* Posts by Michael Strorm

341 posts • joined 11 Feb 2008

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Why can't you install Windows 10 Creators Update on your old Atom netbook? Because Intel stopped loving you

Michael Strorm

Re: Microsoft murdered netbooks

@Chris 155; "Tablets and lower priced laptops murdered netbooks"

It'd be more accurate to say that netbooks were quickly forced up in spec- and price- under pressure from Microsoft to get them to run Windows until they became indistinguishable from typical low-end x86 laptops.

From what I've heard, the manufacturers weren't making much on netbooks, so were probably happy to go along with this, but it defeated the whole point.

The netbook was *already* being priced out of existence as a distinct concept by the time the original iPad came along in 2010, let alone by the point cheap tablets (comparable in price to the original netbooks) started hitting the market en masse.

Similar story with the Chromebook- which one may argue was closer to the original netbook concept- that came out in 2011 after the original market had declined.

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Watson AI panned, 5¼ years of sales decline ... Does IBM now stand for Inferior Biz Model?

Michael Strorm

Re: Not sure comparing job postings is that accurate

@Frank N. Stein; "the one place where you find positions not being eliminated, is management"

Wasn't an excess of management- i.e. everyone wanted to be a manager- combined with failure to move with the times, the reason that IBM almost went bankrupt in the early 1990s?

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Security robot falls into pond after failing to spot stairs or water

Michael Strorm

Repeat of my comment above but... yes it does.

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Michael Strorm

Re: "We were promised flying cars, instead we got suicidal robots. "

@Antron Argaiv; I thought everyone had seen this by now.

Also, if Knightscope's K5 model was useless when it came to avoiding water damage, it looks like they won't have improved one bit when they get to K9.

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The Atari retro games box is real… sort of

Michael Strorm

Just 10 employees....?

"The company, which currently exists as an intellectual property firm with just 10 or so employees"

Hasn't the "Atari" name essentially been used for the whole of (what was once) Infogrames since they first bought it around fifteen years ago? Or are you talking solely about the nostalgia IP exploiting division?

Also, I note that at least Nintendo have come clean about the fact that the NES Classic was primarily "an opportunity to draw consumers' attention to our latest game system, Nintendo Switch", confirming my suspicion that the lack of availability was due to it being a cynical headline-grabbing, nostalgia-building exercise aimed at people Nintendo would rather forked out for their latest gimmick-laden console than were able to buy the carrot that had been dangled in front of them.

I mean, I didn't give a toss about the original NES personally- and by extension, the NES Classic- but I know a lot of people did, and complained about the fact it wasn't available, then it was discontinued. As a result, there was already some scepticism about the announced SNES Classic, and I hope people will tell Nintendo where to shove their second attempt to exploit people's nostalgia.

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Radiohead hides ZX Spectrum proggie in OK Computer re-release

Michael Strorm

Re: C90 cassette, as that medium was the dominant way of storing Speccy programs and data

Who on earth was using expensive chrome TDKs for computer programs?!

C60, C90 etc. was the commonly-accepted generic term for cassette length, though it was more commonly abandoned by manufacturers in favour of their own designation (e.g. SA90) from the 1980s on.

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Trump's CNN tantrum could delay $85bn AT&T-Time Warner merger

Michael Strorm

Re: THE REGISTER IS FAKE! ON THE SIDE OF CNN!

Signposting jokes is naff, though, not to mention I always found the joke icon a bit too "Colin Hunt" for my taste. (I think it's that "trying-way-hard-to-be-fun" (and oh-so-90s) typeface).

On the other hand, you can never be sure which side of Poe's law something is on otherwise...

Edit: ...aaaaand Poe's Law it was. I just looked through the guy's comment history and realise what I assumed *was* meant to be a joke was likely serious. :-O

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Your job might be automated within 120 years, AI experts reckon

Michael Strorm

Re: Natural barrier to runaway

Interesting comments thanks, and I appreciate what you're saying. To be fair though, when I made the calculation, I was simply trying to compare the amount of space required by the technologies themselves, and intentionally trying to avoid overstating my case.

I wasn't trying to figure out the overheads required for a working computer- I realised even then that accessibility would be totally impractical and heat would be a problem, but didn't have the time or knowledge to open that particular can of worms anyway.

Given the amount of heat my configuration would generate, I suspect you were probably being generous with "5 minutes". :-)

Now that I think of it, if you had 2 billion valves with an average lifetime of 8 weeks, and a person was able to find and replace one every three minutes, you'd require around 74,000 people working 24 hours a day. Except that logically, it can be assumed that at any given time, the machine will have a significant number of faulty valves and I've no idea what effect that would have on the operation of something with the architecture of a (scaled up) Intel i7.

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Michael Strorm

Re: Natural barrier to runaway

"At some point an AI will arise which deduces that going any further down the path would be detrimental to itself."

This assumes that the AI will (a) think in a self-preserving manner and (b) have the detached, logical common sense to determine when it reaches a point that threatens its own existence.

I don't want to entirely rehash/repost my previous more in-depth comment on this subject- please read that for more details. In short, AI could reach superhuman levels of intelligence without having been shaped by self-preserving evolutionary pressure, and may end up being totally alien and incomprehensible in its thinking to us, making it impossible to judge the risks.

But regardless, all bets are off when an AI system gets sufficiently above human intelligence that it can modify and/or improve itself. Anyone who claims to have an idea what might happen then is deluding themselves.

In addition, the "120 years" prediction of the article is ludicrous. 120 years ago, we were in the Victorian era; we've only had computers in the modern sense for less than 80 years, with mindbogglingly exponential increases in processing power over the decades. (#) It's questionable how much further we can push such improvements in technology, but I don't think we can remotely predict what AI 120 years into the future might look like.

(#) I figured out that if built from 1940s-style valves/tubes with minimal spacing, a recent two-billion transistor Intel Core i7 CPU would occupy *six* 50m-high office blocks.

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And finally, monsieur, a wafer-thin hologram ... Sir, it is only wafer thin

Michael Strorm

Re: Holograms

@Mage; As far as I'm aware, while traditional "full" holograms give you full viewing movement and parallax in all directions ("like a window") they need to be viewed in fixed-wavelength laser light, which is obviously quite limiting.

The more common "rainbow hologram" sacrifices vertical parallax for the ability to view them in ordinary white light.

They still appear 3D because you have horizontal parallax (stereoscopic vision relying on this), you just don't get the full range of movement.

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Toshiba draws back from fab foundry lock-out foolishness

Michael Strorm

Re: Foxconn is Taiwanese

@ckm5; Ah, my mistake- I was mis-remembering that they were (mainland) Chinese because they're well known for having large numbers of factories there.

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Michael Strorm

"There is speculation that Japanese multi-national business Sharp could join with Hon Hai to lessen the China association"

Didn't Foxconn (i.e. a Chinese company) buy Sharp just over a year ago?

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Virtual reality upstart UploadVR allegedly had in-house 'kink room,' drugs, rampant sexism

Michael Strorm

Re: If Beavis and Butthead moved into IT...

"...this sounds like the kind of company they would run."

When asked to comment on the case, UploadVR's legal representative responded "Are you threatening me?" before announcing that his name was Cornholio and making some confused utterances in a mock-Spanish accent.

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Oh my Tosh: Western Digital takes Toshiba to arbitration

Michael Strorm

"Why doesn't WDC buy the business from Toshiba?"

Because after its takeover of SanDisk, Western Digital doesn't have the money to come anywhere near the offers other companies are making, even if they wanted to.

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Forgetful ZX Spectrum reboot firm loses control of its web domains

Michael Strorm

Re: "They do not so much fly as plummet"

"Shows what a bunch of B-Arkers this lot are"

Indeed, this bunch of incompetents might want to sound like they can threaten the new owner of the domains, but they they can't do anything about it.

Put another way, their B-Ark is worse than their bite.

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Loadsamoney: UK mulls fining Facebook, Twitter, Google for not washing away filth, terror vids

Michael Strorm

Strong and Stable.

A large, vacant hotel lobby. Philip Hammond slowly walks over to the table where Theresa May has been typing out the new Conservative Party election manifesto.

As he gets closer, he is able to read the piece of paper in the typewriter. It contains nothing but the words "Strong and Stable" repeated over and over again, all the way down the page.

As he pulls the paper out of the typewriter, his eye falls over a stack of completed pages. The sheet on top also reads nothing but "Strong and Stable". He starts rifling through the sheets below.

Each and every one says nothing but "strong and stable", repeatedly- a variety of arrangements, the occasional typo or wonky letter here and there, but otherwise identical.

Faster and faster he works his way through them. Hundreds of sheets full of nothing but "Strong and Stable".

Hammond jumps as he becomes aware of May watching behind him.

"What do you think, Wendy?" she asks, grinning maniacally under her forehead.

"Looks good to me," replies Hammond. "I'll get it sent off to the printers tonight".

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TVs are now tablet computers without a touchscreen

Michael Strorm

Re: Hardware Acceleration Required

"And how do you to propose to convert the incoming 10-bit stream into one the hardware decoder can understand - in real time?"

The OP raised the issue of displaying 10-bit brightness on an older display as a distinct and separate issue from decoding; Charles09 was responding to that specifically. *In itself* that issue isn't a show-stopper and is solveable via gamut mapping.

(There's no reason a device capable of decoding wouldn't be able to gamut map a 10-bit output to 8-bit. It would make sense to have that as an end-stage of the decoder- which would have to be hardware-based anyway- but on its own you could (I guess) theoretically do the mapping in software. Not that this was the point being made anyway.)

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Michael Strorm

Re: The road ends eventually.

"will your television carry the brute force needed to handle newer, tighter codecs?"

That's *exactly* what I suspected when I read the synopsis, and had confirmed when the author mentioned that his old TV wasn't able to support the new MPEG-4 channels. Was he under the impression that it would have been able to support MPEG-4 with a purely software-based upgrade? Not bloody likely. The MPEG-2 likely used hardware decoding that probably wouldn't have been doable in software itself, so there isn't a cat's chance in hell the more demanding MPEG-4 could have been supported the same way.

This principle- as you make clear- applies equally to newer codecs.

And even if it was possible, that assumes that all these apps would work with the obsolete version of Android built into his "smart" TV that- experience already makes clear- will never be upgraded because there's no money in that for the manufacturers.

So, yeah. Nothing's changed. Smart TVs were- and are- a crap concept for that reason, and it still makes sense to rely on external units for upgradeability, not the display itself.

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Hard-pressed Juicero boss defends $400 IoT juicer after squeezing $120m from investors

Michael Strorm

"Sugar swings. Serve some."

"A bag of white sugar [..] also delivers plenty of energy"

Indeed it does.

(Sorry for linking to Buzzfeed, but that really does have all the examples I wanted in one place).

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HTC seeks salvation with squeezy design

Michael Strorm

My dog really needs to know

Does it include a squeaker as well, or will that be done in software?

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Game authors demand missing ZX Spectrum reboot royalties

Michael Strorm

"I've tried to contact them through Indienogo to request a refund only to be ignored, heaven knows what crime I've committed in their eyes."

I'd guess that was either the "crime" of asking for a refund and/or not adhering to their line that everything is peachy in RCL land.

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Hasta la Windows Vista, baby! It's now officially dead – good riddance

Michael Strorm

Re: Burn it

Burn it with fire? I say we take off and nuke the entire installation from orbit.

It's the only way to be sure.

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PC survived lightning strike thanks to a good kicking

Michael Strorm

The problem with some sans-serif typefaces...

"A customer complained about random disconnections from the lan"

Maybe Ian was doing it as revenge for the impersonal way people referred to him.

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ZX Spectrum Vega Plus backers complain of months-long refund delays

Michael Strorm

Re: Am I the only one thinking.....

Indeed. That's pretty much the point I made too, a couple of weeks back.

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Michael Strorm

Re: "Uncle" Clive's" business model.

@Bugman; "I still have my serial number 403 ZX-Spectrum (complete with cockroach)"

Strange, I thought it was the QL that was notorious for bugs in the ROM.

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Ever visited a land now under Islamic State rule? And you want to see America? Hand over that Facebook, Twitter, pal

Michael Strorm

Re: Does that include...

"You can't be too careful, he ma have been radicalised over the Ferro-Rocher"

Did you know that each Ferro-Rocher contains 110% of your RDA of iron?

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Good news, everyone! Two pints a day keep heart problems at bay

Michael Strorm

Re: booze is good for you

If (for example) you see a story like "study shows that chocolate may be good for the health of your thumb", and it goes on to explain that the study involved eating a single, small block of unsweetened high-quality chocolate with 85% cocoa solids- or whatever!- once a week... then you know damn well that all most people are going to remember is they heard something about chocolate being good for them, so it's okay to eat half the family-size Dairy Milk they got on offer at WH Smith on the bus home.

I mean, I like Dairy Milk and all that, but I don't use some misremembered "health" claims to justify eating it!

And the other problem with health and nutrition stories in the news in general is that you're always more likely to hear about the ones that make the best headlines- and that's assuming that the story is accurately reported, complete with boring but important details and qualifiers that make it less interesting.

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Why is the Sinclair ZX Spectrum Vega+ project so delayed?

Michael Strorm

Re: A rational and reasonable write-up of the issue.

I notice that the technical standard of 8-bit software (graphics in particular) improved *very* significantly over the decade, but particularly around the mid-80s.

Is this because larger companies started using the newly-released Atari ST and Amiga- and more dedicated artists- to more easily develop graphics for the 8-bit formats (#), along with possibly other cross-development tools? I'm assuming all this more team-based and equipment-intensive approach also forced a move away from the "bedroom programmer" approach?

(#) Since designing even (e.g.) mono Spectrum graphics would be easier with the mouse-based packages on the 16-bit machines than on the Spectrum itself. (Even if the 16-bit formats- especially the Amiga- were initially a bit too expensive to support many mainstream games in their own right).

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Michael Strorm

Re: Mmmmmmmmmmmm

I agree; it's ridiculous that it's descended into this.

AFAICT, this isn't a hardware-based recreation of the original Spectrum design (e.g. using an FPGA). It's a software-based emulator running on some arbitrary modern hardware.

The case- apparently by original Sinclair designer Rick Dickinson- is well enough executed, but (unlike the first Vega's bizarre key-deficient parody of the original Spectrum) there's little connection in appearance beyond the rainbow flash and Sinclair logo.

I've said before that there must be countless Chinese manufacturers offering off-the-shelf handheld designs based on generic and well-supported hardware (i.e. that would run a Spectrum emulator under Android or Linux) that could easily be lightly customised to this end without the need to reinvent the wheel.

Now, to be fair, I later found out that they were planning on building this in the UK- which would be a good thing, but might make the above suggestion less workable.

And yes, I know from the article that the problems are primarily legal and interpersonal. Still, this seems like massively more fuss than it ought to have been- or is worth- for something that's basically just a generic handheld dedicated to running a Spectrum emulator you can already run elsewhere.

The Spectrum Next looks potentially more interesting (being an FPGA-based hardware recreation in a case that mirrors the Spectrum+) and something I'd maybe consider once- if- it became a commercial product at the right price, i.e. £100 to £125. That said, most people seem non-purist and happy to play old games on an emulated console, so it's even more ridiculous that the Vega+ is having so much trouble.

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Boffins Rickroll smartphone by tickling its accelerometer

Michael Strorm

Re: Hang on a mo...

@Frank Ly - "The entire story has been hyped up by these experimenters to give themselved coverage and publicity."

Don't act like it's a big deal- all of us here, we're no strangers to clickbait. You know the rules, and so do they.

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RadioShack bankruptcy savior to file for, you guessed it, bankruptcy

Michael Strorm

Re: ☹️

"No, you can trust the original poster."

No problem there- I hadn't meant to imply any scepticism, since I was quite happy to take their word for it. I just found it surprising Tandy were selling what was (to all intents and purposes) a rival to their own hardware.

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Michael Strorm

Re: ☹️

"We bought our Dragon 32 from the Tandy in Coventry."

That's strange; bearing in mind that the Dragon 32 was an almost-but-not-quite-compatible clone (#) of Tandy/Radio Shack's own TRS-80 Color Computer at a cheaper price (AFAIK) with a better keyboard, I'm surprised that they'd have let it compete with their own product like that.

(#) Some have argued that it might be more accurate to say the Dragon was based closely on the same Motorola reference design that the Color Computer used, rather than it being a direct ripoff of the latter. (Both machines were based around the same Motorola processor and graphics chip).

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Stop the press: Journos not happy losing jobs to journo bots, say journos

Michael Strorm

Re: Journalists, humm I think...

"You're thinking about putting them in a box and sending them somewhere else. I suppose it's easy to do that with robots."

Can't we do that with the real Piers Morgan and Paul Dacre anyway? Particularly if that "somewhere else" we send them to is the bottom of the Marianas Trench.

As for the other guy- listen, and understand. Robot Orlowski is out there. It can’t be bargained with. It can’t be reasoned with. It doesn’t feel pity, or remorse, or fear. And it absolutely will not stop, ever, until Google is dead.

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Prisoners' 'innovative' anti-IMSI catcher defence was ... er, tinfoil

Michael Strorm
Coat

PlayStations on the wing- really? I didn't even know they could fly!

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Nokia’s big comeback: Watches, bathroom scales, a 3310 PR gimmick, Snake, erm...

Michael Strorm

Re: No 3G and lack of quad band support

"Mobile phone with a dial, now that would be something!"

Disregarding one-off artisan (gag!) fake retro contrivances only an insufferable hipster would use for real, there still exists this device. I'm not sure whether it counts as a "mobile phone" in the modern sense, but it definitely has a dial.

Probably doesn't have 4G though. Nor 3G, 2G or 1G.

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Michael Strorm

Re: Am I the only one...

I always thought the 3210 was better-looking than the 3310. I also don't get why the 3310 seems to be the one targeted for nostalgia. The 3210 was the first mobile that was both good-looking (no aerial) yet still affordable enough to become a hit with the younger end of the market (i.e. teens, students, young professionals) it was aimed at. The 3310 sold to much the same market, but was obviously more of a follow-on.

FWIW, I'd have thought the popularity might have been because the 3310 outsold the 3210, but according to Wikipedia, the latter sold 160m to the former's 126m.

All that said, wasn't the key layout and user interface of the 3320 very similar to that of the 3310 anyway? The only differences I can see- and remember- lie in the cosmetic styling of the buttons.

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Michael Strorm

Re: Hello Nokia

"[Psion] is just a name on a piece of paper in a Motorola [..] filing cabinet now."

Yeah, I doubt there's much prospect of them releasing a sequel to Flight Simulation on the ZX81. ;-) I remember "hacking" the BASIC listing to include "amusing" reasons for why you crashed (or just messing around randomly with various bits I didn't understand).

As for the new 3310... er, yeah.

Or rather... nope. It looks more like some no-name Chinese company made a cheap knockoff of the 3310 case in a lazy and unconvincing attempt to exploit nostalgia, but had to compromise the appearance in order to make the case fit the modern, generic, dirt-cheap feature phone hardware it was actually based on.

Which I suspect is what happened anyway, the only difference being an official seal of approval. This is even more pointless than I anticipated on Friday- as I said then, you can either faithfully mimic the design and appearance of the original 3310, or you can modernise it, in which case it's not going to look like a 3310, so why bother?

The unconvincingly updated appearance reminds me of the late-1990s "New Beetle" in that it's obvious what it's meant to be modelled after, and shares some memory-triggering design cues from its predecessor, but relies on people not having seen- or used- the original for some time and not noticing (or at least caring) that there are more fundamental differences in the shape and layout when you see them side by side.

If most people think this is nitpicking and that this model's "feature phone" design is close enough to the original... then I think that proves my point. Of course it's closer to the original 3310 than a smartphone, but you could say that about almost *any* generic, dirt-cheap feature phone from the late-noughties to the present day (which is what the icon interface reminds me of, to be honest).

The one thing they could- and should- have updated without needing to compromise the design is the one thing they didn't. I mean, 2G only- seriously? In this day and age? I've got a cheap mobile-equipped tablet that includes "4G" LTE, FFS! If they're going to charge £40 for a phone that's comparable to those selling for half the price, the least I'd expect would be 3G.

Why bother if they're not going to accurately reproduce the original, at least superficially? Well, because it got them into the news with a bunch of "Nokia's back" publicity, and gave journalists an excuse to write nostalgia pieces about the 3310, regardless of whether the new "3310" is as convincing as the silver-faced Marilyn Monroe robot in Red Dwarf.

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Michael Strorm

"My company phone is a ZTE F320, and it's absolute carp."

Sounds a bit fishy to me...

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Omg, that is, like, sooo 2007... Retromania set to grip this year's MWC

Michael Strorm

3210 and 3310 were *the* milllennial phones!

"I'm not sure few people under 40 will see what the fuss is about. Millennials don't do voice much anyway, and there isn't much else a 3310 (retro or otherwise) can do well."

On the contrary- yes, they were a long time ago, but you forget that the first "millennials" hit their late teens well over seventeen years ago (#) and that the original Nokia 3210- and then the 3310- were *the* archetypal "first wave millennial" phones.

The 3210 was one of the first phones aimed at- and massively successful with- the younger end of the market- i.e. late teens and young professionals- being both affordable and stylish (for the time) (##), and the 3310 was pretty much a continuation of that.

Of course, this was around the time that texting was becoming popular, and that was probably as important as voice- an early sign from the early millennials that, yes, voice wasn't the be all and end all and an indication of how things would go. But in dismissing the 3210 as only being good at "voice", you forget that- again- the 3210 and 3310 were incredibly popular with those same texting teens and students.

All that said, the alleged revival of the 3310 seems like a lazy attempt to exploit nostalgia. Things have moved on. It just wouldn't fit into today's market in that form as-is, and even if you were to slap on a colour display, it'd still just be a feature phone by today's standards - like the Samsung my tech-disinterested Mum got for a tenner- if it remotely resembled the original. And if it didn't, it's not a 3310, is it?

(#) Assuming we take the most common definition being those born between 1982 and 2000. While I've never seen the term "millennial" explained, I'd always assumed it came from the fact those people would be hitting nominal adulthood- i.e. 18 years or so- at or after the turn of the millennium.

(##) Personally, I always thought the 3210 looked much nicer than the 3310. Also, Wikipedia claims the 3210 sold 160m vs. 126m for the 3310, though I'd have assumed the 3310 would have sold more. I'm surprised that the 3310 seems to get more nostalgia than the 3210 regardless, as it was really just a follow-on from the latter.

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Nokia's 3310 revival – what's NEXT? Vote now

Michael Strorm

Re: tones of battery life

@Ralph B; The problem with batteries is that they can go out of tune over their life.

I had a "D" battery, but by the time it was used up, I noticed it had dropped in pitch by around a semitone.

It was a "D flat".

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Scottish court issues damages to couple over distress caused by neighbour's use of CCTV

Michael Strorm

Re: 5 days

@ Lee D; "I wouldn't want the back garden camera to record audio. [..] Hell, if they want to discuss me in their private garden, that's up to them and they shouldn't be in fear of me doing so."

You're not fooling me with that one.

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Dido queen of carnage steps down from TalkTalk

Michael Strorm

Whatever happened to Fido Dido anyway?

@Richard Hewitt; "Never did like White Flag."

Joking aside... Dido joining TalkTalk was a bad idea all round- her style was totally unsuited to the likes of "Life's What You Make It" and "It's My Life".

Maybe they should have got her to sing instead of playing drums.

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President Donald Trump taken on by unlikely foe: Badass park rangers

Michael Strorm

Re: Do not...

@ecofeco ; "Do not fuck with Park Rangers of any kind. They are some of the nicest and smartest people you will ever meet, but with real "fuck you" skills."

Meh... Don't know about American ones, but there are a bunch in England- and royally-appointed ones at that!- who are so lazy they spend more time playing football than protecting the environment.

"Queens Park Rangers", my ass.

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Boffins explain why it takes your Wi-Fi so long to connect

Michael Strorm

Re: hold your phone upside down

@ MrDamage ; Interoperability problems can be minimised by ensuring your SSID is always set to "Bruce".

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Annoyingly precocious teen who ruined Trek is now an asteroid

Michael Strorm

@ Phil W ; Many of those are down to the limitations of the self-contained episodic format most older American shows followed. I've since heard this called the "reset button", i.e. everything basically goes back to normal the next week so you don't have to have followed other episodes.

The one that stuck in my head with respect to ST:TNG was where (*spoiler*) Picard has his mind taken over by an alien probe that makes him think he's lived an entire lifetime- complete with family- on another planet, as part of their culture, only for it to be revealed as an illusion put there by a dead civilisation.

That's going to have an incredibly major effect on a person's character surely?

Next week... back to normal, never mentioned again.

There are plenty of other examples. ST:TNG was still a great series, and I don't hold these things against it too much, that's just the sort of show it was.

Never minded Wesley Crusher that much either (would have been about the same age as the character when I first watched it). That's not to say the character was perfect- some of the criticism *was* obviously legitimate, particularly upon rewatching- but even then you can't really blame those flaws on Wheaton. Was his acting okay? Yeah, as far as I remember, and that's as far as his responsibility went, he wasn't the writer.

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Anti-smut law dubs PCs, phones 'pornographic vendor machines', demands internet filters

Michael Strorm

"Er, what dangers would these be?"

The "dangers" would be whatever ill-informed or intentionally misleading propaganda they wanted to put in there, regardless of their accuracy.

That'd be assuming they got this bill to pass, though.

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Uh-oh! Microsoft has another chatbot – but racism is a no-go for Zo

Michael Strorm

Tell Me More

"Perhaps it's some kind of bland-bot that doesn't express any opinion, in which case I can download Eliza."

What makes you say it's some kind of bland-bot that doesn't express any opinion, in which case I can download Eliza?

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Blue sky basic income thinking is b****cks

Michael Strorm

Re: What I love...

" What I love is a good rant about the problem with X, without providing an alternative."

In itself, and as a general principle, that's not a fair criticism.

It's quite reasonable to see that something is a problem- e.g. global warming- without having an easy answer to it. (If nothing else, it stimulates discussion.)

It's also quite reasonable to criticise someone else's answer to that problem- regardless of whether or not you have one yourself- if that "answer" is blatantly flawed.

Otherwise, it's the equivalent of- having said that painting everyone's bottom blue and shoving marbles up their noses won't actually solve global poverty- the original proposer responding that they don't see *you* coming up with any ideas and at least they're doing *something* about it.

What a negative ninny. Hand us the pot and brush when you're finished with it, won't you? :-)

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