* Posts by asdf

6427 posts • joined 7 Apr 2007

It's 2018 so, of course, climate.news is sold to climate change deniers

asdf
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A fool and his money. Ethics or morals are certainly not going to get in the way of someone taking people's money they are begging to be taken. That's the thing rarely discussed about fake news. Its not the case it exists only to fool people. Some people actively seek it out (and will even pay for it) to comfort them about their own world views.

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Python creator Guido van Rossum sys.exit()s as language overlord

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Re: Actually, this has already been said about Python. Many times over.

>It looks good enough to get the job done.

Probably true for vast majority of use cases out there. You wouldn't want to use it say for embedded systems development though. It does have some JIT capability IIRC but horses for courses.

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asdf
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Re: reflecting opinions more than best practice

Most languages that have been around as long as Python have advantages and disadvantages. Bloat and performance have always been the knock against Python as is to be expected for what Python does, was designed for and what it gives you. As always horses for courses. Still glad its around as choice is always good and hope the community picks up the pieces well.

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AAAAAAAAAA! You'll scream when you see how easy it is to pwn unpatched HPE servers

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Re: MS did it with NT too

Yeah those kind of problems were a bit more understandable two decades ago.

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Tintri terminates 200 staff, cash set to run dry in a couple of days

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Re: Soo...

Wow 6 to 1 reverse split before an IPO and anybody bought after. Fool and his money.

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asdf
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Re: Soo...

Yes a company going into administration so soon after an IPO pretty much highlights what is wrong with our current financial system. Something stinks.

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BlackBerry KEY2: Remember buttons? Boy, does this phone sure have them

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Re: Phone cameras

Then again to be fair the use case for this phone is not myself as no way do I buy an ugly ass phone with buttons on it. Mid 2000s might have been a good vintage for wines (not sure was it?) but not phones. Had a Treo back in the day and don't miss it a bit. BB was better sure but low bar.

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Re: Phone cameras

>They'd sell maybe five units worldwide - if they're lucky.

Yeah the luddite Boomer market isn't particularly big or with fat margins for sure. Get disgusted with the selfie culture as much as the next middle age person but do take pictures of my kids from time to time and have zero desire to carry both a work and personal phone.

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A pretty and helpful user interface? Nahhh. Is that really you, Samsung?

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Re: Form over function

That is the main reason the only Samsung phone I ever owned was the Galaxy Nexus was because as a general rule I am only going to buy a phone from the company responsible for the OS itself. I am sure the Android ecosystem has gotten much better about updates but if putting out big dosh I want one company responsible for everything.

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Microsoft loves Linux so much its R Open install script rm'd /bin/sh

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Re: Remember the rule

Uggh as a grey beard just seeing the command ln -s /bin/bash /bin/sh depresses me.

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Platinum partner had 'affair' with my wife – then Oracle screwed me, ex-sales boss claims

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Re: Employment law, huh!

Its all a balance I suppose. In some places in Europe strict labor laws are partially responsible for youth unemployment being astronomical for example. We are the other side of the coin where our whole culture is built to the advantage of corporations. Not sure maybe the UK has a nice balance.

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Internet engineers tear into United Nations' plan to move us all to IPv6

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Re: Mapping plan

>You're on TalkTalk aren't you?

Nope CenturyLink. Wrong continent. Probably the equivalent in that they are one of the slower options with crap customer service but also only choice for getting decent standalone internet for $40 a month (no bundling garbage).

>you can do it with a 6in4 tunnel.

Completely indifferent to ipv6 so if it doesn't autoconfig then I can't be bothered. Network engineers care a lot more about it than end users at this point.

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asdf
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Re: Mapping plan

In my case my router is all ready to go with IPv6 I believe and does assign it on the local network but my router can't seem to pull an v6 ip from my ADSL ISP. Should just work when ISP start supporting it I believe.

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asdf
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Re: Mapping plan

(Edit: my earlier comment was incorrect, here is the correct quote) - So we could assign an IPV6 address to EVERY ATOM ON THE SURFACE OF THE EARTH, and still have enough addresses left to do another 100+ earths. It isn’t remotely likely that we’ll run out of IPV6 addresses at any time in the future.

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ISP popped router ports, saving customers the trouble of making themselves hackable

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amen

Yep even have LEDE on my DSL modem but alas did have to find a dsl binary blob from a reputable source as the one that comes with LEDE is garbage for my model. Still beats trusting my ISP and their fail hardware for sure.

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Astroboffins find most distant source of oxygen in the universe

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Re: LIFE

Has a shit ton of methane though.

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asdf
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Re: tangent time

Except the universe is not contracting and looks like it never will so always leary of supporting some cyclical theory that says this time its unique. Plus anything with string theory is pretty much a no go as with that whole brane collision crap. General relativity already allows for white holes and they think they might have even seen one https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GRB_060614 .Makes sense because time's arrow in reverse can't go past the moment of the white hole which is pretty much the definition of a white hole. Of course Hawking was about a billion times smarter than me and he leaned towards the quantum tunneling explanation IIRC so yeah that is probably it. Still bubbles of universes forming out of existing universes nearly infinitely is mighty tempting and doesn't require ours to be unique in any way.

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I got 257 problems, and they're all open source: Report shines light on Wild West of software

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Re: "every closed source software vendor has their own license usually with onerous restrictions"

>With closed source only the vendor can make changes to the code.

Generally its more expensive but paying the vendor to support the code has many advantages in the real world. Plenty of bad open source and good closed source and vice versa. Horses for courses.

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You love Systemd – you just don't know it yet, wink Red Hat bods

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Re: Poettering still doesn't get it... Pid 1 is for people wearing big boy pants.

SystemD is corporate money (Redhat support dollars) triumphing over the long hairs sadly. Enough money can buy a shitload of code and you can overwhelm the hippies with hairball dependencies (the key moment was udev being dependent on systemd) and soon get as much FOSS as possible dependent on the Linux kernel. This has always been the end game as Red Hat makes its bones on Linux specifically not on FOSS in general (that say runs on Solaris or HP-UX). The tighter they can glue the FOSS ecosystem and the Linux kernel together ala Windows lite style the better for their bottom line. Poettering is just being a good employee asshat extraordinaire he is.

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Industry whispers: Qualcomm mulls Arm server processor exit

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Re: RISC-V is the future

>Perhaps the downvoters could explain to us just why RISC-V is not the future?

Vested interest in either their employer or their big bad geek game rig powered by X at home?

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JEDI mind tricks: Brakes slammed on Pentagon's multibillion cloud deal

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Re: Oracle lobbying in action?

Wouldn't be surprised to suddenly see someone partnered with Boeing who is usually the one to get these Pentagon procurements cancelled mid stream.

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Windows Notepad fixed after 33 years: Now it finally handles Unix, Mac OS line endings

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Re: Is this the end of unix2dos?

No because Geany on windows can't handle some exotic encodings unless you do a unix2dos first. Of course now you can just open it in Notepad and resave it as well (do actual work in Notepad not so much). Still prefer to drop into a cygwin command line to fix it than open through UI.

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Zombie Cambridge Analytica told 'death' can't save it from the law

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Re: Fob off is a very polite way of describing it

>he has no more right to his data than a tale an in a cave in Afghanistan.

Huh? Get and agree with your general gist and usually not pedantic but that sentence is a WTFer.

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Warren Buffett says cryptocurrency attracts charlatans, AI won’t change investing

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Re: I do like that they admit to (some) mistakes.

When you have generated as much wealth as they have over such a long period easier to cop to mistakes. They are long past having to pump up and sell their brand (name, company, etc) day to day.

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Take-off crash 'n' burn didn't kill the Concorde, it was just too bloody expensive to maintain

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Re: The most amazing engineering

>"I bet the runway was there before your old office. Always amuses me when people complain about what they moved next door to."

Not saying OP did but seems to me also you get some people who get a huge bargain on a place due to proximity and then look for sympathy and fight the airport every chance they get.

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Sir Clive Sinclair dragged into ZX Spectrum reboot battle

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Re: I don't have a crystal ball but...

True to the original company in many ways.

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Doom and Super Mario could be a lot tougher now AI is building levels

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That's right and now I remember the cameras were fairly heavy and bulky compared to say an iPhone as well. Awkward to take a selfie for sure. Most things in the late 1970s to even late 1980s were heavier, as plastic and lighter wasn't used for everything like today.

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asdf
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Re: Is this good or bad?

Well if the computer makes it as hard as that as a few of the end levels in Super Mario 3 (thinking it was the airships) I would just use the in game item to skip them too.

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asdf
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Funny don't remember why we didn't take selfies with polaroids. Probably the flash in your face.

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Autonomy ex-CFO Hussain guilty of fraud: He cooked the books amid $11bn HP gobble

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Re: Due Deligence Before or After a $11bn Takeover????????????????

HP's board at the time wasn't just criminally stupid but was committing criminal acts as well. I figured they would be a great case study for board maleficence.

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ISO blocks NSA's latest IoT encryption systems amid murky tales of backdoors and bullying

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Re: "the NSA started attacking the reputations of those experts

Sadly lack of trust can often be overcome with enough money so celebrate now but don't think they are going away any time soon.

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Danish submariner sent down for life for murder of journalist Kim Wall

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>http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-43673331

Also remember hearing about a get away driver being executed because the bag man who actually shot and killed the clerk in a botched robbery pled, turned evidence and got life. If you are a part of a felony in the US you get blamed for everything including heart attacks. Just how it is.

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asdf
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>I'll raise you this little tidbit of stupidity:

>http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-43673331

Yep much easier to find these stories in the US than some sadistic murderer getting a light sentence. We are the other side of the coin.

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asdf
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>Really Canada the max sentence is life with parole edibility after 25 years.

>Germany has life with parole eligible after 15

>Ireland natural Life with out parole

>Netherlands A life sentence means no possibility of parole.

>Spain has Life.

>Oh look the UK does have Life.

I think you missed the part where I was talking about the juvenile (not this sick fsck inventor) who didn't commit any murders and got basically life in prison in the US. I was saying generally no other developed country will put a 16 year old offender in jail for 100 years without at least one murder not that Euro countries don't have life sentences.

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Re: "feel" the consequences of your actions

Not saying he is a saint or even the sentence is too harsh (though maybe some). Just pointing out to Euros when we mean life in the US in most states the person is going to die behind bars and not released to Libya on humanitarian grounds (ask Manson's bottom ho who we didn't let out even with terminal brain cancer). That vigilante 1980s era caused by people getting off with light sentences and Twinkies insanity defense is long gone.

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asdf
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>that is impossible as they do not try you as an adult fur non violent crime.

Never said non violent.

> Even as adult only crime that you are going to get that much time for is murder, rape, treason,caught with a shit load of drugs

You would assume that but its simply not true in some areas of the US. First nobody in the US goes to jail for treason in modern times. And the only one of those charges he got was for drug possession (for pot which is actually decriminalized in a lot of states laws these days) but didn't sound like he had a shit load. He wasn't innocent for sure but at least 96 years is a pretty long sentence for aggravated robbery (and non fatal kidnapping). Fairly indifferent to this case but just pointing out to our European readers the US may have some problems but going easy on sick violent fscks is not really one of them any more.

>Even tried as an adult you can not sentence a minor to life with out parole

Only technically true for a very short time in our nearly 250 year history (pretty recent SCOTUS decision) and as this case shows not even true in practice.

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asdf
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Ok yes to be pedantic he was charged as an adult I believe but he was a juvenile at the time. Yes also technically it is not life as he is eligible for parole at age 112. My point is he doesn't get more than 30 years in any other developed country guaranteed. When even the Koch brothers are calling for prison reform maybe we are a little too extreme.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime/supreme-court-refuses-to-hear-appeal-of-teen-sentenced-to-241-years-in-prison/ar-AAweEuj?li=BBnb4R7

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asdf
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>In comparison to the US, where a "life sentence" is often just as brief

Umm they largely fixed that in the 1980s and in fact for federal crimes there is no longer parole. Maybe true in some states but not the majority. If anything the US is far too much to the other extreme where there are people who committed non murder crimes as a juvenile that end up with 200 year sentences. Not to mention the 3 strikes laws where you get life for even one violent felony (if have priors) in some states. My guess is more people die in US prisons of old age than all of Western Europe combined and its probably not even close. Only European country even in our same league is Russia.

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Twenty years ago today: Windows 98 crashed live on stage with Bill Gates. Let's watch it again...

asdf
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Re: "That must be why we're not shipping Windows 98 yet," quipped Gates.

He knew his baby back then. Can't watch video at work but have a feeling he drew in some breath as that was being done lol.

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Tech bribes: What's the WORST one you've ever been offered?

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Re: Speed...

My most blatant bribe was actually long ago as a pizza driver when I turned down a $30 tip to not take a check from a customer who had bounced numerous checks in the past. Cool story I know but bored on a Friday.

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Mad Leo tried to sack me over Autonomy, says top HP Inc beancounter

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Re: Face facts

Autonomy is probably not the company you want to highlight to make that point though to be honest. They did not represent what is good about British software companies.

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Re: CEO of HP, demonstrating incompetence

Whenever I picture an HP board meeting I can't help but hear Yakety Sax playing in the background.

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Autonomy pulled wool over Brit finance panel's eyes, US court told

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FAIL

The HP way.

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'Disappearing' data under ZFS on Linux sparks small swift tweak

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Linux has its place for sure and won't deny that. Also have seen problems with some of HP stack above the OS which is why I am not chomping at the bit to move onto an Itanium VM either. HP-UX on RA-RISC hardware though is beyond rock solid. Real pity Itanium came along at all tbh.

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asdf
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@elip - Yep. Linux is great until your company decides to dump HP-UX for it to save money and you are responsible for production system up time (so far so good for me arguing but some others I work with not so lucky). Never seen HP-UX kernel panic ever. Had a Linux system crash this week (get your move fast and break things the fsck out of here). Vendor having control of both hardware and software tends to make systems expensive but you generally get what you pay for.

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Can't view memes on London-Southampton train? It's the worst line for mobile coverage

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Trollface

Re: Where are we going?

To this Yank the Isle of Wight will forever be a Who live album first and an actual physical place a distant second.

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