* Posts by Ian Michael Gumby

3595 posts • joined 11 Apr 2006

Tesla death smash probe: Neither driver nor autopilot saw the truck

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Bleh

Actually a coat of paint to create a pattern so that the white truck didn't blend in to the sky.

Or use LIDAR sensors that would have reflected off the Truck's trailer.

Of course some have said that the camera wasn't properly aligned so there could be truth in that.

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Worried about election hacking? There's a technology fix – Helios

Ian Michael Gumby
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@Voland Re: "Because you can"

Huh?

On election day, you have more than 20+ items.

Depending on the year, you could have POTUS, then State Senators, Reps.

Inside the state, you have various offices, Governor down to local judges, aldermen (councilmen) before you get to referendums and at the end non-binding referendums. (Things you can vote on that don't directly go into a law, but give an indication of what you favor. )

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When we said don't link to the article, Google, we meant DON'T LINK TO THE ARTICLE!

Ian Michael Gumby
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Not so easy...

While you have 'free speech' this isn't a case of it.

Suppose you are in NY and you open up a Fast Food joint called 'Bullet Burrito'. You've gone thru all of the legal filings, paperwork, established a brand, and a web site.

But suppose you find out that 10 years ago, there was another place in West Virginia that was also called Bullet Burrito and was shut down because of a case of food poisoning and not being up to code.

Clearly not you.

But if you go online and Google Bullet Burrito, voila, there's a news story talking about Bullet Burrito getting shut down because of not being up to code.

You go to Google and ask them to take down the link. While its a valid news story, its outdated and its causing you harm. People just see the link on the first page and assume its about you and doesn't see the date of the article or that the place was in a different state.

Who would be right?

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Uncle Sam bungs rich tech giants quarter of a billion bucks for exascale super R&D

Ian Michael Gumby
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If the US builds it ...

China will have the tech within 6 months.

Take a look at all of those companies.

Now take a look at who does business globally and the fact that any improvements made for the US government will flow to consumer equipment after they build it...

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BA passengers caught in crossfire of Heathrow baggage meltdown

Ian Michael Gumby
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Devil

@AC

No, it was yet again system failures as their power supply crossing over caused them to crash.

No need to blame the off shore team for this... its a local pesky problem of an ignorant engineer who accidentally caused the problem which is why we need to move more jobs to India!

Do I really need to add the <sarcasm> tags?

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Hortonworks feathers nest with IBM deal

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@returnofthemus Re: The real pain is going to be supporting customers....

Actually the AC's seem to know more about it than you think.

ODPi is a bit of a joke. There's a good reason why MapR and Cloudera passed. ;-)

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IBM deep-sixes DeepFlash 150

Ian Michael Gumby
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No shock here...

If you exit the hardware biz, no one will take you seriously on your other products.

They should never have sold the server biz to Lenovo. Linux boxes outsell Power

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Farewell, slumping 40Gbps Ethernet, we hardly knew ye

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Hun? Re: Moore's Law on Acid

If you can afford a 40Gb/s switch then what are you doing playing games?

10Gbe is still too expensive for the SOHO. Not to mention your upstream (ISP) won't be bringing in data faster than 1Gb/s ...

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Ta-ta, security: Bungling Tata devs leaked banks' code on public GitHub repo, says IT bloke

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Yank Re: Real Problem

I am familiar with HIPPA and several different countries banking laws.

Its interesting to point out that none of the files shown on the screen shot included code, but were presentations made to different clients.

So while no data was compromised, (No shock there.) there was client specific information. The presentations are work products and should be owned by the client where TATA doesn't have the right to reuse them. (Note: This could be added to the contract, IBM does this all the time with their Type III contracts.)

I have a friend who tossed Mu Sigma from the account because he couldn't trust them to not reuse proprietary algorithms at other clients. The whole point is that many Enterprises are starting to learn that moving offshore may not be the best news. However... it will take many years to right this. Note that if there is another disruptive technology.. it could increase the speed of moving away from offshoring.

Of course if there is a case for a massive lawsuit against a company because there was a massive error done by the offshore team.. It could happen faster.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: And yet CA banks adopted chip-cards long before the US

That has nothing to do with it.

The US already had a large infrastructure in place and they looked at the cost of moving to chip and pin versus the losses (theft) that they had at the time. The cost of moving was higher. So they didn't move.

When there was more data theft and fraud such that the cost of moving was cheaper, the US moved.

That's pretty much the gist of it.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@AC ... Re: FFS

Outsourced teams will and do cut corners to save money - and having worked in India for many years, there is a malaise there - a level of mid-management there that act like feudal lords and treat the programmers / architects / tech resources as serfs.

That's a cultural thing. I've seen it from on-shore Indian managers. While this isn't across the board, its a high percentage.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Korev, Re: Public vs Private Github repo?

You do realize that just parking client's material off the client site could be illegal?

If any of the Financial institutions considers the code to be trade secrets... you have a crime of theft.

At a minimum, you most definitely have multiple breaches of the contracts per institution.

This could cost Tata a boatload of money.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Flame

@Steve Davies 3 Re: Outsource it all To India

Spot on, however I wonder if El Reg actually understood the significance of the following:

The documents related to programming work Tata was carrying out for six big Canadian banks, two well-known American financial organizations, a multinational Japanese bank, and a multibillion dollar financial software company.

Silly me, but shouldn't there be a glass wall between different clients?

Meaning if I were one of those clients, not only would I give Tata the boot, but also would be getting the team of in house counsel lined up to sue the carp [sic] out of them for violating and sort of MSA and NDA.

At the same time, this wasn't the work of a single bad programmer, but a concerted effort to share code.

This also shows not only the lack of professionalism but also calls to question their skills as developers. Which implies Tata is over charging their customers by providing under skilled employees.

Sorry for the flame, but its more about the situation than anything else.

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Whisky snobs scotched by artificial tongue

Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC

But you can actually train your pallet and can tell the difference.

A friend of mine was a bartender. He had me turn around, and he poured 5 different Vodkas.

He asked me to do two things.

Find the vodka I usually drank, and then which vodka I liked the most.

I was able to do both and as it turned out, they were different.

Some people can tell the difference. And for some, they preferred the cheaper drink

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: waste of a taste

You sir are a disgrace to your father-in-law. :-(

Seriously... Scotch is an acquired taste.

What do you like to drink? There is a wide variety of single malts and blended scotch and something should tickle your fancy.

If not... you can always sell the unopened bottles.

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Donald Trumped: Comey says Prez is a liar – and admits he's a leaker

Ian Michael Gumby
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Black Helicopters

@Robert 22 Re: The nub of the biscuit.

Mate, you're got a bit of a revisionist history...

Bush got the intel from the CIA who's source was actual Iranian.

Bush then took it to Congress which then declared war on Iraq.

Now... the funny part.

Shortly before Saddam was to be hanged, he admitted that he was the source of the WMD information. He spread the news in an effort to keep Iran at bay. (You do remember the Iran/Iraq war, right?) He was surprised that the US fell for it.

There's more, but you get the idea.

Did the US really fall for it, or did they just use it as a pretext (excuse) to take Saddam out?

You'll never know and neither will I.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@AC ... Re: Comey: Weird, but it doesn't matter.

Have you looked at other countries and their politics? ;-)

South Korea? and then in South America?

I would hope that the US would be better, but unfortunately there's politicians who put partisan politics before what is best for this country.

Trump would be a better president than Obama if given half the chance to get things done. Of course someone would have to take away his twitter account too, but you get the idea. The thought of Trump actually doing a good job scares the Democrats so much that they would rather attack Trump than fix the DNC.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Sparty ... Re: @eldakka Impeachment?

Are you an American?

The sequence isn't wrong.

Comey isn't independent and is answerable to Trump.

And of course you didn't listen to the questioning and the answers.

Trump was never under investigation.

There's more, but the subtlety is lost .

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: @ Cow Herd ... Impeachment?

Yeah I get Obstruction is grounds for impeachment.

I was alive during Watergate and the whole Nixon thing.

I also remember Iran/Contra

And of course Billy Boy's amazing verbal skills and aw shucks moments.

The issue is though that Trump didn't commit obstruction. Obama and Lynch committed obstruction.

Clinton committed obstruction. (Of course its hard to impeach since they are all out of office. ) ;-)

Trump?

Sure, let him hang himself. Oh wait. The Democrats are too busy stalling and 'resisting' to let the man and the rest of Congress to get their jobs done.

Personally I would think that the entire DNC party should be rebuilt from the ground up. Too many wackos in the party.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Eddie Ito Re: @ Ian Michael Gumby

Did Comey take notes during the meeting?

No. He took them afterwards. So even if he showed his notes... there will be questions.

Not sure where you're talking about 'convictions'.

With respect to Comey... both sides agree that a conversation took place. Comey's notes done after the fact are his recollections of what he heard and what he thought the POTUS meant.

Trump doesn't deny that the meeting occurred but does dispute Comey's account of it. So Comey could be correct in that his notes reflects what he thought about the meeting. Trump recalls something different. Since there was no third party to corroborate either. Notes or not... its still he said / she said.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Paul ... Re: @ Ian Michael Gumby

Wow, no he did not.

Comey made notes after the meeting not during the meeting.

And he most certainly did not share said notes with others.

Also Comey's notes are his recollection of the events.

Please don't try to play lawyer.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Sparty ... Re: @Mi Tasol

Trump does have credibility.

Comey, on the other hand is damaged goods.

There's more to it of course.

The point of a he said, she said trial is that the person who wins is the one who can tell a better story to the jury.

Comey has his notes, which he admitted to being the leaker. He can be charged over that. Even though they are his work product, under the official records act, they are the property of the Government. And it wasn't just a note by Comey, it was something said between Comey and the POTUS. Classified or not, Comey can be charged. (Already Trump's lawyer(s) are asking for the judiciary committee to look in to the leak.)

You also don't seem to get it. Trump won based on the electoral college. It exists for a reason. Had Trump spent more time in CA he could have taken more of the vote. Clinton lost the midwest because she ignored us.

And in a he said, she said... the courts also put more weight on the context of the situation. Comey leaked his note after he was fired.

At the same time... going in front of congress vs going in front of the special prosecutor are two different things. The special prosecutor can and will grill Comey.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Liar, Liar Your Pants on Fire

You do realize that compared to the Clintons, Trump is the lesser of two evils.

There's more, but you get the idea.

Sucks to have a two party system when both candidates are worthless pieces of sh__

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Sparty Re: Lies, damned lies and Trumpy's declarations

I'm no fan of Trump, but him winning is a fault of the voters and the other politicians for being so shit. Not a fault of the system.

Well I'm not a fan of Trump either and you can blame two things...

1) The DNC party rigged the nomination to be Hillary who was un-electable.

2) The MSM who gushed over Trump and gave him free air time ignoring other candidates.

To Trump's credit... he understood the voters and what they wanted. At least give him credit for attempting to fulfill his campaign promises.

But its also important to note that if it came down to a popular vote, we would end up with a system found in the Hunger Games.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@ Sparty...

Wow, shiny gold badge... :-)

Ok,

The reality is that there are more ties between Clinton and the Russian government that Trump.

Recently... literally last week I think... there was yet another batch of emails released due to the JW (Judicial Watch) FOIA lawsuit. The major take away was that Clinton didn't want to fly on the same jet as the First Lady Obama. (You can google that ...)

In that same batch... there are a couple of emails that tie Clinton as SoS and the Foundation. One thread ties the threat of an IRS audit in order to stop the investigation by a country in to a CF donor. (You can google it.) In another, there's confirmation that a Russian Investment Group, again CF donors got 'hooked up' with the right people in the US Government (State Dept. )

The Russians wanted to have chaos... and personally, none of the world leaders wanted to deal with Hildabeast and prefered Trump to her. ;-)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Peter 39 Re: "Leaker"? No !

Actually it is a leak.

Those notes are official documents and under the law (Official Records Act) while not classified documents, it is a criminal act to leak them. They are work products.

At the same time, there's the issue of executive privilege. Only Trump would be able to release the notes.

Comey's actions are criminal, although I doubt that they would charge him with any crime.

You are mistaken that it has to be classified material for it to be criminal. It does not.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Kiwi Re: Two things..

Does Trump have the tapes?

This could be a bluff. If its a bluff then its only as effective as long as you don't know the answer to the question.

If this isn't a bluff and Trump's staff admits to there being tapes... then you have a real problem for Trump. Those tapes could be subpoenaed. This is what caught Nixon and forced him to resign.

It also begs the question... if there are tapes, then what else did Trump record? And again those recordings would be subpoenaed as well.

Its a bad bluff on the part of Trump.

But the real question... did Comey lie under oath because he claimed Trump's tweet is what forced him to leak (which is itself a crime) or is Trump's lawyer right that Comey leaked before Trump's tweet.

That would be a very easy thing to prove.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: What kind of spy

I don't know... Trump could tape the conversation.

But is DC a two party consent state? (DC isn't a state, but has its own laws...)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@eldakka Re: Impeachment?

Exactly.

Alan Dershowitz, a very liberal democrat and Harvard Prof on Law, also pointed this out.

Trump can pardon anyone after the fact. Where the fact is the alleged crime even if there are no charges.

Hypothetically, the POTUS can't hand someone a pardon for killing X before they killed X, but if X was killed and that someone was a suspect, the POTUS could pardon them even if they weren't yet under investigation... (Note: Bad example, but proves the point...)

This is why you really don't have obstruction. Comey admitted that Trump didn't say go do X which would have forced Comey to do X, or resign because to not do X would be insubordination. Many don't understand the law, and those in Congress who do are willfully being ignorant for their own political gain.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@AC re Obama Re: Impeachment?

Wow.

So many things wrong that I don't know where to begin.

First, Obama made public statements stating an opinion during the investigation. This was in fact putting his finger on scale.

Second Obama claimed he did nothing to interfere with the investigation. Yet he had many meetings with Lynch who then, according to Comey's testimony yesterday, attempted to influence (obstruct) the investigation in to Clinton. In fact there is more evidence against Lynch and Obama than there is against Trump. Not to mention Comey previously testified that he did not feel Trump's comments were in fact obstruction.

Your tirade about Trump's tax returns is old news. Trump won the election and Trump was under NO LEGAL OBLIGATION to submit his tax returns. Yeah. There is no law requiring it although Jimmy Carter was the first POTUS candidate to do so setting precedence. With respect to Trump's tax returns... the leaked page (which was illegal to leak) showed he paid more in taxes than any of the other candidates.

So please drop the red herrings.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@ Cow Herd ... Re: Impeachment?

No.

Where's the cover up?

Trump didn't use executive privilege to stop Comey. (He could have)

Trump encouraged Comey to testify because Comey couldn't accuse Trump without himself getting charged on a couple of counts.

The worst thing for Trump, Comey called him a liar because their recollection of the meeting differ. The Democrats and the MSM pounced on that.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Impeachment?

No.

Here's the problem.

Under the law, if Trump wanted to shut down the investigation to Flynn, he would merely just issue a pardon to Flynn. He can do this any time after the alleged act occurs, even if there are no charges present.

That would put an end to the issue, however it would cause more fodder.

Under the law...

If Comey believed that Trump's conversation was an attempt at Obstruction, he would have been obligated to report it ASAP. He did not. By waiting... Comey violated the law. Were he to now claim it was obstruction, Comey could face criminal charges.

In the past, under oath, Comey told Congress that he did not feel that there was any obstruction on the part of Trump. So... if Comey said anything different, he would be in trouble for lying under oath. It would result in a perjury charge and then Comey would have to defend himself.

So Comey was already boxed in to a corner before his testimony.

Beyond that...

In order to impeach Trump, you would have to show intent.

There is more evidence to say Obama committed obstruction when it came to Clinton's email investigation. And also Lynch.

So only a rabid Democrat would call for impeachment while others in the Democratic Party will not yet call for more investigation in to this...

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Mi Tasol

Lawyers learn that unless you're under oath, where you are compelled to be truthful, its ok to lie. And even under oath, as long as its not an outright lie, you can say things that are less than truthful. There exists a willful intent to twist the interpretation of the facts to their favor.

If caught in a lie, the lawyer will apologize and say that they misspoke. Mea Culpa.

Mr. Comey is a lawyer. Don't forget that.

Here's the take-away from Comey's testimony.

His recollection of the events differ from those of Trump. Since they were the only ones present this becomes a he said, she said issue. Both parties will recollect the meeting differently.

With respect to Trump's lawyer's statement...

He honed in on the timeline of events.

Comey said he leaked the memo because of Trump's tweet about there being tapes.

Yet the lawyer indicated that Comey leaked the memo before Trump's tweet.

This should be easy to corroborate. If true, it will hurt Comey.

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HPE to staff: 'We are PERMANENTLY clipping your costs'

Ian Michael Gumby
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Mushroom

Re: International travel

Hogwash.

I've seen sales managers who run and work out daily and are in top shape.

I've seen engineers that are also the same.

And then I've seen fat slobs in either position.

As someone who's traveled across the pond... If I travel in coach, even economy plus, there isn't enough room. The seats were not designed for someone who is 6'2" with broad shoulders. And then you have the guy next to you. So you're fighting for shoulder space. Try sleeping twisted and then go to work the next day... it doesn't end well.

The key question ... do they expect you to function when you land? Also those seats are a death trap if you aren't able to get up and move about.

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Hotel guest goes broke after booking software gremlin makes her pay for strangers' rooms

Ian Michael Gumby
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@Bongo Joe ... Re: One of my pet peeves

Don't be too peeved.

The issue is that the system is designed to make it easy for the transaction to flow in one direction.

Merchant credits... aren't the norm.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Alan Brown Re: "Sounds like a lawsuit"

In the US I believe you're on the hook for the first $50.00

This was done to create some sort of parity not to mention that the CC companies where charging the same per swipe as a CC where there is no risk because the funds were immediately used.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Kristian Walsh ... Re: @baspax ma1010 "Sounds like a lawsuit"

It depends.

On small retailers, their website provider would capture the details and handle the online billing.

With larger chains... no they handle all of the information.

There is tokenization but that happens by a third party at the time of authorization. Its relatively new and it allows the hotel chain not to capture or store the CC info, but the token which is unique to the chain. The actual cc info is stored by the 3rd party. This causes a bit of a headache with the CC providers for a couple of things... (I could say more, but then I'd get in to trouble.., which is why I avoided the tokenization issue. Note: Not everyone is there...)

Things are moving towards the tokenization, however... your CC info is stored by the provider and if they ever get cracked... whoa mamma.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Kirstan Re: thoughts... ma1010 "Sounds like a lawsuit"

Not everyone is using the tokenized system. Especially since the card wasn't swiped but done online.

My guess is that since the offending charges were all from prepaid online bookings, that she did that herself.

But yeah... you get it.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Mushroom

@William 3 Re: ma1010 "Sounds like a lawsuit"

Yes, she was foolish in her use of the Debit card.

Were she a he, I'd say the same thing.

Its not a sexist thing either.

But its funny that you went there.

BTW, I've talked to all of my relatives and my wife about not using the debit card for anything but use at an ATM within a bank and not out in the open. Have you done the same?

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Lost all faith ... Re: ma1010 "Sounds like a lawsuit"

Smug?

Hardly.

In the past 27 years, I've had fraud on my Amex card 3 times.

Each time, I cancelled my card, got a new one and the charges were dropped.

No harm, no foul.

So I am protected from stupidity.

There's more to it, like a bad experience at a boutique hotel I was forced to stay at once that was a dive and of course the company made me prepay the room.

Fraud will hit, however using my Amex makes my life easier, not to mention I was in the middle of BFE and they delivered a card to me within 48 hours after they contacted me about the fraud.

And yeah Debit card mischarged? Phone up, report fraud... wait until the money is back in to your account.

Why the girl didn't do that immediately... is something not found in the article.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Mushroom

@Adam 1 Re: ma1010 "Sounds like a lawsuit"

Its not a question of victim blaming.

Is it not completely obvious that the hotel screwed up bad? Really bad?

The question... is there a potential lawsuit? Maybe, however it can be avoided if the hotel makes restitution to the woman. Which any good lawyer would tell them to settle ASAP.

As to the use of your debit card. Yes, that's the thing. You will get your money back eventually. What wasn't said in the article was if or when the woman contacted the bank. She would have eventually gotten her money back so she's protected, however its the temporary loss that can be problematic.

Calling the woman dumb because she made the mistake of using her debit card isn't blaming the victim unless of course you believe that trying to avoid being the victim isn't a smarter course of action.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@baspax Re: ma1010 "Sounds like a lawsuit"

Mate, you really need to learn a bit more about what happens on the back end and PCI compliance.

The retailer stores the CC information. They have to in order to charge the customer. So they have the full credit card number. The web site, and users do not have access to the whole card, only the last 4 digits because that's all they need to confirm the identity of the person based on those numbers. Now they are asking for more information as a way to verify the person. (Home address, email, phone #, etc...)

The last 4 digits is used to identify the account information. That doesn't mean only the last four digits are stored. The whole account info is stored. That data has to stored in an encrypted format while at rest.

And they have to show that only authorized people have access to the information. There's more... maybe you should learn it.

With respect to the lawsuit... if the hotel doesn't make restitution, there could be a lawsuit, however... the hotel will make restitution. Why the woman didn't contact her bank, even w a debit card, there are laws that they have to follow.

With respect to the hotel... yeah, they are going to have a major problem with their card processing company. It theoretically could bankrupt them.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Voland ...Re: "Sounds like a lawsuit"

The Debit cards have the same rules, however it will take time before the money is back in her bank account. Whereas Credit Cards can't get to the money until its withdrawn.

Not to mention there are rules about disputed charges and what the parties have to do...

Never use a Debit card unless you're doing an ATM transaction at your bank. Only at the banks.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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ma1010 Re: "Sounds like a lawsuit"

No,

No lawsuit as long as they make restitution. In addition, she should have contacted her bank.

As you said the hotel is on the hook for refunding her money, plus and bank charges (over drafts) she incurred.

If she had to get a lawyer, they would be best to also pay her legal fees. (This would be in a settlement.)

The hotel did have the right to store her credit card information, however the first question would be if their system was PCI compliant.

The larger issue... why would someone in IT use a Debit Card for a transaction. The only time I use mine is at the Bank's branded ATMs at their branches. Other stuff on Credit Cards. (Amex for one)

And people wonder why I stay at the larger branded hotels when I travel for work...

And you're right... their IT staff should be terminated. Not just one but several people.

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So despite all the cash ploughed into big data, no one knows how to make it profitable

Ian Michael Gumby
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Flame

@Steve Davies 3 Re: Big Data?

Sorry, but there are many companies that are profiting from their use of big data solutions.

"The answer may come down to one tweet from a Gartner analyst. The spoiler? Virtually no one has been successful with their big data projects. They're spending lots of money but having little success."

Hogwash.

The issue is that those who are successful are not sharing their success stories. Nor are they talking to Gartner.

If Matt meant to talk about those companies supporting the open source product, then sure, Hortonworks and Cloudera are still burning thru cash. MapR hasn't gone public and they really haven't released their financials and their results may be interesting.

There are a couple of reasons why Cloudera and Hortonworks are having problems turning a profit but that's a different story.

Companies that have invested in Big Data are having mixed results.

In part, they hire cheap labor who don't know what they are doing.

In part, they are still early on the adoption curve and need to level set expectations.

In part, many companies don't understand the value in their data and have over estimated its worth and under estimated the costs involved in attempting to extract that data.

And yes, I am one of those 'experts' but rather than the blue talking head, I went with the flame icon.

Matt needs to do his homework before writing yet another "Hadoop is Dead" story.

The truth... Hadoop is hard. Too many learn only the basics yet fail to learn what is needed to make things actually work. Free clue. All of those on shore gray haired guys who've been in IT for more than 25+ years ... you need those guys to help with the infrastructure engineering and to help level set expectations on what you can do with the data.

And to your list:

Facebook, Google, and others that I personally know but legally can't name.

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When can real-world laws invade augmented reality fantasies? A trial in Milwaukee will decide

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: I rather approve of a ban.

I agree. it would be very easy to put up geo-spatial boundaries around private property and public areas.

However, here's the thing.

The park is a public area. So people have a right to go thru the park.

Its going to be a tough call.

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No hypersonic railguns on our ships this year, says US Navy

Ian Michael Gumby
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Alien

@Mark 110 Re: Downsides

Those would be slightly different and would have a longer track in which to accelerate the projectile since it would 1) be larger and 2) carry soft fleshy bits known as puny Humans.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@TDog Re: Optional explosive charge?

No, you could do it...

I just don't want to be near the gun when you're doing the initial life fire testing.

You have exploding 50 cal BMG bullets so why not a rail launched projectile? the trick would be in the fuse.

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Lloyds finally inks mega 10-year cloudy outsourcing deal with IBM

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Hmmm

That sort of client travel is permitted and isn't normally an expense.

That's where the work is being performed. Its the non-billable expense that has been hit.

The issue though is that these guys and gals will do the heavy lifting and train their replacements where they will then fade away to find a new job.

Lloyds just made their systems worse and they don't even care because the bean counters can show the savings to the bottom line as long as things go smoothly.

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The biggest British Airways IT meltdown WTF: 200 systems in the critical path?

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

@James51

No, not ignorance and greed.

Try micro services in additional to having legacy systems in place where it is cheaper to add another micro service in to the chain than it is to rewrite the original service, test it, with the additional feature.

The one advantage is that if you have only a certain class of travelers who have an additional process to check some sort of security... you don't have to run everyone thru that process.

Note, I'm not suggesting that this is the case, or that this model is the best fit for BA, but it could be viable and it what is happening when you consider stream processing.

The issue is that at some point you run in to a problem when the chain gets too long and it breaks in places and you don't know how to move forward or handle the errors.

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