* Posts by Nick Ryan

2016 posts • joined 10 Apr 2007

Nine months and a lot more b*llocks to go before new EU data protection rules kick in

Nick Ryan
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Unfortunately there are a huge number of organisations that will be defrauded with incorrect "advice" and bunk reasons for "further training" or "consultancy". Largely due to scare stories pushed by the media and those that benefit, as in those that sell this "training" and "consultancy".

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Russia's answer to Buckminster Fuller has a buttload of CGI and he's not afraid to use it

Nick Ryan
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Re: Motorway median

FWIW, this whole BS sci-fi fantasy concept has been throughly debunked elsewhere...

Including: Bridges, taller vehicles, vehicles crossing the "monorail/lanes", accidents, weight loading on the monorail/lane, power supply for the vehicle, failure modes when power fails, boarding and disembarking and that's before anything malicious is involved.

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She's arrived! HMS Queen Lizzie enters Portsmouth Naval Base

Nick Ryan
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Re: Drones

Yes, unmanned air vehicles are the future of air warfare. Largely because the effort in keeping a meatsack alive (and concious, which is even harder) in a high speed plane really puts constraints on the plane's weight and aerodynamics. Comparitively inexpensive unmanned aircraft can be smaller, perform much more vigorous evasive maneuvers and there are considerably less unhappy people at home when one crashes or is shot down - they also allow the use of "swarm" type tactics.

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Raising minimum wage will raise something else: An army of robots taking away folks' jobs

Nick Ryan
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Re: We have to consider the human costs

Rubbish, you do not teach them the skills businesses need now you teach them the subjects you are targetting for the future and how to learn, same technique as employed by the countries that took the lead off the UK.

But what about the (hypothetical*) situation where a country has spent years dumbing down it's education because it's all about recording the number of passes and not about the quality of teaching and a person's ability to learn and think for themselves?

* hahahahahaha.

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Nick Ryan
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Re: Who does he think his customers are, if not employed people

I think you are missing the point, that without employment, there are no customers for any business. Wealth is created by moving money around, not siphoning it offshore.

Wealth is not created by moving money around. The only thing that happens when moving wealth (money) around is that, erm, the money is moved around, or "redistributed" in other words. Wealth is only created by the controllers of the financial system creating more money and releasing this into the public domain somehow. This is a simple process because these days almost all money is nothing more than lines in a database somewhere. If the rate of creation of this money is too high then it will trigger the devaluing of the currency however if the rate is too low then the parts of the financial system which accumulate the money will have too much and there will not be enough to go around elsewhere - which for everyone else is a very bad thing. Taxation is a governmental method of slowing down the accumulation (hoarding) of money and to push it back into the public domain through later expenditure.

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Brit firms warned over hidden costs of wiping data squeaky clean before privacy rules hit

Nick Ryan
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Re: Most fundamentally fundamental issue...

Under GDPR you are still required to retain records as legally required by your government, this includes financial records.

Where data is made publicly available there is a very clear clause, Article 17 para 2 which states

2. Where the controller has made the personal data public and is obliged pursuant to paragraph 1 to erase the personal data, the controller, taking account of available technology and the cost of implementation, shall take reasonable steps, including technical measures, to inform controllers which are processing the personal data that the data subject has requested the erasure by such controllers of any links to, or copy or replication of, those personal data.

In other words, reasonable steps. As long as you can justify and argue what you consider are reasonable steps then you will be OK. There are also a host of exclusions (under para 3) that apply to the entire right to erasure article.

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Nick Ryan
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Re: More GDPR FUD

That's just in relation to the case where the controller has made the data public. The get-out clauses have to be read a bit more carefully than that however generally revolve around business or operational reasons.

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Nick Ryan
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Re: "...completely remove all the data they hold on an individual..."

Information you are required to retain for legal purposes is specifically excluded from many of the clauses of the GDPR, for example exclusion 17.3(b) of the "right to erasure" is:

(b) for compliance with a legal obligation which requires processing by Union or Member State law to which the controller is subject or for the performance of a task carried out in the public interest or in the exercise of official authority vested in the controller;

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Nick Ryan
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Re: Backups?

In my experience the issue around backups has yet to be resolved like this because they are a special case.

As for deleting an (external) encryption key, are you seriously suggesting that the solution is that every data row relating to each and every identifiable individual in a database has a unique encryption key? While technically possible any system attempting to do this would grind to an immediate effective halt as soon as you tried to do anything in it, particularly when you involve data searches, indexes or reporting. Also, deferring such protection to a unique external key would just mean that you have to manage these keys in the same way, tracking changes to them and deleting them from your backups as well. This is just an arbitrary central and singular database, then there are the ancilliary records and files related to an individual as well as this would mean that you would have to encrypt every document in this way which given that a document could refer to more than one identifiable individual starts to get incredibly messy.

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Nick Ryan
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Re: Backups?

Backups are an interesting case, and still unresolved from the orginal DPA (1998).

The latest snake oil GDPR consultant I spoke with (essentially a clueless box ticker tasked with bringing in more consultancy and death-by-powerpoint sessions) seemed to think that when an individual's right to erasure is performed that their data must be removed from all backup media as well. They just couldn't understand that it wasn't a case of just "removing" the details from the tape, and I wasn't even going to waste my time running through the fact that backups are almost always compressed, often encrypted, and the backed up data may be in an application or file system format. In other words, to remove "Joe Bloggs" from your backup data you would have to extract the contents of the backup tape to a system what is able to understand and process all the data formats and structures in place, then to remove/overrite all the data pertaning to "Joe Bloggs" and then to respool the data back to tape. All the while not knackering up whatever arcane data formats and structures are in place.

Obviously this is technically possible, however how many tapes or tape sets do you have? You'd have to perform this action on all of them where you reasonably suspect that data may be recorded regarding "Joe Bloggs". Once this is done you hope that the backup media are still in a working order.

The following day you receive another request, this time from "Linda Smith" who also requires that her data is erased... and so on...

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Nick Ryan
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More GDPR FUD

Yay! Yet more GDPR FUD. Anybody would have thought that's there a lot of money to be made out of scaring people/organisations into consultancy. :/

It is NOT REQUIRED, nor specified, anywhere within GDPR that when deleting the information relating to a natural person (i.e. an individual and not a corporate or other abstract entity of any form) that the data has to be securely encrypted, scrubbed, overwritten with random data, zeros, ones or anything.

The GDPR isn't a particularly hard document to read and Section 3, Article 17 "Right to erasure ('right to be forgotten')" is not prescriptive in how data must be erased, just that it is. In general and where possible throughout the GDPR the wording for any process usually states "reasonable" methods and does not specify any particular implementation - this is very sensible given the rapid change in technology.

For the convenience of other commentards, here's the section from the GDPR (note the absence of prescribed methods, Para 2 contains the usual terminology around obligations which are reasonable to perform):

Article 17

Right to erasure (‘right to be forgotten’)

1. The data subject shall have the right to obtain from the controller the erasure of personal data concerning him or her without undue delay and the controller shall have the obligation to erase personal data without undue delay where one of the following grounds applies:

(a) the personal data are no longer necessary in relation to the purposes for which they were collected or otherwise processed; 4.5.2016 L 119/43 Official Journal of the European Union EN

(b) the data subject withdraws consent on which the processing is based according to point (a) of Article 6(1), or point (a) of Article 9(2), and where there is no other legal ground for the processing;

(c) the data subject objects to the processing pursuant to Article 21(1) and there are no overriding legitimate grounds for the processing, or the data subject objects to the processing pursuant to Article 21(2);

(d) the personal data have been unlawfully processed;

(e) the personal data have to be erased for compliance with a legal obligation in Union or Member State law to which the controller is subject;

(f) the personal data have been collected in relation to the offer of information society services referred to in Article 8(1).

2. Where the controller has made the personal data public and is obliged pursuant to paragraph 1 to erase the personal data, the controller, taking account of available technology and the cost of implementation, shall take reasonable steps, including technical measures, to inform controllers which are processing the personal data that the data subject has requested the erasure by such controllers of any links to, or copy or replication of, those personal data.

3. Paragraphs 1 and 2 shall not apply to the extent that processing is necessary:

(a) for exercising the right of freedom of expression and information;

(b) for compliance with a legal obligation which requires processing by Union or Member State law to which the controller is subject or for the performance of a task carried out in the public interest or in the exercise of official authority vested in the controller;

(c) for reasons of public interest in the area of public health in accordance with points (h) and (i) of Article 9(2) as well as Article 9(3);

(d) for archiving purposes in the public interest, scientific or historical research purposes or statistical purposes in accordance with Article 89(1) in so far as the right referred to in paragraph 1 is likely to render impossible or seriously impair the achievement of the objectives of that processing; or

(e) for the establishment, exercise or defence of legal claims.

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Trapped under ice with no oxygen for months, goldfish turn to booze. And can you blame 'em?

Nick Ryan
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Crap. There I was being worried about a planetary takeover by lizard and robot overlords and now I have to worry about goldfish as well? Where will it end?

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Hell desk to user: 'I know you're wrong. I wrote the software. And the protocol it runs on'

Nick Ryan
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Re: My mother

My mother-in-law has a very similar attitude towards TV and, also once a thought gets lodged, no matter how wrong or irrational, no arguing, demonstrations, patience, practical rebuttals or anything else works to change or remove it.

She also talks about plot lines in soap operas as if the bloody things were real... i.e. "I can't believe they let him get away with that", "They shouldn't be allowed to show that on TV" or "I really feel sorry for her, she's had such a rough life and then he comes in treating her like that, it's not right and he should be ashamed of himself".

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Nick Ryan
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Re: Stalk the stalk

The "correct" response in this situation is "Well, you owe me a drink then."

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Good Lord: Former UK spy boss backs crypto

Nick Ryan
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'Counter-terrorism not the only national security threat we face'

No, but we do get to label the most severe threats as "MPs", although currently we have an issue where the elected bring in a hoard of un-elected (either as advisors, secretaries, policy beneficiaries, etc) and we have no, or little, influence over this.

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Nick Ryan
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Re: Give that man a cookie

Lizards. Lizards are the answer.

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It's August 2017 and your Android gear can be pwned by, oh look, just patch the things

Nick Ryan
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Re: You know the drill

Along with the mountain of Windows phones that Microsoft practically had to give away because nobody sane wanted them*. Oh, and all of the older iPhone models, anything prior to a 6, or even a 5, is considered landfill these days.

/right back at you, MS-Fanboi-bot :)

* OK, they weren't bad for the price/specs and were (initially at least) quite stable. Battery life was variable depending on the patch. Unfortunately due to the total absence of applications in the MS app store and a really horrible user interface they bombed (front screen was almost usable, everything else past that was appalling and disjointed - although better than the earlier phones which some replicated all the usability of Win 3 on a mobile device). I'd prefer more competition in the phone market, but MS are not it.

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Nick Ryan
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Re: Why I love Apple

It is a bit broad and possibly a bit of a sweeping statement but in essence is true. While Apple's software updates often appear to focus on efficiency (battery life) this efficiency often doesn't appear to translate into faster operating older kit and instead seems to result in older kit running slower than it did before the update.

Whether this is an unfortunate case of coding for newer processors and systems with more resources or is a deliberate deploy to "obsolete" older kit and thereby forcing device churn is the subject of many a conspiracy theory and fanboi/flame war.

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Nick Ryan
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Re: Shameful!

Wouldn't it be a better idea to start the clock once the device has stopped being sold?

A very good point, and it would be a lot more honest as well. However thinking about it I can't think of a single supplier of mobile devices (or much else) that states it this way.

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Salesforce sacks two top security engineers for their DEF CON talk

Nick Ryan
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Re: Something?

No, and even broad terms of what they were capable of and what they did would have been considered by any competent hacker and factored into what they produce (exploit and anti-exploit is an interesting arms race of sorts). Of course, most hackers are not actually competent and just operate systems provided by others... not that this is a "bad" thing in itself, I drive a car but really don't have the capability to build one, or at least to the quality of the one that I drive.

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Mediocre Britain: UK broadband ranked 31st in world for speed

Nick Ryan
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Re: internet in Romania

As has been pointed out earlier, BT in the UK had zero interest in doing anything other than pushing their cash cow ISDN and leased line solutions because they would make considerably less profit from broadband (ADSL). This was at a time when it was fairly common for other European Internet users to have 100Mbit connections to their home and here in the UK we were still forced to deal with 56k modems and given appalling support on this - despite is being demonstrated at this time that considerably more data was sent through BT's network that voice BT refused to give consumers any guarantee of operation, let alone speed, for data services.

There are a few weirdo problems as well, for example the trunk lines under motorways that cannot be upgraded without digging up the motorways, exchanges that have been fibre or aluminium before BT reluctantly agreed to offer ADSL (over copper) and doubtless a few others that I've forgotten.

In the UK we're basically worse than many "3rd world" countries so coming in at 31st is an achievement.

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Google's macho memo man fired, say reports

Nick Ryan
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Diversity is good, "positive discrimination" is still discrimination and is generally not good.

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Microsoft dumps mobility from its Vision

Nick Ryan
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Re: Oops, a bit of truth accidentally slipped out

The problem is likely that due to litigation society reasons (US), Microsoft cannot sensibly state that they are dominant therefore there are no real competitors because that's an instant, legally binding statement that they are in a monopoly position. Microsoft have to name a competitor or two in their statements (because otherwise they are a monopoly be default), so who is Microsoft's competitor? Far better a nebulous description that cannot really be disproved than an admission of a monopoly state.

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Microsoft breaks Office 365 sign-in pages ahead of surprise update

Nick Ryan
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Re: Paginated

It's probably put in specifically to piss off people who use secure passwords and password managers. That's how it feels anyway, because there in my experience there are almost zero real world (tm) advantages to making the login process more tedious and annoying than previously. Bullshit about allowing different authentication systems is just that - it's not hard, or even remotely difficult, to have different pages or options for logins with unique URLs for each (rather than Javascript non-page UI accessibility failures embedded everywhere).

Part of it stems from the changes that Microsoft themselves made when moving to a GUI... as in the hijacking of the Enter key for form submit (win16 "OK" button) rather than "next field" which is what it always was on every other system and how many users still treat it (yes, even in 2017). So this split page login rubbish gets around this fundamental design failure by treating the username and then the password as two separate form submissions...

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Why do you cry when chopping onions? No, it's not crippling anxiety, it's this weird chemical

Nick Ryan
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Re: Eh - do not refrigerate?

Bananas stored in the fridge will "ripen" broccoli, cabbage, Brussels sprouts etc, turning them yellow and ruining their flavour.

It's possible to ruin the flavour of brussel sprouts? How is it possible to ruin something that tastes like the festuring scrapage of a demon's armpit?

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CMD.EXE gets first makeover in 20 years in new Windows 10 build

Nick Ryan
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Finally... pretty sure it was still in Win 8 though. It was the most pig ugly, barely usable window but was left in since Windows 3.11 - which, IIRC, was the first edition of Windows to support vector fonts natively and killed the entire market in non-core font applications.

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Petition calls for Adobe Flash to survive as open source zombie

Nick Ryan
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That's why it's important to remember history so we don't make the same mistakes. After all, only complete morons created entire websites out of flash (rather that using flash to enhance a real website)... we wouldn't want the same class of morons to do the same with new technology would we?

Oh wait... JavaScript...

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Pre-order your early-bird pre-sale product today! (Oh did we mention the shipping date has slipped AGAIN?)

Nick Ryan
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My Nigerian uncle would be turning in his grave at the thought of such underhand tactics in taking money off people. The poor bugger won the state lottery a few years ago and just can't give the money away...

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Big Cable falls into wormhole to alternate universe, sends back blog post about USA's amazing broadband

Nick Ryan
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Meanwhile here in the UK

Meanwhile here in the UK... we generally get a choice of, erm, two providers. Most of the time, although if you're in a city and can afford it then you can get business lines that are neither of these and genuinely separate. However as a consumer and not a business if you do get a choice then generally you may choose from Virgin Media or BT. If you think you're getting a line from somebody else it's usually just reselling over the BT infrastructure. The same BT that dragged its heels on ADSL technology to extract more money from its cash cow leased line business and where investment in "the last mile" is usually zero.

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Enumeration bug offers five-finger discount on Woolworth Australia loyalty points

Nick Ryan
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Re: Good for you

As LaeMing correctly pointed out, the costs for these schemes have to paid for somewhere and this is in the markup of the goods prices. In theory this could be absorbed through such loyalty schemes driving further purchases that may either happen with a rival or just not at all, however with a healthy dose of scepticism you just know this won't be the case.

So you have three choices:

1) Shop elsewhere that doesn't have a loyalty scheme (may not be possible or make financial sense)

2) Don't take part in the scheme but still pay for it.

2) Take part in the scheme and suck up the tracking of your purchases.

On the latter point, unless you pay with cash the vendor can track you through your payment method, they just can't advertise to you so easily. Also, if all shoppers took full advantage of the offers and discounts, you can bet that the vendor would have to change them :)

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Astroboffins discover that half of the Milky Way's matter comes from other galaxies

Nick Ryan
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Solexit

Damn immingrant star matter coming into our solar system. I demand that we leave the galaxy and go it alone, we can negotiate our own matter/energy transfers and don't need no stinking galaxy and it's gravity imposing things on us. Bloody extrasolar bodies think they can boss us around? We'll show 'em who's boss by exploding our own star. That'll teach them.

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AMD shocks the world by only losing $16m

Nick Ryan
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Re: 486SX 25

At this point I believe you could by a separate maths co-processor. Also I vaguely remember a nastily wide range of differing versions of the SX chips, some of which had full maths capabilities.

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Microsoft hits new low: Threatens to axe classic Paint from Windows 10

Nick Ryan
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You mean to say that there are people out there who haven't already ditched it in favour of the free and vastly superior Paint.NET?

paint.net is not installed on all systems by default, mspaint is. This makes mspaint as useful as notepad or would you rather have to install Visual Studio on all systems (desktop and server alike) to open up a .cfg or .ini file?

Not that installing on all systems by default is a good thing because the 'tards at Microsoft marketing seem to be under the drug addled conclusion that it's a "good thing" to foist candy crush, USA news (or whatever it's called, MSN or whatever) or other shitty preview/freemium applications by default on all Win10 non-enterprise systems.

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Nationwide’s online banking goes down again

Nick Ryan
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They probably use Virgin Media as their ISP... however the total failure of much of VM's network since midday Friday (21/7/2017) is astonishling absent from the press. It's only just beginning to come back online now, 10:00 Monday (24/7/2017). VM even took their own service status offline rather than actually communicate with any of their customers about the failure.

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Fan of FBI cosplay? Enjoy freaking out your neighbors? Have we got the eBay auction for you

Nick Ryan
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Re: Retro

You wouldn't have had to. Everything in 1989 can with wood panelling regardless of whether or not you wanted it. Well, everything that wasn't painted magnolia anyway.

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The lady (or man) vanishes: The thorny issue of GDPR coding

Nick Ryan
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Re: What of micro-businesses, clubs & societies

what are the chances of a helpful answer?

Zero? :)

Just download the GDPR, print it out and assault it with a marker pen. It's not really that hard to read and you will quickly have an idea as to what applies to you and what you need to do. Some of it is intentionally fuzzy (for example, the definition of a public body) and some of it is contextual but there's nothing really scary in there.

For those that don't know, it can be downloaded here: GDPR: REGULATION (EU) 2016/679

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Nick Ryan
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Re: Employee data?

The articles are using the wrong terminology. GDPR refers to "natural persons" - i.e. people and not organisations. It does not matter whether or not the people you are dealing with are suppliers, customers, employees, volunteers or any other form of contact.

The retention of HR data is covered by the employment regulations (and therefore covered by the legal requirements clauses), the retention of data for the protection of individuals is also covered by clauses. It does, however, get a bit more involved when referring to the protection of vulnerable individuals as this requires protection that goes above and beyond the GDPR and is governed elsewhere.

If your business has a public benefit in the retention of these records then this is also an exception to the automatic removal of them.

In short, despite the obnoxious sellers of training courses and consultancy, the GDPR is not there to cripple businesses and organisations, it's there to strike a good balance between preventing abuse of personal data and the genuine use of personal data by an organisation. Download the GDPR, take a marker pen and highlight the sections that apply to you and cross out those that don't. Then re-read it and you'll see your obligations quite clearly.

For those that don't know, it can be downloaded here: GDPR: REGULATION (EU) 2016/679

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Nick Ryan
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Re: re:'Personally identfiable information'

Hence, GDPR is a good gig to get into.

Definitely this. I receive a large number of inane sales contacts about training, tools and other junk vaguely associatable with GDPR. Most of them know nothing about it, the training companies are there to promote training(therefore the courses are almost all doom and gloom with few "facts", many of which are incorrect and seem to be designed to promote further training and services provided by the vendor of the training.

If you're concerned, which you should be to some extent, then download and read the GDPR. It's a bit dry as all legalise documents are, but it is readable and understandable and you'll find that the reality is quite different to the scare mongering that's going on that's lead by the training and tools pushers who most stand to benefit from it.

One of the most important aspects that you need to know is that consent for incidental data collection can no longer be opt-out and that consent must be explicit, therefore no more "tick this to opt out of our shitty newsletter" or "untick this otherwise we'll send your details to our 'partners'". However if the collection of the data is for genuine operational purposes then as long as you can justify this you are welcome to collect it as long as you don't disperse this data (unless explicitly agreed to). In short, define what you need to do and collect the data for that and record and justify this.

The rules about automated processing are interesting however the clauses reduce the restrictions to sensible levels.

The rules about a "request to be deleted" are fine, however get operationally interesting quickly. Many organisations will need to record that an individual has requested to be deleted (because otherwise they may be contacted incidentally otherwise), many organisations have very genuine operational reasons for retaining historical data (restrictions on which do not apply to the deceased) and then there's the practical aspect of genuinely deleting all references to an individual - in theory if this individual is recorded in a backup tape somewhere then they would have to be removed from these as well.

The rules about ensuring that data is accurate are of note but the FUD being spread is ridiculous. Nowhere in the GDPR does it mandate contacting, by post, all data subjects once a year to check that their details are correct, all it states is that reasonable endeavours must be applied to ensure that the data is accurate. What these reasonable endeavours may be depend entirely on the situation, the source of the data and the importance of the processing.

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Solaris, Java have vulns that let users run riot

Nick Ryan
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True, however unfortunately many places still use Java exposed to the Internet, either as an application or as a plugin within the browser.

In short, not permitting Java, Flash, Silverlight or ActiveX in the browser will help reduce your risks considerably.

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Google unleashes 20m lab-created blood-thirsty freaks on a city. And this is a good thing, it says

Nick Ryan
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I assure that it's not that super a power - particularly when you're on the receiving end of it.

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Eggheads identify the last animal that will survive on Earth until the Sun dies

Nick Ryan
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Re: Food

True, would there be enough other organisms alive for tardigrades to feed on them? Chemical/energy input has to come into the food chain somewhere therefore they can't survive on other tardigrades for long.

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Nick Ryan
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Re: the planet has billions of years to play with before the sun goes night-night

How would the swelling of the sun into a red giant affect planetary orbits? From memory Earth is currently outside the projected size of the sun as a red giant, but by then there will be less solar mass and therefore Earth, and other planets, would likely to be further away from the sun due to the reduction in the sun's gravity.

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Trump to world: Forget moving to America to do a startup

Nick Ryan
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Re: The Post-US Era...

Trump has touted the G20 summit as his "wondeful success".

So did chairman May. Well, the rabidly, reality-distorting UK Tory press did anyway.

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Nick Ryan
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Re: Close the door and turn of the light

Control of the press is most important - control the (easily leadable) minds of the majority and you can do what you want. For example, publicly denounce (otherwise impartial) judges for upholding the law in a manner directly reminiscent of some of the most public instances of the early Nazi party. Once you've beaten enough impartial judges down through "popular" opinion, the dictatorship is yours.

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Good luck building a VR PC: Ethereum miners are buying all the GPUs

Nick Ryan
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Re: "Why would anyone need two graphics cards?"

It may make some sense, however it can savage CPU performance because of contention for memory access, not just access to memory in the same block but memory on the same physical component (chip/stick depending on implementation). This is particularly complicated by caching which for performance reasons takes place within the CPU core and therefore won't be shared with a GPU accessing the same memory block.

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OMG, dad, you're so embarrassing! Are you P2P file sharing again?

Nick Ryan
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Maybe El Reg should create a commentard voted "cool wall" where peridocally techniques or technologies are shoved up for a cool/not cool vote.

Lycra, of course, when it comes to middle aged men, should be fired sunward at maximum velocity.

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Nick Ryan
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Re: re: pay for the good/services

I was agreeing with some of your other points, or were ambivalent to them, however (assuming you were being serious):

Copyright abuse is theft and nonesense. Don't do it

Copyright is not, and never can be, theft. Copyright violation is copyright violation, nothing more, nothing less. This doesn't mean that violating copyright is a good thing, just that it's not theft.

Makes a whole mockery of the UK's self-serving FACT organisation (Federation Against Copyright Theft) - it's hard to take an organsation seriously when even their name is a lie. As for the unskippable adverts and theft lies at the beginning of DVDs... that is exactly why I play a ripped copy and not the bloody original DVD or BluRay disc. When I choose to watch a film, I'd like it to start there and then, not some unspecified 5-10m in the future.

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LHC finds a new and very charming particle: the Xicc++ baryon

Nick Ryan
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From what I understand, it's just a case of arranging the basic building components into non-repeating, i.e. elementary groups. Given this there's a nice grid of particles that could/should exist as there's quite a finite set of possibilities.

Until of course some bugger finds a way of breaking the lower level components into parts to see how they're made up and then predicts some new basic building blocks to play with.

(I'm not a particle physicist by a long way, but know enough to appreciate some of the issues without my mind imploding)

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Multics resurrected: Proto-Unix now runs on Raspberry Pi or x86

Nick Ryan
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Re: Primos

Wow - PrimOS. That brings back some memories. Interesting systems, and like many they had some good points and some really infuriating ones as well. Certainly easy enough to use but at the time I used them there were already lots of grumbles about lack of software support with vendors abandoning PrimOS ports in favour of pretty much anything else.

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BOFH: That's right. Turn it off. Turn it on

Nick Ryan
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Re: Thus is the great dilemma of IT support born

blockquote (no angle brackets included for parsing reasons, add to use) is available here in El Reg. However it's not available to all users. I'm sure there's some justification to excluding it for many commentards, I just can't think of it now...

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