* Posts by Barrie Shepherd

174 posts • joined 6 Feb 2008

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Sir Clive Sinclair dragged into ZX Spectrum reboot battle

Barrie Shepherd

Re: But Sir Clive is dead

There is a Mark Twain quote that applies in relation to reports of Sir Clive's (the inventor, as opposed to the author) death.

BTW my 1970's Cambridge calculator still works :-)

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BT pushes ahead with plans to switch off telephone network

Barrie Shepherd

Re: Solution for POTS

"Isn't the idea to supply a "POTS converter" to every premises? In other words, standard analogue equipment will connect to this in-house device which does all the conversion for you."

I believe that will be the end solution BUT the equipment 'at your end of the line' will require you to provide power and if you want resilience from mains failure an associated battery back up unit. The difficulty for emergency phones,and the like, is that the intermediate street equipment, that delivers the Ethernet stream, also requires power, which will have limited reserve battery and therefore could also run out of power.

So in addition to BT having a large very resilient power supply at the exchange location every telephone user will require an additional power supply at their home. As another poster said how green is that?

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Barrie Shepherd

I use VoIP services from 3 VSPs (2 in Australia and one in UK) in addition to my UK POTS line. I don't understand those saying voice quality on VoIP is worse than POTS what they have probably experienced is the 'VoIP' solution they get from the likes of WhatsAPP and SKYPE which don't emulate a true VoIP connection..

My understanding is that in a POTS call only the last leg (exchange to subscriber house) is true POTS all the intermediate switching and routing is VoIP. I'm pretty satisfied with my VoIP connections they sound better than the POTS, as there are no crackles and clicks and, as I run my own modest Raspberry Pi VoIP server, I benefit from lots of Value Added Features and the ability to manage my own least cost routing.

I only ask that in whatever final solution BT propose they don't lock it down to their own 'approved' equipment like some Australian ISPs have done with their National Broadband Network VoIP services.

The UK should adopt a standard VoIP solution AND customers should be allowed to have their login credentials so they can connect to the widest possible selection of terminal equipment. With the right thinking the solution could also provide a 'number for life' meaning when you move home you don't have to change your telephone number.

What we don't want is BT repeating the telephone socket fiasco, inventing a completely new connection plug just to frustrate people wanting to do their own house wiring. Most of the world manages reasonably well with the RJ series of connectors. (yes I understand the 'bell wire' ring detect capacitor and anti tinkle but that could have been handled in a RJ solution.)

The real challenges are provision of services at distant locations, where no internet reaches, and solutions for the probable thousands of legacy POTS installations for base alarms, emergency alerts emergency phones and the like. Education is essential as people will need to understand that the old way of providing extensions phones at home by plugging them in parallel won't work for VoIP unless the VoIP modem provides a POTS simulated connection.

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Barrie Shepherd

Re: Elevators?

"There is NO WAY I'm going to have anything other that a proper POTS line serving the phone. "

If the Australian model is anything to go by you will not have an option to retain the central battery POTS line - the equipment will just not exist. The Australian NBN (BT Openreach equivalent) propose that in addition to a VoIP line, with local back up battery, you also need an additional 3/4G mobile interface to overcome problems should the intermediate carrier equipment fail. All this adds cost for lift owners / operators and of course assumes you are in a mobile phone coverage area!

A simple description with photos at https://mrtelco.com/blog/nbn-lift-phone-emergency

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Barrie Shepherd

Australia is currently ripping out the copper and it's not a smooth process. Customers wanting resilient service have to buy a PSU/battery back up unit https://www1.nbnco.com.au/learn-about-the-nbn/what-happens-in-a-power-blackout.html

PSU has sealed lead acid batteries some of which now need replacing as they were bought via the lowest bidder system - much debate about who should pay.

https://www.nbnco.com.au/learn-about-the-nbn/network-technology/fibre-to-the-premises-explained-fttp.html

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Hold the phone: Mystery fake cell towers spotted slurping comms around Washington DC

Barrie Shepherd

Re: Calling all software engineers!

"An app on your phone has a list for all official fixed cell towers in your region."

Problem is maintaining the list. Networks are bringing new cells on line, taking old cells down all the time. The stinger type devices spoof a network to sniff the IMSI, so could spoof a genuine cell tower ID.

For those interested in how easy these things are go Google "GSM in a box download". A PC (not high spec) and a SDR transceiver and you can build a basic system yourself in an afternoon, complete with SMS, authentication HLR and VLR facilities and with Asterisk added it can be your own private GSM system! Highly illegal as you would need to transmit on carrier frequencies but an example of how simple things can be.

Granted the 'professional' stinger system are able to do more but I'm sure a dig around the WWW would enable a competent Linux person to build one.

Products like this pose a greater risk to protection of personal data https://www.radio-tactics.com/index.php/portfolio/9-mobile-data-extraction/100-the-toolkit-solution

Traffic Cop " Good evening sir, I suspect you were using your mobile phone, please let me plug my analyser in to check"

Driver " I was not using my mobile phone, but OK if it gets me on my way"

Traffic Cop " Thank you sir, it will only take 30 seconds"

In that time your whole phone contents are compromised and currently (in the UK) with no oversight or protocols in place.

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BT to slash landline rentals by 37%... for the broadbandless

Barrie Shepherd

New Article not clear

The article refers to BT i.e the overarching company that holds BT Retail and Openreach.

It is not clear but one explanation for the apparent leaking of info is that it will be Openreach who determine if the line has an internet connection. If no Internet connection (from any ISP) Openreach will then bill BT Retail a reduced cost for the line which BT Retail will pass onto their customer.

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Barrie Shepherd

Re: Here's Ofcom's little but significant (weasel) words...

"{facepalm} Given the "lines only" BT rental goes to the house/premises in question carrying those third-party services,"

Don't doubt it, my point was that the data set BT/Openreach has will not identify houses additionally served by infrastructure installed by other ISPs (i.e.Virgin).

I suspect that BT Retail will be charged for the telephone connection by Openreach, BT Retail will then bill the customer accordingly.

I suspect that Openreach will be the party who is distinguishing between Internet connected / not connected and will be passing the appropriate (reduced for phone only) charge to BT Retail. For Internet connected lines that charge should be the same as Openreach charges other ISPs.

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Barrie Shepherd

Re: Here's Ofcom's little but significant (weasel) words...

"Should BT even be accessing/recording such data regarding rival ISPs in order to differentiate on pricing?"

Is it BT or Openreach? That aside I don't think the issue is so simple and the BA analogy is not similar as the database BT/Openreach has will not, I'm sure, have details of other ISPs direct customer lists. I doubt that Virgin would advise BT/Openreach of their directly connected customer base.

My take is as follows;

BT/Openreach have invested in the infrastructure both in the street and in the exchanges where the third party ISP equipment is connected. To enable and maintain the connection of third party ISP equipment will add to BT/Openreache's maintenance costs, hence it's appropriate that, where BT/Openreache's infrastructure is used to carry other ISPs customers internet traffic, the discounted phone line cost should not apply.

My gripe is where BT/Openreaches infrastructure is not used for other ISP traffic because those ISP's have their own infrastructure connecting to their own customers. For BT to claim that means no telephone line discount is very sharp practice.

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Barrie Shepherd

"BT monthly landline costs are to be trimmed by £7 from this weekend but only for customers who don't buy fixed-line broadband from any provider"

I would like to think that BT saying you have to pay a higher landline (standing) charge, if you also have a completely (i.e via a non BT pipe) Internet service from another provider, can be legal. It must be against some unfair trading practices act. It is none of BT's business what other fixed line connections I have to my premises.

I doubt that an electricity company could get away with saying your standing charge will be more if you also have a gas supply to your premises.

Yes it costs BT (should that be Openreach?) more if their copper connection to your house also carries a BT or a third party ISP Internet connection but it costs them nothing more if a third party ISP has run their own infrastructure to your property.

Seems like BT are smarting because they have been forced to behave in a socially aware way and make the provision of basic telephone services affordable.

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Oi! Verizon leaked my fiancée's nude pix to her ex-coworker, says bloke

Barrie Shepherd

Re: What are the odds

"What are the odds

That her former coworker just happened to be the one affected by this mysterious cloud problem?"

Stranger things happen. I had a problem with myVoIP PSTN number in Sydney once. Instead of reporting my DDI number if forwarded a totally different number. So I called the number and was surprised to have it answered by a friend the other side of Sydney.

No way was it a config issue at my end as I did not know the guys VoIP number and the VSP admitted it was a config issue at their end.

So yes coincidences can happen in the Tech World.

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ASA tells Poundland and its teabagging elf: Enough with the smutty social ninja sh*t

Barrie Shepherd

The ASA is a good example of unintended consequences.

Set up to control the accuracy of adverts in relation to products and services and to prevent "snake oil" claims for products they have now moved into social engineering which currently seems to be the removal of any humour and general censorship.

I'm OK with their policing the extremes of prejudice but they should not have the right, triggered by low numbers of "Offended individuals", to spoil the innocent fun for the majority.

Why the FCUK they can't see the fun is beyond me.

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Boffins crack smartphone location tracking – even if you've turned off the GPS

Barrie Shepherd

Re: Barometer

"You can't use it to assess altitude, because air pressure is independent of altitude"

Is it really? News to me (and probably the whole aviation industry), if it is.

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Should ISPs pay to block pirate websites? Supreme Court to decide

Barrie Shepherd

Look to the Down Under model

A similar situation (requiring ISPs to block on Court Order) has been running in Australia. This was primarily a result of the movie studios working with the owners of the Dallas Buyers Club copyright

There the Courts have come down partly in favour of the ISPs and ordered that Copyright holders have to pay ISPs $50 per domain blocked. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-12-15/federal-court-orders-pirate-bay-blocked-in-australia/8116912

This has led to the inevitable "unintended consequence" that the Copyright holders have to keep going back to the Court to seek further domain blocks which puts the identity of the naughty domains in the public arena giving wannabe pirates a new list of domains to trawl for their films :-)

There is a cost of compliance (even if small) on the ISPs and, as the issue is a Civil matter between companies (i.e. not a criminal prosecution), I think it right that the ISPs should be recompensed for their efforts. Where crime is involved then it's equally right that the ISPs act without payment.

There is a thread, on the very respected Whirlpool Forums site, covering the debate. (tip select "Return to Standard View" - top right hand to make navigation easier.)

https://forums.whirlpool.net.au/archive/2591386

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Barrie Shepherd

Re: "Blocking ip traffic is really difficult"

:-) Good solution :-)

Then we can all set our DNS's to 8.8.8.8 or other "Open" DNSs and carry on as normal.

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Merry Christmas, UK prosecutors: Here's a special gift... a slap from the privacy watchdog

Barrie Shepherd

Why is it so hard

I want to know what information the MOJ holds on me so why is it so hard, they just go to a terminal. type in my name and whatever appears on the screen then print/down load and send to me. Should take no more than 10 minutes of an operators time.

Presumably a policeman sat in a car with a secure data terminal can do this and get answers within minutes why does it take the MOJ years to achieve for individuals?

I suspect its because they have to do a lot of redacting, because they don't want us to know the expanse of the information they hold on every individual.

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Ofcom proposes ways to stop BT undercutting broadband rivals

Barrie Shepherd

Re: If BT can lower their prices........

Australia is in the process of this single nationalized network folly with their NBN.

One result is that a private company TPG, who were rolling out fibre infrastructure, were prevented from expanding their reach because the NBN' "equal for all" aspirations may be "threatened" by TPG's "cherry picking" of "areas of high return".

NBN was a political solution based on "high speed connections for all" but it's not turning out that way and is horrendously over budget and behind time (and over regulated). Many communities who were expecting fibre connections are ending up with under performing fixed wireless and satellite connections.

NBN legislation dictates that ADSL has to be switched off once NBN is in an area - and as NBN is only a wholesaler the retailers then have to sell new NBN connections at, surprisingly, higher cost than your old ADSl. While the connection speed may be higher the actual thru put is in many cases lower because of the complicated deals and contention issues at peak times. There is no point in having a 100Mbit connection to a network if the network can only serve you dribs and drabs while it also serves your neighbors (just like VirginMedia??).

I don't know what business model would deliver fair affordable high speed services for all but having another nationalized industry may not be the way to go - and anyway once all our tax pounds were sunk in it the government would no doubt sell it and we would be back to where were are.

It seems however that a modified quote, attributed to Churchill, " “Democracy is the worst form of government, except for all the others.” applies along the lines of " A nationalized backbone solution is the worst method for delivering equal Internet access for all, except for all the others.”

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Smartphone SatNavs to get centimetre-perfect GNSS receivers in 2018

Barrie Shepherd

Re: Very exciting for the railways

With the "status quo protecting, ultra cautious" signal engineers of the railway companies, the "lets not share technology" supply industry and the "retirement homes" that are the committees of the UIC (with each successive meeting in another country) I suspect that your 40 years is a conservative estimate :-) And when a solution is agreed it will be so complex, over engineered and expensive that it will take another 40 years to implement by which time something else will be in the 'Committee stage".. :-)

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¡Dios mío! Spain blocks DNS to hush Catalonian independence vote sites

Barrie Shepherd

Survey not Referendum?

Perhaps the mistake is calling it a Referendum, which attaches all the legal and constitutional matters.

Take a page out of Australia's book, where a referendum on Same Sex Marriage would most likely embarrassed both sides of government (as neither really wanted to upset their funding sources by having to adopt SSM as policy) so they are having a "Non mandatory, Non binding 'Survey'" [in formal voting Australia applies a mandatory or be fined for not voting policy]. Whatever the result spin will be applied to ensure that the status quo is maintained.

In Catalonia's case a positive survey result would have been a strong piece of evidence to progress their desires through more formal, and legal, channels. If the survey was against then everyone can go back to being Spanish.

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Re-identifying folks from anonymised data will be a crime in the UK

Barrie Shepherd

So the fines have been increased - window dressing! no corporation ever gets fined anything approaching the max - and to many the maximum fine is petty cash.

I advocate legislating for damages, if they collect, share or associate data in breach then, apart from fines, the individual is entitled to damages say 25k per data 'bit'?

We also need stronger (than proposed) law around what data companies are allowed to insist on. I recently had to give my date of birth to buy some theatre tickets! Totally unnecessary data collection irrelevant to the activity of selling theatre tickets.

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Commonwealth Bank: Buggy software made us miss money laundering

Barrie Shepherd

"The news was not a good look for the Bank (CBA), because most of the cash was deposited into accounts established with fake drivers licences."

Software glitches aside what went on with the identity checking?

Given the Australian addiction to identity checking for almost everything (even worse, IMHO, than the UK - I was asked for proof of ID and address when buying a $750 camera lens with cash "to prevent guarantee fraud") the CB should be taken for task for not complying with ID requirements.

It begs the question as to how many other CB accounts are based on fake identity and are operating under the radar by just moving chunks $9000 around.

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'Real' people want govts to spy on them, argues UK Home Secretary

Barrie Shepherd

Re: The idiocy of this runs even deeper.

I'm coming round to the view that all this politicking and "pressure on the tech companies" is more about "legalising" what the security services can already do, albeit somewhat clumsily, than actually being able to do the snooping they want.

The Home Office are the pawns in the arguments between the Cheltenham and the Tech companies and are allowed to be "clueless" so that they can extricate themselves from future damage when the activities in Cheltenham extend beyond the "terrorist" searching, as they will (or have), inevitably do.

Snooping on legal protesters "They are plotting industrial/social/investment terrorism", snooping on elected representatives "They are plotting overthrow of (our view of) democratic (sic) society", snooping on each other "You know where you are with the enemy but you can never trust your friends", snooping on my neighbour "Because I can".

Time travel is real welcome to the 1960's and the Stasi soon to be replaced by 1984 and the all seeing eye.

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UK spookhaus GCHQ can crack end-to-end encryption, claims Australian A-G

Barrie Shepherd

A similar case where the Ministry of Defence may have tapped, en mass, UK telephone conversations to Ireland in the early 1990s.

http://www.lamont.me.uk/capenhurst/original.html

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Barrie Shepherd

"Methinks the pollies, Asio, GCHQ, dost protest too much"

I'm coning to the conclusion that the rank stupidity coming out of Australian (and other) politicians mouths could be part of a cover-up.

For all we know GCHQ/ASIO/NSA are already able to read the WhatsApp and similar messages (probably because of flaws in the apps/phone OS) but don't want us mortals to know - so best cover story, and distraction, is to shout and scream from their various Mount Olympuses,about the need to have the capability and how naughty people are for not giving them it.

If they could why would they publicly announce that they can read the messages? - that would only push the criminal to other alternative communication means.

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Virgin Trains dodges smack from ICO: CCTV pics of Corbyn were OK

Barrie Shepherd

The train is essentially a public place - and the presence of CCTV is well advertised. Have we now got to seek agreement or pixilate every face in a photograph taken in a public place? I see no harm in what Virgin did on this occasion unless of course someone in the picture has something to hide :-)

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Want to come to the US? Be prepared to hand over your passwords if you're on Trump's hit list

Barrie Shepherd

"Already USA knows more personal stuff about me than my home country i.e. UK doesn’t have my finger prints, but USA does"

Are you sure? If the US has data on you it a good bet its being shared with UK.

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Barrie Shepherd

"Same with internet banking and email all use 2fa"

They probably don't know what 2FA is - they still sign cheques and credit card slips.

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Australia to review effectiveness of ISPs' copyright-defending website blocks

Barrie Shepherd

Re: Build a wall round the country - it'll be even more effective.

....and when the wall is complete fill with water and make a nice swimming pool for New Zealand.

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NSW bus Wi-Fi privacy, regulation: 'Move along, nothing to see here'

Barrie Shepherd

Re: The name of the operator says it all...

More than 22 :-) https://catchoz.com/privacy - among others why they need DOB (age would do for targeted advertising) or Drivers License Number is beyond belief.

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BAE Systems' autonomous research aircraft flies itself to Scotland

Barrie Shepherd

Accident Investigation?

If, in the unlikely event the plane does crash, will the computer system be cross examined by the accident investigators and dragged before the courts? :-)

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Researchers crack Oz Govt medical data in 'easy' attack with PCs

Barrie Shepherd

"So this is basically having a car, and leaving it unlocked, with the key in.'

In Australia (NSW) you don't even need to leave the key in! Leaving a car unlocked and unattended is already a crime in NSW and Victoria. There have been reports of police ticketing commuters at some station car parks because they don't want their windows broken so leave the car unlocked.

The mandarins just don't get it that those who are intent on doing naughty things will continue to do so irrespective of the presence of a law.

http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/has-the-world-gone-mad-man-fined-in-nsw-for-leaving-his-car-unlocked-20151128-glaenr.html

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/leader/east/possible-144-fine-for-leaving-car-unlocked-at-westfield-knox/news-story/9f98b8b7f4e5ea4b96b65cda12f1c3f4

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Skype shuts down London office, hangs up on hundreds of devs

Barrie Shepherd

Is the disappearance of the peer to peer encrypted (i.e. not snooperable) Skype more to do with Security Services requirements than product development?

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Photographer hassled by Port of Tyne for filming a sign on a wall

Barrie Shepherd
Joke

How about a Crowd Flash Photo session - all turn up around 12:00 (when the security clowns will be thinking of lunch) and walk up and down the road taking photographs :-)

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European human rights court rules mass surveillance illegal

Barrie Shepherd

GCHQ would not conduct mass surveillance - they would just get the US NSA to do for them.so no ECHR oversight.

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Microsoft pitches lobotomized Cortana for iOS, Android handsets

Barrie Shepherd

I've yet to ask Cortana a question (windows phone) and get a spoken answer - all she delivers is a Web search so why bother porting her to anything. Currently I consider her a gimmick.

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Fingerprints, facial scans, EU border data slurp too tasty for French to resist

Barrie Shepherd

Re: And YOU thought...

Don't know about the other airports but if you enter the US through LAX, on a passport you have previously entered on (and gone though the photo finger print process), you are allowed to use the automatic gates which are signed for Americans.

I discovered this by accident on my last visit in August - it saved me a 60 odd minute wait in the queue for "first time" processing.

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Barrie Shepherd

Re: And YOU thought...

Visit (or just transit at the airport) the US and that is exactly what they get - you are photographed and fingerprinted by the "very welcoming" (sic) Immigration officer. As a return visit (on the same passport) does not require that process it's reasonable to assume that that is because your statistics have been kept on record from the previous visit.

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Angry Austrian could turn Europe against the US - thanks to data

Barrie Shepherd

"He added that Schrems was not required to prove that his own data had been spied upon in order to make a complaint."

Maybe not when the game started but I'm sure Schrems data will be spewing out of NSA printers at a great rate now.

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Welsh council rapped for covert spying on sick leave worker

Barrie Shepherd

Re: @Barrie: A Morons perspective

My bad then - I'm in Australia so have not kept up to date on all aspects of the Data Protection laws/scope.

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Barrie Shepherd

A Morons perspective

Councils are expected to protect public money - thus there is a presumption by the rate payers that Councils will investigate if there is a belief that someone is rorting the system. As said in a later comment the misuse of sick leave in the public service is perceived as high by many people.

As for the "data" - I'm no lawyer but I was under the impression that it used to be that information in written records was outside the purview of the Data Protection Act until it became "held in electronic systems". Of course if a digital camera was used by the PI then I guess the photography is captured by the Act. (If there is another "Privacy" Act that the ICO is responsible for then there may be infringement but the report said Data Protection Act.)

And Yes I would authorise investigation if I believed an act of fraud was taking place. If that makes me a moron then I'm happy to be one.

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Barrie Shepherd

I'm having difficulty understanding how the covert "spying" breached the Data Protection Act.

Despicable as some may think it is has an employer not the right to determine if an employee is rorting the system? It may be an invasion of privacy but I really don't see where data is involved.

Seems to me like the ICO extending it's sphere of influence and assumed power. Or has the report been under-reported and other matters were involved?

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Review mass-snoop laws regularly, says RIPA daddy Blunkett

Barrie Shepherd

Odd how when they get their gong and transit from the Lower to the Upper house they tend to start making the occasional "common sense" statements.

Perhaps Laws should be formulated in the Upper House and sent to the Lower House for approval?

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FTC tells 'scan to email' patent troll: Every breath you take, every lie you make, I'll be fining you

Barrie Shepherd

Re: Bogus

....... but it's the law.

It may be the law but what idiotic Patent Office granted a Patent on a obvious process.

What prey is "innovative" in taking a picture of a document and adding an address to it and dropping it in the Interweb ether for delivery. It's just an electronic mailing machine.

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Japan tells operators: Put a SIM lock in a new mobe? You'd better unlock it for free

Barrie Shepherd

We need to ban handset subsidising

It's hi time handset subsidies were outlawed.

All they do is create drawers full of perfectly good handsets and a waste of world resources and increased usage costs for all. The 1/2 year contract imprints the need for a new phone to users who would, if they had to pay the going rate for a handset, think twice about such a regular "upgrade".

Handsets subsidies were fine to kick start the industry when handset costs were high, All they do now is force operators to keep usage costs high, to offset the subsidy to "new" handset owners at the expense of those happy to retain their older handset.

Why should I pay the same usage costs as someone who has just got a new subsidised handset? If operators want to subsidise handsets then they should also be forced to offer SIM only service at appropriately reduced usage costs.

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GCHQ staff 'would sooner walk' than do anything 'resembling mass surveillance’

Barrie Shepherd

Re: So where the f*** is this coming from?

Could they be from those who trawl the internet looking for VoIP system to hack into? I see similar IPs attempting to access my VoIP box.

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Want a customer's call records Mr Plod? No probs

Barrie Shepherd

Since everyone else seems able to get my metadata why can't I get a copy? Maybe I could try a request under FoI as is being attempted in Australia.

http://www.smh.com.au/digital-life/consumer-security/spies-can-access-my-metadata-so-why-cant-i-my-15month-legal-battle-with-telstra-20141010-1146qo.html

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Oz metadata retention won't include URLs: report

Barrie Shepherd

As I see it they are trying to hose down the public outrage.

They don't need to know from your ISP that you visited www.naughtysite.com IF they have a warrant to monitor the traffic of www.naughtysite.com.

They know from the legal monitoring of www.naughtysite.com what IP addresses accessed it, so it's simple to trawl their ISP stored "free access" metadata to find out who that naughty person was.

In other words so long as they monitor the IPs of connections made to a site for which they have a legal interception warrant they will know who accessed it. Sort of reverse engineering!

No amount of hosing down will change this.

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New Snowden leak: How NSA shared 850-billion-plus metadata records

Barrie Shepherd

Re: Curious?

They don't trust anyone who doesn't speak American as a native language.

Fixed it!

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British Lords: Euro 'right to be forgotten' ruling 'unreasonable and unworkable'

Barrie Shepherd

Re: so..

Equally (currently) you could just type his name into Google-dot-another country or just com.

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Barrie Shepherd

More common sense than the other House

+1 to the un-elected house.

Not tarred with the need to garner votes or bend to influence from corporations and other world governments they have made a very common sense statement. Lets hope the lot at the other end of the corridor take heed.

Lord Denning, and his friend on the Clapham Omnibus, would be impressed.

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