* Posts by John Stirling

192 posts • joined 29 Mar 2007

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Germany tells America to verpissen off over Huawei 5G cyber-Sicherheitsbedenken

John Stirling

Re: How about Apple's apparent deflation? The surgence of "cloud"?

Derivatives do not confer voting rights - therefore are not ownership.

They are a speculative bet on the movement in the price, and are specifically not able to confer control.

If they are 'physical' derivatives (i.e. backed by borrowed shares) then they may influence the share price when the derivative matures if it requires someone to acquire real shares to meet a promise. This can be funny to watch when a short trader gets it wrong.

Bad news for WannaCry slayer Marcus Hutchins: Judge rules being young, hungover, and in a strange land doesn't obviate evidence

John Stirling

Re: Why in the name of god...

As a liberal minded chap - I'm with you. Which is a bit of an odd position to be - but you appear rather less reactionary than my liberal colleague who reacted so strongly.

The algorithms! They're manipulating all of us! reckon human rights bods Council of Europe

John Stirling

The reason this stuff works....

...is because despite THIS forum being a hotbed of high IQ analytical individuals, the main thrust of debate has been to attack the points made by others.

Instead of

Gov says private companies bad...

...no but private companies worse.

The stream SHOULD be

Gov says private companies bad...

...yes, and Gov not great either - how do we legislate to ensure we are not all manipulated into meaningless factionalism by a few well placed sock puppets.

Hmmm.....

British cops told to scrap 'discriminatory' algorithms in policing

John Stirling

Predictive policing has the ability to be great if....

Sadly it is true that certain sectors of society are more likely to be sucked into crime, and especially gang crime. Typically young men from lower income households with lower educational attainment, and lower levels of aspiration.

The issue here is that instead of looking at 'young men who are poor, not doing well at school, and don't see a good future' (which is really difficult to profile) the algorithms take the easy way out and do a match with 'young black or muslim men'.

There is nothing inherently less aspirational, educational, or attaining about any particular genetic inheritance - but there may be about certain cultural groups, and how those groups have integrated (or failed to integrate) into UK society. Algorithms have a distressing tendency to jump on the back of easily identitfiable statistical factors, which may 'work', but which will exacerbate the underlying issues by objectifying and victimising groups which have already experienced significant negative bias.

Sadly unless society (or its proxy, Government) makes a concerted (for which you can read 'expensive') effort to actually address the underlying issues the problems will continue.

A rather interesting study into educational attainment in I think South America showed 10% better education, incomes and attainment now in communities clustered around the sites of educational religious missions 200 years ago. No such positive affect existed around doctrinal religious missions. These affects are long term, and persist long past the original causes, unless positive action is taken to correct problems.

Predictive policing is coming, and it will reduce crime, but it is the challenge for society to ensure it doesn't do so by making it even harder for those who are suffering under current systems to improve their position in society.

Furious Apple revokes Facebook's enty app cert after Zuck's crew abused it to slurp private data

John Stirling

Re: But but - Apple protects our privacy!

Never owned an Apple product, probably never will. Don't like the smug Cupertino bastards at all. I do on the other hand quite like Google stuff, and I don't have a social media presence at all to speak of.

There - affiliations admitted; Apple did the right thing, exactly, and in a timely way. Google possibly did the right thing by pulling their version after getting fingered for doing the wrong thing - but hopefully at least without the breach of license terms that makes this Facebook crime so egregious. Facebook did the wrong thing, repeatedly and persistently.

Facebook need to be prosecuted severely, with a European GDPR style 4% of global turnover fine.

If I'm wrong about Google and they used a dev cert, then they need to be prosecuted on the same terms.

If you wanna learn from the IT security blunders committed by hacked hospital group, here's some weekend reading

John Stirling

Re: show me the money

If management say 'no' then they become the ones where the liability sits personally. That is the beauty of GDPR

The fur is not gonna fly: Uncle Sam charges seven Russians with Fancy Bear hack sprees

John Stirling

Re: Same guys?

I would imagine your compatriots did indeed roll on the floor laughing Ivan.

I can fix your basic thesis though;

The <insert any serious nation state here> are wicked, powerful and adept, but also sloppy, stupid and incompetent.

Seems pretty self evidently true to me.

A basement of broken kit, zero budget – now get the team running

John Stirling

Re: I concur

I see the 'report abuse' button, but where is the 'report self abuse' button when you need it?

Nokia: Oops, financials aren't great. Never mind, 5G will solve our woes

John Stirling

So the cash reduction matches the dividend, so it didn't burn cash, and made an accounting profit..

I.e. Is currently sustainable

That's quite an achievement considering where they've come from recently.

Great news, cask beer fans: UK shortage of CO2 menaces fizzy crap taking up tap space

John Stirling

Re: Bravo madam!

A proper conservative government would stick to asking shareholders their friends sponsors in the City

FTFY

Could we please move on from childish tribal stereotyping.

A proper government of whatever philosophical persuasion will act as best they can to deal with the very complex problems they face on a daily basis for the benefit of their electorate.

If we the electorate had slightly higher standards with regard to the honesty of our politicians they would be more honest.

Doesn't matter if you like it, the 'free' (hah) market drives our choice of politician as much as it does markets.

Corruption and dishonesty are inputs into that process as much as anything else and as long as we (political) consumers continue to purchase what is peddled we'll continue to get it.

There are occasional attempts at grown up honest government from the fringes, but they rarely get far.

Europe dumps 300,000 UK-owned .EU domains into the Brexit bin

John Stirling

Leave/Remain rinse repeat.

I voted remain, because I felt that the second world war was a bad thing, and Europe doesn't have a great track record of not starting wars over any 50 year period in non politically contiguous geopolitical entities (we have definitely been part of Europe in that respect). I suspect our exit will indeed doom the EU as suggested by many exit voters, and I suspect that will lead to adventurous activities in Europe which will be very unpleasant. I sincerely hope I'm utterly wrong.

I respect the exit voters who voted as they did for morally defensible, and aspirational reasons, even though I believe their hopes are trumped by not dying in our (our being the human species) millions. I respect the remain voters who believe in the EU as a flawed but ultimately worthwhile entity.

I really don't respect the invective or pejorative comments which simply seem to suggest to me that my concerns about how people react to one another when not bound together by common goals are valid.

This nonsense about EU domains seems pretty small beer which will be sorted in one of several ways, probably including an extended transitional period for those where it is an issue, but who for some reason cannot use an EU geographically located registrar. It seems a simple fix - and it is only that most people will ignore it until their website stops working that makes it even marginally inconvenient.

Sysadmin left finger on power button for an hour to avert SAP outage

John Stirling

@automatic power on

...I've taken to the simple expedient of not connecting any of the buttons on the case, setting the machine to start when the power comes on. The big switch for the power bar is much less sensitive to cat induced failures....

I used to do that, until the local power company decided to have an outage, which came back on 1 minute and 45 seconds later, and then went off again at the 2 minute mark, before repeating. For 26 hours over the weekend.

Which taught me a couple of things;

1) think hard before enabling auto on after power outage;

2) always use UPS on anything you care about.

3) Fridges also benefit from UPS.

Surprisingly a large percentage of the dozen of so PCs survived that little incident, although a number did not - and the Fridge needed a new motherboard!

Oi! Verizon leaked my fiancée's nude pix to her ex-coworker, says bloke

John Stirling

Re: Four million dollars?

I'm generally against big law suits, but on this occasion I disagree with you, and agree with the plaintiff.

In US terms $4m sounds ridiculously proportionate - in that actually the crime is a) technical error, and then b) saying bollocks to you unless you get a big lawyer.

If the issue is genuine then I sincerely hope Verizon get a seriously bloody nose in public for being complete arseholes.

Here we go again... UK Prime Minister urges nerds to come up with magic crypto backdoors

John Stirling

Re: The crux of it.

An excellent example, as it shows not only the essential futility, but also how much damage it does - once the young toe rag grows up enough to start abiding the law they are effectively excluded from meaningful interaction with society, and thus less likely to ever contribute to that society.

Intel’s Meltdown fix freaked out some Broadwells, Haswells

John Stirling

Re: Hmm.

Since putting the latest MS patches on my (Sandy Bridge based) PC, I've had two unexplained crashes...

...good news! They're not unexplained anymore...

FCA 'gold-plates' EU rule, hits BYOD across entire UK finance sector

John Stirling

Re: Not sure FCA rules say what you think

Small IFA firms can be mifid exempt. Many of the rules still apply, but call recording is replaced with 'detailed notes of relevant conversations'.

John Stirling

Re: Blocking WhatsApp, FaceTime, iMessage etc...

This is largely customer protection. If 'sleazebag drone rings up potential investor and lies through their teeth, it is recorded and (hopefully) things can be done. If they have to call from the payphone the victim (or mark or target or conspirator take your pick) has a greater chance of thinking "hang on, this is odd."

Nothing is perfect, evil people will circumvent any control. The idea is just to make it a bit harder each time...'

The problem with this is that actually the sleaze bags carry on, as the incentive is still sufficient to encourage them, and the disincentive of making it a bit more difficult is not sufficient to dissuade them.

The cumulative cost of regulation now exceeds the cost of fraud before regulation existed.

It is not possible to go back to the 'wild times', nor would one want to, but regulation does need a root and branch rethink about how to actually inconvenience the bad guys enough to make 'bad stuff' uneconomic without stopping legitimate activity completely.

Whois? No, Whowas: Incoming Euro privacy rules torpedo domain registration system

John Stirling

Trouble both ways

Whilst whois is not a necessary part of dns, attribution is a necessary part of freedom of speech. If I'm a local business called xxxx then having someone register xxxxareabunchofcocks.com is a nuisance, and with having no register of ownership I have to prove criminal infringement rather than merely damages (a civil matter) to get the name of the tosser who's trying to defame me.

Without a name then I have no hope beyond the oh so marvellous, timely, and effective dispute resolution rules which will utterly fail me unless I'm a) a huge lawyered up entity, or b) able to show I should actually take control of xxxareabunchofcocks.com, which I won't be able to do since it isn't passing itself off as me.

So I understand the privacy thing, but it shouldn't provide a right to complete civil anonymity without recourse.

Panic of Panama Papers-style revelations follows Bermuda law firm hack

John Stirling

There is a big difference between 'illegal' and 'subject to challenge'

Rich folk often do things which their lawyers tell them are legal, but not to tell HMRC (for UK residents) as HMRC may take a different view.

Make no mistake this will result in a flurry of activity unless the breach is seriously limited.

Whilst I'm not sure I'd set the bar at 'politically embarrassing' as Lee D does, there is a good point that if you're not prepared to justify your behaviour to the relevant authority (which may be the court of public opinion) think hard before acting, as we now live in a world where if you're high profile it's probably going to be public knowledge eventually.

This and other leaks like it may change the 'rich and powerful' to become slightly less psychopathic, which will be no bad thing.

Please replace the sword, says owner of now-hollow stone

John Stirling

Re: Easy

I don't know, this one sounds like it may have been cursed, thoroughly rusty, and possibly even corroded.

Not sure I'd want to #wield it without a ready source of fountains near by.

SanDisk man tipped off his family to Fusion-io fusion, bagged $220k in share snatch – says SEC

John Stirling

desperation

It is astounding what people do when they are desperate.

Manager tells his wife, for no other reason than because she is his wife. She tells her family, they pressure back to buy stock which he either knows about or doesn't. Everyone goes to prison.

It's a timeless classic.

Or he's a complete idiot.

'Dear diversity hire...' Amazon's weapons-grade fail in recruitment email to woman techie

John Stirling

Improve gdp?

OK, I'll bite.

Increasing representation is a good thing. Being diverse enough to represent a fair microcosm of society is a good nice thing.

But how does that translate into half a trillion more cash?

Shock: Brit capital strips Uber of its taxi licence

John Stirling

I was going to write something clever and apropos regarding smoking as an analogy - but actually I can't be arsed. Brenda McViking you're talking complete shit.

This isn't keeping the gravy train going, it is addressing the shortcomings of one of the new operators. The monopoly you speak of is dying, and has been for 30 years - it'll be a while yet, but its final dissolution is probably inevitable.

Uber's basic principle is great - use the internet to make personalised transport easy and more cost effective.

Their detailed business model of 'and damn everything else' is not acceptable, and needs to change.

Since the regulators only have one recourse, they are using it. I am sure that they will do a deal in court announce the win, and then hopefully obey the law. After all the actual rules they have been told to follow really are not that onerous.

Alternatively (and I'm all in favour of this) get Parliament to make the board personally responsible for the crimes of their contractors or employees where they cannot show that they took sufficient steps to ensure such crimes did not happen - and get a proper extradition treaty in place so it can bite.

In fact personally I'd do that anyway for EVERY company with a balance sheet or turnover of more than say £100m.

Make them earn their salaries for once.

Stand up who HASN'T been hit in the Equifax mega-hack – whoa, whoa, sit down everyone

John Stirling

Re: Only

An interesting data point. How many execs hold stock? If it's a dozen then these three are dirty. If it's 2,000 then they are likely random noise.

Oracle 'systematically denies' its sales reps their commissions, forces them to work to pay off 'debts', court told

John Stirling

Re: Sales is hard

I see the joke icon, but as one of those thar sales people who has at times also been a software architect, and engineer (essentially an engineer who can communicate) I'll bite.

The problem with no sales is no progress.

No one will buy the new unproven thing as no one will be pushing it, or leveraging their personal contacts to persuade people to try it.

Which means incumbent monopolies.

Countries without entrepreneurial sales led cultures (as a species we have experimented with this a fair bit) get left behind surprisingly fast.

Sometimes the military keeps up for a bit, but so far as a system it has failed to deliver progress.

Start a new business and you'll discover that the one important department is sales, which I learned by being in involved with an awesome startup that didn't have a sales department, and floundered until the Ceo stopped making the product better and started selling it.

Hacker dishes advanced phishing kit to hook clever staff in 10 mins

John Stirling

Re: WTF?

What you are missing is that corporates pay the hackers to penetrative their networks, so it isn't a crime

Look who's joined the anti-encryption posse: Germany, come on down

John Stirling

and in other news....

...european Governments have decided that gravity can no longer be allowed to influence their legal operations and are going to pass a law that allows duly authorised Government agencies to disregard gravity, and float around at will.

Gutted: 6.6M cleartext creds, dox, breached in ClixSense site hack

John Stirling

Oh for heavens sake...

Massively upgraded security. There is now a clear instruction to press windows-L when they go to the loo.

BEELION-dollar lasso snaps, NASA mapper blind in one eye

John Stirling

Re: And this is why Science is a waste of money

@And this is why Science is a waste of money

By the same argument, so is medicine.

'This ruling does nothing to change the facts' thunders Apple in latest price-fix appeal blow

John Stirling

That's not distortion, it's sophistry.

Apple did nothing to conspire - they joined in an existing conspiracy.

A ruling cannot change facts, it rules on what they were, and how they interact with the law, but clearly doesn't change them.

Good lawyers those Apple folk

WikiLeaks offers $100k for copies of the Trans-Pacific Partnership – big biz's secret govt pact

John Stirling

Why is there an AC trying to derail the comments?

Until I read his 'freeow' comments I was a bit cynical about the story, but once some arse tries to rubbish a stance it's worth inspecting, and like wow, but not freeow.

Go check this out. AC if your moronic asides were intended as a double bluff to get the tech world interested then I suspect you're a genius. Otherwise, not so much

Improved Apple Watches won't get more expensive? Hmmm

John Stirling

@just a thought

There are a surprisingly large number of 'inflation' indices.

http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/taxonomy/search/index.html?newquery=*&newoffset=&pageSize=100&nscl=Price+Indices+and+Inflation&nscl-orig=Price+Indices+and+Inflation&content-type=Reference+table&content-type=Dataset&sortBy=pubdate&sortDirection=DESCENDING&applyFilters=true

Have a rustle around I expect you can find one which suits your needs.

Beardie Branson backs Blockchain's Bitcoin bandwagon

John Stirling

Dish, a fad?

I always use Dish as the benchmark. When they first introduced PoS electronic payments I knew my Barclaycard was here to stay. Likewise when they started using the internet, that's when I gave in and got tubes connected to my house.

When Dish has flying cars I'll know the future has arrived. Until then it's a fad.

Researchers: Trolls have dark tetrad of personality defects

John Stirling

@Harry wertz 1

You seem to have missed criticising the religion/evolution argument and the star trek/wars dispute.

Good illustration of zanshin's point though

ONE EMAIL costs mining company $300 MEEELION

John Stirling

Losses

The only people who lost will be those who sold while the price was depressed. Anyone who bought while cheap made money. Anyone who didn't trade while the price was adrift didn't make or lose anything regardles of their position.

If it was accepted that his motivation was not market manipulation then really this was not the right conviction. Libel perhaps, but not market manipulation. It is a dangerous precedent since it could be uaed to prosecute protesters who successfully impact a corporation through their legitimate protests.

German server lockbox scores MEELLION dollar seed-smashing record

John Stirling

Re: 100 millibits/sec?

I've seen a dead draytek. My old (and much loved) 2950 died one monday morning recently. Had to drive to draytek uk to get a 2960. Took 30 mins to configure. Love it.

My home 2860 is perhaps a *little* over specced for it's purpose but replaced the dead 2800 beautifully.

Doesn't matter how good they are, everything dies in the end.

Don't crack that Mac: Almost NOTHING in new Retina MacBook Pros can be replaced

John Stirling

Re: This is England?

Uh, no.

EU wide two year warranty bought in following the 1999 directive gives two years. Scotland gives 5 years, England gives 6. The latter two coming from the Sale of Goods Act 1979, and the Supply of Goods & Services Act 1982.

The crappy EU extension is occasionally used by shops and manufacturers to wriggle out of their legal obligations when people don't know their rights, but I'm afraid you are wrong. England is indeed the consumer rights capital of the world. In that one incredibly narrow respect anyway. Even better than GB, UK or EU.

I have no clue about the Welsh, or Irish.

That isn't a comment about consumer protection by the way, just a broad statement.

US indicts Brit bloke over backdoor blagging of US troops' data

John Stirling

hyperbole much.....

Obviously we'll never know the detail, but the last arse who thought it was ok to hack the pentagon looking for flying saucers apparently walked in through an open door - I assume the 'millions of dollars in damages' that he caused was mainly putting a password on the system.

There is often lots of noise and heat because the incompetent who committed the crime (and if guilty it is a crime, make no mistake - he is 28, not 12, and he is accused of inserting code to steal real data, he didn't just go looking for flying saucers) embarrassed them. If you embarrass the Government (pretty much any Government) expect pain. It isn't justice, it's revenge. Well sometimes it's both.

Personally I'd prefer it if the US lived up to the one thing they did create which is a) fucking awesome, and b) pretty much all their own work (unlike all that technology that they are claiming in posts further up this page) which is the US constitution. It is a shame that most Americans cannot see how their Government is undermining their own rights, by attacking ours with secret illegal hacking, but vitriol and anti Americanism won't fix that. (Electing politicians who are honest would be a good start, but that appears to be something of an oxymoron)

I'd rather we had a system where the evidence had to be presented to a British court, but that isn't the USA's fault, but rather our own idiotic professional politicians. But do I have sympathy for the modern day 'Robin Hood'? Not as the story is presented, sounds like an arse.

In fact, to use an Americanism - a dumbass.

Behold, the MONSTER-CLAWED critter and its terrifying SPIDER BRAIN

John Stirling

convergent evolution

different phylum, bigger, and more importantly, exists now!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F5FEj9U-CJM

makes your 'giant claw' thing look like... well lunch.

Deep Impact succumbs to 'HAL bug' as glitch messes with antenna

John Stirling

Re: It was a Y2K problem ..

It probably already has a few more bytes than 'required' which is why it was going 7 years after the planned end date. If you 'just add one more byte' to every situation that might require it you end up with a satellite too heavy to launch.

And with the capability (apologies for mixing my satellites and fictional universes) of becoming V'Ger, if you ever get it off the ground.

Apple can't dump Samsung, it needs those iPad displays – report

John Stirling

Re: Competition

Samsung may have an 'internal market' like BT - but it is more likely they are vertically integrated - i.e. although there is an internal price that goes into the calculations of the end product price, there is no formal legal transaction separating the screen manufacture from the tablet/phone manufacture and sale.

BT only had formal separation imposed because they were a privatised national monopoly who were abusing their monopoly once privatised.

Ultimately you have to rent the copper from BT - unless you want to run your own (virgin media) - but no-one has to buy Samsung screens.

Go ahead, Asia, have a look in your Dropbox... We DARE you - hackers

John Stirling

@murph

maybe they think you're a world leader?

that's cool right?

D-Wave IS QUANTUM, insist USC scientists

John Stirling

to address the chap worried about the average intelligence of commentards...

...But does it run Far Cry?

Wikileaks leaks documentary script about Wikileaks

John Stirling

I'm interested to see. ..

...that one person being an ass has sufficiently destroyed good will that the consensus on here (a generally liberal rational forum) is that whistle blowing is bad and governments should keep whatever secrets they like.

after all if wiki leaks had taught us anything it is that authority can be trusted. ..

Apple asked me for my BANK statements, says outraged reader

John Stirling
FAIL

colour scans?

I believe it is a breach of crown copyright to make colour copies of a passport. Apple encouraging copyright theft. sounds like a headline to me.

UK.gov blows a fuse at smart meter stall, sets new 2020 deadline

John Stirling
Mushroom

@ hardened?

About as well as my pc. My TV. My laptop. My fridge. My phone. Please don't use emp as an anti smart meter campaign device. I liked the 20th century. I like the 21st century. I don't want to live in the 19th century. Even without smart meters.

Not so much a sledgehammer as a steam roller to crack a nut.

NTT Docomo leads 5G push with 10Gbps uplink tests

John Stirling

Re: Fantastic

You are entirely correct - these fast data services are just a clever ruse. I have refused to use any phone capable of more than GPRS - everything else is just a clever ploy to confuse me. 114 Kbps should be (more than) enough for anybody. I'm still using 14.4 at home, and that allows me to surf almost without restriction. Of course I do have to stop the browser downloading anything except text, but really what advances have there been in the last 15 years which don't simple detract from a good 'all your bases are belong to us' meme?

Apple seeks whopping $2.525bn Samsung patent payout

John Stirling

Re: "They did not invent."

and yet it is the rounded corners which are worth $22 dollars per machine.

Since we agree that the rounded corners are not special we must therefore agree that the litigation is largely (in financial terms) baseless, and that the company pursuing baseless litigation is therefore being 'bad', and is nothing special.

Then we can subsequently agree that they should get out of the courtroom, and get back to marketing products peerlessly.

Glad we're all in agreement

John Stirling

Re: bloody ridiculous...

Apple did well with the iphone for two reasons, 1) it was an Apple product, and they have seriously loyal (to the point of irrational) customers - how lucky are they?, and 2) the technology had reached the point where it worked. There were many smart phones previously, I owned some of them, reasonably large screens (but not as big, or hi res, as they weren't practical), reasonably functional (but not as functional), and a bit heavier.

The iphone was a fairly obvious improvement in terms of hardware and design tailored to a tightly designed, and highly quality assured user interface - which now looks rather dated, but at the time was revolutionary - but let us remember, it was the software that made it an iphone not the hardware.

John Stirling
FAIL

Re: "They did not invent."

Hmm, methinks you don't understand the difference between 'design' and 'function'. I will grant you that the function is different, but the opprobrium being heaped upon Apple isn't about function it is about design - specifically rectangular with rounded corners.

The thing could be used to make toast for all it matters in terms of function, it is a rectangular tablet with rounded corners, that is the intellectual 'property' Apple sought to protect, and that is the IP that they clearly did NOT invent.

whether they are due the pennies for the function around fumble fingers, I don't know, maybe, but they can sod off for the design.

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