* Posts by Adair

324 posts • joined 23 Jan 2008

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Southern awarded yet another 'most moaned about rail firm' gong

Adair
Happy

Yes, please don't come to Hull

We like to have reliable, fast, uncrowded trains, and affordable family homes, and all the other benefits that come with living in an area that the easily prejudiced and terminally ignorant prefer to avoid.

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Linus Torvalds slams 'pure garbage' from 'clowns' at grsecurity

Adair

Re: Linus exhibits all the qualities of pure sociopath

I baffles me why so many people waste so much of their time whining about someone who is doing his job, and who isn't particularly interested in wasting time with people who can't be arsed to do their work properly, or who spit their dummy out if their ego isn't regularly massaged.

Yes, Linus can be painfully direct and even downright rude, but I can't say that I've seen much evidence of that behaviour arising without justifiable provocation.

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'OK, everyone. Stop typing, this software is DONE,' said no one ever

Adair

As far as I know ...

TeX is officially 'done'. Donald Knuth said so. The bug bounty is still open, but I don't think anyone has claimed for years. There will, however, be a final version issued after DK's death -- just to round things off nicely.

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Amazon and others sniffing around Slack

Adair

When I looked ...

at Slack there seemed to be zero encryption, and the EULA made it clear they made no assurances as to the security/confidentiality of anything sent through their system.

On that basis, why would any business -- let alone private user -- bother?

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Why Microsoft's Windows game plan makes us WannaCry

Adair

@David Webb

The vast majority of hospital staff don't care what OS they are using; what they care about is the application software. they care about that on the level of: are the buttons in the same place they were yesterday, and do they do the same thing they did yesterday?

Changing the OS is, to a large extent, a non-event as long as the software they actually use is familiar; and even when it isn't, within a few weeks the crying and the whining stops as the 'horrible changes' become the new normal, and life goes on.

This above is written from experience---I work in a hospital. Last year we changed from XP to 7, AND changed the basic patient management system. Also in my experience changing to Linux causes non-IT literate people no more difficulty than changing from one version of Windows to another.

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Leaked: The UK's secret blueprint with telcos for mass spying on internet, phones – and backdoors

Adair

Re: Only one question

There is nothing new here, you only need to look at the history of government in Britain to see the trend (not that most other countries are much different).

Britain has hundreds of years of government and civil service acting in a patronising and autocratic way towards the people of the nation. The governing system is, after all, a reflection of and a means of sustaining the 'class system', or more accurately, a means of the privileged maintaining their privilege, regardless of where they fit into the 'class' structure.

Power and money - how to get them, how to hang on to them, and how to prevent, limit, reduce the power/money available to others, especially those who you depend on for your own excessive acquisition of the same. It's an old game, and a dirty one.

That is not to say there aren't very 'good' people working in the system who through their working lives do a lot to mitigate the worst excesses of the wankers, idiots, and scum who work the system as hard as they can for their own advantage.

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Windows 10 S: Good, bad, and how this could get ugly for PC makers

Adair

Re: MS is daft.

There seems to be a misunderstanding here. TLDR version: 10S aimed at hardware spec, c.£150.

QUOTE (from http://tinyurl.com/lzk2jjs - Guardian report):

'Jeff Orr, research director for ABI Research, explained that the education market is tough to design for, with extensive requirements for durability, flexibility and affordability. Orr said: “Both Apple’s Mac laptops and Google-powered Chromebooks have offered a combination of hardware and software to keep Windows from being as dominant in education as it has become in the workplace. The affordability of Chromebooks and the benefits of cloud services has propelled the low-cost laptop use case even further.”

It is here that Microsoft hopes its Windows 10 S and new education initiative will be able to make inroads where more expensive solutions have faltered against stiff competition. Industry partners include Acer, Asus, Dell, Fujitsu, HP, Samsung and Toshiba, producing Windows 10 S-compatible machines starting at $189 (£146).'

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Microsoft sparks new war with Google with, er, $999+ lappies for kids

Adair

Just remember...

It's all about money.

Imagine a hand dipping into 'your wallet'(TM) forever.

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The brave British boat men hoping to poke Larry Ellison's lads in the eye

Adair

QUOTE: 'A number of other countries are also taking part.'

Which include the two teams most likely to leave LBAR as sad 'also-rans': Artemis, and Emirates Team New Zealand.

Hopefully Ben will manage to avoid steering the boat into the dock, or any other solid object, when the racing actually starts - http://www.xssailing.com/article/video-be-a-barry-not-a-ben/

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Good job, everyone. We're making AI just as tediously racist and sexist as ourselves

Adair

'AI' = just another hypegasm

This misuse of language really rattles my rusty cage. It's just another example of marketing bullshit. It may be artificial, but it certainly isn't intelligent in any meaningful sense of that word which is remotely connected to standard usage.

A series of algorithms, however sophisticated, is not intelligent, it's just another 'slave to the rules'. There is no possibility of creativity, lateral thinking, disobedience, or slacking off---all hallmarks of actual intelligence.

So, get off humanity's lawn, you marketing shitheads! Go and live in some hellhole for a while, and if you survive come back when you've learned some humility, and do something useful and wonderful with your lives.

3
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Cowardly Microsoft buries critical Hyper-V, WordPad, Office, Outlook, etc security patches in normal fixes

Adair

"If the PC uses an AMD Carrizo DDR4 processor, installing this update will block downloading and installing future Windows updates."

Hey, it's a feature not a bug! You're onto a winner there mate, AMD clearly have their customers' interests at heart.

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Adair
Trollface

And people...

actually pay for this shit!?

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Windows 10 Creators Update general rollout begins with a privacy dialogue

Adair

Spyware

Whatever excuses are made, however much there is the appearance of choice, that is what it is in the end.

If there was a credible option to genuinely turn it all off, and then switch individual reporting on/off as desired; with an absolute guarantee that all choices would be respected without question or arbitrary reversal by MS, then there might be a shred of credibility in saying 'We're not offering spyware'.

But there isn't, so they are: Windows <whatever it's current iteration> is spyware.

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Put down your coffee and admire the sheer amount of data Windows 10 Creators Update will slurp from your PC

Adair

Re: "There you have stated perfectly the tarpit that proprietary software "

@LDS

Let's be clear, both 'proprietary' and 'FOSS' have their place, and there is no reason why FOSS can't be 'paid for'---'free as in beer' is not obligatory; just as proprietary software can be offered, and frequently is, for free---as in 'no financial charge'.

The problem is our mentality and attitude. I would also pay for a service I need, and I do, when I have established that I am not going to be screwed over or held hostage more than I am willing to be. As a result I long ago abandoned the 'services' that asked more than I was willing to sacrifice, either in freedom or in money, and have found other ways of achieving my ends. In a few cases I have just had to accept that there are things I cannot do, I can't say I miss them.

The thing is, in a commercial environment businesses often can forge their own way, unencumbered by grasping and idiotic third part solutions, but it takes a real vision and determination to leave the herd and retain some kind of integrity. Sometimes it is impossible, but too often the problem is lack of vision, lack of integrity, and a simple desire to 'make money' above all else---and we all live with the results, repeatedly.

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Adair

Re: "The problem isn't lack of software alternatives, the problem is lack of will to change"

@LDS

There you have stated perfectly the tarpit that proprietary software offers to its customers/victims.

You made the best choice you could at the time you made it, but now (partly because, perfectly sensibly, you have stuck with 'what works', both economically and productively) you now find yourself facing a very difficult predicament. You are literally trapped.

There's no point whining about it; you/we have to suck it up, unless we set in motion a process, however painful and costly, of extricating ourselves from the situation so that we are 'free' of the clutches of an agent who, benignly or otherwise, has us over a barrel.

FOSS, whatever its drawbacks, and like everything else it certainly has them, at least offers the possibility, and the opportunity to get the job done out from under the control of an irresponsible self-serving entity. But there's that 'change' thing, and the whining sound of those who will die, or pay and pay and pay... rather than do that.

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Adair

Re: I thought

@Charles9 - 'They've dominated the OS atmosphere for so long that most software has no viable substitutes outside Windows.'

I'd argue that this is, in a large proportion of cases, a bullshit statement. While there are some use cases where the only viable software has only ever been written for the Windows platform, for a very large proportion of use cases the wheel has definitely been reinvented elsewhere. The problem isn't lack of software alternatives, the problem is lack of will to change. 'Change', that thing too many of us are very bad at.

Instead of exploring, learning, adapting, even doing something new from scratch (perish the thought) we become 'Whiners'.

The whiner always seems to want the new to be the same as the old: 'Why isn't <software/app/car/nation I'm not used to> like <preferred software/app/car/nation>; <unfamiliar x> is crap! In fact this is the whiner's justification/smokescreen for their own refusal to put any effort in. They want life handed to them on a plate because they are too stupid/lazy/arrogant to shift themselves. Such creatures generally ensure their own extinction earlier than might otherwise have occurred.

Having had my little rant, I will cheerfully admit that in some instances there are grievous gaps in the software libraries of other OS's, but that applies across the board.

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US border cops must get warrants to search citizens' gadgets – draft bipartisan law emerges

Adair

Re: Can Canada sue?

@anothercynic

I thoroughly endorse Singapore airport as a civilised transit hub. My experience of Dubai has only been as a transit passenger, and so far my experiences have all been good. Will be passing through again later this year - fingers crossed all will be well. :-)

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Adair

Re: Can Canada sue?

@'Your alien overlord'

Times change. The holding pen (transfer under armed guard) is long gone.

Now, it's straight into the 'papers and fingerprints please' hellhole where you fester with many others for as long as it takes. Assuming there is insufficient evidence to detain you further, you then join a queue through security for your connecting flight. Having negotiated that with whatever dignity you have left, and with blood sugar now at dangerously low levels (especially for those with a short fuse), you may be lucky enough to have time to grab some sustenance and recover your equilibrium; otherwise it's a sprint for the boarding pen and another wait until you are allowed to enter the tubular sanctuary for more hours of your life spent in a gentle sauna of BO and farts.

Much of this pain is easily avoided by simply avoiding the 'Land of the Free(TM). Personally I now find Dubai quite an acceptable stop on the way to almost everywhere else that I am interested in going to.

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Head of US military kit-testing slams F-35, says it's scarcely fit to fly

Adair

You gotta know...

when to hold'em,

know when to fold'em,

know when to walk away,

and when to run...

The thing is that too many of the people involved know nothing, except money. And they don't know much about that either.

What a clown show.

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With Skype, Microsoft's messaging strategy looks coherent at last (almost)

Adair

Re: I'm out...

Currently Ring < https://ring.cx/ > looks very promising, but I've only played around with it. I would like to adopt it for daily use, but for the sake of non-IT literate family members whose systems I help keep up and running, and who are scattered around the world, I'm using Teamviewer, which isn't necessarily any better than Skype, either technically or ethically, but it works and combines the two services which I really need: the VOIP and remote access.

Clearly other options are available. :-)

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Adair

I'm out...

Not because I've found something massively better, but because why would I want to offer my personal communications to a huge irresponsible corporate entity. it's cronies, and it's puppet masters.

I can take all of those risks with someone else who just may care a little bit more, and even if they don't what I really want is the choice, and supporting one of the big monopolistic dinosaurs is one sure way of adding yet another brick to the wall the monopolist's want to build to limit choice to what suits them.

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Brit infosec's greatest threat? Thug malware holding nation's devices to ransom – report

Adair

Even better...

more of us need to wean ourselves off the idea that we 'need' to have every ridiculous brain dead bit of tech that cynical marketeers push at us because: 'oooh it's shiny', 'but everybody has one', and all the other bullshit justifications we come up with for 'consuming' yet another piece of unnecessary crap.

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Sir Tim Berners-Lee refuses to be King Canute, approves DRM as Web standard

Adair

Re: All the whining in the world - 2

No, I know what you mean, but the 'world' is not a 'jail' because the 'world' lacks intent (I am not suggesting the world has consciousness) to deliberately deprive people of something that is intrinsic to their being, and/or to restrict access to that intrinsic 'right' by means of some arbitrary 'payment'.

The only reason the DRMers can get away with their action is because sufficient people allow them to by 'buying' into their jail. If what they are buying truly 'belongs' to the jailers then it can be considered a legitimate trade---I regard the benefit I receive to be worth the price I pay. If the 'product' truly belongs to the 'jailers', and we don't like the price they are asking that's our tough luck.

If the 'product' does not in fact 'belong' to the jailers, then it really is open season. The jailers can make their jail as shiny as they like, and try to get the law on their side, but in the end they are trying to lay claim to something that is not theirs any more than it belongs to anyone else.

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Adair

The 'general solution' is probably to come up with better solutions. Laws will always be broken or worked around; technology can almost always be hacked; but coming up with a 'solution' that is socially and economically constructive and elegant will usually drive idiocy and fear away, until the next time when someone's 'nice little earner' gets threatened.

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Adair

Re: All the whining in the world - 2

@AC - 'But is it really a jail when everyone else is in it and you're left basically Walking on the Sun?'

Yes, yes it really is a jail, even if there is only one person 'outside', if the 'inside' is controlled by a few for their own benefit, and those 'inside' cannot leave without permission, then it is a 'jail'. And the one who is 'outside' is the one who is 'free' (if only they realise it).

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Adair

All the whining in the world - 2

The reality is that the money grubbers have, do, and always will grub for money, by whatever means they can get away with (legal or otherwise). That is reality.

DRM is a thing and always will be, because there will always be money grubbers attempting to control the money stream. That is what they do.

If you don't want to use DRMed material, then don't use it. I accept the cost of using Linux because I don't want to have to put up with the cost of all the money grubbing power grabbing shit that is attached to using Windows (plus Windows isn't all the great as an OS anyway, but that's another matter).

I don't have to 'consume' DRMed material, and publishers don't have to use DRM---there are other ways of working and earning a living. If that means I don't get to see some of the things that others get to see, well poor me; life goes on. Just because someone builds a prison and paints it shiny, doesn't mean I'm obliged to go and live in it. All sorts of buildings can be built, and people invited in on all sorts of understandings, and then there is always the big wide world just outside the door. It's important that we do work to keep that world accessible and open to all who seek it. But the jail builders, let them build their jail, and live in it, and much good may it do them.

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Adair

All the whining in the world...

isn't going to take away the reality that, regardless of bad faith, somehow content creators and distributors need to earn a living. In the past the sheer cost, complexity, and inconvenience of owning your own printing press acted as an effective 'DRM'. Digital technology has made everyone a mass distributor (if they want to be).

DRM may be everything it's critics accuse it of, but the critics still have to come up with real world alternatives that somehow look after the legitimate interests of those who pay the price of producing content that others want to use.

Meanwhile, in other parts of the World's Wild Web people will get on with creating innovative ways of using the technology that completely bypasses the dinosaurs of the the old way of doing things, but some how, sooner or later folk have to earn a living without too much risk of being cleaned out by scumbags and lazy selfish 'consumers'.

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Skype-on-Linux graduates from Alpha to Beta status

Adair

I would be interested to know...

if anyone one here has any useful experience of Ring they would care to share: https://ring.cx/en

1
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Move over, Bernie Ecclestone. Scientists unearth Earth's oldest fossil yet: 4bn years old

Adair

Re: 'seeded' from the same extrasolar source

@Hans 1 - '...so the bible is a hoax, fact, undeniable fact.'

Assertion is not fact my good sir. It always pays to understand your target so as to avoid lobbing entirely the wrong munition it it's direction. Your main problems are that 'the Bible' is:

a. not a 'scientific treatise'

b. is effectively a library comprising books of a number of different literary styles, from history through to poetry, and including 'prophecy' (which is not primarily about foretelling the future), and 'apocalyptic' (which kind of is about foretelling, but in coded language).

c. taken all together, far from being any kind of 'proof' of God, they are much more about human beings struggling to make sense of this life, and that if 'God' is what actually God is all about---more often than not they are seen to be making a pigs ear of the whole thing even when there are brief incidents of enlightenment.

Hardly a hoax, much more a realistic rag bag reflecting the actualitie of human existence, while providing and exploring the possibility that there is more going on here than we know, or often care to understand.

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UK Snoopers' Charter gagging order drafted for London Internet Exchange directors

Adair

Re: Cheers Tory voters - United kingdom = worst kingdom

@ - 'There one finds the epitome of the tyrannical "do gooder"'

Nothing like a bit of blind prejudice to cause distraction, and to sow fake facts.

Anglicans, in my now extensive experience, have no monopoly on 'do gooding'. Those kind of people crop up anywhere and everywhere, regardless of belief/unbelief; they are usually people who are rather fragile and brittle, and try to hide it by imposing themselves on others.

Try reading a bit more of Lewis. There will always be stuff to disagree with in his writing (which he would heartily approve of), but he has some pretty solid ideas about what makes life worth living for everyone. Try 'The Four Loves', 'The Problem of Pain', maybe 'The Great Divorce', and 'Till We Have Faces' is rather special. Plus the tri-planetary series is always worth a read, likewise 'The Screwtape Latters'.

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Update or shut up: Microsoft's choice for desktop Skypers

Adair

Re: Any practical FOSS Skype-alternatives?

Have a look at Ring. https://ring.cx/

0
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God save the Queen... from Donald Trump. So say 1 million Britons

Adair

Re: People

What about the 64+M who haven't signed the petition don't our votes count? - No, because they didn't vote! <doh!>

And anyway, petitions are usually valued on the basis that given sufficient participation they begin to more and more accurately reflect the views of the 'silent majority', i.e. if people felt equally strongly in the opposite direction they also would, presumably, wish to make their angst known; if they haven't then the weight of evidence (the petition) lies with those who have.

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Adair

Re: Where were all these virtue signallers...

@Def - clearly downvoted by an 'alternative truther'.

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Adair

@Hans1 - How about trying out: 'Constitutional monarchy' is tried and tested and probably one of the least worst (if not the least worst) options on the table. Having a 'president' is no guarantee against bloodsucking asshattery, or any of the other options designed to limit over weening power greed and idiocy.

If you have a significantly better alternative, let's being having it, with reasons.

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To Hull with the crap town naysayers: UK Culture City's got some amazing... telecoms

Adair

Fake news

@Adam52 - always helps to fix the 'fake news' problem with a dose of truth, even if it does stick in your craw:

£32/month

35GB - Usage allowance

50Mbps - Download speed

5Mbps - Upload speed

And what I'm on:

£46/month

700GB - Usage allowance

75Mbps - Download speed

5Mbps - Upload speed

And yes, the quoted speeds, etc. are what you get, sometimes a bit better -- my download speeds are often closer to 90Mbps.

The monopoly thing is an issue. Other suppliers are legally free to come in, but as it stands, none of them seem to feel it's worth the bother.

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The rise, fall, and rise (again) of Microsoft's killer People feature

Adair

If this could be...

developed into something efficient and sensible, so that Outlook could finally be taken out the back and shot, I would be eternally* grateful.

* where "eternally"="employed_hours"

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LinkedIn, eBay founders and pals kick in $27m to bring Jesus to AI bots

Adair

'Myth'

Popular definition of 'myth': a non-factual 'fairytale' dreamt up to plug a gap in factual knowledge.

Technical definition of 'myth': a story (may be/may not be based on actual events) used to communicate shared understandings about aspects of life (may or may not be factual)

In practice many religious 'myths' were never intended to be taken as factual/historic accounts, but are much more like verbal stained glass---a means of communicating ideas/understandings/truths across the generations (especially in societies without a written language).

So, whether something 'actually' happened, or happened in just the way that the 'myth' tells it is often not very important, certainly not the primary function of the myth. It's all about what it means. Some times what a myth means is basically rubbish, or no longer relevant, but in other cases what the myth means is getting to grips with essential aspects of life: peace, justice, forgiveness, love, etc.

But, always, it's the responsibility of the hearer(reader) as to how they understand the myth, why they choose that understanding, and what they do with it in practice.

1
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Hapless scouser scours streets for lost Crimble drone

Adair
Devil

LOSER!

It just had to be said.

0
1

90 per cent of the UK's NHS is STILL relying on Windows XP

Adair

Re: Maybe they should consider going over to Linux?

@timul20 - But that is really my point: the NHS has always been shambling bureaucratic 'Frankenstein's monster'; a cobbled together collection of institutions and services all operating under the politically useful collective known as 'NHS'.

The dependence on bought in services, without any overall long term planning or structure, is symptomatic of that approach.Down the line, we are all reaping the consequences.

Hindsight is a wonderful thing, of course, but so also would be politicians who know when to engage, enable, and sustain people who genuinely have a clue. But in the 'real world' that hardly ever happens.

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Adair

Re: Maybe they should consider going over to Linux?

@Kubla Cant

That's only one of many possibilities compatible with <REAL_WORLD>, and not so very different to the one that has actually occurred.

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Adair

Re: Maybe they should consider going over to Linux?

@itzman

Just a point of economic reality. if an institution as large as the NHS, with a commensurate budget, chose to use OS 'Z', there would be no shortage of vendors only too willing to write drivers, etc. for their equipment to run on OS 'Z'.

It's all about the money, these people are not in the game for the good of their health, or anybody else's for that matter. And even the few that are focussed on putting human wellbeing ahead of profit, would still happily supply OS 'Z' compatible equipment for an institution the size of the NHS.

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Adair

Re: Maybe they should consider going over to Linux?

@Daniel von Asmuth

Linux is not Windows - I think you misunderstand how it works.

For a start: Slackware, Debian, Red Hat all started in1993 (23 years). The thing is, if you are serious about running a serious long term computing platform across a massive and diverse institutional environment, you are serious about taking the source, and setting it up for your own use, and maintaining it.

If the NHS had sat down, formed an OS development team, taken a base Linux distro, and gone on to build their own bespoke system on top of it they could by now be sitting on a highly developed, relatively very secure and stable OS that they would be in control of and that would offer a common platform for the whole NHS to work with.

Unfortunately that kind of foresight and organisation was not deployed, so we are where we are.

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Adair

Re: 'up'grading is overrated

@JamesPond - given the level of 'IT expertise' available to the average NHS staff member the particular OS they are using could hardly be less relevant.

In my experience the vast majority of people only care about the actual software package they use; in the sense of 'care' meaning: are the buttons in the same place today, that they were yesterday, and do they do the things I expect them to do?

Interaction with the system outside of that very limited scope is practically non-existent for most users, i.e. they have no idea at all how a computer works, and they don't care. All they want to do is get their job done.

This is why so may folks find change in IT even more terrifying than other kinds of change---a computer might as well be a magic box as far as they are concerned.

So, changing the OS? No big deal at all, the pain of change will be the same as if you changed the only software package they use day in day out.

We've just had a whole lot of IT application and OS changes in our Trust. The screams could probably be heard from the Moon. That was six months ago. Today? It's the new normal, not even a whimper (well maybe, but only a whimper).

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Adair

The Linux option...

Probably a good idea, but one that would require actual planning and organisation.

'NHS-Linux' - their own spin, continually developed, tested, distributed, and under their control. How it might have been done, and done well, but it wasn't.

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Kids' Hour of Code turns into a giant corporate infomercial for kids

Adair

Re: Minecraft as a way to force Win 10 in education

Just use Minetest -- www.minetest.net

Problem of MS solved.

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Facebook Fake News won it for Trump? That's a Zombie theory

Adair

Why bother with Facebook anyway?

Even my children (all in their 20s) have given up. Tumbleweeds roll through their pages, which they retain simply to keep up with one or two real, but distant, friends who insist on persevering with the disgusting suck. Entangled tumbleweeds are the only things that have ever had the misfortune to inhabit my own page, which, now that my progeny have essentially moved on, has no reason for existing.

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Microsoft just got its Linux Foundation platinum card, becomes top level member

Adair

The Linux Foundation - it's done!

Somebody, stick a fork in it.

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Let's praise Surface, not bury it

Adair

'You're looking at the market wrong' [fixed]

[overcoming shoddy educational practice one post at a time: 'your' is a possessive pronoun; 'you're' is a contraction of 'you are' -- completely different meanings]

:-)

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Microsoft goes back to the drawing board – literally, with 28" tablet and hockey puck knob

Adair

Re: The silver hockey puck works on and off the screen.

@Mage - I'm with Mage on this. Their critics come across as Millennials who are used to having everything handed to them on a plate.

Surely the whole point of GENERAL PURPOSE COMPUTING is that it is, well, you know: general purpose; in other words you are free to do what you like, rather than only what someone else thinks is good for you (which usually translates as: what they think will be good for their bank balance).

Inch by bleeding inch Microsoft is dragging it's OS and associated application echo system away from that hairy jungle of user freedom (relatively speaking) into that nice safe walled garden where the user's data and money are kept warm and dry and heading in the right direction.

Shiny is as shiny does: distracts from what is really going on.

One day Microsoft will be history. That day is still a long way off. When it comes there will be a new MS to take its place. The question is: how many people will actually notice or care. Too many today seem absorbed in their latest shiny and have no idea, or just don't care, about what is happening around them.

Oh, brave new world, that has such people in it.

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Who killed Cyanogen?

Adair

Re: "try to leverage its market power"

Yep, 'use' covers that pretty well, as in: "I feel used!". ;-)

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