* Posts by Ian Michael Gumby

3661 posts • joined 11 Apr 2006

Amazing new algorithm makes fusion power slightly less incredibly inefficient

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Here are some free ideas

You need to check out some of the research by MIT.

There are designs that make using newer super conducting magnets viable. And newer materials.

Tokamack ?Sp? is based on toroid design but some of the incremental research is using linear systems.

More funding is needed and leaps in R&D and material science.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Back in the day

The article talked about an improvement in the temperature and efficiency over current methods by a factor of 2.

You can go online and find YouTube vids on MIT research in to Fusion and their take on R&D outside of the large scale Tokamacs ?sp? where they want to use the plasma shape to help with its efficiency.

The issue is to raise the temps and the longevity of the 'burn'.

And yes... its still just 50 years away.

I blame Bush, Obama and Congress over the past 12+ years for killing high energy funding.

The interesting thing is the super conducting materials used to help create the magnetic fields has advanced. Kinda cool. So you should check out the vids.

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Boffin supercharges FPGAs with timing signal tweak

Ian Michael Gumby
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@ John ... Re: Abstract is not clear what is being changed.

This is for a specific FPGA. This implies that all of the FGPA compilers are open to this type of improvement.

To be honest, its this sort of low level grunt work that gets overlooked.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Thumb Up

@Kevin Re: Love the comment...

Most PhD papers are meh. Meaning that they aren't as radical or disruptive.

This is really cool work and it shows that the tools you get from the OEM isn't always optimized.

This should make those working for the vendors stand up and say 'doh!' .

Again Thumbs up for a good job.

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HoloLens: Microsoft brags about AI chip in next-gen techno-goggles

Ian Michael Gumby
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Paris Hilton

Can someone define what is meant by AI?

Seriously,

Yet another term that has been morphed by the marketing droids to make their stuff sound cooler than it is.

Paris? Why? Because my AI is smarter than a blonde. ;-P

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I've got a verbal govt contract for Hyperloop, claims His Muskiness

Ian Michael Gumby
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Trollface

@Snorlax ... Re: Please complete this sentence Elon:

A verbal contract may or may not have value.

A 'verbal' government contract has no value.

Maybe he was talking to Gov. Brown of California. Now that's a contract you can use as a spring board to bounce off of.

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Let's harden Internet crypto so quantum computers can't crack it

Ian Michael Gumby
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@Technical Ben Re: Neat idea. Obviously depends on the qualtiy of the "random" generator

Exactly.

So you generate your one time use pub/pri key (Assume a reasonable length of 8096 bits ) and then use that to wrap around the shared secret.

The spy would have to capture all packets being sent in the stream and then try to break the decryption by first finding the initial pub/pri key and then trying to determine the shared secret.

Now if you have a rolling encryption where the shared secret changes frequently... or rather frequent enough... your messages will be very, very difficult to crack and it couldn't happen in subjective real time.

So you can encrypt streams well enough that current and next gen(s) quantum computers could not easily crack your stuff.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@ Technical Ben ... Re: @ Mark 65 Possible deadly flaw - compromised software

Ok.. you've kinda missed the point.

The article suggest that you generate a one time use pub/private key that you send the public key to the other side. They then create a certain random secret and they use the public key to encrypt their response holding the key.

This has nothing to do with the quantum computer except that the quantum computer is trying to break your encryption. Because this pub/priv key is a one time use, its harder for the quantum computer to break it. And then you have the randomized shared secret. The random noise file is something that makes it harder to break than just taking a stream off the random number generator which may or may not be as random as you would hope. I take it a step further and then say take a random number and use that to find an offset in to the file.

The issue was that if the randomized secret wasn't completely random, it would be easier to break.

And you are correct. The whole point of this is to make it impossible to break the keys in subjective real time or in any short order. If you want to make it more difficult, set up a rolling encryption that does this every so often making it more difficult to listen in.

That's the best you can do.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@DougS Re: Not just to protect stored communications

Actually no.

First, if you're storing data in an encrypted format, you need to be able to decrypt the data for use. So you would be better off decrypting and then encrypting the data over time with newer methods.

Keep in mind that there's a cost to the decrypting that you incur when you want to use the data. ;-)

At the same time... the data will lose value over time.

Think about this... 70+ years after WW II, what is the operational value of deciphering the Japanese or German codes?

Encryption should be strong enough to protect the data as long as the value of the data exceeds the cost of the encryption. Keep in mind that you will also have protections around the data which reduces access to the data in the first place.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Milton Re: @ Mark 65 Possible deadly flaw - compromised software

Using your army training.

The concept is to generate a single use pub/pri key as the initial wrapper for the counter party to send you a random secret.

Then you can further use the shared secret...

Simple concept.

The issue being raised was that the random secret wasn't so random.

But if you have a random noise file, changing the offset in to the file will increase the randomness instead of sharing the same file each time. If you were to then change the length of the seed and hash it using a strong algo (e.g. SHA-2) you will have a fairly unique number of a fixed length that is well ... more random and harder to find over time.

Note: If I use the same secret over and over and only generate a new pub/pri key, then its possible to break it w a powerful enough quantum computer. If the secret is not the same... then you will have a bit harder time, now wouldn't you?

Does that make sense?

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Milton ... Re: @ Mark 65 Possible deadly flaw - compromised software

WHOA!

You misunderstood my comment.

From the article:

The brief explanation of such a key encapsulation mechanism (KEM) is: “the initiator randomly generates a random, ephemeral public and private key pair, and sends the public key to the responder in QSKEi payload. <u>The responder generates a random entity, encrypts it using the received public key, and sends the encrypted quantity to the initiator in QSKEr payload. </u>The initiator decrypts the encrypted payload using the private key. After this point of the exchange, both initiator and responder have the same random entity from which the quantum-safe shared secret (QSSS) is derived.”

The issue that was being raised was that the lack of randomness in the responder's payload.

Yes you are correct. All I would want is a random start point in to the noise file. Yes, even though the file of random noise is random, I wanted to add more randomness by offsetting the starting point in to the file.

Most people download a random noise file than try to generate one themselves. (There are actually web sites that sell random files. )

So if I have a 8KB random noise file, I could randomly set the offset such that I can generate multiple sets of 4K or 8K strings that are less likely to be repeatedly sent to the counter party.

I don't need to do the hash, however the hash would be smaller than the 8K file and would be faster.

The key to this is that the pub/pri key is being generated on the fly and is used one time (implied) and then you're sharing a random secret back. The implication is that the random secret is also one time. Thus sending the same random 8K secret would reduce its effectiveness. By randomly changing the starting point would increase the 'randomness' in the process. If you take a random length and hash, you would increase the randomness with a potentially long enough value that changes each time.

Does that make sense?

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Yo! Zalazny wantabe ... Re: @ Mark 65 Possible deadly flaw - compromised software

One of the assumptions of intelligence is that you assume your opponent has perfect intelligence. Thus they'd have the noise file as well. The proposed solution here is far better than your approach. Nice one, though.

Love your lit reference to a fantasy/fiction character that can never die...

But you missed the point.

No. Perfect intelligence would be that they have the same random noise sample. Thus if you use a less than random number generator, it would be possible to generate a series of pairs of random numbers (offset and length) and could then generate the same hash that you use. (Assuming that they also know which hash you are using.)

But the attacker doesn't have your random noise file, nor do they know which hash algo you're using. So they can't easily find your seed. Which is the point.

Note: I was responding to a fellow commentard who believes that FOSS is better than a proprietary solution. Which in this case isn't true. I just created a simple way to generate a secure random number that would be very difficult to break. The whole example was how to get a more random number or seed for your encryption algo than one from simply using a random number generator which you may find to be less than random...

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Pirate

@ Mark 65 Re: Possible deadly flaw - compromised software

Actually no.

There are other ways to increase randomness.

Imagine using the random number to find a seek position in to a file of random noise. Then a second number to get its length. And then take a hash for your random value.

Now tell me how a quantum computer can break that since they lack the actual random noise file.

It may not be the fastest, but it will do the job

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One-quarter of UK.gov IT projects at high risk of failure

Ian Michael Gumby
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Pirate

Re: Why go Anonymous you coward!

25% failure is a high number.

At one client... I had 7 of the top 10 key feature enhancements get handed to me. 100% success.

Next project, same client... management claimed success, we all said it was a bust. Then the next 6 project on third team 100% success.

So yeah, 25% is a high number. Especially when you can easily lower it.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@AC ...Re: Why go Anonymous you coward!

Sorry, but I am one of those contractors that gets called in to do the heavy lifting. I've worked in telco where 80% of the work was done by contractors/consultants. And this product became the cornerstone of the company. Of course every one of us contractors pushed ourselves to do our best work and we were a band of professionals.

Smaller teams of seasoned experts will always outperform the marching masses... regardless as employee or contractor.

When the contractor believes that he's only as good as his last project... he has skin in the game.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Why go Anonymous you coward!

<side rant>

Look you silly git, when you have a real comment that no one in their right mind will find offensive, why hide yourself? Or do you just like the Guy Fawkes icon? :-P

</side rant>

25% is a huge number. When you hear it from the government, admitting their failure, we know that they are guessing on the lower side and that the number is much higher.

As an IT professional, I look at some of the projects that failed and I have come to realize that its more than just setting realistic expectations, but that there aren't enough highly skilled developers working out there at all levels.

<rant>

Too many IT people lack the core training that you get from a solid engineering program. Boot camps can teach you to code, but they don't train you in the theory or how to think about solving a problem.

Too many HR types hire in staff who couldn't design or program their way out of a paper bag. Too much focus on agile where its really just a set of iterative waterfall projects and isn't really all that agile because if you need to correct a previous sprint, you've upset their apple cart. RAP/RAD is now becoming a lost art.

Sorry to say, but if the UK gov were to actually spend $$$ and hire top notch guys who have mastered their craft, they would end up spending less overall on the project and come out ahead. Of course this goes back to the real problem... There aren't enough of us to go around and those who are around end up competing with people who cost 1/2 of their rate and lie on their resumes to get the job for which they are not qualified.

</rant>

I apologize for the rant but seriously, this industry is so f-'d up its insane. On both sides of the pond.

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FreeRADIUS fragged by fuzzer – by invitation – and fifteen fails found

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: C is a [value judgement of choice] language for security

You can use some tools to catch brain farts, but yes, you really have to know what you're doing and learn how to think.

Today, many who think that they can code, can't. The quality of software has gone downhill because bean counters look at the cost of developing software and then having it in production for less time because of the paradigm shifts and language shifts so expensive well written code becomes a luxury.

When you look to hire a senior level developer, check out to see what sort of watch he's wearing.

Ask him why he wears that watch. If he doesn't wear a watch and says his phone tells time for him... that's a major red flag.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: C is an excellent language for security...

Like its been said.

If you can't master C, then you'll never be a Jedi Master.

And Like I said above.

Never put a regular driver in an F1 car and expect good things.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Coat

@AC Re: C is an excellent language for security...

Spoken like a person who never mastered the C language.

If you've never learned to code in C, then you'll never be a jedi master.

Said as an old Jedi Master who's written a couple of C programs/apps and an embedded OS still in use today around the world.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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WTF?

A long program of static tests – the post name-checks Coverity, Clang analyser, cppcheck, and PVS-Studio – clearly hasn't been enough to turn up all the bugs, which arise because “C is a terrible language for security”.

C is an excellent language for security and for systems that need to be fast and efficient. C++ on the other hand is a lousy language to debug because people who write in C++ tend not to know how to write clean code and there are better OO languages around. (Objective-C as an example.)

Today most coders are like drivers, and those that can code in C are like professional race car drivers. You can put a professional driver in your average car and they can drive. You try putting an average driver in an F1... boom.

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Why the Kubernetes Kids can't hurt Bezos' Amazon beast

Ian Michael Gumby
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Kinda misses the point...

I agree with the article, and its take on some spin... I also agree with AndyPiper to a point.

Its not about developer convenience but more on lowering the cost of development and time to value.

You can build and test in small dev environments and then deploy anywhere. I can give developers a decent MacBook Pro, and then a small cluster to test local, cluster deployment. Then I can move to production either on prem or at cloud provider.

The thing about lock in... its the high cost of moving data out of the cloud or around the globe w your cloud provider.

Funny thing... IBM's new mainframe... X14 could be a game changer depending on costs.

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2017: The FBI alerts parents to dangers of Internet of Sh*t toys

Ian Michael Gumby
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Black Helicopters

Re: Ga goo gaa!

You mean the toys that can be morphed in to monitoring tools of not just TImmy but the entire house hold?

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Apache says 'no' to Facebook code libraries

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

This is actually really good advice, my startup company already Cat-X's GPL code, I think I'll put Facebook's stuff on that list, too.

GPL code is FOSS but it protects the rights of the original authors. Apache, you sign away all rights and anyone can use , modify, even charge for your code.

If your startup used GPL'd code you have to follow their license requirements and that has some implications. TANSTAAFL

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@AC ... Re: This isn't a kudos moment.

You contradict yourself.

FB revokes your rights to use the code if you are 'involved' in a patent lawsuit. This means that the rights FB is granting in their code are conditional rights. This is a risk which Apache does not want to accept.

Essentially FB's poison pill would put Apache at risk.

As to Hadoop. remember that Hive was donated from FB and its FB's code at its core. Same for Presto.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

This isn't a kudos moment.

The issue is that there is an incompatibility with the Apache license.

The terms of the FB code release is that if there is any patent litigation, then the rights to use the code are revoked. That puts FB in the position to blackmail anyone who uses FB code or code derived from FB code. (In theory and that's all it will take to cause Apache to Stuff it.)

Not a good thing and it means potentially quite a bit of rework to be compliant.

I wonder what this does to Hadoop (Hive), or Presto....

Apache is protecting their own arse here so don't thank Apache for doing anyone a favor.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Bravo for apache - you're either fully open source

This isn't "fully open sourced" or not...

GPL is fully open sourced however because of how it protects the rights of the authors, its non-compliant for Apache.

You really need to have a solid understanding of IP rights to understand that under Apache, you relinquish your rights to Apache and agree to indemnify them if they get sued because you claimed rights you didn't have.

FB's anti-patent wording means that you can't transfer the complete rights to Apache such that they are on the hook, as well as you if there is any question or claims to a patent infringement lawsuit.

Its Apache protecting themselves and allowing anyone to suck up and license the works as their own and sell support around it. (e.g. Cloudscape / JavaDB) [actually cloudscape is the original code that was donated by IBM...]

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The hidden horse power driving Machine Learning models

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@John Smith ... Re: Why £100K. Convenience of course

The hardware cost is relative.

You have expensive hardware, yes.

But you also have the expense of the R&D in developing the hardware which has to be expense d over the entire product line and its based on the estimate number of cards they expect to sell.

Its less about understanding 'Tensor Flow' than it is to provide the hardware and basic framework to allow tensor flow.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@DrBobK ... Re: Why is the DGX-1 so expensive? Why is it needed?

There's a bit more complexity under the covers when you go from 4K to 40K cores.

That's why.

You are also paying a premium for the latest and greatest kit. But the premium isn't as much as the cost increase due to complexity. Said complexity could be in manufacturing (lower yields due to higher percentage of defects... or something else.) Higher cost in terms of design complexity in terms of interconnects... or something similar.

Does that help?

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Jodie Who-ttaker? The Doctor is in

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@ AC Re: Overstated importance of fans

Too close to Glasgow?

Like Stirling? Or Edinburgh?

Sorry, but some of us Yanks are used to living in a big country. ;-)

But seriously. I'm with you.

Being here in the states we were introduced to Dr. Who on PBS and the first Doctor I saw growing up was Tom Baker.

With respect to a female doctor... we saw this coming in the last season. The Master was made in to a female and the Dr.'s companion was a Lesbian. (Short lived, but it made the relationship between Dr. and Companion have less of a sexual nuance that it picked up over the past couple of years.)

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Google unleashes 20m lab-created blood-thirsty freaks on a city. And this is a good thing, it says

Ian Michael Gumby
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Trollface

Re: "Sexist approach?" No, even though --

Only the ladies bite and suck. (Back in the shower for you...)

We are still talking about mosquitoes right?

Sorry, I couldn't resist.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Trollface

@Khaptain

Next weeks news ( Fake or not) When the mosquitos we released into the wild the interaction with "X" provided a completely unexpected result...and as such the human population of Fresno was suddenly rendered sterile....

No real loss there.

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Supernova bubble clocked at 19,000,000 km/h

Ian Michael Gumby
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Alien

Re: A long time ago and far, far away...

At a distance of 10K light years, that would mean that the explosion happened in 8428 BC

Right around the time man was domesticating dogs, learning to herd sheep and make boats.

Yes Virginia, the Universe is really a big place.

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Kerberos bypass, login theft bug slain by Microsoft, Linux slingers

Ian Michael Gumby
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@LDS ... Re: "It's a statistical thing."

Here's a better example...

Suppose I can show you a Tablet of Ancient Sumerian text. I then show you a translation of the text.

Then we have 100's of people view both the text and the translation. They find nothing wrong.

Contrary, I show the text to two individuals who then say that the translation is wrong.

By your reasoning, 100 vs 2, you'd go with the 100 people. Yet the group of two actually know Sumerian. So what good is a number of eyes when they don't know Sumerian?

And that's the point. Your code is no better off when your set of eyes lacks the knowledge and skills to comprehend the material.

The danger is that this simple fallacy and assumption that just because you know how to crank out code, regardless of quality means you are capable of doing a proper code review.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@LDS ... Re: "It's a statistical thing."

Its not the quantity but the quality of the eyes...

Many moons ago, I wrote some code for a client. I was pulled off the project to work on another client's systems. A couple of months later, I got called back in to the office because the rest of the team had 'fixed' my code and in fact broke it.

Why? Because they didn't read the comments and understand what I did and why I did it.

BTW, the original code worked as designed and was sound. (Someone wanted an enhancement.)

And it wasn't just one guy, but half a dozen people looking over the code. I then had to go back to the original code. Spend a long day walking them through the code, showing them why it works and then showing them how to make the mode for the new feature request.

The point is that unless you have a set of eyes attached to a brain of someone who knows what they are doing... you will end up with a mess.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@ One who crashes in flames...

And you've missed the point.

I've had several clients in the past say that they want to use FOSS and shunned the use of proprietary systems. I asked why and I got the same blathering that it was more secure and better code because you can see the code...

The fallacy is the following:

1) It assumes that you or your staff are skilled enough to actually read the code to understand what is going on.

2) It assumes that if there is a problem, you could fix it. Meaning that you actually have the skills to understand the problem and fix it. (95% of those who use the software don't.)

3) It assumes that you can fix it... meaning that if there is a problem that you could fix the code which would then violate your support contract because you're using a modified version and the company that is selling support has no way to support you or your code.

One of the reasons some companies looked to FOSS and supported FOSS is that it reduced their cost of development and support because the cost of supporting those developers is split among several companies that used the tools but did not get revenue from the tools. (e.g. Google, Facebook, Amazon, etc ...) It also lowered their overall IT budget for staffing.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@John Smith,,, Re: What an interesting set of comments.

Whoa!

You have a lot of misconceptions on software is developed. Especially these days...

Altman believes that the longevity of this particular vulnerability challenges the notion that open source code is magically more secure than closed source code. "The fact that this has been around for as long as it has been in open source, I think, is just one more case that should debunk the theory that open source programming is in some way more secure than closed source programming."

This is a very telling and very significant statement because the myth of superiority of FOSS has been promoted with no counter example. Now you have one.

You seem to think that anyone can just open up and look at some goop (you call code) and immediately understand what is going on and what the author's intentions are? There are two fallacies here. One that the person attempting to debug the code knows what to look for in the code and is familiar with the underlying problem that he or she is trying to solve. The second... That the coder actually took the time to write clean code that is easy to read, understand and debug.

Back in the 90's I stopped taking on projects written in C++. Not because of the language, but that I got sick and tired trying to figure out and fix poorly written and documented code that was full of bugs.

Many concepts of software engineering are not being taught properly or if taught at all.

Seriously, I doubt you've ever really worked with Kerberos and could walk through the code. Or have the free time to do so.

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Trump tramples US Constitution by blocking Twitter critics – lawsuit

Ian Michael Gumby
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@Handleoclast ... Re: @handleoclast ... As I understand it

Again, I suggest that you actually learn something of the law.

First in the court system, the burden of the proof is on the plaintiff. So, if the claims are made, the plaintiff has to prove their case in court.

With respect to Twitter, they are a <u>PRIVATE</u> company. They set the T's & C's and the features. Not the government.

Here's the simple litmus test:

1) Did the user violate the T's & C's of Twitter?

2) Did Trump violate the T's & C's of Twitter for blocking a follower from following them?

3) Assuming that Twitter didn't ban the user... Did Trump's blocking the user remove the user's ability to tweet on his own? gather and maintain his own set of followers? (Note: this is your interpretation of 'assembly' )

Then answer to each of these questions is no.

There's more... none of which supports your argument and views of the law.

Seriously, the lawyers who bring these types of 'creative' lawsuits should be sanctioned by the bar. Using the law to harass

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Flame

@Velv Re: @ Ian Michael Gumby

Again, I suggest that you get a handle on property law.

Your First Amendment right to free speech is that you have the right to speak your mind as long as it isn't hate speech and/or qualifies as protected speech. Note that not all speech is protected under the first amendment.

If Trump or the WH block you from their account, does that mean that you can't post using your own twitter account? The answer is no. Unless you violate the rules of Twitter which is a private company, you can set up your own account and tweet whatever you want as long as its not a violation of Twitter.

So your argument falls flat.

There's more, but that alone kills the lawsuit.

You say " But they are being used to make official government statements, and therefore fall under the laws that control official government communications which must be available to all citizens equally."

Again, I suggest you actually learn the law before making such a silly statement.

<boom mic drop>

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@handleoclast ... Re: As I understand it

Whoa!

You want to play Perry Mason, first go to law school and learn something of the law.

Trump tweets.

You do not have a first amendment right to retweet. That doesn't mean you don't have the right to make a new tweet on the same topic.

Seriously.... you really need to think about the law and what it covers and doesn't cover.

Look at it this way... Trump is in a crowded stadium. You and your best buds decide to go to the event and then unroll a banner that is anti-Trump. While you have your rights to the first amendment, that doesn't mean that security can't tear down your banner and physically eject you from the event, or you getting arrested for trespassing.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: @ Steve 124 ID 10 T alert

So Twitter says George Stephanopolus can be a weenie?

Works for me.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Big D ... Re: ID 10 T alert

Dude, you're so wrong its laughable.

1) The official records act does not cover tweets, snap chats, or whatever... it would have to be updated to include these forms of communication. (It would also imply that all phone conversations should be transcribed and stored.... Same for videos of Trump's speeches and all photo ops. )

2) You're confusing property rights and the Official records act. Assume that the Official records act did require the tweets to be saved. That can be done without claiming that this is now property of the US.

3) The Obama administration set up the POTUS account. So were all of those tweets saved? Did Obama's Admin eject people from the stream?

4) Property rights. Twitter owns the servers and provides a server. By your logic because Trump uses a phone, then the government owns the phone companies.

Bottom line. The case should be dismissed with prejudice.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@John Brown... Re: ID 10 T alert

Trump has two accounts. His own personal account and now the WH account that was created by Obama. While they may have rights to control the account, Twitter owns the system so you can't say that the twitter account is an extension of the government. You are essentially rewriting the laws on property ownership and rights.

Having said that...

If you look at Clinton's server, which is her own property, set up at her house... with the sole user being her and her staff and was her sole form of communication... you would have a better case making your statement that it was in fact a defacto work system and hence she ceded the property to the government.

(I'm sure that there exists case law that would support that.)

If you get bounced, what's to stop you from creating another account and then following Trump?

Or having multiple Twitter accounts?

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@ Steve 124 Re: ID 10 T alert

Within the US, even illegal aliens have rights.

But here's the thing...

1) Twitter is not the US Government.

2) The burden is on the plaintiff to show that their first amendment rights were in fact violated.

Trump has his personal account and the WH account. In both he and his staff have the right to control or block whom they wish. Its a feature of Twitter.

So if Trump blocks George Stephanopulos for being a weenie, that doesn't stop George Stephanopulos from creating another account to listen to Trump's tweets. Note: I do know George from way back when and yes, he's a weenie. ;-)

The case is noise and should be dismissed outright.

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Wi-Fi firm Purple sneaks 'community service' clause into its T&Cs

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

Nothing new here.

We all know the dangers of shrink wrap contracts ... including unenforceable clauses.

This was parodied by South Park.

But what is interesting is the whole GDPR thing.

Want to be compliant?

Just say no to selling customer data. Or sharing data with your 'partners' who aren't really 'partners' but other companies that are paying you for the data.

If you keep your data private, provide industry standards on securing your PII data... you will be compliant.

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0

IO, IO, it's off to Weka.io we go: Let's take a look at a file system upstart

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Funny...

"The deployment model is as a hyperconverged architecture where both storage and application services are run on the same infrastructure.

Hmmm. Sounds a lot like Hadoop.

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Ready, aim... Ignition! Valley VC bigwig ejects after conduct complaints

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Facepalm

He should move DC.

He would fit right in with all of those politicians. Does anyone remember Ted Kennedy?

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Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Devil

Funnily enough, back in 2016 Ignition hired “an expert consultant to conduct sensitivity and anti-harassment training.” Based on the above revelations, it should ask for its money back.

Yeah, he should have learned how not to get caught.

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Viking storms storage monastery wielding 50TB SAS SSD

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Thumb Up

Re: 50TB! I'll take twelvety.

The SSD prices have been kept high due to chip shortages.

For SOHO / Consumer, you'd need to have at a minimum 2 drives mirrored per machine and more likely a set of 4 in RAID 10. 50TB should be enough to store 20 years of data (docs, photos, movies, music, etc ... ) for the normal family.

Very cool and looks like a spinning rust killer.

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His Muskiness wheels out the Tesla Model 3

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

Re: It will retail for just $35,000

I am surprised Mr Musk hasn't followed the Porsche example and de-tuned the cheaper cars so that they don't compete with their more expensive cars on performance. Don't want the masses being able to overtake the <1%.

He's actually already done that.

Top of line. 0-60 in under 3.

More space, longer distance.

So this car will have good (ok great) acceleration but not as good as the higher priced models.

It is smaller than the other sedan and doesn't offer 4x4/AWD .

So its a good deal, if you can house the car and charger. Note that the price of installing the super charger at home isn't included or has decreased.

The one thing that you have to watch out for is that when you do a software upgrade, you can't downgrade. This is a problem for those who own earlier models and the software upgrade may create problems. (My brother in law has one) The other thing... if you're over 6", you won't be comfortable in the back seat. Not enough head room.

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RED ALERT! High-speed alien fugitives are invading our Milky Way

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Alien

Ringworlds?

While you can see these fast moving suns, did you notice the Dyson ring?

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