* Posts by Rupert Fiennes

147 posts • joined 9 Apr 2007

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Linode cloud users in Europe hit as Frankfurt DC falls to its knees

Rupert Fiennes

Forwarding table, eh?

Cisco's Customer Engragement Feature rides again, eh?

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Fancy that! Craft which float over everything on a cushion of air

Rupert Fiennes

Falklands hovercraft

During the late 60's, Naval Party 8902 operated a pair of SRN6 hovercraft in the Falklands as part of the garrison.

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Networking vendors are good for free lunches, hopeless for networks

Rupert Fiennes

Re: That works for a simple network

I think you'll find that's how Google for one actually runs their internal network :-)

https://www.networkworld.com/article/2189197/lan-wan/google-s-software-defined-openflow-backbone-drives-wan-links-to-100--utilization.html

However, I think you'll find that for those of us for whom customer traffic is a major portion of what is running through their own networks (most of what is running in Google's is Google-Google traffic, and much of the actual customer traffic is pushed to the edge or a CDN) will want to be able to manage exit points intelligently, and that means knowledge of the edge becomes essential..which incentivizes the use of BGP. A lot of service providers (and even larger content providers) have settled on an internal MPLS mesh to allow more intelligent traffic engineering than BGP alone can do, plus the ability to make some routers in the core "dumb", speaking MPLS and RSVP/LDP only.

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Argentina eyes up laser death cannon testbed warship

Rupert Fiennes

Small inaccuracy

Gareth, your comment "An Argentine ship dropped off a score of tank landing craft whose crews went on to capture the islands’ capital" was a little inaccurate: a tank landing craft like an LCU is big, so big the Ponce can only hold one. I think you mean it can hold 20+ amphibious APC's like the LVTP7, which is what the Argentines used in 1982.

Also, Ocean is not even slightly similar to Ponce: one is an LPH designed primarily to hand troops by helicopter, one designed to land troops by landing craft or amphibious APC.

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Rupert Fiennes

We don't have any land based antiship missiles in service, unfortunately as they are a lot cheaper for defending a coastline than a warship. Or any air launched ones either since Sea Eagle was withdrawn.

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Smart meters: 'Dog's breakfast' that'll only save you 'a tenner' – report

Rupert Fiennes

Re: Smart meters and electricity storage

There's also the small matter of your cool e-car's batteries not taking too kindly to being drawn on too often whenever the wind drops. Li-ion is good for 600 cycles or so :-(

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Rupert Fiennes

Re: I want a smart water meter

My cat hops into the bath and turns the tap on. Clearly my moggy is more advanced than yours :-)

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Rupert Fiennes

It's not about saving you money, it's about enabling *green* energy

A country of households outfitted with "smart" meters can be selectively shut down whenever the wind isn't blowing or the sun isn't shining. Of course, this may incentivise the install of small and highly polluting generators, but the geniuses who decided we needed to buy more diesels will doubtless spend lots of money trying to subsidise Tesla's bottom line anyway.

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Jodie Who-ttaker? The Doctor is in

Rupert Fiennes

Re: A bit too SJW

That's the positive side to SJW's: they are very inventive about word creation. Mostly insults of course, but...

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Rupert Fiennes

Re: A bit too SJW

See? There's just no pleasing some people :-)

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Rupert Fiennes

A bit too SJW

Lets face it, if the doctor had never married Riversong and had a kid, or indeed started coupling up at all, this would be throughly normal. But since the Doctor has already done so, now there's a bit of a mess.

There's plenty of SJW possibilities: Riversong could be pissed off she's made into a lesbian without consent, or could embrace it and have her own sex change. But then she might be homophobic!

I suspect the more this crap goes on, the fewer people will watch, and then the next Doctor will have to exit a shower asking what he missed :-)

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Ubuntu 'weaponised' to cure NHS of its addiction to Microsoft Windows

Rupert Fiennes

Well, might be better than windows. But not much cheaper

Lets face it, licensing just isn't that big a cost overall. As a previous commenter says, the real plus point is control: you can get support from more than one source, and if necessary strip down the builds to the bare minimum. The real problem with NHS IT is that it's a govt organisation, and inertia rules. Not much point pulling Windows out and replacing open SMB shares with open NFS shares, is there?

BTW, regarding Moorfields: I was at their A&E last Wednesday and there was sod all sign of electronic records. All notes written down. Clearly it's having minimal impact on workflow :-(

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What a tit! Uber CEO hijacks his staff breast-pump room to meditate

Rupert Fiennes

Re: colour me surprised

Frankly, never seen them used. They usually got repurposed as something else after a year of two sitting empty.

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‪WannaCry‬pt ransomware note likely written by Google Translate-using Chinese speakers

Rupert Fiennes

Re: More to the point

Actually, this doesn't make much sense. Southern China could mean Guangdong and HK where they speak Cantonese, but Taiwan and Singapore speak Mandarin. Sounds like a load of bollocks to me!

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After stiffing us with Trump, Weiner 'fesses to underage cock shot rot

Rupert Fiennes

I'm afraid Hilary incompetently running her own email operation so she could scrub her official email at will is what caused her to lose. Weiner is just a symptom, someone who, like the Clinton's, assumed the rules were for the little people :-(

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There be dragons? Why net neutrality groups won't go to Congress

Rupert Fiennes

Not surprising

The Net Neutrality movement is hard to distinguish from the "Vote Democrat" movement these days. Making sensible compromises on the former might imperil the latter, so it won't happen, just like anti-war movements go suspiciously quiet when Democrat presidents are in power. The lesson is not to hitch your movement to one party only.

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How's your online bank security looking? The Dutch studied theirs and... yeah, not great

Rupert Fiennes

DNSSEC has issues

I watched a live demo of how to rotate DNSSEC keys a few months ago. It failed for reasons unknown. Moreover, the root keys have never been rotated. Meanwhile, IPv6 works fine, and accounts for a large minority of internet traffic these days. I feel nervous :-(

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Google has a canary problem: One clocked off and crocked its cloud

Rupert Fiennes

Interesting setup

Note Layer 2 load balancers: not Layer 3. So, unlike the majority of load balancers, rather than rewriting the destination IP to direct the traffic to different servers, the IP headers are presumably left untouched. Given the need to distribute the traffic, that says anycast is used to keep multiple servers clusters with the same IP addresses active worldwide. It also says TLS and the like goes all the way from the end user to the Google server, which is probably preferable to the way they used to do it :-)

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British jobs for British people: UK tech rejects PM May’s nativist hiring agenda

Rupert Fiennes

Re: The elephant in the room - stagnant wages because of the free movement of labour

Interesting comment: one friend working for a US dot com in London is on an excellent wage. I asked him how he got as much and his reply was that " they can barely believe they can get a decent neteng for less than $250k pa, so I look cheap!".

I think you're being over optimistic about the EU economy. Outside of Ireland there isn't that much going on in the EU job wise.

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Rupert Fiennes

Re: looking at this UK passport

Have you ever seen the growth rates of other EU countries? Or ever noted how the last thirty years have been one long moan from the commenting classes that because we weren't committed to Europe / in the ERM / in the Euro it was all going to go tits up?

But still we're on top. Funny that :-)

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Rupert Fiennes

Re: Saying it with Flashman...

Blimey! And she's only been PM for three months!

More seriously Jemma, you need to get out more :-)

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Rupert Fiennes

Re: TLDR

Indeed. And if the "skilled foreigners" turn out to be not quite so skilled, well it's all just too late and how can anyone have checked their references anyway?

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Rupert Fiennes

Just as a reality check: here's my experience

As a UK citizen, I was laid off by a US company mid-year. My experience re finding another job was that there were jobs in the UK (I accepted one out of three offered), and jobs in Australia and the US who were willing to pay relocation. Not much seemed to be going on with regard to continental Europe barring Ireland, which has hordes of US dot coms.

In the end, restricting immigration to companies willing to pay their requirements reasonable money (which is the case for non-EU immigration now) is hardly going to wreck anything. If someone wants to fill low level jobs, well half of this stuff has gone elsewhere already. I suspect most of this article is desperate wish fulfilment :-(

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UK nuke warhead builders shift IT gear into public cloud

Rupert Fiennes

HR data very useful: if you are a spy :-(

I've been a user of Workday. Assuming you can break it, you get a complete org chart of your target, plus their annual achievements. I'd rather AWE found another way of stack ranking :-(

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Did Donald Trump really just ask Russia to hack the US govt? Yes, he did

Rupert Fiennes

This explains it

https://youtu.be/Prls6Iz3B3E

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Rupert Fiennes

Re: Treason

Well, since Hilary's email server is long since offline and in the tender care of the FBI, they can hardly hack it now. They clearly did years ago. But since all the deleted emails were only yoga routines and admin for Chelsea's wedding, why is anyone worried?

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Please stop working and abuse your expense account at the beach

Rupert Fiennes

Nearly: but it happened to someone else :-(

I worked for a particular American web hosting provider as an network implementation engineer for the EMEA region. My US West Coast based opposite number managed two months in Australia on expenses "waiting for a circuit", thereby awakening a fierce desire on my part to do some Munich based rebuild around mid-September. Sadly, the company went bust shortly afterwards :-(

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Brexit? Cutting the old-school ties would do more for Brit tech world

Rupert Fiennes

Boris: remember, 28 not 31

No need for me to add to all the other arguments, but I note Boris forgot the EU has 28 members, not 31. We should thank him for his error, since he's unknowingly pointed out membership of the EU is not required for the Horizon programme on which he sets so much cachet :-)

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Pusher's purist: Five steps to reaching your DevOps zen

Rupert Fiennes

Re: Lovely, lovely DevOps

More like KY jelly :-)

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Rupert Fiennes

Still bullshit bingo I see

True "devops" is something very few engineers could aspire to, and if they could, they'd be selling a product that other people could use. What *is* actually required is some automation, and here you're largely going to be reusing other people's scripts: you'd be silly to do otherwise.

My fellow commenters have said all the other stuff I wanted to say....

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Batteries on wheels are about to reshape our cities and lives

Rupert Fiennes

Insurance costs

"When an insurer looks at the liability profile of an autonomous vehicle - versus a human who can be tired, distracted, drunk, or just plain angry - it’s looking quite likely that autonomous vehicles will cost next to nothing to insure, while the cost of insuring human drivers will skyrocket."

Have you tried buying car insurance lately? Third party insurance is basically the same cost as fully comp, which says to me until the entire world goes autonomous, the insurance for a Google car will be basically the same as any other.

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This time we really are all doomed, famous doomsayer prof says

Rupert Fiennes

Retirement income required

Clearly he needs a revenue stream for his retirement, so the same disaster scenario warmed over with another cause will suit nicely :-)

More to the point, why are acedemics like this still in employment?

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The data centre design that lets you cool down – and save electrons

Rupert Fiennes

The biggest restriction on expanding the power in a DC

...is the availability of diesel gensets. Usually they have to be mounted on the roof, and once the space for them is full, you either run n-x and accept the risk, or call a halt to expansion.

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Rupert Fiennes

I saw that :-)

I saw Google's install in a Global Crossing DC in Sunnyvale back in 2000. Only three small rows, but two mini servers per U and desk fans sitting on the floor between the rows. Oh, and empty cages all around since Google had all the power :-)

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Want to go green like Apple, but don't have billions in the bank?

Rupert Fiennes

It's all a bit mowing the green and ignoring the rough

There's been leaps forward with the DC mechanicals in the last decade. But once PUE gets to values like 1.07, there's really not much else to be done. Server utilisation is where the future gains are going to be made, but that's more a function of the code you run....

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Euro mobile standards chiefs eye tiny beauty: It's the KEY to 5G

Rupert Fiennes

Deja vu all over again

Back nearly 20 years ago while working for Motorola, I chanced upon an internal noticeboard advertising for RF engineers asking for people wanting to work on "3G" at "60GHz"....

If that's the frequency range 5G is one, I think LTE has a very long lifetime, as does Wifi :-)

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Dark Fibre: Reg man plunges into London's sewers to see how pipe is laid

Rupert Fiennes

Fascinating

I did the tour with Geo last year: it's a interesting thing to do, and the state of our 150 year old sewers is really remarkably good :-)

Couple of points you might want to add: I asked about most common failure modes, and they told me that "ragging" where rubbish catches on the conduits and then the flow pulls them off the wall can be an issue (but a small one, overall). Secondly, they also made the point that they run the fibers down secondary sewers as much as possible as getting permission to block off the main ones to install or maintain takes an awful long time!

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IPv6 web starts to look like the internet we know

Rupert Fiennes

Surely a better guide to the adoption of IPv6 would be the prevalence of dual stacked sites, where queries for $site have both V4 and V6 addresses returned? That's certainly how World IPv6 Day's participants saw it, and to avoid unfortunate timeouts caused by incomplete V6 paths, they are incentivized to fix the latter.

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'Space bubbles' may have helped Taliban down 'copter in bloody Afghanistan battle

Rupert Fiennes

Not an accurate description of the incident

Not even slightly. A more accurate description is:-

- SEAL recce team landed deliberately, but foolishly, on top of Takur Ghar. They were badly shot up in the process, but managed to take off again, during which one SEAL fell off the helicopter. While attempting a second landing to pick up this SEAL, the aircraft hydraulics failed it crash landed several miles away.

- after being picked up by a second helicopter, the SEAL team went back to search for their comrade on Takur Ghar, who, unknown to them had already been wounded and then executed by Chechen Al-Qaeda. They landed successfully, and mounted an attack in which several of the latter were killed, but were forced to withdraw. One Air Force combat controller was killed and two other SEAL's wounded. The SEAL's call for the Quick Reaction Force from a Ranger battalion.

- This Ranger unit landed on top of Takur Ghar after a breakdown in communications. This helicopter was shot down, and in the ensuing firefight over an entire day, 4 Rangers and an air force Para-recueman were killed

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Harvard boffins 'reverse-engineer' Chinese censorship

Rupert Fiennes

Actually, quite normal in communist societies

The Soviet name for this sort of thing was "criticize, not generalize", and you saw stuff in Soviet papers from the 70's onwards how there were problems in this factory/collective farm/office due to some specific official who was, of course, unrepresentative of our glorious communist nation. For the current Chinese leadership of course, it's a great way of getting rid of the power base of the previous leaders :-)

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How practical is an electric car in London?

Rupert Fiennes

Re: @Rupert Fiennes

Serves me right for not doing the sanity check first then :-)

Thanks

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Rupert Fiennes

Re: @ecofeco

Yeah, it would be great to see methane produced using technologies unsuitable for electricity generation (eg, wind, solar). We already have the distribution networks to store and pipe this stuff around, and no dangerous or expensive batteries or exotic slush hydrogen required :-)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sabatier_reaction

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Entering the Dragon: A little data from Big China

Rupert Fiennes

It's changed a bit

Last time I was there was 1999: you could take the train from Hung Hom in HK to Guangzhou and see plenty of empty fields. Not anymore!

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Cisco's Chambers to Obama: Stop fiddling with our routers

Rupert Fiennes

This is confusing

Since most Cisco stuff seems to be made in China, presumably the Chinese busily implant bugs before they ship to the US where the NSA does it too. The spying hardware in the average Cisco router probably draws more power than shuffling packets :-)

More realistically, I can't see how more than a tiny percentage of anyone's kit can be "jarked" this way. It's going to be a manual and highly skilled process....

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WTF is NET NEUTRALITY, anyway? And how can we make everything better?

Rupert Fiennes

A little confused

Comcast were not "specifically looking for Netflix IP addresses and blocking/slowing themm", they were just refusing to upgrade their peering links to Cogent, to the degree they were very congested.

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Rupert Fiennes

LLU

Andrew, what about a UK-style LLU campaign for the Bells and Cable?

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US broadband providers holding last-mile traffic ransom, ISP alleges

Rupert Fiennes

Re: Very short memories at L3

All very true: Netflix and the like provide the majority of eyeball bound traffic in the US. Why shouldn't they pay carriers for the massive amount of traffic that they are dumping on them?

If the US wants to improve the situation, de-regulating the ISP business in the US is a better solution: make it easier to lay fiber in the street and gain operator licenses.

The current US peering practice of emphasizing private peering links rather than large public fabrics can hardly help either :-(

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DeSENSORtised: Why the 'Internet of Things' will FAIL without IPv6

Rupert Fiennes

Cisco or El Reg are confused. Or both :-)

"Foddering added that in Blighty only a small number of internet service providers, including Virgin Media, were fully committed to enabling IPv6 capability".

Really? That would explain VIrgin's steadfast absence of IPv6 peering addresses then!

http://www.peeringdb.com/view.php?asn=5089

Compared to say BT

http://www.peeringdb.com/view.php?asn=2856

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STRIPPED DOWN and EXPOSED: Business kit from the good old days

Rupert Fiennes

Those gas masks look (to my untrained eye) like the stuff the Soviets used. Obviously, this place was an equipment dump for a Cold War Spetnaz group. Be careful opening any heavy boxes :-)

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