* Posts by Ian Michael Gumby

3845 posts • joined 11 Apr 2006

How about that US isle wrecked by a hurricane, no power, comms... yes, we mean Puerto Rico

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Standards needed

Slow recovery because prior to the hurricane hitting, they had a substandard infrastructure due to government incompetence.

No power, no matter how many cell towers you get up... you're SOL.

They could put up towers, solar panels and diesel generators, but there's a bit more because the infrastructure is wiped. out.

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Jet packs are REAL – and inventor just broke world speed record in it

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Like it

At 32mph, you may out run cops on bikes, but not if they're using motorcycles or cars.

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OpenSSL patches, Apple bug fixes, Hilton's $700k hack bill, Kim Dotcom raid settlement, Signal desktop app, and more

Ian Michael Gumby
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@Kiwi Re: @Doug S... I wonder what the Trump apologists' excuse will be this time?

Since you're not an American, I'll spell it out to you...

As of Monday, its been revealed that Comey changed the wording of his draft to not say that Clinton was Grossly Negligent because that would have meant they would have to charge her and her staff. At the same time, there was intent. She and her staff intended to violate the FOIA and the Official Records Act by having this server in place. This is in to the addition that there are allegations of pay to play as well.

Why now in 2017? Because the investigation was tainted and both Lynch and Comey tanked the investigation.

Clintons are trash. You clearly don't know their history and their scandals. Trump is an alter boy compared to them.

Please pay attention to the US news over the next couple of months. Because Clinton didn't win... the SHTF is about to happen.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Doug S... Re: I wonder what the Trump apologists' excuse will be this time?

Dude,

You really need to understand the facts and the law before you spout some nonsense.

What Clinton did was to use a personal secret server instead of conducting her business on a .gov email account. This was done with the intent of violating the FOIA.

To make matters worse, she and her staff routinely sent classified material to and from said server. That in itself is a felony violation of the Espionage Act. There's more but lets save that for another story...

The point is that using a personal email account for business, but not for sending or receiving classified material, is in fact legal and permissible under the "Official Records Act" which Bill Clinton expanded to include e-mail while he was POTUS.

The catch is that the person has to send the emails to be archived within I think either 60 or 90 days post transmission. (So if you need to contact someone and you can't connect to the .gov servers, you can still do so within the law as long as those communications are submitted to be archived. )

Clinton? It wasn't until Gucifer outed her by posting emails from her secret server to her best bud Syd. B.

That was 2 years after she left office.

There.

Do you now understand the law?

BTW, Hillary Clinton as SoS fired the Ambassador to Kenya for using his personal email account for doing business, as well as sent out memos warning all of her staff (State Dept employees) not to use personal email for official business. Do you see the irony here?

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Mellanox NICs Xilinx FPGA to save backplane slots and CPU cycles

Ian Michael Gumby
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Definitely cool...

Can really be used to improve networking security.

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Take off, ya hosers! Silicon Valley court says Google can safely ignore Canadian search ban

Ian Michael Gumby
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@Bob .. Re: Disturbingly...

Curiously, the Canuck supremes said not only could the router maker keep its injunction against Google, but also that the injunction can be enforced worldwide to protect the Canadian Equustek's interests, meaning Google had to start deleting the links for all of its users on the planet.

So... this isn't about just stopping Canadians from seeing ads from dodgy kit.

Its to stop the world from seeing ads to see dodgy kit.

If the company wanted to, they could go back the the courts because Google is not being compliant.

While the Canadian Courts may not enforce its order against Google US to block the world, they can order Google CA to do so. They could impose fines and penalties against Google CA or worst case... ban Google from doing business in CA.

Then there's the issue of Trade. However since its not Google who's selling the kit, the company would have a hard time...

But in any country where the company has a distributor or distributors, they can sue Google and could use the Canadian court's verdict as evidence. IMHO They would win and could negotiate a deal with Google to block the ads where their kit is legally sold.

The problem is that the Canadian company tried a short cut and Google is big enough to hire better lawyers who can make arguments against them doing the right thing,

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@The idiot ... Re: Hmmm...

Not quite.

You have a company in Canada who manufactures a product where someone is selling a knock off product that is questionable and harming the brand. (Not that I ever heard of these guys...)

While on the surface of your argument ... that this becomes a jurisdictional issue and a Canadian Court has no jurisdiction in the US... it would make sense.

However, you have some other things that need to be considered.

WTO gets involved because its a question of selling a knock-off.

The Canadian company could take their win in Canada and then sue Google in the US. Provided that the company has a distributor or distributors in the US. The the company can sue Google in the US.

IMHO Google will lose.

The problem is that the company tried to shorten the process and it cost them.

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Go on IBMers, tell us what you really think

Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC ... Re: I don't mind

I came in thru an acquisition.

I was shown a video message made by Lou.

Very strong and good messaging.

Sam? Yeah different.

We used to use Blue Pages to determine seniority based on the number of levels between the person and Lou / Sam because bands were not equivalent across divisions.

Unlike you, I met a lot of people, both good and bad. While heritage IBMers could be the worst, I had respect for the guys who came from PWC.

Oh the stories I could tell... ;-)

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What's HPE Next? Now it's unemployment for 'thousands' of staff

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Clinging to share in a shrinking no-margin market

Funny, but how's SuperMicro making a large profit?

I think the question is... how HP plans to sell commodity products at 2x the retail price?

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Supreme Court to rule on whether US has right to data stored overseas

Ian Michael Gumby
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@d3vy ... WTF?

Seriously you need to think about the issue.

US citizen data taken offshore to Ireland. This would be similar to either German bank data laws or Swiss Data Laws concerning how to handle data.

What we should expect is that the rights of the country of origination will prevail.

Think of it this way. UK data is going to be placed under new rules/regs starting next year. Imagine if Google moved that data in to the US and told you that your data is no longer protected under UK laws because it now resides in the US?

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Rejecting Sonos' private data slurp basically bricks bloke's boombox

Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC Definitely a lawsuit waiting to happen...

There are two issues at play...

1) SONOS clearly wants to remain relevant and compete with Amazon, therefore they are attempting to morph their speakers in to a new product that you already have in your home.

2) Metadata capture is a way to further gain value from you. Your data has value and they can then use it to help identify information that they can sell/rent to advertising agencies.

3) A future product... adding adverts to the streams... ;-) (Think about that one for a second....)

But all of this comes at a risk.

If they don't provide security and protect the information that they capture... they will be sued in to oblivion. .

We can look at half a dozen major financial companies that have taken multi-billion dollar hits over data breaches and the impact to their bottom line.

As many have already put out there... there are other solutions like blue tooth speakers, or I'd prefer actual wires. My old Adcom had A/B unfortunately after 20 year... it died and it was cheaper to replace it with an A/V receiver which had the same thing, which again died and replaced it with a new A/V receiver which I keep in my office with a nice pair of wired bookshelf speakers. ( Vienna Acoustics that I picked up on sale at a steep discount because the stereo store was closing and they were floor models. )

So I'll pass on Sonos and wait for the lawsuit that is definitely coming to a courtroom near you. ;-)

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Samsung rings death knell for disk, gears up for QLC flash production

Ian Michael Gumby
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Still too early...

The death knell may not be QLC but if you can get a high enough density at an MLC or something similar with 100,000 cycles. Right now the high end in the m.2 space is 2TB. If you can increase that density by 4X at the same or similar price point of a HDD at the same density, you'll have a winner. (Even if it were higher but not much... its a winner. )

You don't need to have 128TB density to kill spinning rust.

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Kotlin's killin' Java among Android devs

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: The law of unintended consquences

Meh!

I'd say learn Scala..

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Blade Runner 2049: Back to the Future – the movies that showed us what's to come

Ian Michael Gumby
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Hates are going to hate.

Look,

You may not like the movie or the story line.

But I can tell you that there are people waiting to see this movie.

The original is a tough movie to follow and there's a lot of unanswered questions about the 'universe' and story line.

I agree that there's a lot of crap being made. But that's more about the numbers than a lack of creativity. The issue is that a remake / sequel has a built in audience. That if the movie was made right, you can guarantee a certain minimum return. Net new movie / plot would have more risk.

Just something to think about.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Johnny Mnemonic...

The problem with all of these stories/movies is that their futuristic views are actually based on conceptual technologies that could evolve from existing or emerging tech. Its not just the embedded silicon, but the use of EEG to pull back the data. Or the use of reading EMF noise from machines to see what is going on.

You have to read the book and skip the movie. Gibson was pretty prophetic in his visions. As to Tron, its more pure fantasy, ala Lawnmower Man which would be a better example.

I'm amazed that the author skipped over Gibson's Virtual Light. (Ok, its not a movie... yet)

Or the Anime "Eden of the East" when looking at the power of the social network.

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Facebook, Google, Twitter are the shady bouncers of the web. They should be fired

Ian Michael Gumby
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@Oliver Jones... Re: Just like the Sun (News of the World) then

I said that its their argument.

I also said that FB themselves showed them to be culpable thru some of their experiments on their users.

As to whether they won or lost that argument remains to be scene. It hasn't been tested in a court of law.

So its still a viable defense.

I don't agree with it and I think that the US Courts as well as European Courts rule them to be a monopoly.

(Google, Facebook, Twitter, and even Amazon to a point)

Having been named a monopoly is a legal status that none of these companies want. Google ... er ... Alphabet has set up a corporate structure to help defend being called a monopoly. But that's a different story.

The point? I don't believe that there's a human in the loop reviewing the content of these ads. So ... it makes it harder to say that they are in the loop and are culpable.

Personally I agree with you but again, what you, I and most people who have common sense think doesn't mean much to a bunch of lawyers and a judge.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Just like the Sun (News of the World) then

Oh I agree with what you are saying.

However you can't hold FB, Google, or Twitter liable.

Their argument is that they are not the originator but the conduit therefore they have no responsibility even though they make money from the misinformation.

The real irony... Facebook ran a research project that showed just how culpable they are. How placing information into your news feed, even if just scanned had an impact on your behavior.

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Have MAC, will hack: iThings have trivial-to-exploit Wi-Fi bug

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: @WARNING WARNING WILL ROBINSON .... iOS 11 brings more issues

@AC

It most certainly leaves the phone. Read the description. It's captured data as part of a recommendation engine.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@WARNING WARNING WILL ROBINSON .... Re: iOS 11 brings more issues

So... I know I can shut off the Wi-Fi and Bluetooth from the Systems controller app.

HOWEVER...

Can someone tell me why every single app has a Siri suggestions toggle?

Yeah. So unless you want SIRI turned on and running on your phone, you have to go to every app and turn off this selection.

Very sneaky Apple and very bad.

This is a way for Apple to spy on you when you run an app.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@fake jack of shadows... Re: iOS 11 brings more issues

Look Rock, (yeah I know the series) ;-)

Its not just 'activists or reporters' so why don't you jack your anti-establishment wantabe attitude down... ok?

It's a bit more troublesome than that.

Its a way for Apple to track your movements and habits. Like when you go in to the mall and they want to track your movements to see what stores you visit. Even if they don't connect, just listening for your BT and WIFI queries is enough.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC ... Re: iOS 11 brings more issues

I noticed that right after I loaded it up on my phone.

I used the buttons to turn it off and literally 5 minutes later the wi-fi was turned on.

It was only after I went to the setting and slid the bar that it was turned off and stayed off.

The toggle buttons on the pane seem to be an idiot thing and is a major bug.

Apple is showing the lack of common sense.

Free clue. When I want my wi-fi off and my blue tooth off, I want them off. Automatically turning them on is an invasion of privacy.

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Sigfox doesn't do IP and is therefore secure, says UK IoT network operator

Ian Michael Gumby
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@ Pascal Monet Re: "Sigfox's proprietary protocol"

You don't know that the argument of 'security thru obscurity' is the case.

While this may be true, it may also not be true too. There are other protocols which may be in use that also encrypts the data and relies on some form of hardware identification.

Since they claim its proprietary we don't know for sure.

Having said that... more than likely they cobbled something together that's utter garbage. But there's still the chance they got someone who's from the MOD/DOD/Darpa world and knows a thing or two, now isn't there?

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Hi Facebook, Google, we think we might tax your ads instead – lots of love, Europe x

Ian Michael Gumby
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@Bazza Re: Easy

No, its not so easy.

Pretend that you are the customer. How does the government know what you bought? You are self reporting what you owe. So how does the government audit that you are paying your fair share? Want to see an example? In the US, when you purchase things online from a business who isn't in your state doesn't charge you a sales tax. You are supposed to self report and pay the tax to your state. How many people actually do this? (E.g. You buy a new 8K TV from an electronics store not in your home state, you save ~10.4% sales tax if you live in Chicago IL)

That's just the first problem.

With respect to actually taxing revenues... These companies are playing games. E.g. Starbucks shipping product to a centralized depot in one country with a lower tax rate, then shipping the product to the rest of Europe so that the bulk of the profit margin is captured at a lower tax rate.

In the digital economy, if you tax at the point of sale and not allow Google to claim that the sale took place in Ireland when the customer is in France... you can capture the fair tax. Its a transaction tax or use tax.

This is something the countries can do and IMHO should do.

Google and other companies have brought this on themselves for gaming the system. Note: While its not illegal to game the system, but the system was based on trust that companies wouldn't do that.

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Bill Gates says he'd do CTRL-ALT-DEL with one key if given the chance to go back through time

Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC

Alt-right or Alt-left?

One of the problems we have is the interjection of politics where its not needed.

We definitely need a reboot.

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What's that, Equifax? Most people expect to be notified of a breach within hours?

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Not Qualified

This industry is rife with people who are under qualified.

30 years ago.... to call yourself a software engineer, you needed to go to a college and graduate with a 4 yr degree in an accredited engineering program.

Today... its a job title.

When I look at resumes where someone who calls themselves an engineer who didn't go to school for engineering, I hammer them in the interview.

When I see a resume chock full of buzzwords, I hammer them to see what they know. How they handle stress. Note, I haven't made anyone cry... that's a feat that I've only seen happen once while my friend was interviewing someone.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Words are cheaper than sysadmin time

Sorry mate.. Struts isn't system admin.

Its application admin.

Some companies are large enough that the responsibility gets split.

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Facebook let advertisers target 'Jew-haters'

Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC ... Re: Cambridge Analytica

Chum, hate to break it to you... Trump won because he was the lesser of two evils.

You think Hillary would have been better, her book is proof that she's a nutter and we dodged a bullet. While I didn't vote for Trump, I will say that if he was given a chance, he'd be doing a better job. The issue is that he's an outsider and wants to drain the swamp. So those who made their money in DC and feed from the swamp, don't want him around.

He gets blasted by the Media even when he's doing the right thing and after the fact, it comes out that he did the right thing yet no mea culpa or correction from the MSM. I mean, I kid you not... 90% of MSM is negative. Fox News which ran stories is closer to 55-45 where 55% was negative. (And they're being labeled 'pro Trump')

Trump won because of the fact he went to the rust belt and won the states that Obama won. Clinton avoided them and instead went to fund raisers in California.

The DNC's treatment of Bernie Sanders had more of an impact on voters than any ads that could have run on Facebook. Her illegal activities which are still being investigated today... are more of a reason than any 'pro Trump' ad on FB.

As to using 'Big Data' for political fundraising... The Republicans are far behind what Obama did in 2012 out of Chicago. Something Clinton didn't come close to doing either.

BTW, Clinton's crew ignored the Big Data analytics that was done... ;-)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Voland's right hand Re: How about some balance?

Wow.

Even your response could be viewed as being antisemitic. Free clue. Judaism is both a race and a religion. Prior to the second world war, the largest Jewish community in Europe was in Poland with communities over 400 years old before the Holocaust.

The issue though is that its possible to search for specific key words or phrases which can give clues to people belonging to hate groups. "88" for example. And then the BDS movement which is not only misguided but also produces antisemitic rhetoric and hate speech.

The underlying issue is that Facebook does have the ability to control hate speech as well as other user content, yet here is an area where they are turning a 'blind eye'. This would be akin to the 'pink sheet' contracts that were afforded spammers by the ISPs and Telcos.

Antisemitism isn't getting all of the outrage.

There's more, but I doubt you'd grok it.

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This article has been deleted

Ian Michael Gumby
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@Anton

Wishful thinking, but no.

They were 'undercover'.

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Five ways Apple can fix the iPhone, but won't

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: My Battery lasts all day...

Fucking neo-luddites. Why wouldn't I use the computer in my pocket as a pocket computer?

Because I have real computers for that task? Because I sit in front of a real computer all day?

Oh? You must be a windows luser...

Its not being a ludite. I've been in tech longer than you've been alive.

Its using the tool for its designed use.

My phone... calls, text, emails. Then there are the work related apps. Closed when not in use.

Uber, off when not in use and use of location services are turned off.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Facepalm

Re: Headphone Jack Please

Hmmm.

I would have opted for creating a pluggable device that expanded the USB charging port.

Think of it as a dock that fits over the USB port that still allows you charge but then has a headphone jack that lets you plug in your head phones but then runs thru the USB port.

But that's just me and rather than ruin your phone, you would have a marketable product. (Of course you would have to write the software app that lets you recognize the head sets... )

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Coat

My Battery lasts all day...

Seriously. What are you running on your phone?

Do you keep your apps up and running in the background when you don't need them?

Are you busy watching youtube vids or netflix on your phone?

I have maybe 30 apps downloaded to my phone. Most are for travel, some are for work (emails , slack, skype, etc ...) But that's pretty much it. I don't listen to music although I do have music apps.

So yeah. if you use your phone primarily as a phone and a communication device... your battery lasts a day or more.

Mines the jacket with the small jar of prune juice as I keep yelling at you kids to get off my lawn.

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Bosch wants crowdsourced data for future connected cars

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Low accuracy?

I don't think you understand.

Your position is a bit fuzzy and relative.

(There's the GPS location, and then there's the map which is also a bit relative.)

Here, if you're within 2m , the position relative to the map, but that's where LIDAR kicks in. It helps you determine your position relative to your surroundings. LIDAR can give you fairly accurate positioning. However these are expensive and they may be building/designing cheaper units which are less accurate.

Imagine your lane guidance system where you're going down the highway at 70mph and the guy in the lane next to you starts to swerve towards your lane but doesn't enter it. What does your car do? ;-)

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Apache Foundation rebuffs allegation it allowed Equifax attack

Ian Michael Gumby
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Trollface

Re: @Sane ...

Touche! now go and google 'BOHICA!'

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@ Aodhhan ... Re: @Sane ...

You really are dense... so I'll dumb it down for you...

Breeches will happen. However, you have to ask yourself what the crooks gain by having the data?

Hint: Identity theft .

If you make it impossible for them to open up a line of credit... aka stealing your identity... then the data is worthless for the criminals.

You remove the value from the data for the criminals. However, you remove the chance for the credit unions making $10.00 per account for the privilege to 'freeze' it.

As to the database breech. there are other things that they could do, and that is a different topic for discussion.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Holmes

@Sane ...

No shit sherlock! (Hence the icon)

When they know that they are about to get massively sued in multiple courts / jurisdictions... they are smart to say nothing. Anything they say will be used against them.

The sad thing... it isn't until a massive breech like this that the industry adopts new changes to improve their service.

ALL Credit Bureaus can FIX THIS PROBLEM

All it takes is adding a page to their web site that allows you for FREE to freeze your credit report information and provide a unique Q Code that you can scan as input in to a free app like Google's Authenticator or DUO. So that if you want to apply for credit, you get an alert, you plug in your timed code and then you are up and running. This would shut down most of the identity fraud overnight.

And it's relatively cheap for the bureaus to implement, albeit they lose $10.00 USD per account.

But its a heck of a lot cheaper than a lawsuit.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC Re: And here comes the thunder...

Slow down there perry mason.

Remind me when did GDPR go in to effect? ;-)

Before you jump all over Equifax... if they don't have your credit information, nor do the other information brokers like Trans Union... you do realize that you will be paying more for your next loan or mortgage, right?

Oh believe me, we should sue these monkeys out of bizness. [sic]

However, that doesn't mean that the information brokers who create your credit score should be tossed out.

Instead we need to force them to change their business model.

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Sci-Fi titan Jerry Pournelle passes,
aged 84

Ian Michael Gumby
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@ Yet another anon coward... Re: Science provides facts, you decide.

Sorry, that's the wrong author.

You're thinking of Larry Niven and his Puppeteers. ;-)

There's more, but I don't think you'd get the gist of the discussion.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Peter 18

The irony is that its not the nicotine or tobacco that is killing you but how you ingest it.

Apparently Vaping is healthier than smoking. (Yes, actually there are reports that suggest this... )

There is also evidence that its next to impossible to quit smoking. Most products that exist to help you... fail or have a lousy success rate.

But I digress.

The point is that he made up his own mind and wasn't afraid to speak it (I agree with an earlier post).

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Alien

@AC

You're showing your age.

I remember having a collection of all of the BYTE magazines from the first edition. In 1997, I donated them to my local library only to have them throw them out... :-(

But I digress.

Yeah, he was a good writer and I loved his work with Niven. (Definitely two of the best writers of all times.)

These days 84 is still young.

RIP

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Huawei's storage hardware future: Fancy some cosy NVMe over Fabrics this winter?

Ian Michael Gumby
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Wow

This is the future ...

You can build some crazy fast clusters using 2 of these and fill the rest of the rack with a ToR and 1U servers w lots of cores and Ram w minimal local drives for OS.

How much?

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Scotiabank internet whizzkids screw up their HTTPS security certs

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Banks and security? Pah!

That's par for the course.

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Surprising nobody, lawyers line up to sue the crap out of Equifax

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Insider trading?

First, you can't just make up a credit rating.

These individuals will be charged with violating trading laws by the SEC. Its a no brainer. What happens next would be interesting.

The issue though is why they sold and how much of their shares they sold.

If they can provide legitimate reasons for the sale... they won't be charged or be found guilty.

If they can't... boom. They will be forced to pay a fine that will exceed the proceeds, pay their legal costs which may initially be paid for by the company, and could face jail time, and lose the ability to be a corporate officer of a publicly traded company. It all depends on the dollar amount and the severity of the situation.

To give you an example... a sale could have been done as part of diversification, meaning their broker may have found a good deal and he or she sold to move in to the deal. It could have been done to pay off debts, or to get money ready for college tuition or something... we don't know.

The other problem... Rule FD.

They could argue that the minute they went 'public' aka notified the authorities... they were allowed to sell.

(IANAL so I don't know if that argument would hold up in court. )

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@AC

You can do the following:

1) Pay $10 per credit bureau and 'freeze' your credit reporting. (Meaning no one can pull a credit report without your approval)

2) Join the class action.

There are a couple of ways they can easily improve security. It may mean removing a source of revenue.

The PCI compliance rules need to be updated. However depending on how the systems were breached, the company could have already been out of compliance.

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Facebook ties JavaScript code together with Yarn

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Adding to the confusion

FB is at war w Apache... so to speak.

FB donated code... taken out of Apache because of FB T's & C's.

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Equifax mega-leak: Security wonks smack firm over breach notification plan

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Class action lawsuit.

This is a major class action lawsuit in the making.

There's no denial as to the harm this can cause because it makes it easier for the crooks to target individuals and to steal identities.

There is also no excuse.

They should be offering free credit monitoring for the next 5 years.

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Big Tech fumes over Prez Trump's decision to deport a million kids

Ian Michael Gumby
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@Tom Dial ... Re: ...because we are a nation of laws

There is immigrants and then there are illegal aliens who snuck into the US.

Bit of a big difference.

The US is a land of immigrants, including the American Indians if you go back far enough...

The issue isn't that the Presidency has gotten too big, but that there's been an absence of checks and balances.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: ...because we are a nation of laws

And we are.

Trump isn't wrong is rolling back Obama's order. The fifth court of appeals ruled against Obama citing that only Congress can make laws. Obama broke the law and was in violation of the constitution. SCOTUS was split 4 to 4 and had Scalia still been alive he would have sided with the courts and said Obama's power grab was unconstitutional.

To really put a pin in it... Obama said to the public in 2011 that he couldn't unilaterally make an executive order like DACA, then later he does just that. (IIRC, his words were used against him during the lawsuit.)

You may hate Trump, but he put the ball back in Congresses court. So if you don't have DACA, you can vote out your congress critter in 2018. (Both parties)

Trump is right for doing what he is doing. Ironic isn't it? A lawyer turned senator turned POTUS ignoring the law while a Billionaire real estate puff actually is following it. Go figure.

Meanwhile Clinton attempts to rewrite history with her new book.

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Facebook's music plans mean you'll never leave Facebook

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Paul Crawford

Amazon Prime.

So they can stream videos for 'free' if they have Prime. Or to make purchases.

Kids these days use their phones more than they use computers for 'web apps' to do things like make purchases.

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From landslide to buried alive: Why 2017 election forecasts weren't wrong

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@DougS Re: The phrase "lies, damned lies, and statistics" ...

Sorry but there's a bit more to this...

You can take a larger sample size, but you would still be off.

The issue when polling Trump supporters is that those who are true supporters will openly express an opinion in favor of him. Of those who ultimately voted for him were the undecided and those who didn't want to be outed as Trump supporters. And then there are people who tell the pollsters to F-Off!

That's the real issue. You are assuming that you're getting a random sample, when you are not. Did the polls take in consideration that most people who responded to the poll tended to be Democrats?

As to the popular vote... doesn't matter. Polls are done at the local level.

If you look at the map, Trump won most of the country. The map county by county showed Red.

Bottom line, Clinton ran a bad campaign. And she's a crook and criminal.

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