* Posts by Ian Michael Gumby

4104 posts • joined 11 Apr 2006

Holy macaroni! After months of number-crunching, behold the strongest material in the universe: Nuclear pasta

Ian Michael Gumby
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Alien

Talk to Larry Niven...

Can you say Ringworld? Ringworld Engineers?

I get that while Larry Niven’s stories had discussed this material, these guys actually simulated it. BTW, good luck in trying to mine it... ;-)

But I have to ask... the simulation is based on the material as it is within a Neutron Star, or assuming that they could actually manufacture or mine it... would it react the same outside of the effects of a Neutron Star? Would it lose its liquidity?

Alien because of the Pak Protector reference.

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Google goes bilingual, Facebook fleshes out translation and TensorFlow is dope

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Google Assistant is bilingual

Written or oral?

Right now if you have good Thai to English and English to Tamil, or Welsh, You can translate. You don't need to go direct, but to an intermediate universal language.

But to your point. You need to take it in context.

Where you have trouble is understanding idioms or slang expressions that are based on cultural contexts.

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Lyon for speed, San Francisco for money, Amsterdam for fun: the best cities to be a techie

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

In Chicago...

I can do fiber to the home , or 1GB/s via broadband.

That's because I live in the city and there's fiber everywhere.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Property prices in U.S. cities are not really a function of the financial crisis anymore

Minneapolis?

Dude, have you been there in winter?

They don't plow the streets so if you don't have AWD or 4x4, you will be stuck.

And when its -15 without wind chill... yeah right.

At least in Chicago, you have a real city and public transportation that works and its only -15 for a couple of days...

Not to mention two baseball teams, a hockey team, football, soccer (football) ...

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Linux 4.19 lets you declare your trust in AMD, IBM and Intel

Ian Michael Gumby
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Alien

Re: This is actually useful

No, not really that useful.

At issue is that for most tasks the regular random number generator is random enough.

For tasks that require a better random number generator, they will use alternative that are already available.

So sure it moves the issue to vendor, (e.g. RH, SuSE, etc ...) but it really is attempting to solve a problem that is solved thru other means. I guess you could say it reduces the burden on the other apps to supply their own random number generator. Thats about it...

The alien because one of the best sources for entropy (randomness) comes from listening to background radiation/noise from space...

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It's a net neutrality whodunnit: Boffins devise way to detect who's throttling transit

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Jelly Eel

It depends on the contract.

The 'unlimited' plans have contract language that if the customer were to exceed X GB per month, their network connection will be throttled. However they are still able to use the network to get and send data.

The alternative is to either stop when the amount of data send/received hits X or to charge a premium if they go over for the next Y GB and to automatically charge Y for every GB they go over on their plan.

If you think this is bad, try having commercial grade service on the same network that provides residential service for your broadband. I would be pissed except that I can survive the downtime and if necessary use my cell as a router where the penalty for going over my data plan is much than the cost of going with an ISP and trying to get a fiber pulled to the building. (Aren't SOHO's great! :-P )

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@David123 Not exactly.

Yes, you are correct that this isn't a Net Neutrality issue.

However your example isn't correct.

Net Neutrality deals with the peering agreement between two networks and their traffic.

A better example would be if the Fire Department's central command is on L3 and because of all of the real time high def videos that are being shared, news reports, weather, etc ... (meaning a lot of traffic) that is flowing one way to the fire stations that use Verizon, that Verizon throttles L3's traffic coming from the Fire Department's HQ. Or all of L3's traffic to Verizon.

Many people don't understand how the internet actually works, including politicians who are supposed to get the facts before they vote.

Note: I tried to give you a better example, I am sure that you can poke holes in it. But you get the idea.

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Ah, um, let's see. Yup... Fortnite CEO is still mad at Google for revealing security hole early

Ian Michael Gumby
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Big Brother

Bad action on the part of Google.

Google's security team turned down Epic's 90-day request and published the information one week after the patch. It's not clear when Google informed Epic it was going to publish the details; the issue tracker page refers to an email sent direct to Epic.

Google does have some explaining to do. Maybe they don't think its evil on their part?

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: On one hand...

So?

The correct solution is that when an account is created, it should send a verification request to your email account. No verification, no usable account thus no flood of emails. (Unless its a flood of accounts being set up in your name using the same email address...)

Sorry, no sympathy here.

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Judge bars distribution of 3D gun files... er, five years after they were slapped onto the web

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Why bother

I for one would love to see you go to a range with your plastic AK-47 and try to fire off a couple of rounds.

The gun would explode on the first shot.

If you're going to make that argument, then you have to consider the sale of an 80% ready Glock or AR-15 where you can easily complete if you follow directions and have a couple of shop tools available. Nothing fancy.

And that is next on their agenda. They fear that gangs are going to buy the legal kits and then make guns.

While its a real threat, its not realistic because most of the gang shootings are done with recycled guns where after a shooting the gang sells the gun to another person/gang so that you can get the gun, the guy with the gun, but he won't be the shooter in the crime.

Living in Chicago, talking to the right people, you learn things...

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Grikath Re: you must be...

Uhm... who said anything about plastic?

Yeah. That's the thing. You could use a 3D metal printer to print the components to make a gun.

There is one company that manufactures these printers did just that. They printed a .45 ACP 1911 and then put it out on to a test range.

It worked flawlessly. The goal was to show that its possible to use their printer to manufacture specialized parts that can withstand the high pressures of a gun and thus be useful in engine or other machine parts.

The company didn't release the cost of the gun, but said you could easily buy a lot of 1911s for the price so that its not realistic to make a 3D gun when you could easily buy one.

In terms of plastic guns... the barrel will explode after one or more shots from the pressure of a .22lr.

Anything larger would be dangerous on the first shot.

Now if you did a mix of non ferrous metal, carbon fiber and resin filled plastic... you could build an undetectable gun if you wanted. Oh and it wouldn't be cheap either.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

dew3 Re: Where is the NRA?

The plastic gun isn't really undetectable.

The key would be to make a gun, a real gun, where when broken down doesn't look like a gun so that you can pass thru security and then build it when needed.

This is not a really hot 2A topic, but more of a 1st A topic.

Building your own gun is legal. (Except if its built to be undetectable. )

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Where is the NRA?

The NRA is silent because its a non issue. (There is a statement out, but not really a hot topic)

The legal issue is the issue of the 1st amendment and not the 2nd.

Its like bump stocks. A buddy of mine bought one for 'shits and giggles'. He put it on one of his ARs and played with it. He then took it off and put it in one of his many gun safes along with the ATF ruling making it legal. (He lives in one of the 43 states that allows the legal ownership of machine guns by civilians, and owns at least one that I know of. )

The issue isn't your ability to manufacture your own guns. You can legally do that but you can't sell it or even give it away. (God help you if it gets stolen...)

The issue is the absurd fear that someone with a consumer grade 3D printer can print up a gun and then go on a shooting spree. (You can't. ) Or that the gun would be undetectable. There are metal pieces and again, its a .22lr only and will last at most a couple of rounds before it goes boom. Anything large and it will go boom in your face.

So why waste time on this when you have real issues to deal with.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Coat

@Martin-73

Look, if you want to thumb your nose at Trump, go ahead, nobody cares.

Here, you have an issue of a matter of law which the judge seems to be ignoring, along with some technical facts.

1) Plastic printed guns are a gimmick. You can only fire a couple of .22lr rounds before the gun blows up in your face.

2) There are still ferrous parts in the gun which are detectable while the non-ferrous parts can still be spotted in an x-ray machine.

3) there are other options.

A) a non ferrous barrel, chamber and firing pin with other parts made out of plastic. The non-ferrous barrel could be wrapped in carbon fiber for the needed rigidity to take the pressure from a round being fired.

B) Google zip gun.

C) other ideas out there.

4) Its not illegal for you to manufacture your own guns, you just can't sell them.

So when you consider this... the printing of the plans to create a 3D printed gun is really an exercise of free speech. Which is why its so wrong to stop the sharing of the plans which BTW are out there and you can probably download them off a non US based web / FTP server.

But that's just me... ;-)

Mine's the jacket with the kevlar lining and the side zipper so I can easily get to my legally owned CCW permitted gun.

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Smut slinger dreams of AI software to create hardcore flicks with your face – plus other machine-learning news

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Teiwaz

I think that w celebrity porn, you have a major legal liability if the vids got out in to public.

But guys wanting to fsck their fav porn star? Sure. It makes for an interesting legal contract going forward.

Imagine a new line for Stormy Daniels and her lawyer trying to negotiate a per version payout instead of per performance. (1 sex scene == hundreds of different customers, so she would now be paid 100 times for the scene than just once)

Note: I chose Stormy because she's an alleged porn star / dancer who everyone would recognize her name... could have gone with a crossover starlet like Sasha Grey? (Is that the correct name / spelling?)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Oh No! not Re: Oh yes!

...so you can blackmail your boss with that video of him and those women-who-are-not-his-spouse...

Not really.

Wives aren't that dumb and even if they suspected the hubby of philandering around town... they are not going to believe their eyes. Can you say size discrepancy?

At the same time, you'll be asked to prove a date/time and you can bet unless you know your boss' schedule, he'll have an alibi. Then you'll be carted off to jail and the least of your worries will be the loss of your job.

At the same time... I can see the potential for psychological issues that this may create. Body dysphoria?

(sp? or dysmorphia )

But this reminds me of the Futurama episode w Lucy Liu and the sex robots. ;-) ( Both deal with you trying to live out your sexual fantasy...)

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Everybody dance now: Watch this AI code fool friends into thinking you can cut a rug like a pro

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@AC Re: Oh boy

Just a +1 on the William Gibson reference.

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Muslim American woman sues US border cops: Gimme back my seized iPhone's data!

Ian Michael Gumby
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@DatMafia Re: Don't fall for this

You remember the 'Clock boy'?

And I don't remember what CAIR did regarding those honor killings here in the US.

My nephew did his undergrad in the UK. Now my sister and her hubby are working hard to help teach him how the world really works.

The left has lovely ideas. Except when it comes time to pay for them.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Michael Wojcik Re: Entering a country becomes more and more like entering a prison.

Dude,

You do realize that while you travel on a country's passport (US, UK, etc ...) you are still going to face questions due to regional conflicts that you have no skin in that game.

Clearly you don't know anything about the 'rule of law' when it comes to border control or border enforcement. You take things for granted and don't realize just how easy it is to get in to trouble.

For those of us who have been thru this its no joke.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC Re: @Wzrd1 When Booking-Travel now the first thing I usually do is:

So you got selected out randomly to do the full body scan x-ray?

And your pony tail triggered it to be searched?

Wow.

I've been randomly selected. Not a problem except when my arm was in a sling post shoulder surgery.

Now if I am randomly selected... I will have to be patted down and get the wand because I wear a Freestyle Libre glucose monitor on my arm and its recommended not to be exposed to x-rays.

Big whoop. Add an extra 5 mins for security and you'll be fine.

Oh and get a friggin hair cut you hippy, and stay off my lawn! :-P

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Lots of Stupidity...

Wow,

First, there are a lot of red flags with this lawsuit.

Its a non starter and a fail, however when you consider that CAIR is behind it... you'll understand why. Note:This is the same CAIR that was behind the 'clock boy' incident down in Texas and who's father's lawsuit got tossed by the courts. (Also same CAIR that is associated w Muslim Brotherhood which is labeled a terrorist organization by the US and other countries.)

Second, a lot of anti-US / anti-Trump BS. When you consider that the laws that allow CBP to do this have been in place since 9/11, this has nothing to do with Trump. Google for articles about CBP forcing you to unlock and unencrypt your phone during Obama's tenure. (oops! so this isn't about Trump after all)

Third... all passengers are profiled. Some countries are better at it than others. You want to talk about horror stories against the US, I can share some with the UK where I was told one thing by the UK government yet got hassled by your Passport Control who didn't care that I was in compliance. Now every time I go to the UK, until I get a new passport, I have to spend 15+ minutes explaining why I have certain stamps in my passport.

Travel enough internationally for work and you will start to see that other countries are no better and sometimes worse than the US.

Try going to Israel and then to UAE or Saudi Arabia. You'll have fun explaining that one for a while.

Some of the advice given here is a joke. BTW, if you are going to spend time in a foreign country outside of the EU, buying a second phone makes sense. Its cheaper to get a local number and still be able to get emergency calls on your local phone. Of course YMMV now that you can use wi-fi to make calls.

Its sad that in today's world, most get their news and cannot establish facts from opinion and look at the news objectively.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Entering a country becomes more and more like entering a prison.

As I said this before...

Try visiting UAE after visiting Israel.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Class action

Wow. TDS is alive and well.

You do realize that post 9/11 these laws were put in to place and existed under Obama. You can go back and google cases where people were being asked to unlock their smart phones.

But hey!

Lets not stop a good rant against Trump that isn't based on any rational thought.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: 'I guess you don't travel enough and the paranoia is showing'

Really?

Go down the list.

Try going to UAE after visiting Israel on the same passport. ;-)

It all depends on who you are and what passport you carry.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Dan 55 Re: When Booking-Travel now the first thing I usually do is:

He's blowing smoke. (He's spouting nonsense.)

First, its not TSA, but CBP. Two different agencies with different training and responsibilities. CBP carry guns. TSA agents do not.

A TSA agent will not ask you for your phone or other electronic devices. In theory they could but when traveling within the states, you have certain rights that don't apply when entering the country.

If the moke had a DoD provided phone, depending on where he was going... he would be told to leave the phone at home.

If he had a DoD phone and a DoD id, he would not be hassled by CBP unless he did something stupid. (Which in this case.. sounds likely)

Must be friends with that chick who just got 63 months for leaking files.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: When Booking-Travel now the first thing I usually do is:

Funny, but all countries do this.

You just have to tick enough red flags.

I guess you don't travel enough and the paranoia is showing.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: There are zero rights at the border...

I think you're a little naive about this.

Show me a country where they don't have the same right to question and search you and your things.

Some countries are more advanced than others so YMMV.

Rejhane Lazoja said that when she landed at Newark Liberty International Airport on February 26 after a nine-hour transatlantic flight, she was subjected to a secondary screening by CBP agents who, over the course of the inspection, seized her iPhone 6S Plus.

So where had she been? The article doesn't say anything other than she came to the US off a trans Atlantic flight.

Imagine that you have an arrest record for being caught with a joint, plead guilty and then paid the fine. Now you travel to Japan only to be turned away at the border because of your drug conviction...

Even the UK has turned away American celebrities over jail time or over prior drug convictions in the US.

The point is that every country has similar rules/regs that limit your freedom at the border.

Oh and BTW, even at the airport, you won't be stopped unless its coming off an international flight.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Adam 1

Funny thing about the US law. Depending on where you are, unless there's a SCOTUS case, there are going to be judicial decisions that support either side. They point to two cases and I'm sure that there are cases that they ignore that say otherwise.

Look at all of the cases where the US and other countries force you to provide passwords or decrypt your drives/files for them to copy and review at a later time.

The women will lose.

The group that is supporting their case is CAIR which IIRC has been linked to the Muslim Brotherhood and is also the one's behind the 'Clock Boy Bomber' case where the father pulled his son out of school and sued the school because he walked around with a 'home made clock'* which wasn't among other things.

Not the best choice of supporters who are trying to suggest that they are targeted only because they are Muslim.

Now if the US Government had a fraction of the data that FB or Google has on you... they wouldn't need to do this.

You think the US Government is bad... there's a long list of countries that are worse. Try being a foreigner coming in to the UK and while you're following all of the right policies, still have cbp tell you that you're in violation and threatening to send you back because they don't know the law as well as they think. Even after you call a phone number to speak with a government representative for something like 99 pence a minute.

* Clock boy... taking a circuit board from an Alarm clock and putting it in a case made to look like a bomb is not technically advanced, although it did solicit praise from Obama and fooled some liberal minded folks from MIT who later went silent when some people (including those from the UK) pointed out what he had done.

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Chap asks Facebook for data on his web activity, Facebook says no, now watchdog's on the case

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Doctor Syntax

The report just says he's asking for browsing activity off Facebook. It's not clear whether he also has a FB account or whether he's a non-account holding innocent bystander.

It doesn't matter.

Under GDPR, any data collected by FB on a non-account holder would be a violation since the non-account holder has no way to 'opt-in' to their capture and retention of his data. Where they may claim you approved is that the site you visited had a banner than said that they use cookies therefore if you visit the site, you agree to their capturing data on you and imply that it carries to their third parties like FB.

(And that's questionable at the start) or if they use .js from FB which has nothing to do with the cookies.

So the UK has every right to go after them.

If he is an account holder, then under the GDPR they have to detail what details they collect and how they use it so that the user/punter/shill has the option to 'opt-in' giving them an informed consent to track him.

That's not so clear therefore it too is against the law.

Either way you cook it... its still tainted meat and you will get sick. ;-)

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Just how rigged is America's broadband world? A deep dive into one US city reveals all

Ian Michael Gumby
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@MadonnaC Re: Choice

If you have to relocate, you can see where in the US has the best bandwidth. Some are major cities like Chicago, NYC, SFO, etc ...

But then there's Lenexa KS, Columbus OH, and other smaller cities.

This is a stark contrast to the rural areas where they can't string cable (too expensive) and unless the household makes a considerable investment... (100ft mast to house PtP microwave) ... you won't see it.

This is the largest irony in that many tout high tech, IoT farming, but don't realize the costs of setting up the communications...

Some would love to have something better than dial up or 3-4G (LTE) data plans for connecting house holds.

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Drama as boffins claim to reach the Holy Grail of superconductivity

Ian Michael Gumby
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Holmes

@Christoph Re: Extraordinary claims—

Re: Extraordinary claims—

"delivery of vast power from far away, e.g. from solar concentrators in the Sahara to Europe"

Which would make all those barren stretches of Sahara desert suddenly extremely valuable. Which would promptly provoke robust discussions as to who owned them. (Hint: Not the people who actually live there.)

-=-

Not really.

They are using gold and silver.

How much do you think it would cost to manufacture a 1km length of cable capable of carrying the power generated from such a plant? And how much electricity is lost via transmission and what's its cost?

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Milton ... Re: Extraordinary claims—

Suppose their work pans out... is true...

Considering the materials used (gold and silver), you may find that the cost required to use super conducting material in place of what is used today far exceeds the cost of the energy lost.

So... for a lot of your examples... it doesn't help.

Where it does help is in mag lev transportation. Now the hyper tube could make sense as well as other forms of public transportation.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Sources (yet again el Reg)

Also small nit...

Did I read correctly -37C? Where is that 'room temperature'?

I mean if their stuff works out... nice. Closer to hitting the mark.

If not... sucks to be them.

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Google risks mega-fine in EU over location 'stalking'

Ian Michael Gumby
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Facepalm

Re: popcorn futures

Well with the recent weather patterns, the amount of Sweet corn could be down and prices up. ;-)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@nagyeger Re: polygon

Map Tiles are set sizes and there are larger tiles available for areas where there are less roads/routes. (really its road link segments...) But its easier to standardize on one of the smaller tile sizes.

That's why they use it. They don't care about the guy who lives on the farm in Normal OK and owns most of the 2km^2.

But even in a 2km square, given a truncated IP address, they will have you nailed down fairly well.

If the advertiser has other sources of data... they can even narrow it down further.

Its scary.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@James 47

So they send a map tile id. That and the truncated IP address is enough to identify your location.

Yeah, this doesn't look good for Google.

As the article and other conversations point out that Apple uses it for internal stuff and doesn't serve it up on a platter.

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We've Amber heard a NASty rumour: Marvell man touts private cloud box

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

Good entry point...

2TB is a lot of space for storing the really important stuff.

For the average home user... not bad.

For the guy who does photography or video... wants a NAS to do double duty as a media server that can stream to multiple machines at the same time? Maybe going the custom route makes more sense. But then, you're spending $$$ for SSD/NVME, and a better CPU and upgraded networking. (How many people run 10GbE or higher at home? )

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Google keeps tracking you even when you specifically tell it not to: Maps, Search won't take no for an answer

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@tiggity Microsoft has been doing this for years.

The world is big and it takes a fleet of cars years to capture all of the roads globally.

Not easy and then you have to process the data.

Microsoft partnered with Navteq to do this.

Google got their start by buying Navteq's map data before Navteq thought about putting it online.

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Couldn't get out to the Valley? Here's a taste of the flashy goodness you've been missing

Ian Michael Gumby
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Thumb Up

Definitely Cool!

What we're seeing is a potential boon to an on prem solution to managing fast data and big data applications.

With evolving hardware, and as costs drop, Mesosphere and Kubernetes should be two very popular framework / tools to have under your belt.

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Supermicro breathes in, shimmies a PB of Intel flash into one rack unit

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@AC ...Re: @Colonel Claw

Naw, not really.

There's more to the design than just a single rack.

Also we never talked about DR/BCP planning and your second site.

There's also a bit more to the design... but I'll leave it to you to try and catch up first.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Facepalm

eswan

Hmmm... 8K resolution?

I wonder how much you could store uncompressed.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Colonel Claw

Yeah, you can't.

I think you may want to try CDW but even there... not much.

I think this is something you have to go directly to your hardware vendor to get, and then maybe some of the vendor supply shops that usually don't deal directly with consumer.

Very pricey and most of these guys won't keep kit on hand and will have to special order it.

My guess... the 1U box would be over 500K (USD) to 1 million (USD) fully kitted out. (Probably closer to 600-700K range.

One of these in the center of the rack w 4 4U boxes below and 4 4U boxes above. (plus ToR switches)

And the 4 U boxes contain NVidia GPUs.

Now that's a killer platform for ML or 'Big Data' with the 4Us also having a bit of local disk too.

Of course you'd be looking at a cool 2 million+ USD per rack fully kitted out...

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Oracle tells US Supremes: Ignore Rimini Street. You don't need to review copyright case

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@ Yank ... Re: Oracle will win...

Silly boy... even with a split at the lower courts... SCOTUS can still say no and not take the case. Also was this en banc or a subset of judges at the lower level?

And no, what you suggest while a potential, yet highly improbable, doesn't even register on the charts.

Like I said, the argument is in Oracle's favor.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Oracle will win...

There are three options...

1) SCOTUS ducks the case and the existing verdict stands.

2) SCOTUS hears the case and rules in favor of Oracle.

3) SCOTUS hears the case, rules in favor of Rimini Street, and the case goes back to the court to redo the award to Oracle for damages.

Now these three are not weighted equally. And the odds are that either option 1 or 2 will be higher than option 3. At the same time... if successful, the lower court will re-assess the damages including the legal costs of the appeal(s) and SCOTUS decision.

While the 9th usually gets it wrong, in this case, IMHO, they got it right. In fact Rimini is risking that the original judge could say ... ok, there's willful infringement therefore you face treble the damages plus additional legal fees which would put them back in the same boat.

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Amazon meets the incredible SHRINKING UK taxman

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: How it works:-

So how does it reduce their tax bill?

Are the gains in share price now a write off to Amazon? I mean if they gave 1K in shares to employee but by the time it can be touched the value is 3K, does Amazon get the 3K as a write off?

Can't really blame Amazon for gaming the system.

Just close the loophole.

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Hot US deal! IBM wins $83m from Groupon in e-commerce patent spat

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Mark 85 ... think AI ... Re: Kill Software Patents!!!

I think it would interesting if someone created an AI program to generate code to solve a specific problem that is covered by a patent.

If the AI comes up with software that is very similar, yet generated independently from the other system, it would help foster the argument to invalidate the patent in question.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Not parasitic ... but also not without problems... Re: @Charlie Clark Patent lifetime?

Restaurants hate them as do waiters.

In the US, waiters make their money from the tips. So when your meal is 50% off... while the restaurant may break even on the table, the waiter/waitress loses when they are only tipped on the price of the meal and not what the meal would have cost.

Businesses also hate it in that they run specials to attract new customers, yet the reality is that most who do Groupon will not revisit the businesses unless they have another Groupon deal.

Then again, there are some issues surrounding the coupons and discounts... some irregularities in accounting.

One thing also to remember... they started in Chicago. They've been profitable since day one... none of this sucking in investor capital with no positive cash flow.... (Like you see in Silicone [sic] Valley...)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Trev Re: Didn't Amazon contest this?

Groupon's HQ is in Chicago, IL, in the River North neighborhood. (approx .25 miles / .5km north of the 'Loop')

They were founded in Chicago and one of the founders went on to start Uptake also located in the same building.

(This is the old Montgomery Ward warehouse building)

More history than you wanted to know...

Also across the river (North Branch) from one of the contending spots for Amazon to locate their 2nd HQ.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Falling Man ...Re: Groupon

It depends.

You have to consider the patent as a whole and see what is actually being patented.

From what I have found... even if its possible to argue that the patent is obvious and not really able to be patented, depending on the lawyers arguing... you could still lose.

To your point, the burden of proof is on the person wishing to invalidate a patent. That said, once a patent is granted... its an uphill battle to get it revoked.

Software patents and business process patents should never be granted in the first place.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Charlie Clark Re: Patent lifetime?

Yup still alive and sitting in the their same offices in Chicago's River North neighborhood.

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