* Posts by Yes Me

729 posts • joined 11 Jan 2008

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The future of Python: Concurrency devoured, Node.js next on menu

Yes Me
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Mushroom

Re: Async not always easy

"It's insanely difficult to get large multi-threaded programs correct," Hettinger explained. "For complex systems, async is much easier to get right than threads with locks." That strikes me as absurd. Threads, queues and locks are easy to get right. The model is clear and the pitfalls are well known to every CS student. There are other things in Python that are much more tricky (the semantics of 'global', the absence of a clear difference between call by name and call by value, and of course sloppy types are but three examples).

Event loops are a cop-out compared to real multi-threading. Tkinter is a good example of how not to do things properly. I haven't looked at syncio, but anybody who thinks Twisted is better than Python threading is... twisted.

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Big question of the day: Is it time to lock down .localhost?

Yes Me
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Re: I'd like something similar, but for local network requests

That scope is too small to be useful - but this is thinking behind .home, which has its own attached controversy as it turns out.

BTW the Windows /hosts file arrives with this comment included:

# localhost name resolution is handled within DNS itself.

# 127.0.0.1 localhost

# ::1 localhost

I've filled mine up with lines like this, that help a lot:

0.0.0.0 ad.doubleclick.net

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IBM CIO leaves for AWS – and Big Blue flings sueball to stop him

Yes Me
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logs

His emails will certainly be saved on a company server too. But then, only if he did naughty things using his company email account. A CIO might just possibly know not to do that.

Wiping your devices before handing them back to IT Support seems like normal prudent behaviour to me, although IBM did always claim that they drilled a hole in the hard disk anyway.

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Australia's .au internet registry chair quits amid no-confidence vote

Yes Me
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...intrigue and mismanagement

It's because of the fact that there's money to be made and that, I'm afraid, attracts people with a weak grasp of ethics. Only a very strong non-profit constituition for the registry that caps salaries and bans profits can prevent this; and as this case shows, transparency is everything (and is therefore hated by those of weak ethics).

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Another Brexit cliff edge: UK.gov warned over data flows to EU

Yes Me
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Re: "The potential downside of not getting this right is very serious,"

Probably because the majority of vocal remainers were adamant that another referendum should be taken

Not really - the point is that the referendum was deeply flawed and only advisory; Parliament could have, and should have, decided that the result was inconclusive.

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Yes Me
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Re: @ codejunky

I thought the remoaning position was that the EU was all powerful and we were irrelevant. Now you say we have all the power and should be telling the EU how to do things? That's not what he said or implied. They have 27 potential vetos, so yes, they are in fact all-powerful in the talks: it is their deal or no deal. But by being modest and realistic in the talks (highly unlikely with Davis in charge) we have a chance of getting a deal that might get through the Commons. If we don't, of course, the government will be thrown out (if it even survives that long) and I'm pretty sure that the 27 will then agree to putting Article 50 on hold until a sensible (centrist) government comes along. It would be better to withdraw the Article 50 letter straight away though; that isn't exactly foreseen by the Treaty but the right things would probably happen.

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Yes Me
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Re: @Charlie Clark

Sir Humphrey is in despair, but strongly suspects the whole nonsense will go away soon, along with Theresa May and her "friends".

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IETF moves meeting from USA to Canada to dodge Trump travel ban

Yes Me
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Re: Convenience?

You say "blame Trump for local consumption" but in fact that is exactly not the point. US residents can attend a meeting in SF with no problem; the issue is whether all non-US-residents can do so if they wish - which at this time is unknown for July 2018. Hence, since the IETF is an organisation with no (repeat no) limitations on who can participate, the US is no longer a reasonable venue. This isn't a political choice; it's practical matter. Canada has visa requirements too, but at present they don't appear to be arbitrary or discriminatory.

Personally I've attended successful and convenient IETF meetings in both SF and Montreal in the past, but then, I don't have a passport that leads to discriminatory treatment.

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Behind the scenes of Slovaks' fight to liberate their .sk domain

Yes Me
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Headmaster

"stolen" domain

It's alternative history. Yes, in many countries the original country-code registrar was some geek in some university. Why? Because the university was one of the first Internet-connected sites in the country, and the said geek offered to register a few names in his (rarely her) own time. And in most countries, either the universities themselves got together some years later to get a bit better organised, or some government department (SERC in the UK) prompted the organisation. In some countries with strong PTT monopolies, the government department concerned was the PTT or the telecomms ministry.

In almost all cases the geek was greatly relieved when this happened. Theft was not involved and sovereignty was never an issue. All of this happened long before ICANN existed; when arbitration was needed, it was usually done by Jon Postel personally.

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Yes Me
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Trollface

Re: The radical left do not understand sovereignty!

Good one. Might even suck in some upvotes. Thanks for the laugh.

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Yes Me
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Re: Much ado about nothing?

Actually, running a secure and highly scaleable registry is not trivial, and outsourcing the mechanics of it to a specialist company seems like a sensible idea for a smaller country. But outsourcing the sovereign rights and policy decisions, not to mention the profits, seems stupid. Unlike Kieren, I think that setting up a local non-profit is by far the best next step - even if in the end the actual work is outsourced.

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Yes Me
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Flame

Re: Entirely predictable behaviour

Wrong. They could do with a lot of accountability to the community.

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Web inventor Sir Tim sizes up handcuffs for his creation – and world has 2 weeks to appeal

Yes Me
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Re: I don't see a problem.

Being a published author whose book has been pirated (somewhere in .ru, I believe) and also being a believer in open source software and open standards, my conclusion is that TimBL is correct. As long as there's copyright law in the real world, there's going to be DRM on-line, so it's better for it to be based on an open standard (and on open source implementations). I think the EFF position is unreasonable. To get rid of DRM, first get rid of copyright law (and good luck with that).

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Fuji Xerox's chairman resigns over 'improper accounting'

Yes Me
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Meh

And by the way...

...there was a clue a while back if you knew to look for it:

http://proprint.com.au/News/390287,fuji-xerox-boss-out-the-door.aspx

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Yes Me
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FAIL

SOP

"book sales earlier than was usual" was, er, pretty usual in many companies for many years. In fact, Standard Operating Procedure. But most salespeople figured out that they had to log the shipment off the loading dock and onto the truck by 23:59 on the last day of the quarter. Perhaps the famous "she'll be right" attitude in AU+NZ put paid to that.

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Lordy! Trump admits there are no tapes of his chats with Comey

Yes Me
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Angel

The truth will out...

So he's telling the truth: there are no tapes (now). (But nobody uses tape these days anyway.)

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Australian Dept Defence pulling kit out of China-owned Global Switch

Yes Me
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Re: Confidence?

"we wonder what is really going on"

We don't. What's going on looks like amazing stupidity, but is in fact economic warfare: using blatantly ridiculous "security" arguments to discriminate against Chinese ownership. Personally I'd be more worried about American ownership, given the Trump regime's approach to privacy and human rights in general.

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Backdoor backlash: European Parliament wants better privacy

Yes Me
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Thumb Up

Excellent

Excellent (and another example of why the EU is a good thing, of course). As has been pointed out repeatedly for 20+ years, the only impact of anti-crypto laws is to encourage bad people into using unbreakable private end to end encryption instead of at least leaving a meta-data trail on the public services.

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Small carriers aren't showing up to IPv6 standards chats, consultant warns

Yes Me
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Re: There are fundamental technical reasons for it

1. " The whole v6 autoconfig in this day and age is a solution looking for a problem." If you're running a reasonably large enterprise network, DHCPv6 is probably useful with today's old-fashioned (basically manual) method of network design and config. That will change over the next 10 or 20 years - you're going to see much more automated provisioning and much less human decision making about trivia like addressing schemes and prefix assignments. The end game is full automation, of which IPv6 stateless address autoconfiguration will be a small part.

2. "The end to end principle is idiotic in the highest order." You don't understand it. It doesn't mean any host can talk to any host. It describes how to design protocols for two hosts that can talk to each other. Different thing.

3. "developers switching from protocols which were NAT unfriendly to protocols which do not give a damn about how many NATs " It's just sad that you believe that is a good thing. It's a quick fix, that's all.

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Yes Me
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An interesting conspiracy theory

" IPv6 does or should make it trivial to connect to devices in the home from outside. " Well it doesn't if you have a firewall, which every IPv6 CPE does as far as I know. And it shouldn't. Actually it needs to be hard to connect from outside, so that only the authorised parties can do so. But you are correct that IPv6 is an enabling technology for things that we really can't do in a straightforward way with one address and a NAT box for a whole home network. So there is a conspiracy to make things better.

I think Jordi's a bit pessimistic though. I've seen many small ISPs offering a good IPv6 service well ahead of the dinosaurs.

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Yes Me
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Re: Ugh.... HomeNet ...

Homenet or not is nothing to do with large or small ISPs. It's to do with simple or complex networks in the home. Once the ISP has delegated an IPv6 prefix to the home gateway, the ISP has nothing to do with the internal complexity (or simplicity) of the home network. And you've missed the point of the IETF homenet work: it's to make home networks 'plug and play' whether they are simple or complex. Whether a particular home gateway vendor does or doesn't include homenet support is a commercial decision, of course. What Jordi is worried about is whether RFCs that end up in procurement specs serve the interests of all ISPs, or only some. That's a quite different question from whether ordinary citizens will end up with complex (multi-router) networks in their home or small office. That's a commercial decision too.

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Australian oppn. leader wants to do something about Bitcoin, because terrorism and crypto

Yes Me
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Facepalm

Re: Oh Dear.....

This is all an exercise in futility, anyway. Making cryptography illicit encourages bad people to use even stronger crypto, and making bitcoin illegal would simply drive illicit money somewhere even more obscure.

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Two leading ladies of Europe warn that internet regulation is coming

Yes Me
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Re: How to evolve a smarter criminal in easy steps

"where neighbour reports on neighbour"

But that's exactly what NSA and GCHQ and their friends have been doing for 20 years and more, in effect: traffic analysis of metadata tells them who talks to who, with no need to break encryption. And the worst bad people not being stupid, they aren't going to use any kind of encryption that's subject to a back door attack for the stuff that really matters. You might want to watch the documentary "A Good American".

Agencies looking for bad people don't need to break encryption, but the Thought Police need to break encryption, which is why this is very scary. See you in the Chestnut Tree Cafe.

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DDoS attack brings Qatar's Al Jazeera website to its knees

Yes Me
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free press

Yes, it's all to do with Al J being a very good unbiased news site (and TV channel). Less biased than *any* US news channel or the BBC, and of course a million times better than RT. It's nothing to do with Sunni vs Shia. It's to do with the Arab states hating freedom of speech and even more so, hating unbiased investigative journalism. (And that certainly includes Egypt as well as the Gulf states.) Something that Trump, Putin and the Saudi princes can all agree on!

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Australia to float 'not backdoors' that behave just like backdoors to Five-Eyes meeting

Yes Me
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Go

Mayhem and human rights

Meanwhile Mayhem in her ferro-cement equine storage facility wants to tear up many human rights provisions.

If you're in the UK you still have time to help vote her out.

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Julian Assange wins at hide-and-seek game against Sweden

Yes Me
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Holmes

@Adrian 4

How do you know it was "an offence that hadn't occurred"? If you weren't in the room, only the woman and the man concerned know the truth. And the man declined to explain himself to the prosecutor.

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IBM CEO Ginni flouts £75 travel crackdown, rides Big Blue chopper

Yes Me
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Unhappy

Old guard?

Ginni isn't old guard and that's a lot of the problem with her. She seems to have forgotten that a technology company needs, er, technologists as well as salespeople, marketroids and accountants. And that technologists hired by the square metre in low-salary countries aren't actually any good. Executing to plan is the mantra, but it doesn't work if your technologists are incompetent and the plan relates to some historical business scenario that no longer exists.

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We're calling it now: FCC votes 2-1 to rip up net neutrality on Thurs

Yes Me
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IT Angle

Re: (unsurprising)

> "Internet is owned by the U.S.? What the hell was the point of Brexit, then?"

> Good point. However, the people who voted for Brexit weren't the ones who use the internet much.

Well, no, bad point. Firstly the Brexit vote didn't actually have much of an IT angle; it was just a bunch of people believing lies and fantasies. I dare say some of them also believed the fantasy that the Internet was invented by an Englishman, too. But secondly, that's a cheap shot, lots of OAPs use the Internet.

But on the point, let's focus on the good news: at least the FCC have now made it clear that fair treatment of Internet users in the US is a fair trade issue, which it always has been. Whether the FTC can fix it under a Republican congress is another question, but the real debate can actually start now.

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Months after it ordered a review into allegations of mismanagement, how's that ICANN accountability drive?

Yes Me
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Unhappy

Re: Sue the bastards

What you're overlooking is that many registrars seeking new TLDs (and I am not mentioning any specific registrars, for good reason) are themselves either moneygrubbing bastards already or wannabes. No new TLDs are actually necessary, so all of this carry-on is just an attempt to extract monopoly rents from thin air. Sue, counter-sue, whatever, it's only the lawyers and banks who win in the end. I hope everybody comes to their senses soon, but I'm not optimistic.

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IBM: Remote working is great! ... For everyone except us

Yes Me
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WTF?

beautiful buildings

There always used to be rumours of people lost for ever in the corridors of the Somers pyramids.

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Yes Me
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Re: Looks right to me

"And HPE seems to be benefiting most from management stumbling at IBM."

Bit of a shame, since it used to be the other way round.

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Regulate This! Time to subject algorithms to our laws

Yes Me
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Headmaster

I am not a lawyer but...

Re: "If the process is illegal, that's hardly the fault of the programmers is it?"

The computer's defence is clear: it was only obeying orders. The programmer's defence is less clear. If she was obeying orders but by doing so told the computer to break the law, the defence that she was only obeying orders or that she was ignorant of the law doesn't hold water. She's as guilty as her boss.

In any case, the idea of regulating algorithms is a nonsense. Blame the humans, not the machines.

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'Tech troll' sues EFF to silence 'Stupid Patent of the Month' blog. Now the EFF sues back

Yes Me
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Re: EFF Lawyers are EFF'n Stupid

@-tim : Thanks for the specific example. I'm pretty sure I saw countdown timers in process control GUIs as early as 1980-85, too. My military reference was speculative, but I can't imagine that SAGE (the original Cold War early warning system) didn't display a countdown on the screen as bombers approached, in the 1960s. Oh, and NASA, surely?

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Yes Me
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Holmes

Re: EFF Lawyers are EFF'n Stupid

Um, you don't need to be a patent lawyer to know that a patent is stupid. And the EFF has plenty of legal advice, both on patent claims and on First Amendment rights. Agreed, decoding the real meaning of the claims in a patent is a specialised job, but there are hundreds (probably thousands) of people who would gladly help the EFF pro bono for something as egregious as this.

Let's look at just one of the 39 claims for this GUI:

27. A graphic user interface as in claim 18, further comprising a timer window for graphically illustrating a countdown from a modifiable pre-specified number to “0”
Wow! A window with a counter, counting down! In 1999! Probably 15 years after such a thing first appeared in civilian systems and 30 years after the military had it. I suspect that all the claims were equally unoriginal, covered by prior art, and obvious to one skilled in the art, even in 1999.

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Yes Me
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re: fighting the ruling in Australia

Wrong. They're doing exactly the right thing by fighting the claim that an Australian ruling has any validity in the US - that is much more to the point than butting heads with a foolish and misinformed judge in a minor country like Australia. (Sorry, but there it is, and I live in an even more minor country.)

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Ex-IBMer sues Google for $10bn – after his web ad for 'divine honey cancer cure' was pulled

Yes Me
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many people report positive outcomes...

... which are known to be the result of the placebo effect. Nothing wrong with that in itself, but the danger is people refusing real treatment because of magical beliefs.

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Yes Me
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honey over homeopathy

Honey tastes nicer than extremely pure water, but you might as well buy your honey at the supermarket (and not waste your money on manuka honey, either). I'm sure an oncologist would say the same, while recommending the best treatment for your case.

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Yes Me
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Angel

freespeech

"maybe someone will suggest google are impedeing the mountebank's freespeech?"

He is asserting that. But they're not; he can stand on a soap box anywhere he wants and shout about his scam.

I guess it must have been working for IBM that triggered him to forget his ethics and start selling nonsensical products?

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Huawei faces UK sales ban if it doesn't cough up 4G patent tithes

Yes Me
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Unhappy

Re: If Huawei agreed an payment plan with Ericson

"Purchasing a patent that is already in force and being paid for is simply a matter of buying an asset. "

Humbug. Patents were originally intended to benefit and encourage inventors, but today that intention has been distorted into a welfare scheme for large companies. I bet the original inventors of these patents got a one-time bonus of €1000 or so. Now some company that had nothing to do with the invention at all will get free money from (indirectly) Huawei's customers. One of the real downsides of modern capitalism.

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'No deal better than bad deal' approach to Brexit 'unsubstantiated'

Yes Me
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Re: "48% < 52% less than half in a democratic "

Exactly. Screw the country for 50 years for short-term party political advantage. Worst political misbehaviour since 1956 (Suez).

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I need an ISP that offers IPv6. Virgin Media: Whatevs, nerd

Yes Me
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Re: need? really?

"I would think ISPs will deploy carrier grade NAT before they deploy IPv6 to the end user, "

You're behind reality. The ISPs that deployed CGN a few years ago are trying hard to put in solutions that cost them less money and less help desk grief. The favoured approach now is native IPv6 to the customer equipment plus 464XLAT to carry legacy IPv4 traffic over the native IPv6.

- coming to you from the IETF v6operations meeting currently in progress in Chicago

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Brit firm lands £58m EU spy drone 'copter contract

Yes Me
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Headmaster

Despite what?

"Despite BREXIT"? If you haven't noticed, it hasn't happened. Unless very very recently, Dictatrix Maybe hasn't even handed in the UK's notice yet. There's no reason companies wouldn't win contracts for now; in fact under EU rules they probably must win them if they submit the cheapest valid bid. The collapse of the economy doesn't start until we actually leave, for which even Maybe has been very careful not to set a date.

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Sir Tim Berners-Lee refuses to be King Canute, approves DRM as Web standard

Yes Me
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Re: Any Restriction Placed on the Internet

"If it isn't EME, it'll be something else..."

Exactly. So it's better for it to be an open standard than something produced by a closed club or a single monopolist. Sad but true, so TimBL was right.

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It's time for our annual checkup on the circus that is the Internet Governance Forum

Yes Me
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Happy

So much the better

"A request to discuss the long-asked-for reforms is blocked, delayed or otherwise dispensed with."

This is a problem? The longer the IGF fails to do anything, the better. It's been a useless talking shop since Day 1, and that is its value: it prevents inter-governmental interference with the Internet. (Government interference with the Internet inside each country is a different matter, and each country deals with it in its won way.)

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Awkward. Investigatory Powers Act could prove hurdle to UK-EU Privacy Shield following Brexit

Yes Me
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Unhappy

if only

"...she would undoubtedly have to resign as PM. It's not going to happen."

What very bad news.

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One IP address, multiple SSL sites? Beating the great IPv4 squeeze

Yes Me
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Re: Wrong.

"it was actually DHCP they wanted an alternative to."

Historically, not. DHCP wasn't even there when IPv6 autoconfiguration was invented, modelled on Novell Netware IPX. DHVPv6 was an add-on some years later, after DHCPv4 saved IPv4 from configuration collapse.

(While I'm here, NAT44 wasn't there either, in terms of actual products, when IPv6 was invented. NAT44 saved IPv4 from an early grave, but *after* IPv6 was already designed.)

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Yes Me
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NPTv6

Um, prefix translation is not the same as address translation. So some of the downsides of NAT44 don't apply - no issue with port sharing, since there's a full set of ports for each client. But there simply are no IPv6 scenarios that *need* translation; you firewall off the threats, so NPTv6 brings no benefits, only the downsides.

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Yes Me
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SixxS

SixxS is a free service provided by volunteers. You get what you pay for. If you want to offer something to end users, you need a professionally supported tunnel, which won't be free.

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Yes Me
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Happy

Real programmers *do* use IPv6

Yes, people who want to offer IPv6 service for the increasing number of IPv6 clients can just do it. Either (boring) use a tunnel provider or (exciting) use a CDN such as Cloudflare. No need for your own ISP to lift a finger.

Also, Trevor: a 2012 reference for IPv6 issues? The world has changed a number of times since then. However, I agree: any applications or web service provider needs to support IPv4-only users well into the future, as well as the growing IPv6 population.

I'm still puzzling about what https://nir.regmedia.co.uk at 2400:cb00:2048:1::104.25.78.107 has to do with anything. It's pingable.

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Yes Me
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Re: Doesn't a proxy defeat the purpose?

Particularly, it's not a solution if you're also load balancing, since you can end up losing session persistence... making the affected user most unhappy.

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