* Posts by Oldfogey

300 posts • joined 28 Jan 2008

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Utah fights man's attempt to marry laptop

Oldfogey

Some breeds can live up to 20 years - so don't give up hope

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Oldfogey
Childcatcher

OK Computer

Several of my computers, still in at least occasional use, would meet the 18 rule in the UK.

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Cold callers illegally sold Aussie farmers 1,700 years worth of printer ink

Oldfogey
Facepalm

Too polite

If the photo is of an actual involved individual, it seems likely that they suffer from a problem that afflicts the same generation in the UK - they are far too polite! The only response to a cold call, for anything, is to hang up immediately.

Don't say "No thanks". Don't respond in any way. Just put the phone down immediately. They have techniques for trying to hook you in given the very slightest of openings.

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Alert! The dastardly Dutch are sailing a 90-ship fleet at Blighty

Oldfogey
Pirate

Surrender!

How about if we surrender? Brexit can't happen if we're part of Holland, can it?

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'Completely offended' Sheila calls cops over price-gouging ganja dealer

Oldfogey
Holmes

Re: So if it's decrimmed...

Confused.com??

Tripadvisor??

Just make sure it's really good shit Sherlock.

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Japan tries to launch satellite on rocket the size of a telegraph pole

Oldfogey
Go

Telegraph poles into orbit?

Trivia - lets get the first Albert Memorial to the moon!

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Beeb flings millions more £s at Capita for telly tax collection

Oldfogey
Black Helicopters

A conundrum

I don't have a telly - not had one for 30 years, and don't get hassled. Just confirm every few years if they send me a prepaid envelope and not otherwise. There is no obligation to say anything, or to let the inspectors who never turn up in without a warrant.

But say I take my laptop round to a friends house who have got a licence, and legally download from iplayer? And then take the laptop home and watch it from the HDD? Does it matter whether the laptop is plugged in or running on battery?

Can't find an answer to this!

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New Ransoc extortionists hunt for actual child abuse material

Oldfogey

Easy

To catch these idiots, departments responsible for doing so only need to create a load of files with "suspicious" filenames (they will know from thier work what these should be), and make sure their machines are open to attack - perhaps by surfing some dodgy, but perhaps not illegal, sites. Then track the payment.

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Is this the real life? Is this just fantasy? Spotify serving malware, no escape from reality

Oldfogey
Happy

Free service

Just access Spotify through the browser, rather than an app. No audio adverts, and adblock stops any visual ones.

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Privacy advocates rail against US Homeland Security's Twitter, Facebook snooping

Oldfogey
Go

But FB requires your real details.... (not, actually)

They can have details of my FB, for all the good it will do them. The only correct piece of information is my name, and one post to see how it worked (Hello flowers, hello sky).

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China launches quantum satellite to test spooky action at a distance

Oldfogey
Boffin

Short answer...

If you apply a Lorentz Fitzgerald contraction to one, but not the other, would that not break the entanglement?

On the other hand, because of relativety, how do you know which one is moving fastest?

Finally, no Nobel for you, as I will have invented Resublimated Thiotimalene last week - using it's Endochronic properties.

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Oldfogey
Big Brother

Shutter telegraph

So take a quantitly of entagled photons, display them (or their state) at both ends of your desired link in a grid.

Considered an entangled pair to make their square on the grid white.

Now interfere with selected photons at one end so that entanglement is lost. Those squares are considered black.

Now read the message given by the black squares on the white background.

Then replace the disentangled pairs with new entangled pairs and start again.

Any attempt to interfere would initially make the message dificult to read, then impossible, as more bits were lost.

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O2 sales dip 9% as tight-fisted Brits cling to their old handsets

Oldfogey
Thumb Up

So how "old" is Old?

I've just repalced the battery in my wifes Nokia 1101. From a choice of supplies, and for a few quid delivered.

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Firefox to banish hidden Flash files – and kill off sneaky ad snoopers

Oldfogey

Re:BBC

Has anybody tried "User Agent Switcher"?

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Ad blockers responsible for rise in upfront TV ad sales, claims report

Oldfogey
Stop

Re: Easy way to avoid TV ads

Even easier - get rid of the TV!

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Those Xbox Fitness vids you 'bought'? Look up the meaning of the word 'rent'

Oldfogey
Thumb Up

Office

Don't know about office 95, but 97 still works perfectly well on Win 7.

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You Acer holes! PC maker leaks payment cards in e-store hack

Oldfogey

Re: Storing CC security verification codes

Strictly not allowed to store the security code - but I come across companies that do it all the time. If I realise in time (usually on a phone transaction) I ask if they are doing so, and then cancel the transaction in a very pointed way - including reporting them,

The SHOULD have their card-not-present permission removed, but I doubt it ever happens.

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Q. What's the difference between smartphones and that fad diet you all got bored of? A. Nothing

Oldfogey

Chain of re-use

Once upon a time you could justify the cost of a new phone by giving your old one to your aging parents. Now they've got one, got used to it, and wouldn't thank you for replacing it with a less familiar one.

And nowadays nobody wants to see your latest ooh shiny. Too booooring.

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One million patients have opted out of Care.data

Oldfogey
Holmes

Noel Gordon?

Sounds like the NHS is at the Crossroads.

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Your broadband speeds are up by 6Mbps, boasts UK watchdog Ofcom

Oldfogey
Unhappy

Dial-Up?

Regardless of the sub-head, I know several people who arw still on dial up, for the simple reason that there is no broadband and no mobile service where they live - within 5 miles of a cathedral city.

No cable either, obviously

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Tandy 102 proto-laptop still alive and beeping after 30 years, complete with AA batteries

Oldfogey
Coat

All that old kit in attics...

I reckon when Skynet goes live, it won't be the latest hot server boxes and such, but all the ancient tat festering in Reg readers attics, sheds, garages, and old office cupboards that will be struck by lightening a creak into life.

But they won't be trying to kill mankind off with flash military hardware, instead they will just bore us to death by going on about how nobody writes assembler any more, let alone proper machine code.

My coat is the one with the Psion II in the pocket.

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Microsoft quits giving us the silent treatment on Windows 10 updates

Oldfogey

Re: while we are on the subject

Thanks for the headsup on KB3123862, whichdoes indeed look suspicious.

Personally, having several machines to update, I find it easiest to use Portable Update. This enables me to scan a PC for available updates, download only those I want onto a USB disk, and install from there to all my machines without having to check the numbers again.

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Boozing is unsafe at ‘any level’, thunders chief UK.gov quack

Oldfogey

Re: It all about Tax you fools

Fractional freezing is certainly a more accurate term, unfortunately it is not as good at conveying the meaning to the non technical.

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Oldfogey

Re: It all about Tax you fools

That will have no effect on me - I make my own.

And no, they can't stop or tax it when the ingedients are available from most hedgerows and supermarkets in the country.

In Norway, home distillation is all the rage, and they are well equiped for simple freeze distillation.

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Chinese unleash autonomous airborne taxi

Oldfogey

Wheels

Wouldn't take much to put some lightweight wheels on so it could be driven for short distances!

Yes, put the rotors up high, also use 5 arms, for greater stability and also for safety if a rotor fails.

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The designer of the IBM ThinkPad has died

Oldfogey

Still in use!

Just across the room is a 770EX, running XP and still in daily use for Office 97, Calibre, and some old school games.

It's not connected to the internet, so no security risk, and it still does what it always did, perfectly well.

Couple more upstairs, and when I have time I am going to try putting Win7 on - supposed to be possible - and some flavour of Linux to play with for the future.

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Aircraft laser strikes hit new record with 20 incidents in one night

Oldfogey

One Word

Peril-sensitive sunglasses.

Oh....

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BBC encourages rebellious Welsh town to move offshore

Oldfogey
Pint

Nice little place

I stopped in Crickhowell recently for a spot of lunch, and it is a nice little town with some attractive local shops. Well recommended if you are passing that way.

So what we have here is basically a stunt. The town needs a bit of publicity, the Beeb needs a programme, and HMRC needs a mechanism to try and get the government to do something about tax dodging corporations.

Bingo! Everybody's happy (except Starbucks).

Oh, and there are a couple of nice coffee shops in Crickhowell.

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Microsoft offers to PAY YOU to trade in your old computer for a Windows 10 device

Oldfogey
Paris Hilton

Re: Wow

You do know that you can get an adaptor for the BNC to connect it to Cat 5?

(Never get rid of anything that still works - and how many WFW viruses are there out there?)

I think Paris is trying to boot CPM.

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Are Samsung TVs doing a Volkswagen in energy tests? Koreans hit back

Oldfogey

Re: Can I get

Easy. Just hook it up to a diesel generator.

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So, what's happening with LOHAN? Sweet FAA, that's what

Oldfogey

Copenhagen Sub-Orbitals

I believe that this lot fire from a boat (or plan to), and also have a coastal location in Norway. Norway is not in the EU, so there is a fair chance it has its own rules.

Have a word with those guys - they sound as mad as El Reg anyway, and might be able and willing to help for a contribution to their funds.

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Wileyfox Swift: Brit startup budget 'droid is the mutt's nuts

Oldfogey
Coat

Re: Absolutely brilliant, except the screen size

I imagine that you are not at all interested in portability, with a 13 foot screen size.

I don't expect to find that in my pocket!

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Daredevil Brit lifts off in 54-prop quinquaquadcopter

Oldfogey

Ducted Fans?

I'm thinking ducted fans would be more efficient, plus a whole lot safer.

Add a Pi to control stability and it could just work.

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Spotify updates hated privacy policy ... with exact same policy

Oldfogey
Thumb Up

The app is the problem

So just log in through the browser portal. They get no information except the lies you told them when you created the ID, and for some reason it seems to be ad free???????

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The Raspberry Pi is succeeding in ways its makers almost imagined

Oldfogey

Re: Log in

There are a lot of websites out there that think I am 115. Not quite yet!

If they actually cared they would reject such an obvious date as 1-1-1900

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Rock reboot and the Welsh windy wonder: Centre for Alternative Technology

Oldfogey

Re: I Say Potato and You Say Pot-Ah-To

The Oxford English Dictionary gives both as acceptable spellings.

CAT is pretty much half-way between North and South Wales. The Welsh spoke in the two areas is not exactly the same language.

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Blighty tablet sales plunge 31 per cent in saturated market

Oldfogey

Loads of excellent stuff for free on Project Gutenberg - not forgetting the English Language Gutenbergs such as Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and India (yes)

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Contactless card fraud? Easy. All you need is an off-the-shelf scanner

Oldfogey
Coat

Soon....

In September the contactless payment limit goes up to £30.

If it's 5 uses before a pin is requested, then that could be £150 down the drain.

My coat is the one with the lead lined pocket with a combination lock.

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Rise of the swimming machines: US sub launches and recovers a drone

Oldfogey

So do they really have them?

Is there any evidence? Has anybody seen an underwater drone?

Perhaps they just want to worry the opposition?

You can't believe it without Playmobile evidence!

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Driverless cars banished to fake Michigan 'town' until they learn to read

Oldfogey

Re: Fantastic projets

As I think I have mentioned before on these forae, the Bond Bug was actually an amazing vehicle. The top model was capable of 115mph (for internal consumption only - never let insurance companies know!), and the factory test drive demonstrated to me that it could do handbrake turns, doughnuts, and 3-wheel slides on corners - all because the COG was barely above the wheel hubs.

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Roll up, roll up, for the Meta35: The hybrid snapper's data dumpster

Oldfogey

I wonder

just how many years before it is impossible to buy camera film?

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Ant-Man: Big ideas, small payoff

Oldfogey
Thumb Up

Curious

I'm seeing reviews in the "serious press" that really like this - though they keep apologising for liking something geeky!

And why should I grow up? I got to 66 without doing so, and along the way made enough money to retire in comfort 20 years ago. You grow up if you want to - I don't have to.

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2015 Fiat 500 fashionista, complete with facelift

Oldfogey

Leagues per hour?

This is a UK website. We use MPH, and, despite the pumps being in litres, everybody thinks in MPG. Get used to it.

And who wants a built in satnav? The software probably won't be to your taste, the updates will cost a fortune, and what happens when it dies? Give me a free standing unit.

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The Scientific Secrets of Doctor Who

Oldfogey
Happy

Who?

Joanna Lumley, of course.

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Vauxhall VXR8: You know when you've been tangoed

Oldfogey

Hurrah the Bond Bug

The Bug was very much the wolf in sheeps clothing. With the hot engine (as used in Formula 600 single seaters) it was capable of about 115 (factory kept this quite), and when I was taken on the track by their test driver he showed that it could do a 3-wheel drift under precise control, because of the extraordinarily low COG.

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Messerschmitts, Sinclairs and a '50s living room: The Bubblecar Museum

Oldfogey

Bond Bug

The Bond Bug built by Reliant (the orange wedge) was a bit of a wolf in sheeps clothing. Most had the Reliant 600 engine, which was a nice reliable lump made in aliminium. Some had the 700 version - same but a bit pokier. few had the version that was commonly used in small single seater racers - high compression, etc etc.

That last was distinctly lively, and Reliant never published performance figures, for the simple reason that insurance companies would have had a heart attack. Top speed was 115mph, could have been faster off the line, due to lack of weight, but picked up like a motorbike once rolling. I got a ride in one with the test driver on their track, and the really terrifying thing was that because the centre of gravity was barely above the axles, it could do a 3-wheel power drift on the corners.

A quite extraordinary vehicle.

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Door keys are an option. It's just a matter of time

Oldfogey

Won't somebody think of the non-geeks?

I have a friend with Down's Syndrome, who nevertheless makes quite a bit of use of computers (even though se can neither read or write).

Recently she was visiting relatives who had an iPad, took to it, and was bought one.

In order toget the apps she needed (games, iPlayer etc.) it was programmed with the same Apple Id as her relative.

All was well until the relative found that documents she had created on her ipad were vanishing. And this is where the low level of understanding behind computing is causing problems.

You write your document on the ipad. It is automatically (and by default) synchronised with the cloud. Your Downs relative starts up their ipad later, and, being the same account, it synchonises and downloads the document. Relative looks at this, doesn't know what it is, so deletes it. The deletion is then (automatically) done on the cloud, and this is finally synchonised the the original ipad.

The reason that this happens is that the users had no idea that the cloud synchronisation was happening - it was built in - and no idea how to get out of the situation.

Now one can see how easily things can go wrong with iot leaving open security holes, default passwords, whatever, that the users will know nothing about. How many people have a password on their smartphone? How many would put a password on their door opening app?

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HORDES OF CLING-ONS menace UK.gov IT estate as special WinXP support ends

Oldfogey

Re: Police Scotland

And why would they need to upgrade Office?

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18-wheeler robot juggernaut hits Nevada's highways. Cower, fleshies!

Oldfogey

Re: Won't work in England.

C'mon - the White Stripes were pretty crisp on their first album

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EC probe into murky cross border e-commerce kicks off

Oldfogey

re: Language

Well, I can manage in French and German well enough to order many things on a website - but definitely not well enough to understand the terms and conditions.

And certainly not well enough to debate with a support, warranty, or legal department.

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