* Posts by Ian Michael Gumby

4045 posts • joined 11 Apr 2006

'Fibre broadband' should mean glass wires poking into your router, reckons Brit survey

Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC

If you had fiber to the box, then told the consumer that they had to spend extra $$$$ for no difference in terms of performance... how do you think that they would feel?

If you're talking copper for the last 100 yrds or less, its not the same as if you had copper for the last mile.

So if you live in an apartment and had fiber to the building but then its muxed out via copper... is that really a bad thing?

Yes, I'm the guy who 20 years ago had a pair of fibre cables pulled from my unit to the telco closet / room so that I could put fiber in some day when FIOS came around. So even if its in my neighborhood, since my building doesn't have it... I can't get it. Its the 200-300 feet under ground within a pipe that is missing, but you can't tell the phone critters that.

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Insurers hurl sueball at Trustwave over 2008 Heartland megabreach

Ian Michael Gumby
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If the insurers had a case, they would have pursued it at the time. Not a decade later. "What were you doing the second Tuesday in October, a decade ago?"

Perhaps the lawyers are just looking for a nice payday.

-=-

The lawsuit didn't just start yesterday.

It takes time to pull things together.

However to your point, yes the insurance companies are looking at a way to get some of their money back. Its not a 'payday' because one company lost 20mil on this... So if they can recover some... they win.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Kain Preacher ...

The simple answer is that its possible to be in compliance with PCI and still be hacked.

As much as I dislike Trustwave, the lawsuit will go their way.

There's a lot of legal wiggle room and the law is on Trustwave's side.

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Creep travels half the world to harass online teen gamer… and gets shot by her mom – cops

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: @AC ... The cat is pretty well out of the bag already

Can you be killed by a .22lr? Yes it is possible.

The .22lr is a small cartridge. You can kill someone with a pellet gun too.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Jtom ... Re: @Ted Treen ...@AC ... The cat is pretty well out of the bag already

What you described is what is known as the Castle Doctrine.

While in your house, you do not have the burden to show that you could no longer retreat.

And if you are going to shoot, you shoot to stop the threat. (Yeah its a polite way to say shoot to kill. )

Outside of your home, there's a 'Stand Your Ground' law which varies state by state. Without it, the burden of proof is on you to show that you could not egress from the situation.

Yes, gun laws can be complicated. Just ask Zimmerman. While he may be a stupid git, his case was a clean shoot. The forensic and eye witness evidence supported his story.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@StargateSg7 ... Re: @AC ... The cat is pretty well out of the bag already

No, you cannot get an AR-15 in 7.62 NATO.

Note: 7.62x39mm (AK-47 round) or .300BLK is available, but not 7.62 NATO

Cartridge is too big.

.50 AE may be possible, however I seriously doubt it would be a good idea to fire. .50 BMG is a much different story. You need to be more specific when you talk about the calibers that a gun will shoot. A good example... a rifle that is designed to shoot .223 Remington cannot be used to shoot 5.56 NATO. While the 5.56 NATO rifle can shoot .223 Remington. (Both rounds are extremely similar however the pressures in a 5.56 NATO are higher. )

And clearly you don't know anything about guns or gun laws.

AR-15 are semi-auto only. Not select fire, nor full auto. ;-)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Maty Re: @AC ... The cat is pretty well out of the bag already

It depends on the hit. A graze from a 9mm could be less of a problem than if you got hit w a .22lr in a vital spot.

I don't know what gun she had... if anyone has a link, please supply.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: @Rustbucket... @AC ... The cat is pretty well out of the bag already

CM == Creedmore.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Tomato ...Re: @AC ... The cat is pretty well out of the bag already

First, legally, he couldn't get a gun.

Second... unless you know a guy or know a guy who know's a guy... you can't get a gun.

Third... there are a lot of firearms that you can't own in other countries that you can own in the US and even if you own them. you may not be able to store them in your home. Of course YMMV. However in the UK... you have really weird gun laws.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Rustbucket... Re: @AC ... The cat is pretty well out of the bag already

AR-15 can be found in a couple of different rounds like

.223

5.56 NATO (yes, .223 is not the same as the 5.56 round)

6.8 SPC

300 BLK

and I think someone did a 7.62x39mm

AR-10s are .308 or now 6.5 CM along with a couple of Wildcat rounds.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Star child... Re: @AC ... The cat is pretty well out of the bag already

AR-15s do not make a good home defense gun.

(Well maybe if they're in 300BLK or if they're a carbine in 9mm or .40)

Castle Doctrine exists in most states explicitly and at the same time... the lack of her being able to retreat is enough to warrant lethal force.

Open carry on your private property is legal. In rural SC I open carried walking down the road and waved to the local sheriff. (I was walking along the fence line to a gate 1/2 mile down the road to where I needed to be.) No hassle.

Again, the moral of the story, don't bring a knife to a gun fight... unless you're a highly trained assassin.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Ted Treen ...Re: @AC ... The cat is pretty well out of the bag already

First, you have insurance so the item can be replaced. The life you take can't.

Second... the guy/gal who's life you took has relatives and they will sue you for millions in a wrongful death lawsuit. You will lose.

The law allows you to use lethal force if you have reason to believe your life is in danger. And its a reasonable belief... like a guy breaking in to your house holding a weapon. It doesn't allow you to shoot someone to protect property.

And then there's Karma. She's a bitch and needlessly taking a life... really pisses her off. Being forced to take a life... she's ok with that. But then you'll have to live with it.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Peny-gors ...Re: @AC ... The cat is pretty well out of the bag already

Yes, criminals being criminals already own illegal weapons. Carrying concealed weapons is a crime if you don't have a permit.

Which is why many law abiding citizens do own firearms.

I used to only own air rifles. Why? Because I liked to shoot little holes in paper @ 10m.

Then when I was at my father-n-laws farm, I got a hunting rifle and borrowed his shotgun. Less about killing bambi, but more about protecting the herd from varmints and pests. Also to stop crop damage.

Back in Chicago, when the laws changed and I could buy a handgun, I got one. Why? To shoot little holes in paper at various distance out to 50yrds. Now I plan on getting my CCW permit. Why? Because even in my neck of the woods, crime is up and I choose not to be a target.

The reality is that I will most likely not carry unless I'm out walking my dog early in the morning where there are crazies out who do want to hurt you for no real reason or because they need to get their next fix.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC ... Re: The cat is pretty well out of the bag already

Even if you keep a low profile, there are other ways to identify you online. Like thru White Pages where your phone number is published with an address. Or thru your internet connection. They can geocode you to a point... and from there it becomes a bit more trivial to narrow down where you are.

What you and others missed is that the guy didn't get it... When someone says they have a gun... in the US... its most likely true and its a warning... While many in the Western world can't own firearms... law abiding citizens in the US can and many do.

In the US, there's a concept called the 'Castle Doctrine' where you have the right to use lethal force to defend yourself from someone trying to break in. Its important to point out that there is evidence that he broke in to the basement, was scared off and then attempted to break in again. So the second time, she shot him apparently while he was outside of the house but in the process of breaking in. The laws vary state by state, however in this case... she was well within her legal rights to defend herself and her children.

What wasn't told in the story is if she dialed 911 and notified the police before she shot him.... again for those who don't live in the US or have spent time in the US... the police are usually minutes away when seconds count. In Chicago, they can be 5 seconds to 5 minutes away. In rural areas... 5-10 mins to 20-30 mins away. Had she dialed 911 before shooting... she's definitely in the clear. Even from a civil lawsuit.

The moral of the story... don't bring a knife and duct tape to a gun fight. ;-)

[Note: Its very legal to use lethal force to protect people, not property. No property is worth it. ]

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When Google's robots give your business the death sentence – who you gonna call?

Ian Michael Gumby
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@Hamish Re: Sadly Not Really New

Did you pay attention to the article?

"This guy is running important multimillion dollar production on a consumer plan. This is on him, not Google," observed one Reddit member.

While I am not a fan of Google (Do know evil to do no evil) , this is on the guy's company and not Google because they were most likely running on the wrong terms (SLAs) because it was cheaper.

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Reality Winner, liberty loser: NSA leaker faces 63 months in the cooler

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: 'Complaints about them having Fox News on'

You never understood America or Americans.

She should have gotten more time tossed at her.

So too should have Clinton and her team.

Sorry, that's not a political issue, but a criminal issue.

What you're watching is western society in decay. Its sad really.

I'm the guy who's buying farm land and going off the grid as much as possible, albeit with a really nice internet connection.

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US Supreme Court blocks internet's escape from state sales taxes

Ian Michael Gumby
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Yo! Yank ... Re: Er ....

Actually its trivial. Really.

I mean the Feds could set up a web service where you enter your zip code and you can get the array / json object of each tax spelled out for you. The onus would then be on the local government to maintain their taxes else either lose out or payout a refund if they repeal a tax and forget to update it.

But SCOTUS didn't go that far. They only went to the State level, which is extremely trivial (50+ data point for states and territories) And you could create a service to assist. Sales tax rates are slow to change.

Again, the truth is that this is rather easy but no one wanted to do it.

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Trump kept ZTE alive as ‘personal favour’ to Chinese president Xi

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: I am sure it had nothing to do with Trump receiving Chinese bribes

Unlike Clintons, Trump was rich before going in to politics.

Think about that.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@John Brown Re: @thegroucho ... "The US president claims he’s a negotiator"...

Trump is no ordinary US politician.

He could care less about being re-elected. He wants change and to fix what Obama and others have screwed up.

Say what you will, Trump is Trump.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Strum Re: @Rich 11 ... "A special place in hell ..."

Wow.

Must be a CNN watcher.

Sorry but the facts show that the gain is attributed to Trump's actions. Directly attributed to the tax cuts.

Must be a Nancy Pelosi fan too.

TDS appears to be rampant among El Reg readers.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: @Rich 11 ... "A special place in hell ..."

LOL... lets keep watching the stats...

Now Chicago... that's a different situation.

What makes it worse is that some of the local politicians are encouraging the crime by changing the laws. There's an article in today's Chicago Tribune which explains why there's an increase in car jackings and why more minors are being involved.

But yeah, go ahead and now ban knives...

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@DougS ... Re: "... thought his real family were from Raxacoricofallapatorius"

The goal is to show Kim that he doesn't need them to succeed.

Trump will claim victory early. That's a given and its already happening.

The reality is that he was the first to crack this nut, so give him some credit.

The real winner will be China. Watch and see.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: @thegroucho ... "The US president claims he’s a negotiator"...

No, Fake news CNN.

Or MSNBC...

With the AT&T merger going through... want to bet there's a regime change at CNN?

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Big Brother

@Alistair Re: I have to point out that

ZTE was no coincident.

Nor were the whole tariff threats.

Trump isn't linear. He threatens tariffs to get a reaction and then works out what he wants.

Trump is Trump and you just have to watch what he does and how he does it to understand his next move.

It wasn't a deal for a resort.

I suspect it was a deal to exert pressure on North Korea in order to get them to the table.

There's an interesting timeline.

Kim goes on armored train to China. After 'secret' meeting, he starts to talk tough and then Trump cancels meeting. Something happens, Kim backs off and then meeting is on.

Trump's hotels? Not in China. In North Korea.

Want to know who wins?

Chinese investors who will now start to put money in to North Korean real estate once the nuke deal is done. Kim wins because he owns the land so his regime come out ahead. The US? wins by not having a rogue nation. South Korea? The Korean war ends, and they too can invest in North Korea.

I'm not a huge fan of Trump, but if you think about it... if he pulls this off, it would be one of the greatest deals / cons in our life time.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Rich 11 ... Re: "A special place in hell ..."

Yes we have guns.

Seems your Bobbies now have them as well. (Guns beat knives ;-)

But I don't understand your comment about 'economic migrants fleeing the failed state to their south.

The US is between Mexico and Canada.

Oh you meant the US? Funny but since Trump reduced the taxes, money has been repatriated and US unemployment is at record lows. Historical lows, really.

Growth is up. Trump may lie like all politicians, but the numbers don't.

BTW, didn't the number of violent murders in London exceed those of NYC?

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: "A special place in hell ..."

Sorry but Trudeau tried to pull a fast one and is already on thin ice politically. There's been some articles on his government and the latest purchase of the pipeline ...

After seeing the images of Trudeau on a visit to India, I have to wonder about him. Definitely cut from the same cloth as Obama who is definitely the worst POTUS in the recent history of the US. Jimmy Carter is jumping for joy because he's lost that title... ;-)

And yeah, I'm old enough to have lived thru Carter's tenure.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@thegroucho ... Re: "The US president claims he’s a negotiator"...

Whoa!

Did you happen to miss the fact that the President of South Korea personally and publicly thanked Trump for making their historic meeting happen?

Seriously, are you folks suffering from TDS? (Trump Derangement Syndrome)

Do you only get your US based news from CNN?

I'm an independent, and not a Trump supporter, but so far, the guys done a lot of good and is making a lot of the right moves.

Want to thank someone? Talk to Pompeo who did a lot of the leg work.

Seriously, its really sad to watch the MSM melt down over this.

Please take a step back and watch things unfold.

Either Kim is going to back out, or he's going to get rid of his nukes. The only scary thing... China doesn't want there to be a strong NK and US relationship because its too close to their borders.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: I am sure it had nothing to do with Trump receiving Chinese bribes

That would be Clinton.

You really need to follow the money.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: "The US president claims he’s a negotiator"...

While its easy to take pot shots at Trump, doesn't anyone wonder why he would do Xi such a favor?

Sorry, but seriously, you have to stop thinking in such simple linear patterns.

To be clear, consider this...

Trump just went to Singapore to meet with Nork's Kim. Ask yourself how did Trump get Kim to the negotiation table so quickly?

The simplified answer... Kim's bank account is running dry. Reports are that Kim only has foreign cash reserves that will last until Oct, before he's out of money. Because of pressure from the US, the sanctions are cutting off his ability to get money. And the only way the US could get the UN to approve the sanctions.. is with the help of China.

Without the support of China, Trump couldn't do what he is attempting to do. Even great negotiators have to make deals. Rather than kill ZTE, Trump gets a billion dollars (USD) and China's help.

Will Trump be successful? I hope so.

Trump is Trump, but the fact of the matter, North Korea with a ballistic nuke ... much more dangerous.

Trump kind of reminds me of the character MM (Milo Mindbender) in Catch-22.

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Facebook and Snap jam Blackberry patent suit

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Alice?

Didn't she chase the white rabbit?

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Blackberry has a good case and chance to win...

You have a strange definition of 'patent troll'.

Patents are IP which mean that they have value and can be bought and sold. A patent troll is someone who buys patents with the sole purpose of extorting companies to pay licensing fees which is the only source of revenue for said company.

Blackberry isn't a Patent Troll by any sort of the word since the patents in question originated w Blackberry.

(Would you call Motorola, Nokia, Ericson or other tech companies which sue to protect their IP and licensing revenue patent trolls? )

Even still, the point I was making was that the patent is in place and the burden of proof to overturn the patent relies on the IPR, FB and Snap. (Assuming that FB and Snap can get the IPR to review the patents. ) If not, then they have to go to Court. And even then they may not be successful.

That is to say that FB and Snap have an uphill battle where they have to show why Blackberry's patents should be invalidated.

Because of this... the odds are in Blackberry's favor.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Blackberry has a good case and chance to win...

The fact that they have the actual patent, FB is going to spend $$$$$$$ in an attempt to invalidate the patent.

The downside... every case where they do this... it weakens their own patent portfolio by showing why most software patents are BS and should never have been granted in the first place.

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Google plots death of inline installation for Chrome extensions

Ian Michael Gumby
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Big Brother much?

By routing everything thru the store, Google has the ability to spy on you and know which add ons you use.

Sorry, but I only use Chrome as a last resort.

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IBM to GTS: We want you to 'rotate' clients every two years

Ian Michael Gumby
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@DaveB ... Re: Arrogance

You've never negotiated an MSA w IBM or as part of IBM with the customer.

(I have and I've had to mediate between IBM and client lawyers to get the deal done.)

You can try to get that type of clause in... IBM will argue you out of it and will walk away if you are insistent... unless you're a major player like wallyworld and buy millions from IBM per year. And I mean 10's of millions from IBM...

Then IBM will negotiate ...

The strangest contract stuff I dealt with had to deal with placing IBM staff on customer site, where IBM did the drug testing of the employee. You have no idea how that can go sideways real fast due to HIPPA. And then tell the employee if they want the assignment, they will have to get drug tested, however if they fail, they will be terminated. Oh joy that was a fun one...

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC Re: They have been doing this with senior-most executives for years now...

There's a term called 'getting your ticket punched'.

You relocate to a new team to enhance your skills in order to get promoted.

This isn't it.

They slowed down and stopped this many moons ago, although senior execs do get moved around as they get promoted, however its not the same as taking a young gun and sending him to Brazil for 2 years, or Europe so that you can groom him for an international role in management.

This is a pure smoke and mirrors play by IBM bean counters again.

They are just too clever for their own good.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Making It Worse?!

Yup.

And I had them play games over it by using offshore support staff to call at odd hours with a 'status update'. At the time I was single and I suffer from sleep shift disorder, I usually answered the call which shocked them. ;-)

Oh brother, I know your pain.

Of course the worst time to do any sort of upgrade or routine maintenance is around the 4th of July weekend. Was doing an upgrade of an SP2 instance which went south fast. Ran in to a series of defects and it was Sev 1. Too bad, the support team for the most part was on vacation so we were shunted to people who didn't know jack and we had to roll back to the previous version. It was a Sev 1 and we ran out of weekend to get things straightened out.

And yeah, when the SHTF, you escalate. and call back and escalate...

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@yank lurker ... Re: Interesting... color me skeptical.

The rotation was for the selected handful who were getting groomed to move up the food chain. They stopped doing that years ago.

Back in the 90's ex-pat benefits for a lot of companies were really good. And those days are long gone. You post overseas for a company... its a toss up and not always a win, albeit always a learning experience.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@eldakka Re: Interesting... color me skeptical.

I know many military brats.

The transfers are due to your parent getting his/her ticket punched as part of a path to promotion.

What IBM is suggesting is not a path to promotion. They stopped doing that long ago.

And the point is that younger workers are more mobile while the older workers are not.

As you point out... when you sign up for a career in the military, you know what you're getting yourself in to. A friend's father retired out while at Wright Pat. The officer's housing wasn't bad.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC Re: @Glad and Done ... Making the same mistake the Banks did.

Yes, I have.

I was an overlay and have dealt with several global customers as well as several very large US customers and have been party to penning some very big deals.

I won't say which ones or for which group since I am not posting this anon.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Making It Worse?!

Huh?

From mainframe to legacy... DRDA gateway, CDC, MQ, or something else that is fairly straight forward.

Mainframe to NoSQL/Big Data? pretty much the same. Not that difficult.

Opening up a PMR that's Sev 1 really spooks support. Especially when you explain to them why its a Sev 1. ;-) (Yes, had many meetings w IBM and Cust where they tried to get me to relabel the Sev 1 to a Sev 2. )

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Press Button ... Re: Almost Cunning

While I agree with your cynicism, I think you're way off base.

There seems to be a consensus that IBM is doing this as a way to cover staffing losses and to also bring in cheaper labor. Not as a way to increase costs to the client on actual delivery. That's the sales staff and they aren't the ones rotating.

The problem is that IBM could be looking at a way to keep their aging staff happy and also to limit their ability to claim age discrimination as they do a stealth RIF.

And yeah, I escaped from the borg. I was an experienced hire that came in thru an acquisition. I never had rose colored glasses or drank from the blue cup.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC

Gallows humor is always necessary but never understood by those who have not had to go through a similar process.

The simple answer is that IBM is trying to kill two birds with one stone.

They need to address the issue that older employees who are targets of the RIF can claim discrimination when they can show that there is still demand for their skills.

At the same time... they have to be able to meet client needs w the staff they have and they need to upgrade their employee skills.

But rather than take the time to do it right... meaning you bench the consultant for 2-3 weeks of training and deep immersion into the newer tech before placing them onsite... they want to do this on the cheap.

At least that's if you believe the stated goal.

But then you have to look at this from a different perspective. Wholesale cut/slash of experienced staff and replacement with lesser trained and cheaper labor (yes I do mean offshore), can cause a client to revolt and to toss IBM out of a contract. (Its even possible for the client to write clauses in to the contract that give them veto power over staff changes in some cases.)

So this could be viewed as a way to do stealth RIFs, onshore off-shore resources, and other dirty tricks to beef up bottom line.

So... you could take them (IBM) at face value, or you could suspect them of being under handed in this...

For those who have spent time in the borg, and know IBM... which do you think is the real motivation?

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Anon South African

Did you happen to work for IBM and were in Information Management? ;-)

I would suspect that they would rotate in to a new position at a reduced rate, which could impact their PBCs and rev recognition numbers.

I would also suspect that they would learn On the Job and maybe get some online course access.

My fear is that they end up getting rotated out to a RIF due to a lack of a transition client.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Glad and Done ... Re: Making the same mistake the Banks did.

I don't think so.

First, its never a good idea to let the worker drones maintain the relationship with the client. That has to happen at a higher level. (This doesn't mean that you shouldn't value relationships forged by workers but that it shouldn't impact the client when a worker leaves.)

Second, in IT, you need to consider a "Hit By Truck" scenario. That is to say, there should be some sort of redundancy in the event of an unforeseen emergency so that the client still has coverage.

Third, in IT, the average tech worker is on the job at a client for roughly 24 months to 28 months. So its routine for staff to rotate in/out based on projects and roles.

So from the client perspective... they shouldn't have a concern as long as the rotating staff in has the same level of skills and expertise. You don't want to be the client who is paying top dollar and then training up their staff at your dime. Nor do you want them to promise onshore / local staff, and slowly replace them with off shore cheaper labor as a way to maintain/increase margins.

That said... trust IBM to muck it up.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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You got Training?

Consider yourself lucky.

All I got was SSM because anyone in a 'sales' or 'sales related' capacity had to take the course when our company was acquired by IBM.

Everything else was done on my own time which meant no training because it took 50-60 hours plus travel to hit my numbers when they were realistic.

I got out in 2005 and never looked back except to tell my friends that the grass is greener outside of the borg.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Interesting... color me skeptical.

This could be good, or it could be very bad.

First, there is an issue of teaching current workers new skills and balance that against bench time. ( Bench time is time when a consultant/contractor is not billable, but still collects a salary. )

But then when you think about it... suppose you have a guy who's an expert at X. If he rotates to a new client, so he can learn Y, does he still get charged out at the same rate as being an expert at X? In this case, you're over billing the customer for a sub par resource. An example could be that you take an Oracle DBA who has 15 years of RDBMS skills and send him to an account where they need someone who knows NoSQL object stores. Here he's a novice, and the client is paying him to know something where he is clearly learning on the job at their expense.

Then there's the other issue... What happens if you have this guy Bob, who's got 20+ years in at IBM and its his time to rotate out to a new client. Only there's no job for him to rotate to? What happens then? Can he be made redundant?

This is a bit of a double edged sword. On the one hand... it forces older employees to learn new skills rather than be comfortable staying within their niche. (Humans, for the most part, are not comfortable with change.) On the other, it makes stealth firings, or demotions easier.

And one other consideration. Suppose you live in NYC, have a family and everyone is settled. IBM now says congrats, you're on a new project in Cleveland, OH and you have to relocate. Refusal to relocate means grounds for termination. If your family is settled... relocating every 2 years, assuming that IBM is going to cover all of the costs... is still going to be a deal breaker for the older employees. (Try buying and selling homes every 2 years....) (Assuming you can't find another project in your current area. ) Try telling your wife and kids that they have to move to a new school. No, its not a promotion or getting your ticket punched... but just for the same old job and salary.

This still would work for the younger employee who rents an apartment and doesn't own a house, or have a family to uproot.

The other issue.... regional salary differences... If you move from NYC to most of the mid-West, your cost of living goes down so if you're being paid $$$$, you win. However the reverse... you go from lower cost of living to higher cost of living... you're getting screwed.

So many issues with this less than thought out plan... not good. The Devil is in the details and IBM doesn't do well when it comes to specifics...

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NASA spots asteroid on crash course with Earth – with just hours to go

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Re: Short Notice

I wonder if the next thing we see is a rail gun used as part of a missile / asteroid defense shield.

I mean being able to hit an inbound projectile with a massive enough bolt from a rail gun, it should shatter the asteroid in to smaller fragments that would continue to burn up...

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Who had ICANN suing a German registrar over GDPR and Whois? Congrats, it's happening

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@AC ...Re: Meh

And if you're caught, they can drop your ownership of the domain ASAP. (Dropping your domain)

Keep in mind... Domains were meant for businesses and not personal use.

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Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

ICANN will win

Hey commentards...

Does GDPR cover businesses?

How does it handle regulatory filings?

When you start to consider the details that you provide... you have no privacy because you're providing necessary contact details.

Its when those details are fake that you run in to problems.

If you've ever had to run a domain... and you trace back bad behavior to another user on another domain, what do you do? In the past, you look at the whois information and you contact their admin.

Now, I guess you just spin up a DDOS cloud and retaliate or some other immature stunt.

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Overhyping AI doctors, language translation goes open source, and new jobs on the cards

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

@404... Re: Ever get the idea we're doing this all wrong?

You have two issues...

1) Coming to a conclusion and a diagnosis based on a patient interview...

2) Coming to a conclusion and diagnosis based on diagnostic imaging.

Its not just asking the better question, but also how you interpret the answer.

To give you an example...

My father was a Radiologist who, back in the day, actually had patient contact. ( Radiologists today, for the most part, don't really interact with the patient, except in a couple of procedures. )

He used to tell me that when he looked at a patient, he sometimes had to ask if they were a smoker or a drinker. If they drank, he would ask how much... e.g. how many beers in a sitting or per day.

Then based on what he saw, and how they answered... he would come up with a swag. Why? Because a good doctor knows when a patient is lying or not being completely truthful.

So imagine when you have an AI attempt to do the same thing... not so easy.

But when you get to diagnostic imaging processing, you have more potential for AI to help augment Radiologists. (e.g. CAD systems for mamograms) This is where both the AI and the Radiologist are on par in that it takes training and attention to detail in order to find an artifact or something that would require a biopsy.

And of course the X-rays aren't just binary... you may find calcification / remodeling from earlier breaks and healing. How does the AI interpret that? Again, it takes a lot of data and experience to be able to interpret the data, so the AI systems can improve... IMHO... I'd still trust the human over the machine.

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