* Posts by Ian Michael Gumby

3993 posts • joined 11 Apr 2006

UK has rejected over 1,000 skilled IT bod visa applications this year

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@tip pc Re: @AC Use local

I don't disagree.

My point is that if you can't find a special skill at a senior level... you bring them in on a temp basis.

But for the routine stuff that should be sourced local.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC Re: Use local

It depends...

If the IT role is generic and doesn't require deep skills, absolutely.

However, if its a role that does require deep skills, then you are shooting yourself in the foot.

Of course the person making the decision doesn't know jack about IT or skill levels.

Tough call.

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Sueballs flying over Facebook's Android app data slurping

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Laudable but...

Its a nuisance lawsuit that is just the tip of the iceberg. If they win/settle, FB faces more lawsuits. Also it could mean that it could become a class action lawsuit.

Either way... FB is going to be spending $$$$ on lawyers and settlements.

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Make masses carry their mobes, suggests wig in not-at-all-creepy speech

Ian Michael Gumby
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Airplane mode?

I was going to say take the battery out.

Even on airplane mode, you can keep the blue tooth and wi-fi on.

Here in the states... this wouldn't fly. And truthfully, you would be hard pressed to find people who won't carry their mobe. Its become as important as your house keys.

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JEDI mind tricks: Brakes slammed on Pentagon's multibillion cloud deal

Ian Michael Gumby
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@Mark85

Its not really pork.

In AWS defense, from the beginning they went and certified how secure their environment can be.

(Assuming that you're smart enough to turn them on and configure them properly... )

Not sure where IBM and others are.

What I don't get is that the US Government could build their own cloud.

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Cambridge Analytica dismantled for good? Nope: It just changed its name to Emerdata

Ian Michael Gumby
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Mushroom

Down voted really? Re: Meh.... Here comes the new boss.

Let me get this straight....

Are you ok with FB capturing data about you and capturing data not just on FB users but others because sites like El Reg link their js code?

Are you therefore OK when they freely share this information w Obama's team?

The researcher who sold the data to CA is the one who broke the rules w FB. Not CA. Nor Trump campaign which paid CA to use the data.

So what's the outrage?

IMHO if you're dumb enough to have FB account... then you have no reason to be outraged. If you don't have a FB account, then you have a reason to be outraged. But lets be clear. Not CA or Trump but at FB

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Meh.... Re: Here comes the new boss.

Cambridge Analytica didn't do anything wrong.

They played by FB rules.

And remember that FB *gave* Obama access freely to the same data.

Yet w Trump's team *buying* access? Everyone is up in arms.

Lets be fair and place blame on the punters who didn't think or care that the free service(s) they got were really stealing their data.

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NASA dusts off FORTRAN manual, revives 20-year-old data on Ganymede

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@ST Re: The problem probably wasn't the software...

Cross compilation had been around before 1989. So code portability had a thought.

As others have pointed out... it could have been due to the hardware as well as the specific libraries to analyze the data. There's no reason why they couldn't migrate the data to another system once they've pulled it off the older hardware, although you will have to recreate/port the old very specific libraries used to work on the data.

That could prove to be a bit more problematic.

We don't have enough information on the quality of the code.

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Google Pixel 2 XL: Like paying Apple-tier prices then saying, hey, please help yourself to my data

Ian Michael Gumby
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Mushroom

@Oddlegs

Actually Apple does collect a lot less data about you than Google does.

Its a well known fact. Yes FB and other app providers also slurp data, however you can control which apps you put on your phone and its not the underlying OS that is doing the slurping. So its Caveat Emptor

As to your comment about Siri, you have to push the button to get Siri to listen. Not always on.

@Andrew Orlowski, while I like your article and writing, this is a few years too late.

Everything you've printed is true and it has been well known for years.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: the threat of closing down an Apple factory

Apple does not have any factories in China. All their manufacturing there is done by other companies.

Yup and with Foxconn moving to Wisconsin (They must either like Cheese Curds or they didn't care for Illinois' politics) The phones could be manufactured in the US...

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IETF: GDPR compliance means caring about what's in your logfiles

Ian Michael Gumby
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@JohnFen Re: Difficult

Kinda sorta...

You have both Criminal and Civil statutes and then there's the argument that if you failed to protect your data or systems from a criminal hack, you're liable. So that's going to run counter and you would have the right to retain certain data.

I guess it gets down to how the law was written. If it was written poorly, it could be challenged over this and it could be overturned and they would be forced to rewrite it.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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"You can't possibly detect and investigate suspected breaches in three days."

Correct! That's the point. If you can't detect a breach it never happened and you do not have to disclose it. The GDPR lawyers actually were brilliant.

Yes, there's a couple of long game attack vectors where you need to track IP addresses for longer than 3 days. However, I suspect that if you consider that you still require the full IP address for security purposes, its not a violation. It really depends on how they worded the actual rule/regulation.

But to your point... if you show that a company allowed or didn't discover breaches because of the 3 day suggestion, you will see a queue of class action attorneys getting ready to sue the company.

Now is the time for all senior IT guys to go back to school and get a law degree so that they can specialize IT legal compliance.

Don't know how it would work in the UK side of the pond, but it could be a great alternative to becoming a patent attorney.

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Happy having Amazon tiptoe into your house? Why not the car, then? In-trunk delivery – what could go wrong?

Ian Michael Gumby
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@Christoph Interesting question...

Where do you find an insurer that will allow this, and how much will it add to the premium?

You don't, what will happen is that after a period of time, the underwriters will have enough data to properly assess the risk and when you renew your policy they will ask you if you partake in this service and they will then add it to your rate.

Or they could inform you that you are not covered since you did xxx and you're in for a fight. (Not really that likely, but YMMV based on your insurance carrier. )

Keep in mind... Amazon continually attempts to expand and grow the biz thru innovation and improvements.

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Facebook admits it does track non-users, for their own good

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Cue the lawyers ... Re: Big Hoodie

Depending on the site's ToS, the fact that FB is monitoring and tracking non FB subscribers may be a violation of the ToS and agreement w Facebook.

Again this shouldn't be a surprise and why many w NoScript block FB scripts.

Of course not all browsers work w script blockers and addons.

This could be a major Class Action lawsuit against FB since none of those who were tracked gave permission for FB to track them.

Again, lets ask El Reg why they run Google's Analytics given that in today's world, its very easy for a competent admin to write their own tracking javascript. Note: While not FB, its an example of a major corporation spying on you without your knowledge or approval. It is also one way that FB , Google and others can spy on you and track you without the use of cookies.

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Cisco backs test to help classical crypto outlive quantum computers

Ian Michael Gumby
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@Lee D ... Re: Encryption is complicated enough already

Thus building the core of encryption on thousands and thousands of tiny such hashes, it's possible that it makes the number of possibilities so vast, even with instantaneous discovery of every single one, that it becomes infeasible.

Pretty much.

I think we're at the stage of Quantum computing where its possible to break some encryption so that its possible to steal BTCs from your wallet. Or bank.

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Cryptocoin investors sue Chase Bank for sky-high credit card charges

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: @Bombastic Bob ... The Bank is RIGHT

Gift cards are not a recognized currency, but you will pay cash advance fees for buying them I believe.

I'm not so sure.

I don't buy gift cards and I don't know how the bank would know that you bought a store gift card. THere's a description and a sku that they would have to track.

I guess you could buy a gift card and then see your credit card statement online to see how they describe the transaction. Cash Advances are itemized separately. So tell me how that works out.

As to the idea about buying an item for speculation... you can go in to a shop and buy gold or diamonds or even gold coins which wouldn't be considered currency. (Yeah, how much is that gold dollar, or silver dollar...)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Bombastic Bob ... Re: The Bank is RIGHT

Errr Maybe.

I agree with what you're saying. However its not that simple when it comes to a court case.

First Cryptocoins are not a recognized currency. That's still up for debate.

Lawyers being lawyers could argue that Crypto coins are not currency because they aren't recognized by the US as currency. Nor are they regulated as such. (There are some lawsuits still out there. )

So its a tough one.

At issue is if the bank unilaterally made this decision without notifying customers. Again, here's the rub. That would be illegal because they didn't notify their customers. (FD, I have an account w Chase I don't recall seeing anything... not that I buy crypto coins)

At the same time... Crypto currencies want to be recognized as a currency, so if they win.. its a step backwards.

My guess... the class action could fizzle. Or settles quietly.

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Boffins find new ways to slurp private info from Facebook addicts using precision-targeted ads

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: missing the point?

Google ?

Oh they are capturing much more information. So much so, that they don't need to use cookies.

Ask yourself why do many well known sites still use google analytics? ;-)

But overall, none of this should be a shock to anyone.

You are the product. Without you, FB would be nothing.

Unfortunately even if you don't have a FB account, they are tracking you too.

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IBM swings shrink ray from workforce to mainframes

Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC ... Re: @Doctor Syntax ...

Being a monopoly is a legal decision. They almost did consider it a monopoly when it came to the browser, however Microsoft consented and avoided that label.

That said. Amazon is a monopoly if the courts find it to be. And that's an interesting pickle. Some of their business practices on the retail side are in fact monopolistic. So IMHO it could be easier to show Amazon as a monopoly and then force the company to split up. That said... look what happened when they split up Ma Bell in to Baby bells. Some good and some bad. And somethings didn't change.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@ Christian Berger Re: I'd like to have an honest non-marketing answer to the question...

Cheaper hardware?

That's relative. Considering that your cheaper hardware is going to be less efficient meaning you're going to have to buy more hardware, larger footprint and more energy.

So it becomes a bit of a toss up and TCO is a bit fungible when you consider all of the issues.

FD, I haven't run all of the numbers so its still a question of which wins out. Also ... IBM's price is fungible. Large players get larger discounts. Tiers from A-J and then some discounts on top of that too.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Doctor Syntax ...

IBM has kept the mainframe as its sacred cow.

In the converged data center... the mainframe running linux , docker , kubernetes... could be an AWS killer if they get their pricing model down and develop similar tools.

That could be difficult unless Trump's Administration considers Amazon a monopoly and break ups the company.

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Facebook crosses off one legal headache, another pops up: Server blueprint theft spat with Bladeroom settled, but...

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@AC Re: Zuck will say nothing of significance

Zuck will fall on his sword and say mea culpa.

He pleads the fifth he's toast on the NorCal lawsuits against FB.

He'll tap dance around tough questions. And if the Republicans were smart, they'd nail FB on giving away the data for free to Obama. That's actually against the FEC (election law)

There's a lot that FB has to answer for...

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The new Black: Western Dig doubles capacity on slimmed-down flasher

Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC Re: @Ivan 4

Yeah, however the M.2 NVMe does a better job than dual ported SAS.

The point was that it depends on the use case.

Most PC gamer types aren't going to need this.

But if you're doing a mini cluster for work using higher end PCs could keep the costs down.

18 core chips are expensive and then you have to have enough memory to boot.... that's $$$

Building out a tiered storage platform on PCs (i9 chips) could make more sense.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Ivan 4

Not going to happen.

Also most PCs maybe have 1 M.2 port, some 2 and a few 3.

For the home PC 2TB of fast storage is good enough.

For those doing real things ... you would want more fast storage and then use SSDs (SATA) for slower storage and ditch HDDs altogether.

Add to this some GPUs w CUDA capabilities and you have a poor man's workshop for ML and AI.

Its a good thing that the M.2 NVMe drives are now more affordable but still a long way to go...

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Co-op says IT upgrade project going swell since axing IBM

Ian Michael Gumby
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The important thing... this shows how IBM is failing...

When a company outsources to IBM, the current crop of employees are moved to IBM and become IBM employees. Over time, these employees are replaced with lower cost alternatives that supposedly can do the same job.

Clearly this isn't the case, but the the pointy haired managers have their huge bonuses for saving the company money and have long since left the building.

(At least in the US)

This isn't an isolated incident and this is in part why IBM has a sullied brand.

Rometty can shift the focus.... but she cannot change the brand's reputation as easily.

And stories like this only show just how much better it is to keep things in house.

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Facebook dynamites its own APIs amid data slurp scandals, wrecks data slurp applications

Ian Michael Gumby
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Mushroom

@Updraft ... Re: The 'Shadow Profile' Economy

What about the average Joe who doesn't have a FB account, so never opted-in yet visits a site that runs FB javascript code? FB is slurping that data. Of course they probably pay the site to use their stuff and are therefore a 'partner' and thus you've agreed to it if there is a ToS for the site. For others. probably not.

Which also begs the question... El Reg, why do you use Google Analytics on your site? Google Tag Services?

Its the same thing... FB, Google slurp data from other websites on people who may or may not have an account thus no consent.

How is that going to survive a privacy challeng in the EU?

The Bomb Blast icon is for the idea that EU privacy laws are going to impact many companies in unsuspecting ways...

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AWSome, S3 storage literally costs pennies

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Meh.

They don't mention the cost to retrieve the data and xfer it back...

To be fair, you would have to price a competing solution...

You'd have to consider building out a cluster of rack mounted servers with lots of disk. You would run something like CleverSafe (now part of IBM) to get the replication across the cluster. Then you would have to take a look at your sunk cost in hardware, the price of drives and then take that over a 5 year life span. (Warranty for disks and average lifetime expectations.) Cost accounting would let you do an accelerated depreciation model.

Bottom line... if you own your DC already... its cheaper to roll your own.

If you lease rack space? It depends on your lease agreement, but still probably cheaper.

The advantage to AWS is that its 100% an annual expense no need to depreciate the hardware.

If you were doing this for a home office... going with a NAS would be cheaper but you would have to expose it to the internet if you wanted access from outside of your SOHO. Not to mention its still one device, albeit raided drives.

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Here's the list of Chinese kit facing extra US import tariffs: Hard disk drives, optic fiber, PCB making equipment, etc

Ian Michael Gumby
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Black Helicopters

@ Tom 38 You don't get it...

Trump's tariffs ... they went from mega tarriffs to being whittled down.

Want to bet that most of the tariffs go away after Trump starts to talk w NORKS? And of course some other trade agreements.

Trump is an interesting character.

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What's silent but violent and costs $250m? Yes, it's Lockheed Martin's super-quiet, supersonic X-plane for NASA

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Potential

Well, forget Concorde. Lockheed Martin's Skunk Works, makers of the iconic SR-71 Blackbird, was today awarded a $247.5m contract by NASA to build a potential successor: the Quiet Supersonic Technology (QueSST) X-plane by 2022. The 94ft-long airframe has a wingspan of 29.5ft and is designed to fly at Mach 1.4, or 940 mph, at an altitude of 55,000 feet.

That should clear up your reading ... you should get your eyes checked...

That said... how is this a successor to a spy plane that flew many times faster?

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Stop us if you've heard this one: Job cuts at IBM

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: @AC ... Re: @AC ... No Shite. RA = Untouchable

Actually its possible.

The issue is that it will either take one SVP to call in a favor, or you have a skill that they really want. I mean desparately want....

I've heard about it with someone I know... but its very rare. And it was a mistake for them to let him go in the first place.

Most friends who got RA'd ended up back within the borg because of an acquisition.

I still have some friends left on the inside, although over time, its getting fewer and fewer. Many retiring or being RA'd For most, the grass is greener away from the borg.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC ... No Shite. Re: RA = Untouchable

If you're on the RA list, it would take an act of god to save you. Really two senior VPs have to sign off on it... from what I'm told...

Your managers know when an RA is coming. If they can't protect you... they give you a heads up and recommend you for another job that would be safe.

You're right, you become persona non gratta ?sp?

As someone who left the borg long ago, the grass is greener on the outside.

Don't blame Ginny. She had the vision but could never succeed on the execution. Her senior staff that were heritage IBMers were her downfall. Not to mention they had no clue how to succeed in their new space.

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Uber self-driving car death riddle: Was LIDAR blind spot to blame?

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: "...a [Lidar] blind spot low to the ground all around the car."

Radar should have seen the pedestrian and bike.

Lidar would have picked up the bike and woman faster and easier than the radar.

Even still the car should have picked up the cyclist well within range of the sensor on the top of the car.

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Happy as Larry: Why Oracle won the Google Java Android case

Ian Michael Gumby
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@Boltar Re: "Should've gone with C++ and HTML for their App needs."

I stopped coding in C++ because I was sick and tired of fixing other people's obvious mistakes and piss poor code.

I prefer C over C++, but in terms of coding today... SCALA.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@AC

"Google didn't need to licence the Java code, it wrote its own implementation from scratch."

No it didn't. As Andrew points out, they raised an affirmative defense of 'Fair Use'.

What Andrew got wrong is that Google wasn't going to get that piece of paper for free from Sun.

Remember that Sun had a mobile version of Java that required that the company needs to buy a license while the desktop version was free. It was their way of monetizing Java.

Could Google have bought a license from Sun? Sure.

Most likely a cash payment and then a royalty per phone. Would have been much cheaper than what they now owe Larry. But it wouldn't have been free or cheap.

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Are you able to read this headline? Then you're not Julian Assange. His broadband is unplugged

Ian Michael Gumby
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Do you think the Embassy can't block signals?

Sorry but its a gentle push to remind him that its time to go.

Maybe they drug him and claim he was sleep walking out their front door.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Trollface

@Teiwaz ... Re: It would take a heart of stone not to laugh...

The Americans are not good when dealing with public assassinations.

The Russians however... they are top notch.

Which is probably why Assange doesn't drink tea anymore.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Black Helicopters

@Bucake Wookie ... Re: It would take a heart of stone not to laugh...

I'm sure you've been to a CIA Black site... ;-)

And what makes you so sure that's where he'll go?

The point is that the fear of the US is only in Assange's mind.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Mongo .. Re: >... serious aggravating factors.

Nope.

Doesn't work that way...

At the time of the EAW, the investigation and potential charges were in effect. He hadn't been charged because of a quirk in Swedish law that doesn't allow him to be charged if he's not present.

So he would have faced the charges at the time of the EAW hearings and subsequent jumping bail.

In addition, he caused harm to the Brits in terms of their EU standing along with the additional costs of police time monitoring the Embassy.

So he would probably face the full force of the law on this one.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@AC ... Re: Simple solution.

Yeah the fear of the death penalty is way overblown.

At issue though is why? Posting the leaked files would be shielded to some degree due to the Ellsberg decision back in the 70's. Even without it... it would mean fines and some prison time at most.

Then you have the potential for espionage act. That would mean that Assange assisted Manning in the actual theft. Because Manning got off light... Assange would face at most some prison time.

And yes, its true that if the US wanted him, the Death Penalty would be off the table, not that its really an option in the first place.

With respect to the UK offering safe passage... When they are done with him for jumping bail, he's on a flight to Australia. End of story.

Most like he will not get a suspended sentence since he's cost the Brits a lot of money with extra security around the embassy.

Either way... Assange is in a world of fun when he gets to Australia. They can seize his passport and then he would have a harder time leaving the country. Assuming that the US doesn't request extradition of him from the Aussies first.

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Fed up with Facebook data slurping? Firefox has a cunning plan

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@AC Re: While Facebook Container may help a bit, it has limitations.

That assumes you have a FB account. The slurp is that FB most likely has a financial agreement in place to have some of their code running on a lot of site's pages or they convinced the sites to have single auth or tie in to their site.

What's more disturbing...

in 2009 Zuck sayz no sharing period.

2012 Zuck shares w Obama for free. (Which actually is very illegal when it comes to FEC laws)

Not a peep or complaint.

2016 Trump buys data / algos from a company that purchased this from a researcher who got it from FB.

Everyone is complaining.

The truth is that this has been a major issue when it came to monetizing FB.

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Huawei joins Android elite with pricey, nocturnal 40MP flagship

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Agreed

It seems that the telcos are no longer subsidizing the price of the phones and you're getting in to the true cost of the phone itself.

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India: Yeah, we would like to 3D-print igloos on the Moon

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: RE: ArrZarr

If you're capable of building a sustainable base on the moon, then cost isn't going to be an issue because you've already solved your energy problem.

As to the rail gun... you can use anything within the payload. Google Sabot round. At issue is aiming the payload and the payload being a smart payload which can change trajectory because the rail gun can't.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: RE: ArrZarr

It depends on how big those rocks are...

The moon is a harsh mistress.

-Mike

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Fleeing Facebook app users realise what they agreed to in apps years ago – total slurpage

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@AC ...Re: This is what could really do Zuckwit and his company serious harm

You are confusing criminal vs civil complaints.

W.R.T criminal complaints... they US Government will charge them and the company will pay out a fine as part of a settlement.

W.R.T. civil... that's where the company can get soaked. Litigation costs will be in the millions before any chance of getting near settlement talks.

What FB doesn't want is for the lawsuits to peel back their operations during discovery. This is when the lawyers get to see what really goes on and how much they know as well as what they do with this information. This is Zuck's worst nightmare.

One other question will also be answered... everyone is enraged at CA getting this data and supposedly using it w Trump's campaign. But what about Clinton and Obama campaigns.

Then there's the research in to seeing if they can effect people's mental state thru what news they filter in their news feed... All of that will come out.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Roml0k ... Re: This is what could really do Zuckwit and his company serious harm

Grey area. Most likely nothing since they didn't 'eavesdrop' on the call and the US Supreme Court has identified the metadata as not being private.

The real issue is that they slurped data from and about people who did not agree to their T's & C's as well as one other small fact. They could have been spying on minors which brings in a whole nother slew of laws and potential lawsuits.

To your point... they could face lawsuits over the slurping because those who installed the App were not aware of the level and details that FB was slurping.

You can bet there will be some serious big dollar lawsuits against FB.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Mushroom

@SVV Re: This is what could really do Zuckwit and his company serious harm

The data slurp included Facebook app users' interactions with others who are not on Facebook – meaning people who never gave the Social Network™ permission for anything are probably profiled in its data troves anyway.

To your point, yes this could do FB serious harm. If the lawyers can find a lead plaintiff. In the US as well as around the world.

Keep in mind, the fact that FB also has java scripts running on many news sites slurping details about you. This is quasi grey space because you may have allowed your data to be slurped by these sites under the T's and C's of those sites.

This is most likely why Zuck is trying to go all apologetic because they just ended up in a world of hurt.

How would you, as a non user of FB find out what they have slurped about you?

And every company that uses FB scripts will also become suspect.

Its a huge potential mess...

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Just when you thought it was safe to go ahead with microservices... along comes serverless

Ian Michael Gumby
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Facepalm

Re: Security?

Who needs security?

Yeah, toss in security and see what happens.

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BOOM! Cambridge Analytica explodes following extraordinary TV expose

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@theVogon... Re: Popcorn

Keep dreaming...

Look, lets break this down.

What are the facts...

1) Did CA snarf the data? Or did the buy it from the Cambridge professor who wrote the app that collected the data and snarfed the friends data that wasn't locked down. (And friends of friends?)

2) Trump's Campaign may have used the data and services which were paid for , to CA. So what is Trump's culpability / liability? The answer is none. Of course you should talk to a lawyer because 90% of the news on Trump is negative (which shows bias) . So Trump is clear.

The issue is how did they get the data? Facebook allowed the research to occur and what you have is a breach of contract by the professor who sold his code and the data to CA.

So, depending on the contract, CA could be guilty of somethings (IANAL and don't know UK law) but in the US, could just be forced to delete the data. The Cambridge University Prof? He's in a lot of hot water

CA? Some. Trump? None.

As to candidates using analytics and data? Started with Obama. (In Chicago BTW...) Oh and of course FB was happy to share w Obama...

Just keeping it real.

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Facebook confirms Cambridge Analytica stole its data; it’s a plot, claims former director

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@tea hound ... Re: Fake News!!

You do realize that FB and Google have a way to tie your alias to your real id?

Yeah...

When you consider that... you're not as hidden as you think.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Teiwaz, Not even close...

Trump has a keen sense of what people want and what they don't want.

The real reason Trump won was that Hillary was soooo bad as a candidate.

There's rumors that the MSM helped Trump by giving him a lot of free air time because they didn't think he'll win the primary or could beat Clinton in the main election.

The election was sooo tilted in Clinton's favor, its her own fault.

1) Mail Server... she set it up (w Obama's blessing) as a way to avoid having her communication available for FOIA and the Official Records Act. Were it not for Guccifer busting her... she would have gotten away with it.

2) She avoided campaigning in the Midwest. Seriously. Three states went to Trump which was the difference. Clinton was so sure she had them in the bag, she hung out with the rich elite in Hollywood rather than hang with the plebs.

There's more and over the next couple of years, it will come out just how far Obama, the DNC and Clinton went to steal the election. Just ask Bernie.

Seriously... if you're an American, regardless of your political beliefs... A serious set of criminal acts occurred and you should be outraged. This will be Obama's legacy. This will be Hillary Clinton's legacy.

A criminal conspiracy too big to prosecute. Or so they hope.

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