* Posts by Barrie Shepherd

192 posts • joined 6 Feb 2008

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What do Zuck, Sergey, @Jack and Bezos have in common? They don't want encryption broken

Barrie Shepherd

Re: Hmm

"I think I'll stick with government in this one, at least theoretically it can be reelected."

That won't make the matter go away, just leaves a nice platform for any new government to play with. An incoming government will not be repealing any laws soon

".......it does not try take over all aspects of life, censor everything it does not like and sell your information to the anyone ready to pay."

Maybe not yet, but when they can they most likely will.

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Oi, you. Equifax. Cough up half a million quid for fumbling 15 million Brits' personal info to hackers

Barrie Shepherd

Re: Gob = smacked

What in seven hells¹ were they doing with driver numbers? More to the point, how did they get them?

I'd very much like to know that as well.

I'd also like to know how an American ID checking company, used by Air B&B, are able to use your UK Driving License number to confirm your ID - "just send us a hi res photo of both sides of your license and we will confirm your ID to Air B&B so your rental booking can proceed"

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Barrie Shepherd

"It's being held on machines accessible from the internet so you can make credit reference enquiries over the internet."

Not wholly true - I can't make a credit reference check over the internet (even of my account) to the the depth that other 'trusted' organisations can. It's held on servers connected to the internet so that Equifax can sell the data to third party organisations for credit checking, identity checking etc. - that's their business.

As they get a fee for each check, a fee that I'm sure is greater than 3 pence, then the fine is just pure noise and in no way forces them to improve their systems.

Lets face it in the scale of things it's simper to pay the odd fine of £500,000 than spend that much on additional staff, consultants, servers and SW upgrades to rectify poor IT security.

I'm sure the CFO will report it to the board as "The cost of doing business"

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Rights groups challenge UK cops over refusal to hand over info on IMSI catchers

Barrie Shepherd

"I have a budget, and a valid use for IMSI's at work,"

Try some Googling - GSM in a box IMSI sniffer.

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Barrie Shepherd

"If anything, that would be a private contract matter between the seller and the plod, but neither of them can subtract themselves from compliance with the law ,,,,,,,,,,"

I appreciate this, but non-disclosure agreements may explain why the plods are not easily revealing anything and are stalling. They are no doubt hoping that the matter will never get to a Court with the power to force them to disclose the information.

This is just another example of the police (or at least their senior staff) believing they are above accountability to the people they serve and who pay their salaries. Facial recognition is another example. Technology is advancing so fast that the law is out of date or never catches up, and when attempts to catch up are made it's too late - the cat being out of the bag.

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Barrie Shepherd

Most units are probably supplied under strong "Non Disclosure" contract terms. Some information here;

https://www.muckrock.com/news/archives/2016/dec/07/rochester-police-release-unredacted-list-harris-co/

and some other info here;

https://theintercept.com/surveillance-catalogue/stingray-iii/

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UK.gov commits to rip-and-replacing Blighty's wheezing internet pipes

Barrie Shepherd

Re: Backhaul

"As long as we have ISPs racing to the bottom of the "unlimited 80Mb/s for just £XX per month" we'll have congestion, packet loss, latency, not to mention crap service when faults develop from ISPs who get the runaround from BTOR and just pass it on to their customers."

You could be describing the Australian NBN !!!!

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Barrie Shepherd

Others have tried

The accountants and economists will get in and scupper the plan.

I suggest people look to the disaster that is the Australian NBN which started life with a similar 'optic fibre to every home' mantra. As soon as costs were on the table the cost cutters crept in. Now it's a mixture of fibre, re-use of pay TV coax, satellite and fibre to the basement-copper to the user. User costs have gone up, speed in some cases is no better than ADSL2. People expecting a cabled connection are on satellites and the boxes in homes that allow phone service have life expired batteries - which users have to replace.

Service providers are mean in the capacity they buy from NBN making speed more restricted at busy periods as data gets divided around. The whole scheme is horrendously over budget and years behind schedule.

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Facebook sends lowly minions to placate Euro law makers over data-slurp scandal

Barrie Shepherd

Re: I've said it before, I'll say it again.

"If you block your citizens from accessing FB at all (except via VPN) then you stop FB from being able to make any money off them."

Inevitably FB will be fined by the EU for something, they will scream but eventually get the cleaning lady to pay up from the Petty Cash box they keep for other cleaning products.

As Shadow Systems says above far far better to block Facebook, sort of equivalent to the removal of liberty of a prison sentence, for a number of consecutive days. That will make all the users aware of the bad things they have done, allow the addicted ones some cold turkey and probably increase productivity in the EU overall.

People will scream "but you are hurting the innocent users" - good! that's the idea as it will only be the "innocent" users who can bring pressure on FB and the like to change their ways.

Governments need to get some 4/3 Pi R[] and hit organisation where it hurts, fines have no clout.

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Barrie Shepherd

Re: Facebook's chief privacy officer Erin Egan

"The fact that Facebook actually has a "privacy" officer is laughable."

Perhaps we misunderstand the underlying/undocumented function of the Facebook Privacy Officer.

Maybe his role is to protect, at all costs, the Privacy of Facebook and it's Executive staff from the probing of EU and UK Government departments. Given the current position he seems to have been very successful so is probably sleeping very soundly.

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Trademark holders must pay for UK web blocking orders – Supreme Court

Barrie Shepherd

Media companies face the same issue in Australia, they have to pay the ISP's when they apply to the Courts for a web site to be blocked. The advantage (some claim) is that the list of sites has to be made public in the Court notice giving those naughty boys with VPNs somewhere to go to look for their knock off films!

ISP's are in these cases no different to a postal service, a conduit for delivery of material produced by others. No one would expect the 'Royal' Mail to be responsible for the contents of envelopes it delivers for others so why should an ISP?

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Shock: Google advises UK peers against more legislation

Barrie Shepherd

"......femdroid voice that sounds like C3PO's inbred half sister."

ROFL - very good

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Barrie Shepherd

Google should charge to upload a video. $10 via PayPal or Credit Card.

If the video is clicked by many the 'per watch' money paid to the uploader will offset the cost. If no one watches people will soon get fed up with paying for their cat/dog/budgie/silly-prank to be uploaded. The reduced number of uploads will allow the hard pressed Google monitors to focus on the really nasty stuff which I have no doubt is there.

Oh and a further $5 if your video uses a robotic voice or has inane background 'music'.

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UK digital secretary throws cold water over bid for laws on kids' use of social media

Barrie Shepherd

"The parents have a responsibility to ensure that children use technology appropriately. For instance, I allow my children to do their homework online, but I don't let them on to social media," Hancock said."

What has gone wrong in government? A spokesman speaking common sense - must be a first. Hancock for PM!

Sorry parents, you decided to have children get to grips with your parental responsibilities instead of expecting government to do it. Maybe talking to your children at an early age about the birds and bees would be a start. As would not projecting horror at the sight of a naked body and making looking at one "naughty" - which will make kids want to do it even more.

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Australia wants tech companies to let cops 'n' snoops see messages without backdoors

Barrie Shepherd

Re: Benefit of the doubt?

"I think he may be talking about thrashing out metadata and grey areas like the FBI-vs-IPhone case here."

Aus authorities already have access to all communications Metadata. Like all politicians he is just a mouth piece to spout the words others write without understanding the context or meaning. A spin projector ejaculating infertile ideas into the air.

It's an on-going mantra from the Aus Police, ASIO, AFP etc. (and their UK equivalents) that they need to be able to get to the content - in their position why would they not?.

Against all the technical evidence they continue, probably to mask the fact that they can already access quite a lot more than they want us to know, and are just trying to hoover up the last bits.

Of course they are also preparing their defense for when a terrorist attack is successful " Well we have been saying for years that we needed to get to message content. had we have had that facility this terrorist act would have been prevented"

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Google listens to New Zealand just long enough to ignore it

Barrie Shepherd

NZ Government should make their request via the EU System which seems to be able to stop us sheeple seeing thing governments, rich people and offenders don't want us to see on Google.

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Barrie Shepherd

Please can I have access to Google's uncensored search results. :-)

Will be far more interesting than all the other Google sites with their missing results because of EU law disclaimer.

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The future of radio may well be digital, but it won't survive on DAB

Barrie Shepherd

Re: DAB

Hardly and "Audiophile scam" - the audio quality of DAB is far from audiophile.

VHF/FM is far superior assuming you have a decent signal, and even a poor signal creates a better listening experience than the gaps warbles and glitches of a poor DAB signal.

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Sir Clive Sinclair dragged into ZX Spectrum reboot battle

Barrie Shepherd

Re: But Sir Clive is dead

There is a Mark Twain quote that applies in relation to reports of Sir Clive's (the inventor, as opposed to the author) death.

BTW my 1970's Cambridge calculator still works :-)

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BT pushes ahead with plans to switch off telephone network

Barrie Shepherd

Re: Solution for POTS

"Isn't the idea to supply a "POTS converter" to every premises? In other words, standard analogue equipment will connect to this in-house device which does all the conversion for you."

I believe that will be the end solution BUT the equipment 'at your end of the line' will require you to provide power and if you want resilience from mains failure an associated battery back up unit. The difficulty for emergency phones,and the like, is that the intermediate street equipment, that delivers the Ethernet stream, also requires power, which will have limited reserve battery and therefore could also run out of power.

So in addition to BT having a large very resilient power supply at the exchange location every telephone user will require an additional power supply at their home. As another poster said how green is that?

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Barrie Shepherd

I use VoIP services from 3 VSPs (2 in Australia and one in UK) in addition to my UK POTS line. I don't understand those saying voice quality on VoIP is worse than POTS what they have probably experienced is the 'VoIP' solution they get from the likes of WhatsAPP and SKYPE which don't emulate a true VoIP connection..

My understanding is that in a POTS call only the last leg (exchange to subscriber house) is true POTS all the intermediate switching and routing is VoIP. I'm pretty satisfied with my VoIP connections they sound better than the POTS, as there are no crackles and clicks and, as I run my own modest Raspberry Pi VoIP server, I benefit from lots of Value Added Features and the ability to manage my own least cost routing.

I only ask that in whatever final solution BT propose they don't lock it down to their own 'approved' equipment like some Australian ISPs have done with their National Broadband Network VoIP services.

The UK should adopt a standard VoIP solution AND customers should be allowed to have their login credentials so they can connect to the widest possible selection of terminal equipment. With the right thinking the solution could also provide a 'number for life' meaning when you move home you don't have to change your telephone number.

What we don't want is BT repeating the telephone socket fiasco, inventing a completely new connection plug just to frustrate people wanting to do their own house wiring. Most of the world manages reasonably well with the RJ series of connectors. (yes I understand the 'bell wire' ring detect capacitor and anti tinkle but that could have been handled in a RJ solution.)

The real challenges are provision of services at distant locations, where no internet reaches, and solutions for the probable thousands of legacy POTS installations for base alarms, emergency alerts emergency phones and the like. Education is essential as people will need to understand that the old way of providing extensions phones at home by plugging them in parallel won't work for VoIP unless the VoIP modem provides a POTS simulated connection.

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Barrie Shepherd

Re: Elevators?

"There is NO WAY I'm going to have anything other that a proper POTS line serving the phone. "

If the Australian model is anything to go by you will not have an option to retain the central battery POTS line - the equipment will just not exist. The Australian NBN (BT Openreach equivalent) propose that in addition to a VoIP line, with local back up battery, you also need an additional 3/4G mobile interface to overcome problems should the intermediate carrier equipment fail. All this adds cost for lift owners / operators and of course assumes you are in a mobile phone coverage area!

A simple description with photos at https://mrtelco.com/blog/nbn-lift-phone-emergency

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Barrie Shepherd

Australia is currently ripping out the copper and it's not a smooth process. Customers wanting resilient service have to buy a PSU/battery back up unit https://www1.nbnco.com.au/learn-about-the-nbn/what-happens-in-a-power-blackout.html

PSU has sealed lead acid batteries some of which now need replacing as they were bought via the lowest bidder system - much debate about who should pay.

https://www.nbnco.com.au/learn-about-the-nbn/network-technology/fibre-to-the-premises-explained-fttp.html

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Hold the phone: Mystery fake cell towers spotted slurping comms around Washington DC

Barrie Shepherd

Re: Calling all software engineers!

"An app on your phone has a list for all official fixed cell towers in your region."

Problem is maintaining the list. Networks are bringing new cells on line, taking old cells down all the time. The stinger type devices spoof a network to sniff the IMSI, so could spoof a genuine cell tower ID.

For those interested in how easy these things are go Google "GSM in a box download". A PC (not high spec) and a SDR transceiver and you can build a basic system yourself in an afternoon, complete with SMS, authentication HLR and VLR facilities and with Asterisk added it can be your own private GSM system! Highly illegal as you would need to transmit on carrier frequencies but an example of how simple things can be.

Granted the 'professional' stinger system are able to do more but I'm sure a dig around the WWW would enable a competent Linux person to build one.

Products like this pose a greater risk to protection of personal data https://www.radio-tactics.com/index.php/portfolio/9-mobile-data-extraction/100-the-toolkit-solution

Traffic Cop " Good evening sir, I suspect you were using your mobile phone, please let me plug my analyser in to check"

Driver " I was not using my mobile phone, but OK if it gets me on my way"

Traffic Cop " Thank you sir, it will only take 30 seconds"

In that time your whole phone contents are compromised and currently (in the UK) with no oversight or protocols in place.

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BT to slash landline rentals by 37%... for the broadbandless

Barrie Shepherd

New Article not clear

The article refers to BT i.e the overarching company that holds BT Retail and Openreach.

It is not clear but one explanation for the apparent leaking of info is that it will be Openreach who determine if the line has an internet connection. If no Internet connection (from any ISP) Openreach will then bill BT Retail a reduced cost for the line which BT Retail will pass onto their customer.

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Barrie Shepherd

Re: Here's Ofcom's little but significant (weasel) words...

"{facepalm} Given the "lines only" BT rental goes to the house/premises in question carrying those third-party services,"

Don't doubt it, my point was that the data set BT/Openreach has will not identify houses additionally served by infrastructure installed by other ISPs (i.e.Virgin).

I suspect that BT Retail will be charged for the telephone connection by Openreach, BT Retail will then bill the customer accordingly.

I suspect that Openreach will be the party who is distinguishing between Internet connected / not connected and will be passing the appropriate (reduced for phone only) charge to BT Retail. For Internet connected lines that charge should be the same as Openreach charges other ISPs.

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Barrie Shepherd

Re: Here's Ofcom's little but significant (weasel) words...

"Should BT even be accessing/recording such data regarding rival ISPs in order to differentiate on pricing?"

Is it BT or Openreach? That aside I don't think the issue is so simple and the BA analogy is not similar as the database BT/Openreach has will not, I'm sure, have details of other ISPs direct customer lists. I doubt that Virgin would advise BT/Openreach of their directly connected customer base.

My take is as follows;

BT/Openreach have invested in the infrastructure both in the street and in the exchanges where the third party ISP equipment is connected. To enable and maintain the connection of third party ISP equipment will add to BT/Openreache's maintenance costs, hence it's appropriate that, where BT/Openreache's infrastructure is used to carry other ISPs customers internet traffic, the discounted phone line cost should not apply.

My gripe is where BT/Openreaches infrastructure is not used for other ISP traffic because those ISP's have their own infrastructure connecting to their own customers. For BT to claim that means no telephone line discount is very sharp practice.

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Barrie Shepherd

"BT monthly landline costs are to be trimmed by £7 from this weekend but only for customers who don't buy fixed-line broadband from any provider"

I would like to think that BT saying you have to pay a higher landline (standing) charge, if you also have a completely (i.e via a non BT pipe) Internet service from another provider, can be legal. It must be against some unfair trading practices act. It is none of BT's business what other fixed line connections I have to my premises.

I doubt that an electricity company could get away with saying your standing charge will be more if you also have a gas supply to your premises.

Yes it costs BT (should that be Openreach?) more if their copper connection to your house also carries a BT or a third party ISP Internet connection but it costs them nothing more if a third party ISP has run their own infrastructure to your property.

Seems like BT are smarting because they have been forced to behave in a socially aware way and make the provision of basic telephone services affordable.

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Oi! Verizon leaked my fiancée's nude pix to her ex-coworker, says bloke

Barrie Shepherd

Re: What are the odds

"What are the odds

That her former coworker just happened to be the one affected by this mysterious cloud problem?"

Stranger things happen. I had a problem with myVoIP PSTN number in Sydney once. Instead of reporting my DDI number if forwarded a totally different number. So I called the number and was surprised to have it answered by a friend the other side of Sydney.

No way was it a config issue at my end as I did not know the guys VoIP number and the VSP admitted it was a config issue at their end.

So yes coincidences can happen in the Tech World.

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ASA tells Poundland and its teabagging elf: Enough with the smutty social ninja sh*t

Barrie Shepherd

The ASA is a good example of unintended consequences.

Set up to control the accuracy of adverts in relation to products and services and to prevent "snake oil" claims for products they have now moved into social engineering which currently seems to be the removal of any humour and general censorship.

I'm OK with their policing the extremes of prejudice but they should not have the right, triggered by low numbers of "Offended individuals", to spoil the innocent fun for the majority.

Why the FCUK they can't see the fun is beyond me.

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Boffins crack smartphone location tracking – even if you've turned off the GPS

Barrie Shepherd

Re: Barometer

"You can't use it to assess altitude, because air pressure is independent of altitude"

Is it really? News to me (and probably the whole aviation industry), if it is.

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Should ISPs pay to block pirate websites? Supreme Court to decide

Barrie Shepherd

Look to the Down Under model

A similar situation (requiring ISPs to block on Court Order) has been running in Australia. This was primarily a result of the movie studios working with the owners of the Dallas Buyers Club copyright

There the Courts have come down partly in favour of the ISPs and ordered that Copyright holders have to pay ISPs $50 per domain blocked. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-12-15/federal-court-orders-pirate-bay-blocked-in-australia/8116912

This has led to the inevitable "unintended consequence" that the Copyright holders have to keep going back to the Court to seek further domain blocks which puts the identity of the naughty domains in the public arena giving wannabe pirates a new list of domains to trawl for their films :-)

There is a cost of compliance (even if small) on the ISPs and, as the issue is a Civil matter between companies (i.e. not a criminal prosecution), I think it right that the ISPs should be recompensed for their efforts. Where crime is involved then it's equally right that the ISPs act without payment.

There is a thread, on the very respected Whirlpool Forums site, covering the debate. (tip select "Return to Standard View" - top right hand to make navigation easier.)

https://forums.whirlpool.net.au/archive/2591386

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Barrie Shepherd

Re: "Blocking ip traffic is really difficult"

:-) Good solution :-)

Then we can all set our DNS's to 8.8.8.8 or other "Open" DNSs and carry on as normal.

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Merry Christmas, UK prosecutors: Here's a special gift... a slap from the privacy watchdog

Barrie Shepherd

Why is it so hard

I want to know what information the MOJ holds on me so why is it so hard, they just go to a terminal. type in my name and whatever appears on the screen then print/down load and send to me. Should take no more than 10 minutes of an operators time.

Presumably a policeman sat in a car with a secure data terminal can do this and get answers within minutes why does it take the MOJ years to achieve for individuals?

I suspect its because they have to do a lot of redacting, because they don't want us to know the expanse of the information they hold on every individual.

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Ofcom proposes ways to stop BT undercutting broadband rivals

Barrie Shepherd

Re: If BT can lower their prices........

Australia is in the process of this single nationalized network folly with their NBN.

One result is that a private company TPG, who were rolling out fibre infrastructure, were prevented from expanding their reach because the NBN' "equal for all" aspirations may be "threatened" by TPG's "cherry picking" of "areas of high return".

NBN was a political solution based on "high speed connections for all" but it's not turning out that way and is horrendously over budget and behind time (and over regulated). Many communities who were expecting fibre connections are ending up with under performing fixed wireless and satellite connections.

NBN legislation dictates that ADSL has to be switched off once NBN is in an area - and as NBN is only a wholesaler the retailers then have to sell new NBN connections at, surprisingly, higher cost than your old ADSl. While the connection speed may be higher the actual thru put is in many cases lower because of the complicated deals and contention issues at peak times. There is no point in having a 100Mbit connection to a network if the network can only serve you dribs and drabs while it also serves your neighbors (just like VirginMedia??).

I don't know what business model would deliver fair affordable high speed services for all but having another nationalized industry may not be the way to go - and anyway once all our tax pounds were sunk in it the government would no doubt sell it and we would be back to where were are.

It seems however that a modified quote, attributed to Churchill, " “Democracy is the worst form of government, except for all the others.” applies along the lines of " A nationalized backbone solution is the worst method for delivering equal Internet access for all, except for all the others.”

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Smartphone SatNavs to get centimetre-perfect GNSS receivers in 2018

Barrie Shepherd

Re: Very exciting for the railways

With the "status quo protecting, ultra cautious" signal engineers of the railway companies, the "lets not share technology" supply industry and the "retirement homes" that are the committees of the UIC (with each successive meeting in another country) I suspect that your 40 years is a conservative estimate :-) And when a solution is agreed it will be so complex, over engineered and expensive that it will take another 40 years to implement by which time something else will be in the 'Committee stage".. :-)

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¡Dios mío! Spain blocks DNS to hush Catalonian independence vote sites

Barrie Shepherd

Survey not Referendum?

Perhaps the mistake is calling it a Referendum, which attaches all the legal and constitutional matters.

Take a page out of Australia's book, where a referendum on Same Sex Marriage would most likely embarrassed both sides of government (as neither really wanted to upset their funding sources by having to adopt SSM as policy) so they are having a "Non mandatory, Non binding 'Survey'" [in formal voting Australia applies a mandatory or be fined for not voting policy]. Whatever the result spin will be applied to ensure that the status quo is maintained.

In Catalonia's case a positive survey result would have been a strong piece of evidence to progress their desires through more formal, and legal, channels. If the survey was against then everyone can go back to being Spanish.

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Re-identifying folks from anonymised data will be a crime in the UK

Barrie Shepherd

So the fines have been increased - window dressing! no corporation ever gets fined anything approaching the max - and to many the maximum fine is petty cash.

I advocate legislating for damages, if they collect, share or associate data in breach then, apart from fines, the individual is entitled to damages say 25k per data 'bit'?

We also need stronger (than proposed) law around what data companies are allowed to insist on. I recently had to give my date of birth to buy some theatre tickets! Totally unnecessary data collection irrelevant to the activity of selling theatre tickets.

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Commonwealth Bank: Buggy software made us miss money laundering

Barrie Shepherd

"The news was not a good look for the Bank (CBA), because most of the cash was deposited into accounts established with fake drivers licences."

Software glitches aside what went on with the identity checking?

Given the Australian addiction to identity checking for almost everything (even worse, IMHO, than the UK - I was asked for proof of ID and address when buying a $750 camera lens with cash "to prevent guarantee fraud") the CB should be taken for task for not complying with ID requirements.

It begs the question as to how many other CB accounts are based on fake identity and are operating under the radar by just moving chunks $9000 around.

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'Real' people want govts to spy on them, argues UK Home Secretary

Barrie Shepherd

Re: The idiocy of this runs even deeper.

I'm coming round to the view that all this politicking and "pressure on the tech companies" is more about "legalising" what the security services can already do, albeit somewhat clumsily, than actually being able to do the snooping they want.

The Home Office are the pawns in the arguments between the Cheltenham and the Tech companies and are allowed to be "clueless" so that they can extricate themselves from future damage when the activities in Cheltenham extend beyond the "terrorist" searching, as they will (or have), inevitably do.

Snooping on legal protesters "They are plotting industrial/social/investment terrorism", snooping on elected representatives "They are plotting overthrow of (our view of) democratic (sic) society", snooping on each other "You know where you are with the enemy but you can never trust your friends", snooping on my neighbour "Because I can".

Time travel is real welcome to the 1960's and the Stasi soon to be replaced by 1984 and the all seeing eye.

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UK spookhaus GCHQ can crack end-to-end encryption, claims Australian A-G

Barrie Shepherd

A similar case where the Ministry of Defence may have tapped, en mass, UK telephone conversations to Ireland in the early 1990s.

http://www.lamont.me.uk/capenhurst/original.html

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Barrie Shepherd

"Methinks the pollies, Asio, GCHQ, dost protest too much"

I'm coning to the conclusion that the rank stupidity coming out of Australian (and other) politicians mouths could be part of a cover-up.

For all we know GCHQ/ASIO/NSA are already able to read the WhatsApp and similar messages (probably because of flaws in the apps/phone OS) but don't want us mortals to know - so best cover story, and distraction, is to shout and scream from their various Mount Olympuses,about the need to have the capability and how naughty people are for not giving them it.

If they could why would they publicly announce that they can read the messages? - that would only push the criminal to other alternative communication means.

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Virgin Trains dodges smack from ICO: CCTV pics of Corbyn were OK

Barrie Shepherd

The train is essentially a public place - and the presence of CCTV is well advertised. Have we now got to seek agreement or pixilate every face in a photograph taken in a public place? I see no harm in what Virgin did on this occasion unless of course someone in the picture has something to hide :-)

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Want to come to the US? Be prepared to hand over your passwords if you're on Trump's hit list

Barrie Shepherd

"Already USA knows more personal stuff about me than my home country i.e. UK doesn’t have my finger prints, but USA does"

Are you sure? If the US has data on you it a good bet its being shared with UK.

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Barrie Shepherd

"Same with internet banking and email all use 2fa"

They probably don't know what 2FA is - they still sign cheques and credit card slips.

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Australia to review effectiveness of ISPs' copyright-defending website blocks

Barrie Shepherd

Re: Build a wall round the country - it'll be even more effective.

....and when the wall is complete fill with water and make a nice swimming pool for New Zealand.

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NSW bus Wi-Fi privacy, regulation: 'Move along, nothing to see here'

Barrie Shepherd

Re: The name of the operator says it all...

More than 22 :-) https://catchoz.com/privacy - among others why they need DOB (age would do for targeted advertising) or Drivers License Number is beyond belief.

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BAE Systems' autonomous research aircraft flies itself to Scotland

Barrie Shepherd

Accident Investigation?

If, in the unlikely event the plane does crash, will the computer system be cross examined by the accident investigators and dragged before the courts? :-)

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Researchers crack Oz Govt medical data in 'easy' attack with PCs

Barrie Shepherd

"So this is basically having a car, and leaving it unlocked, with the key in.'

In Australia (NSW) you don't even need to leave the key in! Leaving a car unlocked and unattended is already a crime in NSW and Victoria. There have been reports of police ticketing commuters at some station car parks because they don't want their windows broken so leave the car unlocked.

The mandarins just don't get it that those who are intent on doing naughty things will continue to do so irrespective of the presence of a law.

http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/has-the-world-gone-mad-man-fined-in-nsw-for-leaving-his-car-unlocked-20151128-glaenr.html

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/leader/east/possible-144-fine-for-leaving-car-unlocked-at-westfield-knox/news-story/9f98b8b7f4e5ea4b96b65cda12f1c3f4

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Skype shuts down London office, hangs up on hundreds of devs

Barrie Shepherd

Is the disappearance of the peer to peer encrypted (i.e. not snooperable) Skype more to do with Security Services requirements than product development?

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