* Posts by JassMan

258 posts • joined 26 Mar 2008

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IT at sea makes data too easy to see: Ships are basically big floating security nightmares

JassMan
Mushroom

Re: Die Hard: Offshore @ Archtech

That's because the US warships are quite capable of ramming other ships or even stationary lighthouses which failed to move out of their way. The container ships don't need to ram, they just need to be in the vicinity of a US warship.

There have already been 4 incidences in the last 12 months.

17
0

UK data watchdog swots automated marketing call pest with £260k fine

JassMan
Flame

Re: RE: AC

With an old style dial phone so their index finger really knows they have made some phone calls.

4
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Microsoft's AI is so good it steered Renault into bottom of the F1 league

JassMan
Trollface

It'll never work

If the AI sits on Win10, it will never have time to collect input data from thousands of channels because it will be continually checking to see if someone has deleted the local administrator account.

Either that or it will keep trying to upload gigabytes of Renault's highly confidential realtime performance data back to Redmond over the first unsecured WiFi it can find so that they can improve the user experience.

40
2

Mad scientist zaps himself to determine the power of electric eel shocks

JassMan

Re: Shock in watts?

Yep, its a real shame that he didn't set up the experiment to include a storage scope so he could record the time element. Looking at some of the videos, it looks like the fish can sustain up to 2 seconds of pulses at an approximate 50% duty cycle although probably not a square wave. It does look though as if this little fish could possibly produce more energy than a 0.8J fence.

edit: Just found a video ( youtu.be/VGbj9Up4dvs ) showing one goading an alligator then killing it. Unfortunately for the fish, the gator dies with a death grip on its neck. The main thing is, it keeps shocking the gator continuously for just over 45 seconds, so several 10s of Joules involved.

4
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Volvo is letting Android 'take over underlying car software' – report

JassMan
Linux

Interesting

It seems that Volvo are also a member of the GENIVI consortium. Are they trying to play one set of developers off against the other? "Add these features or we won't use your software in the next model."

Icon because genivi and android are both based on linux.

0
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Beaten passenger, check. Dead giant rabbit, check. Now United loses cockpit door codes

JassMan
Trollface

Re: "t took a few thousand deaths for the airlines to get their acts together."

The Germanwings incident shows yet another example of the stupidity of airline regulations. You can't even carry on a thread cutter with a 1/4inch blade for embroidery because it has a sharp edge yet there are AXES already on board so that the crew can try break down the cockpit door. Any genuine axe murderer would have a field day.

13
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'Judge Java' to sueball-slinging smut studio: Test your pirate-hunting tools or walk the plank

JassMan
Trollface

Re: it's all too obvious

Not everyone has a reason to obfuscate their browsing habits. Maybe in this the geolocation actually worked but they didn't bother checking the owners of those addresses until after they had lodged the court papers; Pretty stupid I know, but you can never discount the stupidity of get rich quick lawyers and top management.

They probably found that half the 35 they dropped were cast and crew wanting a copy to add to their CVs and the other half were law enforcement checking the film to see if any laws had been broken.

3
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Boeing-backed US upstart reckons it'll be building electric airliners

JassMan
Trollface

Unless batteries vastly improve, it'll never take off.

I can see why why you wanted to remain anonymous. There are already fully electric planes in full production. One example is the Pipistrel - http://www.pipistrel.si/plane/alpha-electro/overview. Admittedly at the moment the range is limited by 1hour flying time, which is presumably why Boeing are working on the hybrid route. Airbus have also had a fully flying "eFan" prototype for over 2 years and announced a year ago that they were also entering the small commercial arena - https://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/airbus-considering-19-seat-hybrid-electric-aircraft-427715/.

Looks like Boeing are playing catchup. Farming out to a smaller developer is probably more a matter of agility rather than risk avoidance (but that was probably factored in).

2
1

All aboard the warship that'll make you Sicker

JassMan
Trollface

With 2 ships at less than £287M

Sir Phillip "de le vert" could have had one refitted as a luxury yacht and not have had to rip of the BHS pension fund by so much. Then he wouldn't have gotten into so much hot water. Call himself a business man :; Pah!!!

0
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Ex-army sergeant pleads guilty to using private browsing mode

JassMan
WTF?

Since when has it been illegal to use private browsing in the UK?

The merkin courts abuse the Sarbane-Oxley law to add extra charges for "destruction of evidence" but is there an equivalent law in the UK?

Next they will be throwing you in prison just for setting a limit to the cache size because you are running out of disk space. What happens when you really have run out of space? Do you have to transfer your old cache to your new disk so that the plod can see everything you ever viewed since the internet began?

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13

Quadsys Five walk free after hacking rival company

JassMan
Paris Hilton

They didn't exactly walk away free

IANAL but they still got a prison sentence and a criminal record - the sentence is just suspended. If they break any more laws in the next 2 years, they WILL have serve that sentence (with time off for any good behaviour). Also if they fail to do the unpaid work, they will be in contempt of court and the sentence for that often exceeds the punishment for the original crime.

3
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Apple's Breaxit scandal: Frenchman smashes up €50,000 of iThings with his big metal balls

JassMan
Trollface

They seem to be confusing "worth" with "retail value". Since they haven't been sold before destruction, the worth of the iphones is the factory door cost, plus transport charges, plus re-order effort. Since they leave the factory at about $16 and shipping cost is in the order of 10s of cents, there is no way he could have done 50,000 worth of damage. OK the macbooks etc., maybe cost 100 to 200 ex-factory but he still would have done more damage to the display cabinets.

Even though all the destryed iThings are velbon goods, the punters are just as happy to buy the next one off the production line. Its not like any of these overpriced pieces of tat are in anyway unique.

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Internet of Things security? Start with who owns the data

JassMan
Holmes

Simples

If I buy an iFridge, iKettle or other IoT device, the data is mine. If the maker of the device or some other 3rd party wants access or instance to improve my health, they can licence that data from me. The terms of that licence should be negotiable - do I accept that they can share that data with their partners, do I want to receive publicity in place of paying for added value, etc?

If they add data beneficial to me they may put a price on they added value and I may or may not choose to pay that price.

2
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ROBO-PLOD! 'Droid snatches scumbag's shotgun in standoff

JassMan
Trollface

Re: Perhaps it's a north american term @ Prst. V.Jeltz

I think it was invented a little pre-murica. They were in use outside any medieval castle several hundred years before North America was colonised by anyone carrying a firearm. From Wikipedia:

"In medieval military engineering, a berm (or berme) was a level space between a parapet or defensive wall and an adjacent steep-walled ditch or moat.[1] It was intended to reduce soil pressure on the walls of the excavated part to prevent its collapse. It also meant that debris dislodged from fortifications would not fall into (and fill) a ditch or moat."

As in all things where we are 2 nations separated by a common language, we think of it as the space in front of the wall where muricans insist that it is the defensive wall itself.

1
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When you've paid the ransom but you don't get your data back

JassMan
Trollface

What planet do these people live on?

"Quizzed about their motivation behind a decision to pay the ransom, most companies (37 per cent) said they were worried about being fined if data were lost. Other reasons included encrypted data being highly confidential (32 per cent) and an easy-to-pay, low ransom amount (29 per cent)."

worried about being fined if data were lost. : its not been lost, you just can't read it, stupid

encrypted data being highly confidential : so confidential that even hackers will have trouble reading it

easy-to-pay, low ransom amount : I also have a nice bridge across the Thames I can sell you for a song

0
0
JassMan
Pirate

Re: Is it legal to pay this?

Maybe yes maybe no, but they should consider suing for misrepresentation. Actually they should have insisted on paying by PayPal, then they could get the money back when the key failed to decrypt.

1
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Network Management Systems are a 'treasure map' for hackers

JassMan
Holmes

Users of these products

"Users of these products are urged to ensure they are running the latest versions of the software."

In these days when even the assumed most bomb-proof (been running for a decade without a problem) programs turn out to have attack vectors, users of any products should ensure they are running the latest versions of the software.

0
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You're guilty but broke, judge tells Wash.io – the 'Uber of laundry'

JassMan
Trollface

I bet that the board didn't miss out.

You can be sure that the directors, CEO, CFO etc were all paid their fees on time before the money ran out, and that the fat performance bonuses were paid in full. Probably even had time to sell their shares.

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Fujitsu's billion-dollar ARM supercomputer delayed by up to 2 years

JassMan
Joke

They missed a use for the new beast

"The Post-K system will be used to model climate change, predict disasters, develop drugs and fuels, and run other scientific simulations."

Being 8 times faster than the world's current leader, it is obviously intended to become the world's first piece of sentient silicon. Welcome your new master.

0
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Spinning that Brexit wheel: Regulation lotto for tech startups

JassMan
Trollface

Brexit means Brexit

Says our beloved leader, but now she is saying that she will not guarantee any of the pledges made by the lying politicos who convinced the slightly dimwitted amongst us to vote to leave the EU. I can see her point, in that most of those pledges and promises of what would happen when we leave were unsustainable. Since she is now offering a form of Brexit which is not what the very small majority voted for, then surely she should offer a new referendum based of the new likely terms of exit.

Don't get me wrong, there is a lot I don't like about having a European superstate but on balance I would say Jeremy Corbin probably got it right by giving the EU 7/10. That's a lot better than the 3/10 muddle the bunch of exit negotiators are going to come up with.

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NHS 'paperless roadmap': Fewer dead trees, more data control

JassMan
Trollface

Surely they would save more money by ditching Windows XP

Obviously not by upgrading to Windows 10 because then they wouldn't be able to sell off patient data, since Microsoft would already have hoovered it all up and sold it on, as allowed under the latest EULA. But if they insist on using Windows, they should be able to run most of the old software in compatibility mode under Win8.x. Better still, they should bite the bullet and swap to some form of Linux probably with XFCE since this would give them most of the look and feel they are used to.

Has anyone done any testing with Wine to see if any of these mission critical apps which only run under XP can be made to run under Linux?

0
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'I'm sorry, your lift has had a problem and had to shut down'

JassMan
WTF?

No obvious OS but it was a talking lift

I was once stepped into a lift at BBC TV Centre Spur when it said "8th floor going up". This was worrying in two ways: I wanted to go down since I was already on the top floor, secondly that top floor was numbered 7 so the lift seemed to have been in some alternate reality. Luckily, it took me to the 3rd floor where I wanted to go. However, I was starting to worry that my life had been more blameless than I thought and that the lift had decided to take me on shortcut to heaven by crashing through the basement.

5
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EE looks at its call charges, hikes a bunch, walks off giggling

JassMan

Re: Ripp-off Britain

Its not just the mobile phones which are a rip-off. @Hans1, like you I live in France and pay 36€ for my ADSL connection. I find that with telephone and TV bundled with this that it is unmatchable value compared to any offer available in UK once your low price period ends. I have also found that the 0€ mobile offer is sufficient since you have unlimited texts. Even if you exceed the 2hours of voicecalls/month the charges are so reasonable, they are not worth worrying about.

I can't wait for the offer of a free upgrade to freebox mini with its built in femtocell.

1
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'Fake CEO' Chinese chap cuffed in $54m fraud probe

JassMan
Trollface

Re: Effectively unstoppable

The COO of a Corporation I used to work for was made redundant when our Technology division was outsourced. 6 months after he left, I discovered that his email accounts were still open and that he was still on the list of persons allowed to sign off £10M on his single signature. Plebs like myself and colleagues who actually generated all the income had to have 5 other signatures in order to spend more than £100. Either he was incredibly honest or he didn't realise how inefficient the admin systems were on his leaving. The company was either very lucky or if he wasn't honest, he was good at hiding his tracks.

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SpaceX Dragon capsule lands in Pacific carrying 12 moustronauts

JassMan
Joke

So long and thanks for all the fish

Hopefully these mice aren't related to the ones monitoring Deep Thought before it is destroyed by the Vogons.

7
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Watch the world's biggest 'flying bum' go arse over tit in a crash

JassMan
Thumb Up

Re: DoctorNine It's a ship.

Admittedly I don't know the details of this particular ship but I have flown on an Airship Industries Skyship 500 and the pilot assured me that all the other airships he had flown used ballast to change the pitch attitude. Not surprisingly they use air, not water, as they don't need to carry it around with them when it not needed. Basically, there is a large bladder at each end, with a very big fan pushing air in when required. This has 2 effects:-

1) air is surprisingly heavy when you have enough of it (or light in a hot air balloon)

2) the volume occupied by the by the bladder pushes on the helium balloon thus reducing the lift at that end of the ship.

I was slightly surprised when he showed me the bladder evacuation system which consisted of a rope and pulley which lifted a big flap and let the air out again. Simple but effective. On the Skyship, the pilot achieved 30° of pitch up which I think was mainly due to the bladders since it has no aerofoils.

3
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LinkedIn sues 100 information scrapers after technical safeguard fail

JassMan
Trollface

If I wanted a job at any company

I would email/phone them directly. I wouldn't put all my private info on a site and hope that they saw my details amongst 100K others and somehow decided I was the one they wanted. Especially one owned by those well known security specialists, M$hite. Anyone who gets spammed after putting their details where all and sundry can read them deserve all they get. Not that spammers shouldn't be hung, drawn and quartered after having the red hot poker treatment, but that is a different topic.

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Nokia taps former Rovio man Rantala to market relaunch

JassMan

If the real Nokia were to start making Jolla Sailfish phones

I would buy one. The Jolla phones need a real name behind them so that users have more confidence as well as some management control to ensure they produce one working product instead of spreading their efforts trying to produce tablets, licenseable software etc. If they can produce a full featured smartphone for €169 with a production run of only 1000, they should be able to produce a worldbeater on a production run of say 250K as long as they can get some R&D money to sort of the deficiencies. .

2
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Three times as bad as malware: Google shines light on pay-per-install

JassMan
Linux

Thank goodness Linux tells you which packages are being installed

I was getting a bit blasé about checking all the various packages which are retained, changed, removed, installed, each time I install something new, but after reading this I will be double checking everything.

11
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Email proves UK boffins axed from EU research in Brexit aftermath

JassMan
Facepalm

Thank you Mr.Farage

It is all right for you to retire so that you get back to having a life, but your lies have ruined the lives of thousands of others. Thank you also Gove, Johnson etc.

Even if the government finds a way to ensure that funding continues until Article 50 is completed, this is a pointer to how UK science will be suffering within 3 years.

As Moedas said: "As long as the UK is a member of the European Union, EU law continues to apply and the UK retains all rights and obligations of a member state." My guess would be that Moedas regards funding as a privilege and not a right.

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West country cops ponder appearance of 40 dead pigeons on A35

JassMan
WTF?

Why don't they just check the leg rings?

I was under the impression that most pigeons kept by fanciers and racers were chipped with an RFID in the way that many other pets are.

Even if the pigeons are not chipped, they should just read the leg ring. I think there are only 7 registers in the UK so they just need to read the alpha chars to determine which register to check.

SU Scottish Homing Union

GB Royal Racing Pigeon Association

IHU Irish Homing Union

WHU Welsh Homing Pigeon Union

NEHU North of England Homing Union

NWHU North West Homing Union

AERC All England Roller Club

I am not a pigeon keeper but it took all of 10 seconds to search for this info on the net.

2
0

Forget security training, it's never going to solve Layer 8 (aka people)

JassMan
Trollface

Initially I was surprised at how low the figures were.

25 per cent of testees clicked on the email link and 43.5 per cent did the same for the Facebook message.

Then I realised the test was on students. I bet if they did the same test on Joe Public the clickees would have been much higher. The gullibility of the man in the street never ceases to amaze me.

10
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Seagate inflates 12TB helium drives, floats them to IT bods to test

JassMan
FAIL

Re: How big is the case it comes with?

Luckily the name is only a marketing ploy if the article is to be believed:

"air-filled 8TB drive has fewer heads and platters than WD's 8TB helium-filled drive."

I would be much more worried about the guarantee on the WD drives. Not only will the thermal properties of the drive change as the helium diffuses out but that same diffusion causes embrittlement (admittedly less than hydrogen) of most metals and alloys. I believe some copper and aluminium alloys are less susceptible but I wouldn't hold out much hope for the permanent magnets or the rust on the platters.

Hydrogen embrittlement is one reason I think pressurised hydrogen will never really catch on as a means of energy storage.

2
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Akamai, Limelight bury hatchet (not in each other) to end patent spat

JassMan
Trollface

OMG!

Who is going to feed the children of those poor lawyers who will no longer making a mint of of patent disputes if this sort of activity should spread? How did the boards of these companies become clever enough to work out that licencing a patent (however dubious) can sometimes be cheaper than paying a firm of lawyers to spend a decade fighting an unwinnable case? For the costs involved in some of these cases, it must surely be cheaper to buy^H^H^H lobby a few politicians to get the patent system fixed.

0
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Reminder: IE, Edge, Outlook etc still cough up your Windows, VPN credentials to strangers

JassMan
FAIL

Bollocks to security by obscurity

This is INSECURITY by design. WTF? Why does SMB pass your credentials in the clear with just a simple hash of your password? Surely the entire authentication process should always be encrypted if passed over a network.

11
3

Crocodile well-done-dee: Downed Down Under chap roasted by exploding iPhone

JassMan
Coat

Phlogisticated phone phries pedalist

Sorry!

I'll get my coat as soon as I have phinished my pint.

18
0

Don't want to vote for Clinton or Trump? How about this woman who says Wi-Fi melts kids' brains?

JassMan
Joke

she may or may not be right about green issues but:

"To be clear, Stein is suggesting that Wi-Fi usage may lead to children dying later on in life."

Doesn't she know that LIFE is a terminal disease.Whether or not you have been subjected to WiFi you ARE GOING TO DIE in later life.

35
2

Chinese Android smartphone firm: It packs a dedicated crypto chip

JassMan
Big Brother

To be really useful...

It should detect an incoming call from another the same and allow you to realtime encrypt your voice calls with a previously exchanged onetime pad. Unfortunately, if they sold that capability in China you would be disappeared very quickly.

0
0

OK, we've got your data. But we really want to delete it ASAP

JassMan
Facepalm

The real problem is the way bean counters work.

They see 1TB of full disk as £75 of assets which can't be used for any new project and is therefore a waste. What they don't realise is that it takes much more than 1 hour of a project managers time at £150/hr to sort though the data and kill off unnecessary files maybe gaining 25% of the space back because the rest will be required as stated in "Every time!"

12
0

Black Hats control Jeep's steering, kill brakes

JassMan
Trollface

Re: Why? @chris miller

I am sure that most cars still have a direct mechanical link in the steering. The SERVO may be controlled over a canbus but unless you are a 35Kg weakling you can overcome it. I know my car does because although it has electric steering, you can still steer it while pushing it unpowered. I am sure this is a matter of primary safety. I think that even cars with self drive capability still take the steering wheel position as the main control input and only self steer if you are not holding the wheel. Admittedly it would be rather unnerving and extremely distracting if the car tried to turn without your input.

The brakes are also physically linked to the mastercylinder as a matter of primary safety. It is only the servo system which is driven electrically rather than old fashioned vacuum assist.

Drive by wire accelerator is another matter since without power the engine will not be running so no need to have a physical link.

The main problem with having no security is the likelihood of theft. I am sure lots of script kiddies would think it a real hoot to be able to play GTA with real cars (especially someone else's).

6
0

Milk IN the teapot: Innovation or abomination?

JassMan
Facepalm

Better hope that no teabagging was involved

On the grounds that the culprit was obviously a deviant one should be worried if any teabagging was involved in the adulteration of this classic drink. That white stuff may not have been just bovine lactate.

As for using a coffee pot for making tea, this should be grounds for instant dismissal. It may or may not change the quality of the tea but it sure as hell changes the flavour of the next coffee brew.

0
0

UK 'emergency' bulk data slurp permissible in pursuit of 'serious crime'

JassMan
Joke

Sounds like Davis is the consumate politician

And obviously a consumer as well, since he knows which side his bread buttered on.

0
0

It's 2016 and Windows lets crims poison your printer drivers

JassMan
Unhappy

Re: Software contains bugs

Yeah but is software which has been round for a very long time and Win10 has supposedly been re-written from the ground up.

13
6

Let's Encrypt in trademark drama

JassMan
Joke

Re: So Comodo are

arseholes?

No. They are obviously even lower than arseholes since a commode is something you sh^Hit on.

1
1

Watch as SpaceX's latest Falcon rocket burns then crashes

JassMan
Facepalm

Maybe he should have licenced a SABRE engine

If the analysis is correct then maybe he should be licencing the https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SABRE_(rocket_engine). OK they still have a little way to go before full certification but this looks like a very promising way of pushing stuff up the walls of the gravity well.

0
8

Cats understand the laws of physics, researchers claim

JassMan
Joke

Re: Hmm...

I think the real answer where food in tins and cats are concerned, is that cats are telepathic and this is what they should have been testing, rather than whether gravity is affected by electromagnets. Our cat can be sound asleep in the most distant part of the house, and you only have to have the passing thought of "should I open the beef terrine or the fish in jelly for his next meal" and you find he has instantly teleported himself to his bowl and is making the special meow that means "give me my food now, and don't make those puny excuses about having to open the tin first"

3
0

China gets big data fever, backed by security push

JassMan
Trollface

What's the Pink Floyd angle?

I saw the album cover and thought there was some Floyd angle to the story. Thought, maybe the chinese had offered Gilmore, Mason and Waters a humongous fee to make another comeback to celebrate opening a mega data centre or something, but no Floyd angle anywhere.

0
0

Australia copies UK's Google tax on 'contrived' dodges

JassMan
Trollface

I hope those ozzies have paid for this.

If they haven't paid the UK gov for this blatent rip-off, Baroness Neville-Rolfe will have them thrown in prison for 10 years.

1
0

Woman charged with blowing AU$4.6m overdraft on 'a lot of handbags'

JassMan
Joke

Re: What am I missing? @ I ain't Spartacus

Where can I get one of these time machines? I would happily sell my house just to rent one for long enough to go back in time and put £1000 on Leicester to win the premier league. Its a shame that the bookies won't make a mistake like that again. I'll even bet a fiver that Christine Jiaxin Lee would like to use some of her overdraft to do the same, just so that she can pay off her overdraft.

1
0

Edward Snowden sues Norway to prevent extradition

JassMan

Re: The marathon-couch-surfing champion in the Ecuadorian embassy @AC

I know that "the land of the free is the US". I had assumed every else did as well, and that they had read the original article all the way to the end. This is why I didn't explicitly state that it would be a stupid idea to try to consider a move to Norway with big wide open spaces rather than staying in an embassy where the longest walk is from the couch to the nearest door and back. It is why I didn't explicitly state that Norway's only exception for extradition is where they consider the reasons for extradition to be the result of a political act.

Also, thanks to all the downvoters, I feel suitably chastised. I apologise for:

1) mistakenly believing that Reg readers were a cut above the general population in terms of ability to make an inference from literal shorthand;

2) assuming that Reg readers actually read an entire article before voting on the comments.

3) writing a comment having drunk a triple "Armorik" single malt from Bretagne having discovered that it is the equal of some of the best Scotch ever made. [for the hard of reading I have NOT stated that it is better, only the EQUAL OF SOME and you should note that sense of taste is a very personal thing]

I take solace that readers such as dan1980 understand the ways of the world.

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