* Posts by sed gawk

266 posts • joined 1 May 2008

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If Shadow Home Sec Diane Abbott can be reeled in by phishers, truly no one is safe

sed gawk

@ken, Re: Austertity is a choice

I call bollocks on that one. The reason we didn't *start* paying back until 2010 was because Gordon didn't want to. He was, in fact, the first example of a politician jettisoning austerity because it was politically useful to do so. It didn't mean the money wasn't due.

It's not a loan, it's an investment which is now starting to return some of the costs, so in the longer term this will be a very good deal for the taxpayer.

On the so-called profit, I would ask what was the opportunity cost of investing umpteen squillion in a bank, only to get umpteen squillion and one back a decade later.

We were rather forced into the position, and the dire truth was that it was marginally cheaper to recapitalise the banks on the expectation of a future return, than to compensate all the individual account holders under the government backing of deposits in bank accounts.

On the wider point of printing your own money, this *might* be true if we were the only country in the whole world. The point about issuing your own money is that you can inflate away your debts. It also allows you to lend yourself unlimited sums of money with only inflation as a penalty - obviously http://www.technovelgy.com/ct/content.asp?Bnum=735 (TANSTAFL) applies here.

In practise, the whole money system is rather baroque and illogical, but despite that it has been rubbing along with occasional crashes for quite some time now.

The amount you can buy with a fiat currency depends just as much on how much other nations value it, unless you are 90+% self-sufficient in everything.

This is not quite the point, that is an exchange rate and not the point of "floating" currency, the idea is that inflation is controllable by manipulation of interest rates. The only other lever to control inflation is taxation, (removing money, dampens the growth of inflation).

The central point of issuing your own money is that taxation is not required to fund spending, but rather to control inflation as TANSTAFL indeed will start to effect the pricing of your securitized debt (guilts/bonds) meaning the .gov would need to offer really high interest rates to price in the depreciation in the value of the currency relative to something else, e.g. euro clearing rate on day of purchase.

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sed gawk

Re: Eh?

Nurse, Sed is out of bed again

Pass the dried frog pills Bursar. ;)

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sed gawk

Re: Re:Re:Eh?

Totally agree FPTP is a travesty and both sides should have fixed it.

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sed gawk

“What I say to people calling for a second referendum now is you should be careful what you wish for, because my suspicion is that if we had a second referendum now, the same people that voted Leave – who are not largely speaking in London – would vote Leave again, saying ‘didn’t you hear us the first time?'” On QT last night - sounds like the kind of wise head we need.

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sed gawk

Re: I doubt she'll ever be Home Secretary, but...

And the only reason "our" stake in the banks returned a profit is because he fixed the rules so it would be impossible not to.

Explain why making sure we made a profit on a huge loan is a bad thing, I'm not seeing it.

He's a politco, they lie, but he was quite good with the money on balance. It went tits up all over and we were doing nicely far quicker than anyone else, till we voted the con-dems in.

Maggie broke the pension link in 1980 - Blair - then Brown carried on a Tory-Lite policy tempered with some moderate social policies and a good dose of sleaze.

I personally have a bigger bone over PFI then the pension scheme, as basically the issue with the pension is as much cost of living as the actual number.

So, winter fuel allowance, free bus pass, discounted council tax, etc and other means would be the Brown way of tackling that, and indeed the roughly 5Billion a year in tax credits went unclaimed, completely by accident I'm sure. But again, we can make sure that people can have a decent retirement and are allowed and encouraged to save both privately and collectively.

Its collectively saving if we have for example nationalised energy generation such that you could then make it cheaper. But I agree, changing the rules out from under you is unfair.

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sed gawk

Re: I doubt she'll ever be Home Secretary, but...

I don't care about who consenting adults choose to spend adult time with.

That's a matter for the people invoiced and their partners, not my business.

I do think a prurient interest in other peoples sex lives is a poor trait for a democracy.

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sed gawk

Re: Eh?

She had to choose between privilege of rank and position and upholding and living by the values of her political party and it's socialist position and she chose privilege.

No she had a choice between giving her kid the best she could or the schools in hackney at the time, which were dreadful and are now much better, I want principled politicians but the person who puts their political future ahead of their child's future is not a good parent. And conversely she was as good as her word, those schools are hugely better now.

She worked her arse off to get where she is, why should she not help her kid.. Do you seriously expect people to disadvantage their children in the hope of appealing to some random, less interested in "why the schools were allowed to fall into such a state", than claiming a scalp for inconsistency.

I don't quite see the issue, unless you'd like to insist that a market in providing educational services should be the exclusive preserve of the public sector. That's never been labour policy to my knowledge, so it's seems consistent to say "School is too shit for my kid, tough that you can't exercise that choice, but I'll do my best to make sure that your kids school is fixed ASAP".

This is why there's no choice between the parties any more.

Bullshit. flat out bullshit. Voting tory = "renting the house to a crackhead".

Voting Green = "Homoeopathic levels of belief in my vote mattering to someone"

Voting Labour = "Roulette", You could get a Liability (Kinnock), a Tory(Blair), a Wet(Miliband) a Democrat(Corbyn), Opportunistic sleazeball(Chukka)"

How can you not be thankful for such an embarrassment of riches.

People should be aware this is why there is little earnest drive to improve public education, out leader have no stake in the outcome beyond ensuring the buck doesn't pause outside their door and hinder their career prospects.

Flagrantly untrue, the drop in standards is due to Blair's target of increasing participation at university level without addressing the route cause, e.g. childcare provision. Resulting in pressure to assemble course in ways that are easier to assess without having to assume a larger body of pre-existing knowledge, at each level of schooling post-nursery. The quality of after school care and the chances to passive learn something fun are also not evenly distributed.

You cannot slate him for doing something, while also saying noone has any interest in doing something.

Lots of people are trying, it's a really hard problem, and so far all our efforts are just keeping level, much less impovement.

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sed gawk
Facepalm

Re: I doubt she'll ever be Home Secretary, but...

@ken - you is you and me too, one was not forced to raise ones buttocks from the comfort of one's chair to answer the siren call of the donations bucket as we raised a few trillion from a whip round - was the point I was making.

Austerity is a political choice, the "contribution" as you put it began during the 2010 con-dem regime, and was not needed, has damaged our economy and has been jettisoned every time it was useful to the .gov to do so. Austerity and the 2008 Fiscal Crash, are not related.

Its a good story, and it's just seems nice and neat, we paid a lot of money, so we "have to balance the books", but We print our own money, bluntly the lies are not true.

Hint "we paid the money already" so we clearly didn't need to raise it in tax *before* spending it.

So balancing the books clearly not that precise an art, as in real life you'd need a creditor, but we don't have one, as we printed the <bob-geldof>f-gg money</bob-geldof>, hence paying it back by slash and burn = poltical con-trick - clue is the name "Con"...

If you will accept my work and provide an exchangeable token for doing so, we have a fungible asset.

If you add a nation state backing the issued token, and a central bank to authorising issuing these token, you can print as much as you like, that's really as barmy as that.

It works provided you don't poke at it, because your happy with the work, I'm happy with the beer token, the publican is happy with the token, and so forth.

You cannot cut your way out of a crisis, you pay people lots of money, so they spend lots of money, so you tax them lots of money. Cutting people's wages, support, or benefits is counter-productive.

We have made a profit on the bank bailout, now The dividend is worth £240m and the Treasury will receive £149m as RBS is still 62%-owned by the government. "https://www.theguardian.com/business/2018/aug/03/rbs-to-pay-its-first-dividend-since-2008-bailout"

We are paying the cost of voting Tory.

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sed gawk

Re: Is it positive that maggie was the first female pm

Yes.

Don't get me wrong. I disagree with Thatcher politically. But its no small thing what she did. She was smart, ruthless, and a really effective political thinker. She got to the top in a sexist society without having to shake her arse, or get her kit off.

Yes, I don't think the country came out of thatchers policies well but, for example when she got in she made a massive difference to the economic model of the country, for example joining EEC, transition away from heavy industry etc.

I don't like how she did stuff, that doesn't mean she was wrong. Her personal views, and the outcomes, I have issues with, but its a positive that Britain had its first Female PM. Yes, I'd rather it wasn't maggie but she actually is quite a two-headed beast. On the one hand, you have https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_Bodies_(Admission_to_Meetings)_Act_1960 and on the other you have a clear wooing of the national front voters "the British character has done so much for democracy, for law and done so much throughout the world that if there is any fear that it might be swamped people are going to react and be rather hostile to those coming in" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_Thatcher#CITEREFJohnson1991

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sed gawk

Re: I doubt she'll ever be Home Secretary, but...

Sure, Diane worked for the Home Office in 1976. She was so smart they put her on a course to fast-track her career.

Diane was Race Relations Officer at the National Council for Civil Liberties from 1978 to 1980.

Diane was a TV researcher and reporter from 1978 to 1985. I know a lot of those. They’re fast thinkers, avid fact hounds, brilliant minds.

Diane’s political career began in 1982, on Westminster City Council. Then in 1987, I’ll say it again, she became the first black female MP.

Peter principle my arse.

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sed gawk

Re: Eh?

No - Total respect for not pretending the public schooling system is not shite.

Total respect for putting her kid above her reputation.

And if you think I wouldn't fuck you and everyone you know over to help my child, you are sadly mistaken.

She is trying to make stuff better for all of us, but unwilling to throw her kid under the bus to avoid the likes of you, trying to make cheap points.

Good for her, and good that she has the backbone to defend her choices.

"I had to choose between my reputation, whatever reputation I have for consistency, and my son - and I chose my son.

"Obviously, inevitably, I have been very damaged by this. But as I say, I had to choose, in a way, between my own interests and my son's interests.

"All I can do is continue to campaign on issues around education and on issues of gun crime for the benefit of a whole generation of young men in our inner cities."

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2003/nov/05/labour.uk

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sed gawk

Re: I doubt she'll ever be Home Secretary, but...

How dare the (tory-lite) labour govenment of Gordon Brown be in power when the parcelling out of https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Securitization debt blew up across the globe.

We came out of it rather well as we had an economist at the helm, hence we returned a profit on our stake in the banks.

Jesus wept, take a look at the country *now* and understand that these people are not on your side.

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sed gawk
Thumb Down

Re: I doubt she'll ever be Home Secretary, but...

She has spoken on Leveson, terrorism, education, poverty, welfare, illness, disability, refugees, child sexual abuse, pro-choice abortion. Her campaigns include legal aid, civil liberties, fighting crime, sickle cell thallasemia, public transport, improving education.

2008, her speech on civil liberties in the counterterrorism debate won Parliamentary Speech Of The Year in the Spectator awards.

That speech is here. Watch it, and then come back. https://t.co/qNMvtilMa1

Report when you've got something of note to say, we'll wait.

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sed gawk

Re: I doubt she'll ever be Home Secretary, but...

She voted through every punishing measure with the government.

She tried to block the enquriy into the IRAQ war.

She's not a principled mp by any stretch of the imagination.

https://www.theyworkforyou.com/mp/24871/tracey_crouch/

Her voting record speaks for itself.

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sed gawk

Re: I doubt she'll ever be Home Secretary, but...

So N.I. Sec. who knows sweet fa about N.I. https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/sep/07/karen-bradley-admits-not-understanding-northern-irish-politics

Brexit Sec. Raab - sweet fa about the border issues at dover - https://www.theguardian.com/politics/blog/live/2018/nov/08/brexit-cabinet-david-davis-urges-mps-to-vote-down-mays-brexit-deal-so-eu-makes-better-offer-politics-live?page=with:block-5be41aaee4b00d0bde3d8223

Racist mayor for the tories - not Johnson - Bailey https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/oct/03/tories-london-mayor-pick-shaun-bailey-multiculturalism-robs-britain-of-its-community

Oh and "She's a Journo, oops" Watermellon Letterbox Piccanny Johnson.

Yeah "Competence" is *really* your issue here.

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sed gawk

Re: AC

Fools gold perhaps.

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sed gawk

Re: Eh?

Rubbish - we have grade boundaries which determine who we elect in which seats.

https://www.opendemocracy.net/ourkingdom/liam-anderson/voters-per-mp-why-first-past-post-failed

Bluntly it cheaper in terms of votes to elect a tory, next it's labour, then the others.

As an example in 2015, LibDems took 8 seats with 2.4 million votes while UKIP 3.8 mllion votes got one seat.

It's dodgy on both sides, and now the tories have taken it to its logical conclusion and abolished the oppostions strongholds, e.g. Corbyns seat. https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/sep/10/uk-parliamentary-boundary-changes-final-plans-unveiled

We get the govenment that the shire impose on us, until such time as the country is sufficently messed up that even the tory voters vote for change.

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sed gawk

Amber "Stop techies laughing at me, when I say stupid things" Rudd.

She's her own parody in real time, another over promoted chinless wonder, who's prime qualification for political office, being, "Rudd helped to find extras for the film Four Weddings and a Funeral (1994), for which she was credited as the "aristocracy co-ordinator", and appeared briefly in one of the church scenes in the film" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amber_Rudd

I'm sure, that this incompent one looks more appealing to you..

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sed gawk

Re: Eh?

Your first mistake was looking up at these people. (Hint wrong direction)

Your second mistake was expecting that weak line of argument to carry any weight.

Hint, we elect MP's as that is the *only* say we get, not for whatever nonsense you have larded that bald fact with.

She's been a consistuency mp for a long time, she's very well regarded.

Interesting venn diagram showing the overlap between people who don't like her and their other political view points..

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sed gawk

Re: I doubt she'll ever be Home Secretary, but...

He served under the Blair government but yes I'd agree he's of that political tradition.

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sed gawk

Re: I doubt she'll ever be Home Secretary, but...

There was this little thing called the good friday agreement, which tory-lite (labour) brought about.

There the funding of headchoppers in saudi - both sides.

Buntly the tories are the parties of apartheid from S.A. to Israel.

Thatcher herself enthusistic suppoter of the https://www.britannica.com/topic/Bantustan policies and coup in Guinea https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2004_Equatorial_Guinea_coup_d%27%C3%A9tat_attempt

So all the current cabinet "lightwieghts" joined at the time when this was party policy, a pox on all their houses.

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sed gawk

Re: I doubt she'll ever be Home Secretary, but...

As we are floating currency issuer, our spending is not determined by tax revenue.

When we bailed out the banks to the tune of several trillion, no-body knocked on your door and asked for a contribution.

What we spend our money on is a purely political choice, gated only the limit of real resources (bricks, skilled people, land) not sterling which is in itself a bet on the UK .gov honouring its issued gilts / bonds.

A bet, the UK has not failed to honour in 300 years.

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sed gawk

Re: I doubt she'll ever be Home Secretary, but...

Tories are far more profligate with the public finances - https://fullfact.org/economy/labour-and-conservative-records-national-debt/

What happens is the Tories make providing services more expensive by introducing a "market", which has only approved suppliers, so that products and services now are more expensive for the same outcome.

This lets the tories funnel public money to their cronies why claiming record levels of investment in our public services.

As an example of tanking the public finances, and screwing sterling, Brexit should loom large.

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sed gawk

Re: I doubt she'll ever be Home Secretary, but...

Is that you Boris?

Johnson got elected based on "he looks like he'll be a laugh".

And he was, largely at our expense.

The man is a stain on the skidmark that is our political system

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sed gawk

Re: I doubt she'll ever be Home Secretary, but...

Not true sir.

Robin Cook - Principled MP.

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sed gawk

Re: I doubt she'll ever be Home Secretary, but...

Well said, at least someone has a grasp of political history not drawn from the pages of the beano.

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sed gawk

Re: I doubt she'll ever be Home Secretary, but...

You're spot on, the last "socialist" .gov we had, gave us the NHS.

The last 39 years of Maggie's policies have been an abject failure by her own measure.

1) Property owning - down

2) Share owning - down

3) Privatizing rail - too extreme for thatcher.

4) Top rate of tax 60%

1930 - 1995 - people leaving this country in droves - 1997 tory-lite (labour) start to reverse the trend in homelessness, which falls drastically until 2010.

8 years of true blue, tory and the country is a basketcase, led by a clown, but sure "Corbyn" and moderate policies to help the worst off in society are going to damage us. We are already damaged and but keep on stepping over the homeless and ignoring the foodbanks.

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sed gawk

Re: Eh?

Sure, she has.

Care to name any, or just going to throw shade at one of the few decent MP's..

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UK.gov to roll out voter ID trials in 2019 local elections

sed gawk

Re: The trial was a resounding success.

Sadly, I don't think anyone cares to stop the slow motion coup taking place in this country, despite the obvious parallels with the US.

This measure is intended to entrench the party of government in power by means of voter suppression.

"On May 3rd 2018, 350 people were denied a vote in their local council elections. ... The minister hailed these trials of mandatory voter ID as a ‘success’. ... The scheme disenfranchised far more ordinary voters than potential wrongdoers: in a single day across the five councils, twice as many people didn’t vote due to having incorrect ID as have been accused of personation in eight years across the whole of the UK."

www.electoral-reform.org.uk

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Facebook sets Linux kernel tools free

sed gawk

Re: Who's been pottering about with kernel code?

Yeah, no.

man bpf(2) will make this clearer.

BPF is what libpcap understands and exposes as tcpdump/wireshare filter syntax.

eg. 'dst port 80'

eBPF allows you to have a stat collection buffer in kernel space, and then collect the stats from userspace.

This is huge for lots of tedious bit twiddly reasons, see https://blog.cloudflare.com/epbf_sockets_hop_distance/ for someone with a better explanation.

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sed gawk

Re: Who's been pottering about with kernel code?

Its not as bad as all that.

EBPF is a verified safe subset of instructions that can be attached to certain kernel paths.

Think a very fine grained ptrace with much lower overhead...

As this is a rather esoteric subject, I can recommend a very nice blog post series from

Cloudflare on the subject.

This is by far the most accessible of the series https://blog.cloudflare.com/epbf_sockets_hop_distance/

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sed gawk

Re: oomd - for reigning in developers who shouldn't be

The OOM kills processes at random.

OOMD will let you kill a specific process, possibly allowing you to fix the problem.

FB after all is famously a user of "saturate, log, and leak" so choosing which process to restart under such circumstances would be most useful.

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Mourning Apple's war against sockets? The 2018 Mac mini should be your first port of call

sed gawk

Re: Not bad, Did not offer an opinion on the Mac Mini fwiw.

Not comparing against MacMini - OP asked for a macbook replacement, " I’m looking to replace my MBR 15 with something that supports high definition screens and is quiet."

I recommended the machine I used as a macbook replacement.

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sed gawk

Re: Not bad

DELL precision 5510 about 1200 quid, 32GB RAM, 256GB SSD, can drive 2 4k external displays.

Supports USB-C external dock - so single USB-C cable provides, power/ network / displays / esata / usb.

Mine came with dell flavoured ubuntu (14.04).

I run VMs and C++ workloads and it's a decent mobile workstation, which replaced my 2013 MacTop.

If you get it, get the dock. and the 180 watt power supply as the laptop will require 130 watt of supply over and above the draw of the dock itself.

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sed gawk
Trollface

Some of us "mainstream professional power users" ...are willing to pay for an OS and a platform that works the first time, every time,

Yes but we were discussing OSX

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Budget 2018: UK goes it alone on digital sales tax for tech giants

sed gawk

Re: A tiny step in the right direction

Had a grep through your links, care to point to the section enforcing "EU rules on government contracts the government is not allowed to use the companies prior performance as a reason to reject a bid."

I'm struggling to locate the text, it seems at odds with the general thrust of the document, which although dry, seems rather anodyne and unthreatening, positively sensible even.

Perhaps, I'm not seeing it, would you mind pointing it out.

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The D in Systemd stands for 'Dammmmit!' A nasty DHCPv6 packet can pwn a vulnerable Linux box

sed gawk

Re: how did it get to this?

I personally like openrc as an init system, but systemd is a symptom of the tooling problem.

It's for me a retrograde step but again, it's linux, one can, as you and I do, just remove systemd.

There are a lot of people in the industry now who don't seem able to cope with shell scripts nor are minded to research the arguments for or against shell as part of a unix style of system design.

In conclusion, we are outnumbered, but it will eventually collapse under its own weight and a worthy successor shall rise, perhaps called SystemV, might have to shorten that name a bit.

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We asked 100 people to name a backdoored router. You said 'EE's 4GEE HH70'. Our survey says... Top answer!

sed gawk

Re: you need to have local access

So can a browser hosted javascript use ssh, and thereby do drive-by-exploit ?

My gut says maybe, and google threw this up https://github.com/billchurch/WebSSH2

Which on poking around suggests no.. on the basis it's using a proxy thus the (ssh)network packets do not come from the client network.

That said JS has arrays, and integers, so you should be able to craft appropriate packets, leaving only finding a way to inject the packet on the client network as an exercise for the reader..

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Atlassian: Look at our ginormous Jira revenues!

sed gawk

Re: it all sucks balls

It doesn't fit for devs either, but as a developer, save yourself.

Learn to use the rest api, and wrap it into a small script so you can open / close/ list and manage tasks / tickets without leaving the comfort of your vim.

This chap makes bobswift.atlassian.net available which wraps the rest api into a CLI jar

java -jar ${LATEST_VERSION_PATH}/lib/${LATEST_VERSION}.jar \

--server "$server" \

--user "$user" \

--password "$password" \

"$@"

for example java -jar xx.jar --server https://jira.example.org/ --user johndoe --password "s3KURe!" --action getServerInfo.

I literally have never logged into the jira web interface since.

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sed gawk

Re: Seems this thread had been invaded by Microsoft.

I'm a *nix man, and I vote for none of the above.

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sed gawk

Re: Could be great

Jenkins is okay, provided you do the sane thing and run actual shell scripts from an actual git repo, so the only thing provided by Jenkins is credential/parameter injection.

Ultimately, C/I needs to work in plain shell with the C/I system doing setenv(3). so C/I simply records the value of the previous variable invocations thusly "env > env.txt", allowing local debugging by simply sourcing the env.txt in a clean shell, e.g. env -i sh -c ".env.txt && ./ci-script.sh"

Jenkins just makes this apparent earlier, having played with bamboo, I was curious as to what features caught your eye as they seem fairly interchangeable for me.

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The mysterious life of Luc Esape, bug fixer extraordinaire. His big secret? He's not human

sed gawk

Re: ""Who owns the intellectual property and responsibility of a bot contribution: "

Patent are complex in England & Wales, but copyright is quite straightforward.

Code or patches to code is a literary work, as such the copyright is automatic and vests in the creator.

My studies are rather out of date, but I was taught that software alone is rarely patentable within our legal framework. I think an additional hardware component is typically required, and the combined usage held to be "novel to one skilled in the art" for the grant of patent.

For example, industrial cyclones - prior art, filtering particulate matter with suction - prior art - dyson cyclone - patentable.

There isn't a way to best of my knowledge to make a pure software output say a VHDL chip generated by your bot, into a patentable item, regardless of how novel the output is, it's still a novel, literary work.

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sed gawk

Re: ""Who owns the intellectual property and responsibility of a bot contribution: "

This is not true in England & Wales - see Copyright, Designs, and Patents act 1988. Section 9. Subsection 3.

https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1988/48/section/9

s(9)(3)In the case of a literary, dramatic, musical or artistic work which is computer-generated, the author shall be taken to be the person by whom the arrangements necessary for the creation of the work are undertaken.

In other words, if I write you a program and that program produces output, the output is copyrightable and the copyright belongs to the person running that program.

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Stroppy Google runs rings round Brussels with Android remedy

sed gawk

Re: I trust Google more than the EC

Better the devil you know, and I'd rather have the ability to choose to not use the services of a company I disagree with be legally enforced by the Courts than have no ability to hold a company to account whatsoever.

Fixed it for you.

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sed gawk

Re: Ha

The EU is a chance for people to access courts and protect themselves against their governments.

Its kind of like the right to bear arms, but effective[1].

[1] against the same level of tech, (no use when one side has the USAF and the other has rifles), however the weapon in the courts is the law, and you still have a chance, That why people want to take access to supra-national courts away from us.

I hope, you might advance an alternative means of effective defence against the scoundrels in power, post brexit, or having accepted that there is none, please, stop helping in this shameful disenfranchisement of our nation.

Back to the meat..

TomTom is a massive firm in the EU, seeming untroubled by the politicians.

Google - are Big and Profitable, doesn't mean the tech coming out of the chocolate factory is really any different from anywhere else. They hire from the same pool as the rest of us, and frankly the code coming out of there is less than earth shattering.

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Git push origin undo-my-last-disaster

sed gawk

Wanky name - but useful idea

Hate the name but authorizing changes to state via git hooks is a goodness, as I already trust the people with access to my repo.

However reusing the implicit authorization of write access to a given respository as a proxy for permission to make changes to configuration is different from storing config files in a SCM.

GitOps is still a wanky name for this idea.

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sed gawk

Re: etckeeper

it sounds like you are describing etckeeper http://etckeeper.branchable.com/

It's quite cool - and does the daily autocommit etc.

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Red Hat tries CoreOS on for size – and buys

sed gawk

CoreOS is SystemD already

CoreOS is basically a Gentoo Derivative but with the package manager(emerge) removed.

SystemD preinstalled + Docker.

And "ignition" - some JSON configuration file which fills out SystemD unit files - so there is no escape, no C compiler, and everything runs in a container - or is statically linked, or is just a pain to install.

They go to some lengths to disguise the Gentoo heritage, but it's getting some traction with DC/OS (separate software bundle from Mesophere) being the quick start tooling for Kubernetes/Mesos clusters on AWS, and DC/OS choosing to make that bundle use CoreOS as a base rather than say CentOS or Debian.

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Ever wondered why tech products fail so frequently? No, me neither

sed gawk

Re: Software testing?

“The reason that the rich were so rich, Vimes reasoned, was because they managed to spend less money.

Take boots, for example. He earned thirty-eight dollars a month plus allowances. A really good pair of leather boots cost fifty dollars. But an affordable pair of boots, which were sort of OK for a season or two and then leaked like hell when the cardboard gave out, cost about ten dollars. Those were the kind of boots Vimes always bought, and wore until the soles were so thin that he could tell where he was in Ankh-Morpork on a foggy night by the feel of the cobbles.

But the thing was that good boots lasted for years and years. A man who could afford fifty dollars had a pair of boots that'd still be keeping his feet dry in ten years' time, while the poor man who could only afford cheap boots would have spent a hundred dollars on boots in the same time and would still have wet feet.

This was the Captain Samuel Vimes 'Boots' theory of socioeconomic unfairness.”

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Carnegie-Mellon Uni emits 'don't be stupid' list for C++ developers

sed gawk

Re: Oh, goodie!

Coverity is decent.

Sonar has little value to me over using Clang's static analyser, which is really rather good, combined with the usual suspects, compiling against different compilers / platforms, valgrind.

Nothing else I've seen is worth the price or more importantly offers an advance on the open source tools.

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