* Posts by Nick Ryan

1934 posts • joined 10 Apr 2007

BA CEO blames messaging and networks for grounding

Nick Ryan
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Precisely, his choice of weasel-words was careful. At no point did he mention where the data centres were located. "foreign country" is relative to the origin point.

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Don't rely on fitness trackers to track number of calories burned

Nick Ryan
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Re: Only off by a factor of 1000

The calorie thing by way of food intake is laughably inaccurate anyway. This doesn't mean that it doesn't have value, because some measure is better than no measure, just that people shouldn't accept it as utterly accurate.

Consider this: how does a human body process food? The chewing, saliva and other enzymes are just the start of the variables, then there's the bacteria in the digestive system and their variety efficiency, which greatly varies depending on the bacterial make up, the pre-processing of the food (cooking, chewing, etc), the food itself and the internal conditions at the time (food bulk, temperative, acidity, etc). Basically, it's complicated. Very complicated. Also, some foods require considerably more energy to break down than others - this is generally the value of more natural foods compared to heavily refined foods which are usually very easy and quick to break down, as in the difference between long chain "sugars" and short chain (refined) "sugars".

How do we measure the calorific value of food? The original method was through measuring the temperature change in water through burning the food. The methodology these days is a bit more refined than this however the overall process is/was based on this. The calorific value of most modern foods are calculated using pre-set values and the manufacturer's estimated/average measure of the food components and extrapolating from there.

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Sysadmin finds insecure printer, remotely prints 'Fix Me!' notice

Nick Ryan
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A few years back, when the likes of BT were still foisting USB ADSL modems onto users and collectively sticking their fingers in their ears and chanting "lalalalalala, can't hear you", I demonstrated to a friend and his family that perhaps they should invest in a firewall. This was before Windows came with a firewall, therefore to deploy one a user had to actively go out of their way to install it.

How did I demonstrate this? By grabbing their IP address from email headers, accessing their PC remotely, opening one of their personal files and printing it to their printer with a cover page telling them that I'd dunnit. :)

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Particle boffins calculate new constraints for probability of finding dark matter

Nick Ryan
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Re: Dark Matter - pah!

Have we got some kind of hellishly perverted dark matter fetishist around?

Probably, but scientists are human like the rest of us and if much of your professional life is based upon a proposition and somebody questions this the reaction may not be positive. There are quite a lot of notable scientists who have doggedly stuck with theories that were later disproved, it must have been very hard for them.

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Nick Ryan
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Re: Dark Matter - pah!

I don't know about your predicted propositions, however I've had a feeling for quite a long time that "dark matter" and "dark energy" are just contructs made up to fill in missing gaps in current models. It doesn't mean that they don't exist, it's just feels like some "thing" has just been created to fill holes in a model and we've spent a large amount of time trying to prove this rather than consider the validity of adding "invisible" matter or energy to models.

At some point we, of course, have to try and corroborate theories but it just feels like dark energy/matter has been accepted rather than suitably challenged.

...probably reasons why I'm not a theoritical physicist...

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Pioneer Kodi plug-in unplugs

Nick Ryan
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Re: Non issue

In the UK, for broadcast material (TV shows), the copyright period is 50 years from the year of first broadcast, therefore anything broadcast 1966 and earlier has expired. For films it's rather harder to calculate as it's based on the death of the directors, authors, etc plus 70 years, therefore it has to be judged on a per film basis. However it does mean that some true classics from the 1930s are generally available now.

In the US, however, the Disney Corporation paid to change the copyright law to protect one of their most boring, but for some reason iconic characters, Mickey Mouse. Doubtless they'll do the same again in another 15 or so years to extend the US copyright period for films further.

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Has AI gone too far? DeepTingle turns El Reg news into terrible erotica

Nick Ryan
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Re: Has a thing that doesn't exist gone too far?

At least this "AI" is using some of the fundamentals of real AI, as in neural networks and training - so more "machine learning" than procedural programming or AI. Most are nothing more than procedural iterations with configured choices with an AI badge slapped on for marketing purposes.

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Bye bye MP3: You sucked the life out of music. But vinyl is just as warped

Nick Ryan
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Audio Compression

Audio compression is not purely driven by laziness or a desire for loudness, there are (unfortunate) practical reasons as well.

Classic FM (UK national radio station playing classical music, for those not in the UK) was one of the first to widely use audio compression. Why? Because having long periods of (near) silence is not great for a radio station. Yes, they lost the range between the quiet sections and the loud sections but it was very clearly judged at the time that always broadcasting something was better than, often, broadcasting near silence. It also meant that the station became playable in more locations because a listener wouldn't leap out of their skin with the, often sudden, variations on volume level. Radio stations also tended to compress their audio not just for the periods of "silence" but to volume match consecutive tracks - no listener really wants to be able to barely hear one track followed by being nearly deafened by the following track because they had to crank up the volume for the previous track.

Moving onto the digital age, and the general contempt of "modern" music or "modern" digitisations, this is also done because tracks are more commonly listed outside of their own album. Adjusting the output volume as you start each album is annoying enough however with digital playback being what it is having to adjust for every track is just not acceptable. In short, playback habits have changed therefore carefully choreographed and sequenced albums are now much less likely to be produced compared to albums that are just containers for a set of tracks. While it's easily possible to adjust the playback levels based on the peak volume level this does not work because the overall perceived volume level is usually very different from the peak volume level, therefore processing is, unfortunately, necessary to reduce the distance between the low and the high volume levels and to adjust the perceived audio level to a set "standard" level.

So, in short, if you want to get a digital copy of an original audio source that is not compressed then choose carefully. It would be nice if the sources were marked as to whether or not they were compressed or not, there are some online sources that do clearly state that the content they provide is not but these are few and far between.

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Microsoft to spooks: WannaCrypt was inevitable, quit hoarding

Nick Ryan
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Re: El Reg Comments on Hacks

Did I mention that I'm really clever? I noticed that it was all the Tories' fault as they encouraged, nay forced, criminal software vendors to write code that can't run on patched systems.

Genius sir. I now no longer have to think about any posts. Ever. Let's lobby El Reg to build a real (and genuinely) AI system that can create post for us. Perhaps with a little help from the community it will produce output more intelligible than their previous attempt, AManFromMars.

Although perhaps one could add sub-categories to the scheme and group it according to political party, vendor, supplier, cloud blame and all that. I suspect that merging it with the BofH's excuse calendar would help as well. Currently the most obvious omission is the "I build my own processors by hand using tin and copper that I mine in my own garden therefore I know my processors inside and out" type of response...

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Months after it ordered a review into allegations of mismanagement, how's that ICANN accountability drive?

Nick Ryan
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Re: FIFA, I mean ICANN

In the age of negative press it's delightful to come across something thinking positively. So rare these days...

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Today's bonkers bug report: Microsoft Edge can't print numbers

Nick Ryan
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Re: Well one of the features of Windows used to be...

It would have been even better if the API featured all the bloody functions that one needed when it came to printing and rendering. Hell, if printing used the same units throughout it would have been an improvement what with having to pass much code through various twips to inches to cm to pixel translators before using them.

However even aside from this, where MS really dropped the ball is that they could have easily implemented an OS level printer preview that would have worked for applications using the Windows printing mechanisms, as distinct from using PostScript direct. Unfortunately printing has always been the poor cousin of PC software design and even now printing support both at the Operating System and application level is pathetic. When was the last time you didn't scream at your web browser's half-baked and largely useless print of a web page? Have you tried printing an image using the Windows 10 native image viewer (hint: it doesn't work, right click file and click Print to print usng the old image viewer's print handler which does work, most of the time).

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After years of warnings, mobile network hackers exploit SS7 flaws to drain bank accounts

Nick Ryan
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Re: pragmatism

Answered with a question... Which is more expensive to the major telcos involved? Patching, red tape or the occasional fine?

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Another AI assistant... It's getting crowded in here, isn't it, Siri?

Nick Ryan
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These assistants – which use powerful AI (artificial intelligence) engines to deliver detailed, context-aware and personalized answers to users’ questions

Yep, stuff like the above is total marketing bullshit. Hello, El Reg [SLAP], are you listening?

They have reasonable voice recognition routines that may, just may, use some neural nets but most likely just refined algorithms. Neural nets are rather expensive to simulate in either software or hardware compared to traditional voice processing. These words then get passed through a few filters to try and figure out what the poor user actually wanted, then these words are passed onto a specific application that may, possibly, could do (but almost certainly doesn't) use AI or neural net processing in order to process the provided words and perform an action or give a response.

In other words, pretty nifty language processing being passed onto textual services depending on the interpreted words. What these services do may or may not be clever, but it ain't AI by any stretch of the imagination. It's most likely not even Machine Learning.

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Red alert! Intel patches remote execution hole that's been hidden in chips since 2010

Nick Ryan
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Re: What does this vulnerability actually enable?

Another question I'd be interested in: both CPQ/HP and Dell servers have had their own equivalents of the above functionality, for years, even before vPro/AMT (for CPQ it's the iLO or integrated Lights Out facility, can't remember what the Dell variant is called). Do these systems also have the newly publicised vulnerabilities?

No, they have their own vulnerabilities. A good pen scan will show these buggers running antiquated versions of shared libraries, are know to have hard coded passwords and many other horrors. On the other hand, they are very, very useful.

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'I feel violated': Engineer who pointed out traffic signals flaw fined for 'unlicensed engineering'

Nick Ryan
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As pointed out previously in comments, in the UK engineering is not a licensed profession. Engineers here bang on about the fact that doctors and lawyers are licensed while engineering is not.

Not licensed? If you want to build many things in the UK, the design must be approved by someone who is a Certified Engineer in order to not fall foul of Building Standards

Different fields of engineering have rather different requirements and, necessary, restrictions and controls. Therefore if you want to work in the field of nuclear engineering in the UK you had better be up to date and a member of the Nuclear Institute, or a recognised international equivalent - it starts to get messy at this point. Likewise working with dams and resevoirs and many other construction projects. Having somebody who is demonstrably competent (to a level of testing as such as is possible - the hard bit is having a test that is as objective as possible) sign off on projects that could adversely affect, or just kill, members of the public is a good thing.

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Waiter? There's a mouse in my motherboard and this server is greasy!

Nick Ryan
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Pubs and bars...

I used to work in the pub and bar (club) industry, before the smoking ban.

The state of some of the returned PCs we got back was pretty terrifying... they were mounted in the DJ console in the clubs, could be anywhere in the bars. A combination of alcholol inbued sweat, dust, dirt and tobacco smoke and ash does pretty horrible things to the inside of a computer. The worst I remember had a matt about 2cm deep over everything on the inside, every part of it was sticky and it probably would have been worse if the fans sucking this shit in hadn't failed sometime earlier.

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Need the toilet? Wanna watch a video ad about erectile dysfunction?

Nick Ryan
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Hotel Toilet quality assessment

Having in the past travelled extensively, both for business and pleasure I took to judging the real quality of an establishment by the state of the toilets.

As a rule of thumb it stands up pretty well with those establishments only interested in the shiny veneer of quality having appalling quality toilets compared to their front areas an approach which was usually mirrored by being shoddy elsewhere as well. Whereas better quality establishments looked after the rarely seen areas, taking care to ensure that they are clean and working. The ones that just want to appear as quality but don't follow it through everywhere are the ones to want to watch out for due to the usual joys of infestations, food poisoning or just awful food often combined with a steady decline in the quality of service and rising prices.

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Another ZX Spectrum modern reboot crowdfunder pops up

Nick Ryan
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Re: Why not go further?

I suspect that too far would be the Oric-1 :) Although it would be an educational and possibly a hard task for a relaunch to accurately replicate the serious problems that these devices were launched with. In theory it was a superior device to the Spectrum however the implementation lead to it being considered the clown-car equivalent at the time.

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IT error at Great Western Railway charging £10k for 63-mile journey ticket

Nick Ryan
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Re: Demand pricing...

Airlines/online travel agents have done this for a long time. It's not the searches that ups the price, it's the cookies on your local computer. For a long time (haven't tried for a while) the only safe way to buy such things online was to search using one browser and then go back with a different browser (or clear all cookies) and then buy the damn ticket/holiday/flight at the original price. Operated by Utter Bar stewards.

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Less than four weeks till DevOps' finest assemble in London

Nick Ryan
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I can't wait

"Just" four more weeks of this long running advert masquerading as articles? I can't wait for it to go past.

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Mastercard launches card that replaces PIN with fingerprint sensor

Nick Ryan
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Targetting the wrong method?

And there I was thinking that "cardholder not present" fraud was the most costly and most serious - sticking (undoubtedly low quality) fingerprint readers on cards won't help with this at all.

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Nick Ryan
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Re: @Tony

The sensor fails because the water or grease on the sensor smoothes out your fingerprint either by filling the troughs making it harder to pick out the ridges or by being electically conductive and therefore confusing the sensors as they would otherwise detect the patterns of conductivity on a finger - depends on the implementation and many sensors are the the electical conductivity type. Nothing much to do with measuring bio-electrical activity or heat.

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Why Firefox? Because not everybody is a web designer, silly

Nick Ryan
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Re: Chrome works better

Chrome is pretty awesome though. Firefox is good too. Anything is better than IE.

Unfortunately Microsoft would like to disagree with this therefore they created Edge. As a result they feel a need to push this tripe browser and therefore have put a shitty little icon in the latest version of IE prompting the user to open using Edge instead.

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Euro Patent Office reforms hit another stumbling block: Reality

Nick Ryan
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Superficial examination, whatever its outcome may be, helps no one.

Would somebody like to tell the US Patent Ofiice? Where the practice is that not even a superficial examination is performed with just a rubber stamping and adding to statistics to prove how innovative US business are. All that then happens is that patent validity is considered "somebody else's problem", much to the delight of the US legal system.

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Pong, anyone? How about Pong on a vintage oscilloscope?

Nick Ryan
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Re: Kudos for the effort....

AFAIK Pong (the game with the name) was invented, or populised, by Atari. There were many earlier computer games but none called Pong.

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Mediaeval Yorkshirefolk mutilated, burned t'dead to prevent reanimation

Nick Ryan
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Re: Help a foreigner, please

I believe that Mediaeval is more correctly represented as Mediæval however due to various technical limitations in technology (and Americans, who are generally poor at spelling) the æ ligature(?) was dropped in favour of the separate letters. Not sure when/why it morphed into Medieval as well (probably the same buggers who keep forgetting the letter u and replacing the letter s with the letter z).

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Reg now behind invisible HTML5 Bitcoin paywall

Nick Ryan
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I suspect it's not a coincidence, but would be hilarious if it was genuinely patented :)

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Creators Update gives Windows 10 a bit of an Edge, but some old annoyances remain

Nick Ryan
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Re: Github power shell script

True to windows nature, doesn't work every time, sometimes needs to be run a couple of times, sometimes needs a re-boot, but it does (seem) to work.

This is due to the incompetent way the Windows store application works. If an update for an application is queued in the windows store (this is, of course, an invisible queue and cannot be purged) then regardless of whether or not you uninstall an application in the mean time the application will be reinstalled later. This gets dafter because of the useless speed of the process (probably due to not wanting to grind a PC to a crawl on startup, therefore understandable in intention) an update to an update can also be added to this update/installation queue. What should happen is that when uninstalling an application all pending update to the application are purged from the installation queue, but this seems to be beyond Microsoft.

Of course, every time a new user accesses a Windows 10 system all the crappy default windows store applications are installed for them - these buggers are on a per user, per machine installation profile. Which gets added to arbitrarily by Microsoft.

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Nick Ryan
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Re: Auto Wastebasket purging based on date?

I had a particularly daft "office manager" who stored emails that she didn't want in the deleted items in her mail client. These got deleted after a while (server based, therefore a deleted items purge was occasionally needed to make space). She only finally understood the stupidity of this when I went to went to her desk, took her paperwork in her in-tray and put it in her bin and asked her if she expected to see it there tomorrow after the cleaners had been in the evening. Sometimes physical demonstrations work well.

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WONTFIX: No patch for Windows Server 2003 IIS critical bug – Microsoft

Nick Ryan
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"but there's a limit to how long Redmond – or indeed the vast majority of software companies – will continue to support outmoded operating systems."

Which is fine, however this is an exploit of an Application, not an OS. The fact that some class-1 a-hole at Microsoft (marketing) decided that an Application, such as IIS should be inexplicably linked to the Operating System is the cause behind these problems. Yes, at some point an application may go beyond the native capabilities of the host OS, however these points should be relatively rare and more related to underlying hardware or just-above-hardware abstraction levels and as time goes by these points should become rarer due to feature saturation. However, this doesn't sell, or more accurately force the sale of, new Operating System licences therefore this is not a business model that the likes of Microsoft (they're not the only ones) operate.

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Windows 10 Creators Update: Clearing the mines with livestock (that's you by the way)

Nick Ryan
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Moo

OneDrive updated? It's just ****ing application (or should be anyway), therefore what does this matter with regards to a Windows OS update? Will the next Win10 update be squawking about improvements to Word? If it's not just an application, then there should be questions asked regarding competition.

As for other changes - frankly I can't see much to get excited about. Improvements to Windows store - whatever. Until this can be supplemented or replaced by an in-house store (or application deployment system) it's of no interest whatsoever. Until then it's mostly populated by tumbleweed and wholly entirely ontrusive and unwanted - no, I don't want ****ing CodeWriter, similarly for "Get Office", "American News" (or whatever it's called), a pitifully under-featured version of PowerBIDesktop or any of the other crud that is forced, unwanted onto every user on every new login. Edge? Meh, it's useless because for "consumer" browsing everything else is better and for corporate use only Internet Explorer works "properly" with many Microsoft services.

I've yet to see what it's called "creators update", it may as well just be named arbitrarily.

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How Ford has slammed the door on Silicon Valley's autonomous vehicles drive

Nick Ryan
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Re: The CAN standard makes it very clear that security is not a part of the core specification.

The same thinking that gave us the botnet internet of tat things.

How unhelpful.

No. Not at all. CAN is devised as a closed system. Not a system that operates across the public Internet. It's a world of difference. In CAN if you want security don't connect it to anything insecure.

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Nick Ryan
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Re: Security ???

Exactly. The CAN standard makes it very clear that security is not a part of the core specification. It may be added using customised protocols (typically initial controller-device authentiction), but that's it. It's not designed to protect device-device configuration and there is nothing much to stop a rogue device flooding the CAN bus network, thereby generating a local DOS attack.

So the following:

It's also data that the car makers are keeping for themselves. Apple and Google may have a place in many dashboards, but there is a Chinese wall between their smartphone platforms and that CAN bus data.

is very sensible. It's when the manufacturers cut corners and allow direct CAN to Internet connectivity that there are problems.

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Microsoft loves Linux so much, its OneDrive web app runs like a dog on Windows OS rivals

Nick Ryan
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Sometimes you have to look beyond idealistic fanboism and understand that businesses tend to gravitate to what they are used to and what works (to some measure of "works").

OneDrive is used because it's not bad, as in it's no worse than DropBox for example, and it comes bundled with Office365 which despite being a recurring revenue stream model forcing vendor lock-in, does have quite a lot of advantages. Admittedly many of these are forced by Microsoft's software and licensing changes but they are there.

This doesn't make OneDrive (for business) any more stable, but it is useful and it is used nonetheless.

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Nick Ryan
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Re: There are already many sites that work on Chrome but poorly on other browsers...

It's not just lame developers targetting the single browser they're using, it's also lame developers using inappropriate and unnecessary (JavaScript) code when they could just use the standard features of the web browser's HTML/CSS or just don't add utterly unnecessary and pointless things to a website in the delusion that it's a desktop based modal client application.

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Norfolk County Council sent filing cabinet filled with kids' info to a second-hand shop

Nick Ryan
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Re: Ha ha ha!

Given that it's "just" 7 records I'd guess that the cabinets had been emptied but some files fell down the back and were at the bottom. Anything vaguely heavy would/should have been spotted by council staff, movers or charity staff.

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Face down in a Shoreditch gutter: Attack of the kickstarting hipster

Nick Ryan
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Re: Yikes

In itself creams like E45 are decidely safe when it comes to flinging matches at them. However once the water and other compounds have evaporated or otherwise left, what's left is rather more flammable. It's still very unlikely to be any cause for problems on skin, however when these paraffin oils are rubbed off onto fabrics, which have a large surface area due to the fibres and oxygen gaps in between, the situation is rather different.

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Headphone batteries flame out mid-flight, ignite new Li-Ion fears

Nick Ryan
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Re: Scary. Really.

Possibly, or it could have been the fact that she lent her head onto them in such a manner that caused the battery compartment to be deformed a bit, causing the battery to short internally. In this case it wouldn't matter if they were turned on or not.

100% speculation of course.

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Microsoft nicks one more Apple idea: An ad-supported OS

Nick Ryan
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Registry

For those that like to mess with the registry:

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\Advanced

DWORD:ShowSyncProviderNotifications, set value to 0

Of course in classic Microsoft ass-hattery, and as noted in the article, this will also disable important sync provider messages. Scumbags.

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UK Home Office warns tech staff not to tweet negative Donald Trump posts

Nick Ryan
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Joke

Ban?

So this is really a ban on posting about trump then? After all, it's all but impossible to find anything positive to say about him...

(see icon)

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After 20 years of Visual Studio, Microsoft unfurls its 2017 edition

Nick Ryan
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Re: Reboot required ...

While I can perhaps understand that an IDE has to install components at quite a low level, and given Windows these require a reboot, what is not acceptable is that it is impossible to uninstall Visual Studio and undo the "damage" that it does to the configuration of a system - i.e. masses of additional controls, libraries and registry entries that are no longer relevant.

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Watt the f... Dim smart meters caught simply making up readings

Nick Ryan
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Re: pah....

The last run in I had with the TV licensing folk was when I received a blunt/rude threatening letter about not having a licence because I bought some video kit that was capable of receiving TV signals under my name and the TV licence was under my partner's name (same address). They demanded that I provide evidence that we had a TV licence. I wrote back to them informing that they must know about the TV licence we had because that is what their TV adverts stated on their very clever systems and therefore they should check their records first before sending rude threatening letters. I didn't exactly get an apology, more something along the lines of "in this instance we are letting you off for forcing us to do our job properly".

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Palmtop nostalgia is tinny music to my elephantine ears

Nick Ryan
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Re: When is the last time you decided to use your 7" or less phablet in portrait mode?

These terms derive from photography. Some developers, including Adobe, also use the more sensible" vertical" and "horizontal".

Pretty sure the terminology comes from much, much earlier than photogeaphy. Go to an art gallery or stateley home and you'll see the difference between portraits and landscapes - as in portraits of people or landscape scenes.

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Frustrated by reboot-happy Windows 10? Creators Update hopes to take away the pain

Nick Ryan
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Re: Hmmm

Obviously system stability isn't an issue and every application that every one of your users use is not a leaky resource hog that needs to be closed occasionally just so the user experience becomes marginally less treacle like.

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Microsoft slaps Apple Gatekeeper-like controls on Windows 10: Install only apps from store

Nick Ryan
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Unhappy

Re: +30% & +22%

...and somehow that's still less that Adobe.

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Intel scales Atom to 16 cores, updates Xeon SoCs

Nick Ryan
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Re: Get into cars !!!

Same here. While I'm quite a fan of virtualisation (the computer industry have been virtualising different layers for decades) when it come to life critical systems these should be physically separated from anything else. This is standard practice in industrial safety systems.

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Amid new push to make Pluto a planet again... Get over it, ice-world's assassin tells El Reg

Nick Ryan
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Re: 9-planet Orrery

That must have been a fine bit of orrery engineering if it also included an approximation of Pluto's solar orbit - being on a different plane and swapping places with Neptune must be a bugger to engineer :)

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Dying for Windows 10 Creators Update? But wait, there's more!

Nick Ryan
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Re: ugh

So there's plans to overhaul the Cortana assistant, Which is not available in my region (still).

My favourite overhaul would be to permanently disable Cortana. It's not necessary for 99.999% of uses and far better would be an improved local search tool with the option to subsequently search configurable external sources (i.e. corporate search systems, choice of search engine, not just the next to useless American-Bing). If a user wants to use Cortana, then that's fine but it shouldn't be rammed into the OS/Shell at a deeper and deeper level.

Add more support for virtual reality hardware, which almost no-one uses

Since Microsoft have taken over the deplotment of many device drivers, which does save problems and should improve quality given the state of many device drivers, they should support more hardware. Whether the OS shell (UI/desltop) itself needs to particularly support VR is a very different matter.

Improve mobile integration, which almost no-one uses if they mean Windows phones. Which might be interesting if they mean Android phones, but they will probably make a total hash of.

MS have made a pigs ear out of bluetooth support (e.g. SYNC) and their awful tools for phones which is foisted on all Windows 10 devices is pretty much a total waste of time. It's still considerably better than Samsung Kies but that shouldn't really be taken as any kind of measure.

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Nick Ryan
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Re: ugh

@P. Lee - Bottom of the barrel case - you business grinds to a halt because the "update" is incompatible with some 3rd party program. Even the Slurp shill Ed Bott on Zdnet had a post that the frequent "upgrades" are likely to cause problems with businesses because they will always be behind the curve on testing.

Usually "consumer" multi-function printer devices from the likes of HP. Bloody things borked many upgrdes to Windows 10, borked Office 365 installs and many other joys.

It's impressive when even AV software makes itself less of a ball-ache when it comes to interfering with an Operating System.

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Google bellows bug news after Microsoft sails past fix deadline

Nick Ryan
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EMF problems?

Seriously, that's not a surprise. Most people who have tried to use a file saved in .EMF format gave up and went back to saving the file in .WMF format instead because that at least worked. .EMF support was/is so useless that exporting something as .EMF in one Microsoft application and then importing it into another and it would be flipped, missing components or otherwise corrupted. In short, Microsoft don't seem to understand their own format.

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