* Posts by Ian Michael Gumby

3884 posts • joined 11 Apr 2006

Sili-spurned Valley! No way, San Jose! Amazon snubs SF Bay Area in search for HQ2 city

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Sloppy Reporting...

Just to add... in El Reg's defense... several other major news organizations also didn't comment on Chicago.

(That could be a good thing.)

Bezos is a Blue man and will probably pick a blue state. California, Illinois, NY are the bluest state.

Toronto is out... think about all of the border crossings when you have to visit the office. The border agents will constantly harass you about why you're going to Toronto and try to see if you're doing any sales business there. (Which means tax revenue...)

Atlanta? Traffic sucks. Talent? Meh, there's some.

Chicago has Google, Groupon, and others. (Boeing, United, Allstate, McDonalds, Miller Brewing, ... )

Get rid of Madigan and fix the pension issue, and we'll be back to normal.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: I'll take a Punt

Austin?

Traffic sucks.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Indy!

Sorry mate.

Chicago.

What do you do in Downtown Indy after 5?

Its like most cities in the midwest. All of the 'burbs look the same and the city shuts down after 5.

Indy, Cleveland, Columbus, Cincy... all the same.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Flame

Sloppy Reporting...

Got to flame El Reg.

Sorry guys but you talk about 19 of the 20 cities leaving out Chicago.

In terms of cities... Chicago has a lot going for it. I know where four of the potential sites are and I live very close to one of them (Walking distance to most of them, albeit not a walk I would want to take in the frozen cold or heavy rain. )

In terms of commuting to work... You can live anywhere in Chicagoland (Chicago and surrounding suburbs, including Indiana) get to downtown via car, rail (Metra), or the EL. Or bike even. You have high tech companies as well as several tech incubators in the city. And O'Hare is a major airport w Midway for some flights too. So transportation isn't an issue.

The only 'red flag' is Illinois' state government. Get rid of Mike Madigan and his daughter, and you will see the necessary changes flow thru the State's government.

If you can stomach real seasons, its not that bad. We don't fold when it snows and we don't have threats of Hurricanes. (Or earthquakes.)

Its not just the local schools, but Chicago draws on talent from across the Midwest.

Cowlumbus isn't bad, but not the same as Chicago. Indy? Meh.

So why didn't El Reg mention Chicago? Only one reference on the page and its in the list.

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Who's using 2FA? Sweet FA. Less than 10% of Gmail users enable two-factor authentication

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: SMS 2FA shouldn't even count as "security"

I have to call BS on the AC posts.

2FA may use SMS txts. BTW you can set your phone to not show texts on your lock screen....

But you can download DUO or Google's tool for setting up 2FA Then you have to only have your phone handy with you.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC Re: Not Surprised

There are few good reasons not to use 2FA (and I can't think of any outside of, possibly, some for users with disabilities)

huh?

If you are disabled and can use a computer, then you can use a phone app to do the 2FA key.

But yeah, I'm one of the 10% who does it on my active gmail accounts.

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Is this the real life? Is this just fantasy? Self-processing flash drives, we'll need more capacity

Ian Michael Gumby
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Angel

Re: Outstanding headline

Channeling Freddy?

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Super Micro crams 36 Samsung 'ruler' SSDs into dense superserver

Ian Michael Gumby
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Alien

@Lord_Beavis... Re: And the serious question again is...

You're behind the curve.

We're talking 8K pr0n and even then... lots of it. The only limitation would be your ability to manage all of those streams.... (Assuming you want to serve up the pr0n for $$$

If this was for your own personal use... I hope that you're on the NHS or have a really good health insurance policy. (CTS, laser removal for the hair on your palms, vision checked and glasses , plus a seeing eye dog...)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Hans 1

You do realize that with the smaller form factor... 36 of these drives will deliver Petabyte scale.

Spinning rust is the new tape. It will take 10-15 years before you start to see it disappear and even then it will still exist.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@DougS Re: Hate to think about what this will cost

If you have to ask, you probably couldn't afford it. ;-)

Yeah, I would want 3-5x of these boxes. I would imagine you could buy a small house for the price of these servers if maxed out. Probably 180K or more just on the drives alone.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC ... Re: Use Case?

Oh lots of good reasons.

Consider that today's Enterprises have a mixture of fast and slow data that you will need fast access to use if you want to do subjective real time analytics.

There's a ton of applications that could take advantage of this model. At a minimum... you would need three of them as part of a hadoop cluster to handle fast ingest, or fast lookups from HBase / MapR-DB or even as part of an Elastic Search index. (In memory with fast application level swap to disk. )

If you want to get into specialized apps. Try dealing with active maps where you need to take in map attribute data, recompile the maps and push out. (e.g. variable speed limit roads, accidents, and traffic)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Freddy bogs Re: Breaking News

Considering that you don't know which 2 CPUs you will put in this unit, you can't say that.

They have 'reasonably' priced 18 core chips which have 36 thread for a total of 72 threads to work with.

Even if you lose 30% performance in the CPU... you don't necessarily lose 30% of your performance overall. It depends on what you're doing.

The interesting thing ... what's the cost? Sure the drives aren't on the market yet, but you build out a rack of these guys... (That would be 38-40 depending on heat/cooling/power and ToR switch capacity... )

Now you've got a lot of fast storage. Of course in real life, you'd mix and match these across a row of racks and fill out the rest with other gear ... Very nice...

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FBI says it can't unlock 8,000 encrypted devices, demands backdoors for America's 'public safety'

Ian Michael Gumby
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Big Brother

@Adrian 4 Re: Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?

If you haven't been paying attention, there is this thing called the official records Act. That is to say all work products and communication by Federal Employees must be retained and readable.

In the CFPA (I think that's the acronym) there's a group calling themselves Dumbledoor's ?sp? Army. Where they have downloaded encryption apps and what not. (You can find out more by googling.)

Those individuals should be terminated because by law everything they do should be review-able.

As to this... tell them to punt. They put a backdoor in... a year or two later, someone pilfers the NSA/CIA and poof, those hacks are out.

Not to mention with all of the news of the level of corruption within the DoJ and FBI... fuggitabout it.

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SpaceX delivers classified 'Zuma' payload into orbit

Ian Michael Gumby
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Mushroom

Re: Mars Orbit?

Just a follow up...

Rumor has it that the satellite failed to deploy and returned to earth.

So if it was a corvette you'd see the real thing from Heavy Metal.

Just saying... The explosion is from the solid debris hitting the earth at a high velocity going boom.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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FAIL

Re: Mars Orbit?

Sorry El Reg, its a major Fail.

Everyone knows that it should be a Classic Corvette Convertible.

For those too young, go watch the opening scene to Heavy Metal.

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Who's that at Ring's door? Why, it's Skybell with a begging cup, er, patent rip-off lawsuit

Ian Michael Gumby
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@the vogon Re: They have a case?

A deadbolt is a far cheaper solution when it comes to baring entry thru the door.

A single door bell or sensor isn't going to cover a large area and you. Just walk over to the window a few meters away and break in. ;-) In either case you defeated a cheap deadbolt or a relatively expensive doorbell w sensors on a door that lacked the nicer dead bolt.

As to defeating the system... take out the wifi and you're in.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Just add...

You say this as a joke but yes...

The problem is that when you have a set of criteria and definitions on how to consider a patent request and you're a drone... it fits. Patent granted.

This is why Patent Reform is critical and it almost passed until Harry Reid killed it a few years back.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@ecofeco Re: They have a case?

You asked " They have a case? "

I may get down voted by those who don't read the full comment...

Yes, they have a case. <u>(Unfortunately)</u>

They have a case because some moron in the USPTO granted them a patent when none should have been granted. Because they have the patent, they can sue and will win unless you can get the USPTO to reverse themselves.

Without Patent Reform, these types of patents will continue to allow what you and I see as frivolous lawsuits. Its the while business process. Think the electronic shopping cart patent.

The company didn't invent the motion detector. They didn't invent the electric door bell. In fact they didn't invent any of the technology involved in the lawsuit. What they did was to combine them to create a specific product for which they applied and were granted a patent.

What you have to do is to show that their combination of parts to build a product was not really new or novel, that it was common sense and a probable evolutionary step forward. (e.g. a door pad buzzer with a camera tied to a close circuit TV leading to a door pad buzzer with a camera tied to video being streamed over the internet is an obvious step in evolution.... )

The burden is now on Ring to show that the patents should be invalidated which is a very expensive task. The community could also get involved too if anyone wants...

But that's the sad state of affairs.

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Woo-yay, Meltdown CPU fixes are here. Now, Spectre flaws will haunt tech industry for years

Ian Michael Gumby
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@Doug S Re: Insider trading

There's a couple of things here...

1) Martha Stewart did time because of her lying to the feds and not being smart about what she did.

If you think she was the only one who does this... hardly. Its hard to get caught.

2) There may be nothing illegal in the share sale. It depends on a couple of factors.

If he is already in a programed sell of shares as a way of portfolio diversification. Meaning he gets a huge stock option grant, he then sets up a pattern of sells to cash out and diversify his portfolio.

There could be an undisclosed life changing event.

The point is that before you get a lynch mob, learn the facts.

(Then heat up the tar.... )

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IBM lobs sueball at travel site Expedia for using some old Prodigy patents

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Gordon Re: Length of Term

Patents are enforceable up to 20 years from filing date.

So yeah, most of this is moot. Or so one would seem.

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Missed opportunity bingo: IBM's wasted years and the $92bn cash splurge

Ian Michael Gumby
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Facepalm

@Yes Me Re: Don't blame Ginny

IBM took the offshore/onshore model to an extreme.

You don't need any skilled people, just bodies who can do what they are told and are cheap.

This is a bean counter / MBA viewpoint that resources are equal, when they are in fact not.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Don't blame Ginny

Look, its no secret.

For over a decade, IBM executives have been buying back the company's stock to increase the stock share price as a way to earn major bonuses.

Ginny was promoted to Captain after the ship (IBM / Titanic) struck the iceberg. (Seriously, anyone who knows IBM... why would they put a woman in charge? She was set up to fail from the start.)

Under Sam P, they cut expenses to the bone. They moved everything offshore that they could, sacrificing customer sat in the process. All the time preaching to the sales team that for every percentage point of customer sat gain represented a billion dollars in additional revenue.

So when Ginny took charge, she was dealing with a company that still brought in a pile of cash, just less of it each quarter, and she needed to jump start the company.

She tried. and she was hobbled by her executive team who not only lacked vision, but also imagination. They were so brainwashed and hog tied by the bean counters not much they could do. Not to mention that the promotion ladder at IBM promoted the drone who would follow orders and lacked creativity. That were more process driven and didn't take risks... just do the same old thing because maybe this time it will work. Or they were fed so much blue punch that their brains rotted. (Just talk to any heritage IBMer who was fired... went thru the shock and found that life outside of IBM is much better.)

So don't blame Ginny because she lacked the staff needed to make the change.

You think Trump faces a deep state trying to usurp him? Ginny has it worse. And while I say don't blame Ginny, I haven't forgotten the fact that she too is a product of IBM and because she lacks perspective is also doomed to fail.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Version 1.0 Re: Maths anyone?

Son, you're a couple of decades late to the party.

Every major corporation who has extra cash on hand has been playing this game for years.

Its an old dog that still hunts.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Big assumption with that theory

As someone who came in thru one of those acquisitions, and yes, my alias is not a complete secret, I can tell you that any acquisition goes thru this process.

And having been in this industry for far too many years, I can tell you that what happens at IBM is not alone in this process.

IBM, Oracle, Teradata, EMC, etc ... they all do this and unless you've spent time working for a mega corp, your soul will get crushed because you are not prepared for it.

There's more, but I can't really say because of friends still within the belly of the beast even today.

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Nest's slick IoT burglar alarm catches crooks... while it eyes your wallet

Ian Michael Gumby
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Coat

Rasberry Pi to the rescue?

We've already seen cool apps and projects built around the Pi.

This could be used in terms of motion sensors and some of the components.

Of course this could be tied in to a small Linux box hidden away on a UPS...

All FOSS driven.

It may not save you on your insurance... but it will add to your piece of mind.

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Weed wish you a merry Christmas: Pot-toting OAPs tell cops 30kg stash is for pressies

Ian Michael Gumby
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Coat

They won't see any jail time.

Due to their advanced age, they will be convicted, fined, and put on probation.

(Want to bet that they have a card for medical MJ? )

These two are definitely first gen hippies. (Do the math)

Mine's the Scotties vest lined with vacuumed packed baggies... ;-)

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That was fast... unlike old iPhones: Apple sued for slowing down mobes

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Pomgolian .... Wrong... Re: That probably explains..

There are two things happening...

1) Moore's law which is still holds true... (to a point)

2) Bloatware.

And product design...

Please don't conflate these with what is happening...

As newer, more powerful CPUs are created, more features are added because the phones can do more. Your older phones are having a harder time running with the latest versions of software because of their slower, less powerful CPUs. Also, the more horsepower, the more likely that sloppy code works well enough and added features that you really don't want aka bloatware...

And then there's product design that wants slimmer cooler look and feel. If you don't believe me... if two cars cost the same... one ran like a tank but looked ugly, or a sleek model that does a better than good enough job... which do you choose?

NOW HAVING SAID ALL OF THAT.... APPLE WILL LOSE OR SETTLE THE LAWSUIT...

All of the issues that you raise are true of all PC tech products. (see above)

However, the issue is that they are throttling you because your battery is supposedly starting to fail. Because of the product design, you are unable to DIY battery replacement, thus you have to pay for the service time in addition to the battery. (and the warranty that it was done right and the phone sealed back up properly...) So you can purchase a new battery. Much cheaper than a new phone.

At the same time... if you do purchase a new battery, your phone will still be throttled. So how are you protected? You're not. There is no way for Apple to know if you've replaced your battery or not therefore your phone will still fail.

A judge, or a jury will see thru their argument.

If they didn't do this... you would still have a choice and of course many would go to CPR (a third party phone repair service) and replace the phone battery. Or you could upgrade your phone because your older phone would be less capable of running the newer apps that you want to have or your kids say are 'must have' apps.

(You could go to Apple, and it would be smarter because some of these places use cheap knockoff parts that well... could cause your phone to explode or catch fire. ... re. USB charging cables (remember that fiasco?) ... )

Because Apple doesn't allow this path... they will lose the case and you can bet that if you bought a new iPhone... you'll get some sort of credit at the apple store, or a coupon/rebate... all while the lawyers get millions in a class action lawsuit.

IMHO, Apple and others in the Silicone [sic] Valley need to wake up and get a reality check.

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Oi, force Microsoft to cough up emails on Irish servers to the Feds, US states urge Supremes

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: US Attorneys and international law

The law is very interesting.

Microsoft can't claim that because the servers are overseas therefore the court order isn't valid.

It is.

Note: We're not talking about an Irish citizen who lives in Ireland and the US courts wants his data. That would be a completely different issue. The question here is how do you handle jurisdiction of data.

To make this simpler... You have a criminal act in NY committed by a US citizen and resident of the state of NY, yet the data sits on a server in California. The defense could argue that because the server was in a different state that they didn't have jurisdiction.

Now, that doesn't sound right, now does it?

Move the server to Toronto...

The point is that because the data is accessible from the jurisdiction where the crime was committed, it should be admissible. That the location of the server is irrelevant.

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IBM to expunge over 500 people in latest redundo round

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@AC

The Death spiral started long ago.

You can blame IBM, but you also have to blame the customer who keeps wanted things cheaper and bringing in offshore resources is one way. You can blame the book keepers who don't understand that not everybody is at the same level. Employees are not cogs.

The way to save IBM is to create wholly owned subsidiaries that are funded by IBM but do not share the same culture and bean counter demands.

IBM has the cash to make things happen. Only the brand is tarnished and management is not prepared to adapt and compete.

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Oregon will let engineer refer to himself as an 'engineer'

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: let me guess

So.. you have the engineering equivalence of an Art History degree. ;-)

(No jobs available in your field of study.)

And no, you're not. :-P

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@BillG Re: let me guess

No.

You can get a BS thru a non accredited engineering program.

Your degree (BS or BE ) has to be thru an accredited 4yr engineering program.

(BS in College of Arts & Science != BS in College of Engineering)

PE (Professional Engineering) is someone who has gone thru the process outlined here:

https://www.nspe.org/resources/licensure/what-pe

PE is not governed by the state.

Then you have the use of engineering that is governed by the state. (e.g HVAC, building services, etc ...)

That's the end of story.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: let me guess

Not exactly.

The problem is that there a couple of professions that call themselves engineers and there's some history in licensing professions. E.g. an HVAC guy or building engineer isn't the same as a civil engineer or electrical engineer. ...

But if you're providing the HVAC or building engineering services you have to be licensed.

(just as doctors and lawyers are also licensed by the state too. )

What makes matters worse is that everyone loves to call themselves software engineers because that's their job title, even though they aren't software engineers. To be a software engineer you need to have graduated from a 4yr accredited engineering program.

So while its a fail what the Oregon agencies did, its a bit more complicated and unless you've had to deal with state and local governments you wouldn't understand.

An engineer isn't an engineer unless he's an engineer. Now which train do you want to ride?

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Shingled out: 14TB helium-filled Toshiba drive floats to market

Ian Michael Gumby
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Coat

Re: RAID rebuild times?

That's why you go jbod and use a DFS.

Scary thought. 2U box 12x14TB = 168TB. (I think its a 2U box)

Either way. 10 of these guys (servers) will give you 1 1/2 PB of storage in less than a rack.

Can you imagine all of the 8K porn you could stash on these things?

And yes, the internet was made by guys to share their porn collections.

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Did you unwittingly support the destruction of net neutrality rules?

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: queue remoaners wanting a similar tool in the UK to validate brexit votes (:

"I do not agree though that so many US voters where in favour of destructing net neutrality rules."

Do you really understand the driving issue behind net neutrality?

Do you understand the peering agreements that make up the internet?

When you put net neutrality in those terms, you're looking at a very different argument that many see in the press. How net freedom and freedom of speech are at risk.

That's not the issue. Follow the money.

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'Break up Google and Facebook if you ever want innovation again'

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Platypus...

The funny thing about FOSS... its a false economy.

But back to the article's author's point.

If you run NoScript (The latest verision) you can see what scripts El Reg runs.

Why do they have Google Analytics and Google tag services? Could they not run their own analytics internally?

Free clue. This is why Google has a monopoly on the ad services ...

Then there's facebook. Why run js code from facebook.net?

The author is correct in his assertions. You may not know this unless you're old enough to remember the birth of the PC.

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DNS resolver 9.9.9.9 will check requests against IBM threat database

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

because policing is one of the many opt outs taken by the UK government"

Partially true - the exemption in GDPR is not for police forces, but for data used for policing purposes. This system is very much subject to GDPR.

Actually they may disagree with that... since this is tied to security and police efforts... but I'm not going to play lawyer.

They have the ability to log your request and that's not against the GDPR. However, if they were to combine their logs with DNS information and can identify you from your static IP address... that would be different. Assuming that you do have a static IP address and this doesn't fall in to an exception.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Does not work very well

;; ANSWER SECTION:

google.com. 153 IN A 172.217.8.174

;; Query time: 8 msec

;; SERVER: 9.9.9.9#53(9.9.9.9)

;; WHEN: Mon Nov 20 12:11:47 CST 2017

;; MSG SIZE rcvd: 55

Of course YMMV depending on where in the world you are located.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Dan 55

I would have down voted you.. but you are currently up five and down five so it fits your moniker. ;-)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Dan 55

It doesn't matter if they are running on IP addresses because those addresses will have to resolve to someone.

And there are more threats than just malware.

As to this being free...

Consider this a community service. The more people who use it, the better the database becomes and the more people will use it.

They may not make money off of you, but by having a robust database, they can use it as part of their services offering. They are using you to make their database better, hence its free.

At a later date, they could throttle or charge you for usage if the number of queries exceeds a certain threshold.

And they will want to capture who is using their database as well. How long they retain their logs or how they will aggregate it is another matter.

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How about that US isle wrecked by a hurricane, no power, comms... yes, we mean Puerto Rico

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Standards needed

Slow recovery because prior to the hurricane hitting, they had a substandard infrastructure due to government incompetence.

No power, no matter how many cell towers you get up... you're SOL.

They could put up towers, solar panels and diesel generators, but there's a bit more because the infrastructure is wiped. out.

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Jet packs are real – and inventor just broke world speed record in it

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Like it

At 32mph, you may out run cops on bikes, but not if they're using motorcycles or cars.

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OpenSSL patches, Apple bug fixes, Hilton's $700k hack bill, Kim Dotcom raid settlement, Signal desktop app, and more

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Kiwi Re: @Doug S... I wonder what the Trump apologists' excuse will be this time?

Since you're not an American, I'll spell it out to you...

As of Monday, its been revealed that Comey changed the wording of his draft to not say that Clinton was Grossly Negligent because that would have meant they would have to charge her and her staff. At the same time, there was intent. She and her staff intended to violate the FOIA and the Official Records Act by having this server in place. This is in to the addition that there are allegations of pay to play as well.

Why now in 2017? Because the investigation was tainted and both Lynch and Comey tanked the investigation.

Clintons are trash. You clearly don't know their history and their scandals. Trump is an alter boy compared to them.

Please pay attention to the US news over the next couple of months. Because Clinton didn't win... the SHTF is about to happen.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Doug S... Re: I wonder what the Trump apologists' excuse will be this time?

Dude,

You really need to understand the facts and the law before you spout some nonsense.

What Clinton did was to use a personal secret server instead of conducting her business on a .gov email account. This was done with the intent of violating the FOIA.

To make matters worse, she and her staff routinely sent classified material to and from said server. That in itself is a felony violation of the Espionage Act. There's more but lets save that for another story...

The point is that using a personal email account for business, but not for sending or receiving classified material, is in fact legal and permissible under the "Official Records Act" which Bill Clinton expanded to include e-mail while he was POTUS.

The catch is that the person has to send the emails to be archived within I think either 60 or 90 days post transmission. (So if you need to contact someone and you can't connect to the .gov servers, you can still do so within the law as long as those communications are submitted to be archived. )

Clinton? It wasn't until Gucifer outed her by posting emails from her secret server to her best bud Syd. B.

That was 2 years after she left office.

There.

Do you now understand the law?

BTW, Hillary Clinton as SoS fired the Ambassador to Kenya for using his personal email account for doing business, as well as sent out memos warning all of her staff (State Dept employees) not to use personal email for official business. Do you see the irony here?

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Mellanox NICs Xilinx FPGA to save backplane slots and CPU cycles

Ian Michael Gumby
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Thumb Up

Definitely cool...

Can really be used to improve networking security.

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Take off, ya hosers! Silicon Valley court says Google can safely ignore Canadian search ban

Ian Michael Gumby
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@Bob .. Re: Disturbingly...

Curiously, the Canuck supremes said not only could the router maker keep its injunction against Google, but also that the injunction can be enforced worldwide to protect the Canadian Equustek's interests, meaning Google had to start deleting the links for all of its users on the planet.

So... this isn't about just stopping Canadians from seeing ads from dodgy kit.

Its to stop the world from seeing ads to see dodgy kit.

If the company wanted to, they could go back the the courts because Google is not being compliant.

While the Canadian Courts may not enforce its order against Google US to block the world, they can order Google CA to do so. They could impose fines and penalties against Google CA or worst case... ban Google from doing business in CA.

Then there's the issue of Trade. However since its not Google who's selling the kit, the company would have a hard time...

But in any country where the company has a distributor or distributors, they can sue Google and could use the Canadian court's verdict as evidence. IMHO They would win and could negotiate a deal with Google to block the ads where their kit is legally sold.

The problem is that the Canadian company tried a short cut and Google is big enough to hire better lawyers who can make arguments against them doing the right thing,

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@The idiot ... Re: Hmmm...

Not quite.

You have a company in Canada who manufactures a product where someone is selling a knock off product that is questionable and harming the brand. (Not that I ever heard of these guys...)

While on the surface of your argument ... that this becomes a jurisdictional issue and a Canadian Court has no jurisdiction in the US... it would make sense.

However, you have some other things that need to be considered.

WTO gets involved because its a question of selling a knock-off.

The Canadian company could take their win in Canada and then sue Google in the US. Provided that the company has a distributor or distributors in the US. The the company can sue Google in the US.

IMHO Google will lose.

The problem is that the company tried to shorten the process and it cost them.

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Go on IBMers, tell us what you really think

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@AC ... Re: I don't mind

I came in thru an acquisition.

I was shown a video message made by Lou.

Very strong and good messaging.

Sam? Yeah different.

We used to use Blue Pages to determine seniority based on the number of levels between the person and Lou / Sam because bands were not equivalent across divisions.

Unlike you, I met a lot of people, both good and bad. While heritage IBMers could be the worst, I had respect for the guys who came from PWC.

Oh the stories I could tell... ;-)

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What's HPE Next? Now it's unemployment for 'thousands' of staff

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Clinging to share in a shrinking no-margin market

Funny, but how's SuperMicro making a large profit?

I think the question is... how HP plans to sell commodity products at 2x the retail price?

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Supreme Court to rule on whether US has right to data stored overseas

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@d3vy ... WTF?

Seriously you need to think about the issue.

US citizen data taken offshore to Ireland. This would be similar to either German bank data laws or Swiss Data Laws concerning how to handle data.

What we should expect is that the rights of the country of origination will prevail.

Think of it this way. UK data is going to be placed under new rules/regs starting next year. Imagine if Google moved that data in to the US and told you that your data is no longer protected under UK laws because it now resides in the US?

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Rejecting Sonos' private data slurp basically bricks bloke's boombox

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@AC Definitely a lawsuit waiting to happen...

There are two issues at play...

1) SONOS clearly wants to remain relevant and compete with Amazon, therefore they are attempting to morph their speakers in to a new product that you already have in your home.

2) Metadata capture is a way to further gain value from you. Your data has value and they can then use it to help identify information that they can sell/rent to advertising agencies.

3) A future product... adding adverts to the streams... ;-) (Think about that one for a second....)

But all of this comes at a risk.

If they don't provide security and protect the information that they capture... they will be sued in to oblivion. .

We can look at half a dozen major financial companies that have taken multi-billion dollar hits over data breaches and the impact to their bottom line.

As many have already put out there... there are other solutions like blue tooth speakers, or I'd prefer actual wires. My old Adcom had A/B unfortunately after 20 year... it died and it was cheaper to replace it with an A/V receiver which had the same thing, which again died and replaced it with a new A/V receiver which I keep in my office with a nice pair of wired bookshelf speakers. ( Vienna Acoustics that I picked up on sale at a steep discount because the stereo store was closing and they were floor models. )

So I'll pass on Sonos and wait for the lawsuit that is definitely coming to a courtroom near you. ;-)

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