* Posts by Yes Me

704 posts • joined 11 Jan 2008

Page:

Julian Assange wins at hide-and-seek game against Sweden

Yes Me
Bronze badge
Holmes

@Adrian 4

How do you know it was "an offence that hadn't occurred"? If you weren't in the room, only the woman and the man concerned know the truth. And the man declined to explain himself to the prosecutor.

5
1

IBM CEO Ginni flouts £75 travel crackdown, rides Big Blue chopper

Yes Me
Bronze badge
Unhappy

Old guard?

Ginni isn't old guard and that's a lot of the problem with her. She seems to have forgotten that a technology company needs, er, technologists as well as salespeople, marketroids and accountants. And that technologists hired by the square metre in low-salary countries aren't actually any good. Executing to plan is the mantra, but it doesn't work if your technologists are incompetent and the plan relates to some historical business scenario that no longer exists.

14
0

We're calling it now: FCC votes 2-1 to rip up net neutrality on Thurs

Yes Me
Bronze badge
IT Angle

Re: (unsurprising)

> "Internet is owned by the U.S.? What the hell was the point of Brexit, then?"

> Good point. However, the people who voted for Brexit weren't the ones who use the internet much.

Well, no, bad point. Firstly the Brexit vote didn't actually have much of an IT angle; it was just a bunch of people believing lies and fantasies. I dare say some of them also believed the fantasy that the Internet was invented by an Englishman, too. But secondly, that's a cheap shot, lots of OAPs use the Internet.

But on the point, let's focus on the good news: at least the FCC have now made it clear that fair treatment of Internet users in the US is a fair trade issue, which it always has been. Whether the FTC can fix it under a Republican congress is another question, but the real debate can actually start now.

3
4

Months after it ordered a review into allegations of mismanagement, how's that ICANN accountability drive?

Yes Me
Bronze badge
Unhappy

Re: Sue the bastards

What you're overlooking is that many registrars seeking new TLDs (and I am not mentioning any specific registrars, for good reason) are themselves either moneygrubbing bastards already or wannabes. No new TLDs are actually necessary, so all of this carry-on is just an attempt to extract monopoly rents from thin air. Sue, counter-sue, whatever, it's only the lawyers and banks who win in the end. I hope everybody comes to their senses soon, but I'm not optimistic.

1
0

IBM: Remote working is great! ... For everyone except us

Yes Me
Bronze badge
WTF?

beautiful buildings

There always used to be rumours of people lost for ever in the corridors of the Somers pyramids.

1
0
Yes Me
Bronze badge

Re: Looks right to me

"And HPE seems to be benefiting most from management stumbling at IBM."

Bit of a shame, since it used to be the other way round.

1
0

Regulate This! Time to subject algorithms to our laws

Yes Me
Bronze badge
Headmaster

I am not a lawyer but...

Re: "If the process is illegal, that's hardly the fault of the programmers is it?"

The computer's defence is clear: it was only obeying orders. The programmer's defence is less clear. If she was obeying orders but by doing so told the computer to break the law, the defence that she was only obeying orders or that she was ignorant of the law doesn't hold water. She's as guilty as her boss.

In any case, the idea of regulating algorithms is a nonsense. Blame the humans, not the machines.

1
0

'Tech troll' sues EFF to silence 'Stupid Patent of the Month' blog. Now the EFF sues back

Yes Me
Bronze badge

Re: EFF Lawyers are EFF'n Stupid

@-tim : Thanks for the specific example. I'm pretty sure I saw countdown timers in process control GUIs as early as 1980-85, too. My military reference was speculative, but I can't imagine that SAGE (the original Cold War early warning system) didn't display a countdown on the screen as bombers approached, in the 1960s. Oh, and NASA, surely?

2
0
Yes Me
Bronze badge
Holmes

Re: EFF Lawyers are EFF'n Stupid

Um, you don't need to be a patent lawyer to know that a patent is stupid. And the EFF has plenty of legal advice, both on patent claims and on First Amendment rights. Agreed, decoding the real meaning of the claims in a patent is a specialised job, but there are hundreds (probably thousands) of people who would gladly help the EFF pro bono for something as egregious as this.

Let's look at just one of the 39 claims for this GUI:

27. A graphic user interface as in claim 18, further comprising a timer window for graphically illustrating a countdown from a modifiable pre-specified number to “0”
Wow! A window with a counter, counting down! In 1999! Probably 15 years after such a thing first appeared in civilian systems and 30 years after the military had it. I suspect that all the claims were equally unoriginal, covered by prior art, and obvious to one skilled in the art, even in 1999.

46
1
Yes Me
Bronze badge

re: fighting the ruling in Australia

Wrong. They're doing exactly the right thing by fighting the claim that an Australian ruling has any validity in the US - that is much more to the point than butting heads with a foolish and misinformed judge in a minor country like Australia. (Sorry, but there it is, and I live in an even more minor country.)

11
4

Ex-IBMer sues Google for $10bn – after his web ad for 'divine honey cancer cure' was pulled

Yes Me
Bronze badge

many people report positive outcomes...

... which are known to be the result of the placebo effect. Nothing wrong with that in itself, but the danger is people refusing real treatment because of magical beliefs.

5
0
Yes Me
Bronze badge

honey over homeopathy

Honey tastes nicer than extremely pure water, but you might as well buy your honey at the supermarket (and not waste your money on manuka honey, either). I'm sure an oncologist would say the same, while recommending the best treatment for your case.

6
0
Yes Me
Bronze badge
Angel

freespeech

"maybe someone will suggest google are impedeing the mountebank's freespeech?"

He is asserting that. But they're not; he can stand on a soap box anywhere he wants and shout about his scam.

I guess it must have been working for IBM that triggered him to forget his ethics and start selling nonsensical products?

5
0

Huawei faces UK sales ban if it doesn't cough up 4G patent tithes

Yes Me
Bronze badge
Unhappy

Re: If Huawei agreed an payment plan with Ericson

"Purchasing a patent that is already in force and being paid for is simply a matter of buying an asset. "

Humbug. Patents were originally intended to benefit and encourage inventors, but today that intention has been distorted into a welfare scheme for large companies. I bet the original inventors of these patents got a one-time bonus of €1000 or so. Now some company that had nothing to do with the invention at all will get free money from (indirectly) Huawei's customers. One of the real downsides of modern capitalism.

1
1

'No deal better than bad deal' approach to Brexit 'unsubstantiated'

Yes Me
Bronze badge

Re: "48% < 52% less than half in a democratic "

Exactly. Screw the country for 50 years for short-term party political advantage. Worst political misbehaviour since 1956 (Suez).

9
0

I need an ISP that offers IPv6. Virgin Media: Whatevs, nerd

Yes Me
Bronze badge

Re: need? really?

"I would think ISPs will deploy carrier grade NAT before they deploy IPv6 to the end user, "

You're behind reality. The ISPs that deployed CGN a few years ago are trying hard to put in solutions that cost them less money and less help desk grief. The favoured approach now is native IPv6 to the customer equipment plus 464XLAT to carry legacy IPv4 traffic over the native IPv6.

- coming to you from the IETF v6operations meeting currently in progress in Chicago

1
0

Brit firm lands £58m EU spy drone 'copter contract

Yes Me
Bronze badge
Headmaster

Despite what?

"Despite BREXIT"? If you haven't noticed, it hasn't happened. Unless very very recently, Dictatrix Maybe hasn't even handed in the UK's notice yet. There's no reason companies wouldn't win contracts for now; in fact under EU rules they probably must win them if they submit the cheapest valid bid. The collapse of the economy doesn't start until we actually leave, for which even Maybe has been very careful not to set a date.

6
2

Sir Tim Berners-Lee refuses to be King Canute, approves DRM as Web standard

Yes Me
Bronze badge

Re: Any Restriction Placed on the Internet

"If it isn't EME, it'll be something else..."

Exactly. So it's better for it to be an open standard than something produced by a closed club or a single monopolist. Sad but true, so TimBL was right.

9
4

It's time for our annual checkup on the circus that is the Internet Governance Forum

Yes Me
Bronze badge
Happy

So much the better

"A request to discuss the long-asked-for reforms is blocked, delayed or otherwise dispensed with."

This is a problem? The longer the IGF fails to do anything, the better. It's been a useless talking shop since Day 1, and that is its value: it prevents inter-governmental interference with the Internet. (Government interference with the Internet inside each country is a different matter, and each country deals with it in its won way.)

0
0

Awkward. Investigatory Powers Act could prove hurdle to UK-EU Privacy Shield following Brexit

Yes Me
Bronze badge
Unhappy

if only

"...she would undoubtedly have to resign as PM. It's not going to happen."

What very bad news.

1
0

One IP address, multiple SSL sites? Beating the great IPv4 squeeze

Yes Me
Bronze badge

Re: Wrong.

"it was actually DHCP they wanted an alternative to."

Historically, not. DHCP wasn't even there when IPv6 autoconfiguration was invented, modelled on Novell Netware IPX. DHVPv6 was an add-on some years later, after DHCPv4 saved IPv4 from configuration collapse.

(While I'm here, NAT44 wasn't there either, in terms of actual products, when IPv6 was invented. NAT44 saved IPv4 from an early grave, but *after* IPv6 was already designed.)

1
2
Yes Me
Bronze badge

NPTv6

Um, prefix translation is not the same as address translation. So some of the downsides of NAT44 don't apply - no issue with port sharing, since there's a full set of ports for each client. But there simply are no IPv6 scenarios that *need* translation; you firewall off the threats, so NPTv6 brings no benefits, only the downsides.

0
2
Yes Me
Bronze badge

SixxS

SixxS is a free service provided by volunteers. You get what you pay for. If you want to offer something to end users, you need a professionally supported tunnel, which won't be free.

1
1
Yes Me
Bronze badge
Happy

Real programmers *do* use IPv6

Yes, people who want to offer IPv6 service for the increasing number of IPv6 clients can just do it. Either (boring) use a tunnel provider or (exciting) use a CDN such as Cloudflare. No need for your own ISP to lift a finger.

Also, Trevor: a 2012 reference for IPv6 issues? The world has changed a number of times since then. However, I agree: any applications or web service provider needs to support IPv4-only users well into the future, as well as the growing IPv6 population.

I'm still puzzling about what https://nir.regmedia.co.uk at 2400:cb00:2048:1::104.25.78.107 has to do with anything. It's pingable.

0
1
Yes Me
Bronze badge

Re: Doesn't a proxy defeat the purpose?

Particularly, it's not a solution if you're also load balancing, since you can end up losing session persistence... making the affected user most unhappy.

0
3

Net neutrality? Bye bye, says American Pai

Yes Me
Bronze badge

Re: Wait a min...

Well yes. Local loop unbundling wasn't such a bad idea after all, was it?

0
0

NZ High Court rules US can extradite Kim Dotcom after all

Yes Me
Bronze badge

Re: What about the fraud?

That's the point, isn't it? He can't be extradited for the copyright offence, but he could be extradited on a fraud charge. That's a win for Kim since the original extradition request, warrent, police raid, etc were for a non-extraditable offence. So it seems he will now claim that the whole process started by that extradition request is null and void. The alleged fraud would need a whole new process.

0
1

UnBrex-pected move: Amazon raises UK workforce to 24,000

Yes Me
Bronze badge
Facepalm

Re: What's the Brexit angle?

The angle is that Brexit --wait for it-- hasn't happened yet. Most of these seem to be jobs that can easily be shed when the economy collapses a few years from now.

0
0

Global IPv4 address drought: Seriously, we're done now. We're done

Yes Me
Bronze badge

we all just start implementing it

Good luck - you will relive the last 20 years of IPv6 history

0
3
Yes Me
Bronze badge

some catchall proxy

Routers aren't the problem, they have supported v6 for years. Dual stack ISP backbones are common; tunnel providers will soon be only a memory. You're worrying about problems that were solved ten years ago. The gap today is hosting providers and the like - theregister.co.uk is a good bad example. https://nir.regmedia.co.uk is IPv6, BTW.

0
2
Yes Me
Bronze badge

... just add an extra octet

For the N'th time, that simply doesn't work.

IPv4 has no provision for any form whatever of address extension. Adding an extra byte, or an extra bit for that matter, will fail on every single IPv4-only computer, router, etc. There is, mathematically, logically, no way round a new version that is necessarily incompatible on the wire. That's why the *only physically possible solution* is a new packet format. That has a lot of implications, most of which are independent of the design details.

IPv6 just works, these days, as far as domestic, cell phone, or small offices are concerned. Yes, there's work to do for larger enterprise networks, hosting providers, and ISPs. No way out of that, but it's part of the price of doing business these days, or should be.

1
5

2009 IBM: Teleworking will save the WORLD! 2017 IBM: Get back to the office or else

Yes Me
Bronze badge
Paris Hilton

open plan

Don't overlook that IBM has gone hard into hot desking in those open plan offices. The last place I worked for them, if everbody showed up, there wouldn't have been nearly enough chairs. Remote working was sold to the management as a money-saver. I wonder how many new tables and chairs, and square metres, they will have to pay for? Or maybe "shoulder-to-shoulder" and "standing room only" are meant to be taken literally?

(Paris, because I feel sure the Hilton chain will benefit from this somehow.)

4
0

Third time lucky: ICANN beats off .africa ban

Yes Me
Bronze badge
Holmes

Logic?

...the logic that it is possible for the .africa name to be redelegated at a future date. While that is theoretically possible, it demonstrates almost no understanding of how the internet registry market functions.
No, I think it demonstrates that the judge doesn't care; if redelegation occurs, it would hand all the registry operator's customers and future revenue to the new one. That would be some future judge's problem.
There is literally nothing that the addition of the .africa name to the internet will do to expand Africans' access to the internet addresses; it is simply a word.
Exactly right, which is why all the new Latin script TLDs created by ICANN are sheer stupidity except, of course, for the shysters who skim off the registration fees.

0
0

Brought to you by UK.gov: 'Most ambitious programme of change of any government anywhere in the world'

Yes Me
Bronze badge
Flame

Re: 2027 Headline prediction

"British bureaucracy isn't going to make their lives any better than the European bureaucracy."

How dare you, sir? British Bureaucracy is the Best in the World. Better than anyone else at insisting on irrelevant details, duplicate information, pointless hoops to be jumped through repeatedly and - when on-line - at swallowing all input yet producing no output, except possibly a notice that your application for whatever it is will be dealt with in not more than seven hundred and twenty three working days. How could things possibly not be better than under the jackbooted heels of the EU?

1
0

Australia wants to jail infosec researchers for pointing out dodgy data

Yes Me
Bronze badge

Re: Fine idea - apply to all other research that doesn't meet the politicians' favor

"Anonymization is hard, which is why need more researches finding potential holes in the process."

Indeed, and there are many fine researchers outside Australia who will be glad to have a bit less competition now. It 's a hilarious example of jobsworths who, only 70 years after the invention of general purpose programmable information processors, and 50 years after the invention of packet switching networks, still don't understand the first thing about them.

0
0

Trump's cartoon comedy approach to running a country: 'One in, two out' rule for regulations

Yes Me
Bronze badge
Mushroom

When?

When's the impeachment hearing starting?

13
5

Wow, look out, hackers: Trump to order 60-day cybersecurity probe

Yes Me
Bronze badge

impunity

A bit of phish that I looked at recently traced back to hosts and companies in Samoa, Ukraine and Brazil, although the email address it forged was supposedly in the UK. It's pretty much to be expected that bad actors operate internationally, because it's the best way to obfuscate their true location and make investigation or prosecution difficult. And that's been the case for 30 years to my personal knowledge.

2
0

IBM old guard dropping like flies in POWER and cloud restructure

Yes Me
Bronze badge
Unhappy

Re: This month's rearranging of the deck chairs is complete!

Yes, one batch of know-nothings replaced by another. There was a time when IBM SVPs actually understood technology, not just MBA stuff. Funnily enough, the company had better products and services then, and they had customers.

2
0

Top UK judges rule: Government can't pull the Article 50 trigger alone

Yes Me
Bronze badge
Megaphone

All this case result did was confirm...

... the Bill of Rights, etc. etc. Good. But it doesn't change the outcome unless suffcient Tory and Labour MPs defy the whip and block the Article 50 bill in a few days. Hundreds of them know that this is the best thing for the country and that many Leave voters have changed their minds, so the referendum result is now meaningless. The question is whether those MPs have the moral courage required to vote Nay. You can help, by contacting your MP urgently with the message: stop Article 50 at any cost.

9
2

Government to sling extra £4.7bn at R&D in bid to Brexit-proof Britain

Yes Me
Bronze badge
Facepalm

Is Harold Wilson back?

Industrial strategy?? Is Harold Wilson back in Downing St? Is the Cabinet taking advice from Jeremy Corbyn? It's never worked in the past and it will never work now.

1
0

Windows 10 networking bug derails Microsoft's own IPv6 rollout

Yes Me
Bronze badge
Big Brother

Re: Not that awful

It's worth mentioning that the logs of carrier-grade NATs must be of immense interest to the three-letter agencies.

2
0
Yes Me
Bronze badge
FAIL

Re: IPv6 needs a catalyst

"There are even entire countries (with far more than 2^16 clients active at any time) sharing a single IP address."

Yes. And I wonder how many "RESTful" transactions per minute fail half way through as a result. This is a prime example of applying enough thrust and obtaining a flying pig.

2
0
Yes Me
Bronze badge

Re: It is not the backward, it is the forward bit which is the issue

Indeed, modern home routers run DHCP(v4), dual-stack DNS and dual-stack routing in one box. And very likely VoIP as well. Enterprise routers usually run a DHCP relay however, with the actual DHCP server centralised. But having each router announce the prefixes it supports is an elegant plus point for IPv6; there really isn't a down side for the operations people, since they have to configure the prefix into the router anyway, it might as well generate its own announcements.

2
0
Yes Me
Bronze badge

Re: IPv6 and NAT

You're right. ISPs should routinely hand out at least a /56. SOHO networks of the future will need that.

1
0
Yes Me
Bronze badge

in the early 1990s

"they didn't care at all about compatibility"

I assure you we did. A long co-existence period with no time limit was absolutely fundamental.

2
0
Yes Me
Bronze badge

v6 information via v4 DHCP

"If v6 clients could get v6 information in their v4 DHCP request the whole thing would have been a non-issue. "

Yes, the lack of feature-equivalence between DHCP and DHCPv6 is an issue. I think it will come in time, despite the zealots. The main gap is a small one: getting the next hop router from DHCPv6.

No, getting v6 information via DHCP/v4 is a *bad* idea operationally. v6 operations should not depend on correct v4 operation, nor vice versa. That way you are inviting complex failure modes, and all kinds of difficulty ten years down the road when IPv4 becomes the legacy.

1
2
Yes Me
Bronze badge

fundamental?

NAT isn't fundamental, except for getting round the shortage of IPv4 addresses. Firewalls are fundamental, and IPv6 has them.

6
2
Yes Me
Bronze badge
Facepalm

Why the IETF didn't make this next-gen networking protocol backward-compatible

" why the Internet Engineering Task Force decided not to make this next-gen networking protocol backward-compatible?"

For the zillionth time: because it's mathematically and logically impossible to do so.

IPv4 has fixed-length addresses and no provision in the packet for extensibility of the address. So, by definition, an IPv4 protocol stack cannot understand packets with bigger addresses. So, by simple logic, a computer can speak IP4, or IPv6, or both at the same time, but each packet on the wire is one or the other*.

The way we achieve the appearance of backward compatibility is the so called dual stack model - but sadly that means the computer/router/whatever needs separate code paths for the two protocols. For example, DHCP runs over IPv4 and DHCPv6 runs over IPv6 - two different animals. Hence the reported problem, plus the fact that Google in their infinite wisdom have refused to put a DHCPv6 client in Android.

*By the way, apparently this was known before IPv6 was even designed: RFC1671.

4
1

IPv6 vulnerable to fragmentation attacks that threaten core internet routers

Yes Me
Bronze badge

Re: How can this happen ?

It can happen because the people who designed IPv6 fragmentation are human beings and let this one slip by.

> Internet-will-die-otherwise

People overstate things sometimes. An Internet without packet translation will work better than one with packet translation. And (as I noted a minute ago) IPv6 is designed for situations where IPv4 does badly: stand-alone networks, IoT, and tens of millions of multihomed enterprises.

1
1
Yes Me
Bronze badge

Re: .

@Roland: "much earnest discussion about using IP directly over the physical media and thus replacing IEEE 802"

Not that I remember, at least not in the proposals that actually became IPv6. On the contrary, the layer 2/layer 3 separation was considered very fundamental. MPLS came later, but not to eliminate layer 2, rather to fix the mess created by ATM. TRILL came much later.

It's true that the IETF chose not to use the OSI datagram protocol (CLNP) but there was very little dispute about the layered model, which the OSI people got from TCP/IP (and CYCLADES) in the first place.

1
0

Page:

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017