongst others) using a large quantity of different methods.

Your insistence that Netflix does away with its version of DRM basically implies that Netflix could remove the paywall they have in place. I understand that you want to view Netflix movies in your player-of-choice. However, Mr Berger, ultimately we (is it 8 billion these days?) only need 1 person to pay Netflix, upload everything to putlocker.is or piratebay.cr, and all the others (8 billion - 1) can now freely watch Netflix' stuff.

Even Netflix-produced material needs to be paid. Kevin Spacy (President Underwood) isn't going to survive without Netflix paying him. Orange won't happen (which is *massively* upsetting since I'm Dutch).

An alternative would be to levy Netflix membership payments onto everybody's individual internet connection subscription. Where I currently pay Netflix once, I will end up paying them twice albeit possibly at a lower rate. If you never watch Netflix you still have to pay. That's the same scheme as a tax, so would be rather disturbing...

Would you work full-time without pay? Forever? Then why should others?

Regards,

Guus

38
5

The internet may well be the root cause of today's problems… but not in the way you think

Guus Leeuw

Optional religious wars were ended?

Dear Sir,

can you please provide a citation as to when religious were ended?

Isn't this "terror because Islam/Muslim" a religious war? How about the ban on flying to the US from anywhere in the Middle East? Can Indonesians fly to the US? Why?

It is all and always religious wars... They started 2017 years ago by (according to gospel / rumors) Herod the Great. Reason? Personal benefit: Herod did not want to lose his seat as Roman-appointed King of the Jews.

The theme really hasn't changed in those 2017 intervening years. Whether people wore red-crosses-on-white-garments, chased and killed all cathars, broke free of the roman catholic church into protestant churches, started the church of England... It's all the same stupid thing.

Removing religion isn't going to help - I have come to believe, because there will always be people who will find the next best to improve their own personal situation over that of others. So removing one case of "my-dick-is-bigger-than-yours" isn't really going to help society at large.

Regards,

Guus

2
3

The nuclear launch button won't be pressed by a finger but by a bot

Guus Leeuw

Re 2nick3

Dear sir,

Can i assume that you have not read The Dark Tower?

Regards,

Guus

2
0

EU axes geo-blocking: Upsets studios, delights consumers

Guus Leeuw

Optional news item in the Republic of Ireland

Dear Sir,

of course this is picked up as newsworthy in the Republic or Ireland: the only, say, Amazon Video stream that is somewhat available in the Republic is amazon.co.uk. Titles that I bought when I lived in the UK, say "Only Fools and Horses", are not available in the Republic. Even side-stepping .co.uk and going to .de doesn't help, as Amazon Prime doesn't recognize that I have titles that might be displayable through the German servers, since I'm in Ireland. Amazon's explanation is that royalties would have had to be paid in Ireland for me to allow me to see what I bought in the UK.

Only resolution: Proxy

Hopefully this legislation will make it better, not in the case of amazon.co.uk or UK-origin contents, but surely in other things.

Unless Command in Chief May does a hard U-turn and a soft-bailout.

Regards,

Guus

11
0

IBM to UK staff: Get ready for another game of musical chairs

Guus Leeuw

Re: Poor IBM

Dear sir,

Well called.

Shame that senor management does not want it to be that easy though. They rather get rid of their diamond and replace it with something that will never work in the same way (the cloud).

I've said it before: IBM had computing down to a T in the 60s; the rest of the industry is still trying to do what the mainframe did effortlessly half a century ago.

Shame really.

Regards,

Guus

2
0

Is your child a hacker? Liverpudlian parents get warning signs checklist

Guus Leeuw

Vacancy at El Reg: Optional stone editor

Dear Sir,

Why is anybody awarding Liverpool with something for 2008 this year?

Regards,

Guus

0
0

Trump lieutenants 'use private email' for govt work... but who'd make a big deal out of that?

Guus Leeuw

Why editors allow this through?

Because there are no editors at the register... many years of evidence to back that claim up....

Guus

4
0

Google's Grumpy code makes Python Go

Guus Leeuw
Trollface

Only fools and horses

Delboy at work at google these days?

0
0

Fallout from Euro Patent Office meltdown reaches Dutch parliament

Guus Leeuw

Re: Locksmith

Dear Sir,

Firing Batelli will not help at all, I'm afraid.

Best regards,

Guus (Dutchy) Leeuw

0
1

Dyn Dyn Dyn – we have a buyer: Oracle gobbles Internet of Things DDoS victim

Guus Leeuw

With Oracle?

Dear Sir,

I have been trying to get away from Sunacle for a good few years now, but it's not been easy... MariaDB finally is mainstream for a lot of distros, so I thought I was finally getting out...

Now this. While I don't mind Larry, I certainly do not want to put money into his sailing expeditions.

I'll be starting to offer small-fee DNS services myself over the next couple of months.

Regards,

Guus

6
1

British politicians sign off on surveillance law, now it's over to the Queen

Guus Leeuw

Re: Ascent

Dear Sir,

also, the Sovereign could pull a Belgian move:

1) Abstain from signing the law by resigning from Queen-ship and move to the East End

2) let the prime minister take over for a day

2a) Sign anything into law to the Sovereign disagrees with

3) The day after all the signing is finished, the Sovereign says: "Actually, now that I lived for a day amongst the likes of Del Trotter, I'd like to still be Queen, please"

4) Everybody cheers, the Commons got what they wanted, the Sovereign is back, nobody is any the wiser, accept the British are now hampered by surveillance against the UN human rights...

Police state calling itself a Sovereign Democracy... What a bleedin' scam...

Regards,

Guus

6
0
Guus Leeuw

Re: VPN

Dear Sir,

So, uhm, how exactly is CitizenVPN.com not headquartered in the EU / UK / US?

Sorry for asking!

Regards,

Guus

0
0

Antivirus tools are a useless box-ticking exercise says Google security chap

Guus Leeuw

Re: If Only Google Could Get A Handle On Their Own Security Problems

Dear Sir,

this is what a company gets when having a senior security engineer what appears to need to hold his crotch in public, for reasons of comfort or security...

Or am I being too sarcastic now?

Regards,

Guus

2
1

Trumped? Nope. Ireland to retain corporate tax advantage over the US

Guus Leeuw

Re: From across the pond

Dear Brandon,

Yes you can do that (for corporation tax purposes, and as you pointed out, move here to Ireland).

*However*: In Ireland, if you want to draw money out of the company, you must either be able to declare it as an expense (non-taxable) or as a salary / wage / income. That in itself attracts various different tax burdens, depending on full yearly income.

Depending on your situation, you pay a base rate of income tax of 20% on upto €42,800 annual income. Anything above that (or whatever the base amount is, depending on your situation), you will pay 40% tax.

In my situation, that means I pay 52% income tax, and 12.5% corporation tax on any profits I make.

What you can do, though, is route most of your invoices through Ireland, and have your US parent company suck in the money to the extend of your personal salary / wages. Pay that out, and then you have the best of both worlds: corporation tax low low in Ireland, and income tax low low in the US.

Hope this helps,

Regards,

Guus

10
0

'We already do that, we’re just OG* enough to not call it DevOps'

Guus Leeuw

Re: Oh gee

Dear Sir,

"gee" in colloquial language, here in the Republic of Ireland, means vagina.

So "Oh gee" definitely has a link to the Republic or Ireland...

Regards,

Guus

1
0

Of supermarkets, Volkswagen and the future of Dell-EMC

Guus Leeuw

Bentley?

Dear Sir,

"Let's list a few Volkswagen car brands: Audi; Bugatti; Seat; Skoda; Lamborghini; Porsche; and VW itself."

followed by:

"Prestige sports cars: Audi, Bentley, Bugatti, Lamborghini, Porsche"

Where did the Bentley come in to the equation?

Regards,

Guus

0
1

IBM swings axe through staff, humming contently about cloud and AI

Guus Leeuw

Re: The American Dream

Dear Sir,

<pedantic>

who said what now?

</pedantic>

Regards,

Guus

2
0

Having offended everyone else in the world, Linus Torvalds calls own lawyers a 'nasty festering disease'

Guus Leeuw

Tips and corrections

Dear Sir,

"Comparing Mallon to Kuhn may seem like a bit of a stretch"... Yes indeed, as Torvalds was actually comparing Kuhn to Mallon... But heyho, not knowing English never stopped anybody from writing at TheRegister...

Stone Editor rant, you've all seen it before - I won't repeat it.

Oh, and when will TheRegister put up a page for this type corrections? Why do I need to start another application to send a correction to TheRegister? Crowd-documenting, me hole!? Get a stone editor.

Regards,

Guus

1
0

Ireland looks like it's outpacing Britain in the superfast broadband rollout stakes

Guus Leeuw

Tips and corrections

Dear Sir,

correction: "Eircom" to be replaced by "eir".

tip: Please make sure we do not have to employ my email infrastructure to tell you about corrections... Just create an online page here on TheRegister from where I (as a logged in user) can send tips / corrections...

Regards,

Guus

0
0
Guus Leeuw

Dear Sir,

"in France it will be a city-centre apartment block"... Fibre to the home / premise isn't necessarily going to change that when compared to the UK / Republic of Ireland.

The real difficulty is that in the UK / Republic of Ireland, there are certain regulations and general practises in place that determine that a lot of the FTTH/P are indeed going to single houses / families, not apartment buildings.

But surely, there where apartment blocks are created, a loop into the block will then be shared by all people in that apartment building, I would reckon.

Regards,

Guus

2
0

IT delays helped derail UK's historic child sexual abuse inquiry

Guus Leeuw

Dear Sir,

should it not be investigate, arrest, prosecute?

Regards,

Guus

18
0

Science contest to get girls interested in STEM awards first prize to ... a boy

Guus Leeuw

Re: To Be Fair

Dear Sir,

That is exactly what gender-based political correctness is all about: tilting tables in favor of the seemingly under-represented people.

I am all for giving everybody equal opportunities, but that must indeed mean equal to everybody. Not "equal to everybody except those who are in the majority".

Regards,

Guus Leeuw

17
7

Medical data experiment goes horribly wrong: 950,000 records lost

Guus Leeuw
Headmaster

Re: Ya'll left out one biggie

Dear Sir,

"You will left out one biggie"?

Regards,

Guus

1
5

Outage outrage: Banks need clear targets for improving IT systems

Guus Leeuw

Dear Sir,

"IT risks need to be accorded the same status as credit, financial and conduct risk. They are every bit as serious a threat to customers and to overall financial stability"

while I applaud the sentiment in those sentences, I think it would be wholy incorrect to create one group that will provide guidelines for IT Security. Who should be in that group? GCHQ? NSA? Google? HPE? IBM? End-users? FSF? Why not also Microsoft?

An ITSecurity/Resiliency Regulator... What a waste of money. What have the romans ever done for us, eh?

Creating laws that make it unlawful for a technology-driven company (any really, not only banks)

* to have outages that take longer than 24 to fix (public SLA)

* to have systems that can be hacked into

* to not report such (also) illegal hackingly acquired access

Make the amount of fines payable to the court depending on how life-necessary the technology service is, and/or how many records were stolen and/or how many (wall-clock) hours of illegal access were achieved and/or how many hours of DDoS caused systems to be unreachable for their intended purpose. I.e. facebook can pay the amount of (£|$|€)0.001 if unavailable for 1 year, whereas for example a national news service (paid by TV licenses) might attract fines of half a million in case their online services are unreachable for half a day, possibly payable by budget cuts from then on in (ie lower TV license cost).

To me, that should be part of the Computer Misuse Act. Yes, I understand that IoT and Cloud Computing require responsive and dynamic compute resources... That in itself does not mean one can foresake a firewall, a bastion host, or a FortiNet device (oh wait...), or any IT Security measures that common sense dictates should be implemented.

Best regards,

Guus Leeuw

3
0

Blocking out the Sun won't fix climate change – but it could buy us time

Guus Leeuw
Headmaster

Re: Refreeze the poles?

Dear Sir,

"In the early-mid 1960's I was a deep sea trawlerman fishing the arctic, small bergs were called 'polar mints', penguins are called, 'waiters-in-tail-coats'."

I doubt, somehow, very much that you've seen a lot of waiters-in-tail-coats, somehow.

Regards,

Guus

2
0

Page:

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2018