* Posts by Ian Michael Gumby

3427 posts • joined 11 Apr 2006

Lloyds Banking Group axing hundreds of jobs AGAIN

Ian Michael Gumby
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@Headly Grange Re: Continued Cuts

How much did HSBC pay to end the US's money laundering claim against them?

That alone would be enough to cover the difference between onshore / off shore staffing for 10 years.

The other issue is that you have to deal with bringing less than competent people onshore and that's a larger problem.

Smaller, higher skilled staff can be used and while the individuals are at a premium, the TCO is lower and the amount of risk is lower.

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We're 90 per cent sure the FCC's robocall kill plan won't have the slightest impact

Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC Re: @Shadow .. The rest of us are 100% sure it won't do a damned thing.

If you want to stop your sister from calling you... just block her number.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Shadow .. Re: The rest of us are 100% sure it won't do a damned thing.

Its actually simpler than that.

Force the telcos and internet providers to offer a feature. *666 where it will report the last call to your number as a robo call. Then the phone company will look at the actual pen data and not the CID which can be spoofed while the actual number can't.

If it goes back to a SIP provider, the SIP provider will have to provide their IP logs so that the caller can be traced. (Assuming its a SIP call and not someone who set up an actual land line. Which would already be game over.)

When you trace back the robo call to its origin, you can now go after them regardless of the country and you can extradite them to the US because the US should be able to enforce the computer laws against them.

Only thing stopping them is loss of revenue ... anyone remember the pink sheet contracts ISPs had for spammers?

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FYI anyone who codes outside work: GitHub has a contract to stop bosses snatching it all

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@YAAC ... Re: It's not just code or tech related IP

Whoa!

First, companies will say whatever they want in a contract, regardless if its enforceable or not. IBM is notorious for doing this. They know this and they do it to scare you and/or hope they can bluff a judge if it goes that far.

Beyond that, they do have a right to stop you from doing technical work and may have the right to claim ownership. IBM is notorious for this and they can and will win if it goes that far. They can claim that although you weren't working on that technology, you were exposed to that tech while working for IBM.

This is why you see a lot of IBMers with Sid businesses outside of tech.

There is more, much more. Suffice it to say... companies tend to have deeper pockets than you or I and will win or wear you down to the point that you can't afford to continue.

As to your fetish porn, that doesn't cut it. But hey, its your hobby.

I would seriously suggest talking to a lawyer before you do anything you will seriously regret down the road.

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Google Fiber goes full Wizard of Oz: We're not in Kansas any more

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@rh587 Re: If Google owns the fiber...

Silly boy, a wholly owned subsidiary offers some reporting, tax and legal protection. It doesn't stop Google err now Alphabet from being labeled a monopoly. It could force Alphabet to divest and split the company completely, however then it would whither and die. It would no longer be able to be a loss leader for Google to gain more data from its subscribers. Laying fiber isn't cheap and unless you're in a densely populated (read large city), your cost per subscriber isn't going to let you charge $70 for a gigibit line to the house.

Google fiber is going to have to show a profit at some point in time and relatively soon.

BTW Virgin Media VMED is a separate publicly traded company from Virgin Atlantic which is part of Virgin Group which is the privately owned company founded and controlled by Branson. Virgin US is now part of Alaskan Air. So your argument falls flat.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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If Google owns the fiber...

How does that impact their other businesses?

If you think about it... becoming an ISP may cause governments to reclassify Google and it may cause more regulations on their business and at the same time they could have attempted to do deep packet sniffing to get more insight in to your internet use. (As if they can't do that already.)

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Intel reveals Optane SSDs: 375GB to start, at surprising speed

Ian Michael Gumby
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Shirley you jest ... Re: Competition at last?

That would be foolish.

Intel 800 ton gorilla in the industry. AMD is a flea in terms of Intel's dominance of the market.

If caught, Intel would be in a world of hurt and the risk outweighs the gain by several orders of magnitude.

Its not just the payout in damages but also the potential for Intel being named a monopoly. Even the hint of a threat of being called a monopoly scared IBM shit-less and forced them to back down during the 80's.

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MI5 man to steer GCHQ as Trump wiretapping saga continues

Ian Michael Gumby
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@ Doc ... Re: @AC Isn't it their job?

Touche.

But no. This is one of those dirty little secrets that won't see the light of day because its so caustic.

You can bet governments around the world have secrets far more darker and dangerous than whatever Assange could have published.

Snowden was worse.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC Re: Isn't it their job?

All intelligence agencies gather information about friend and foe alike. To assume otherwise is dangerous.

The question is what does the agency do with the data? With whom do they share it?

Trump may be right, however you, I and everyone here will be long dead before the truth sees the light of day, if ever.

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Spammy Google Home spouts audio ads without warning – now throw yours in the trash

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Chatbots could totally be a trillion-dollar industry

"There's this guy named Gruber... ;-)"

Does he live next door to Paddington Bear?

Only if Paddington Bear moved to Cambridge Mass. and is a professor at MIT. (Sloan I think)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Charles 9 Re: Easily fixed

I pay for the WSJ digital edition.

But then again, according to WSJ I've been a subscriber since 1965. (My account got merged with my dad's account. But I have been a subscriber for over 25 years now. )

I use Adblock, and NoScript. So FB and Google don't see me. I do see some ads because they are being hosted by WSJ directly however, its a paid content site so its less intrusive.

I think you'll start to see more paid content sites for those that have actual value. As to other news sites, they make their money off their TV ads and sites if they start to work to bypass filters... they stop using them. I no longer read Fortune for that very reason. Content is not worth white listing them.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@VinceH Re: A company

The cynic in me is suggesting the (perhaps longer term) plan is to have adverts that are more subtle, in the hope that people wouldn't recognise them as adverts - and that the above is therefore a canned statement ready for when someone inevitably spots and points out that they're using it for advertising.

This is sometimes called stealth marketing. Getting to the consumer before their 'radar' comes up and realizes its an advert.

You either create a clever ad or guerilla ad that catches the consumer off guard or one that they want to see, or you do something clever like product placement. (E.g. Going for a cup of Sanka because it has that deep dark flavor you enjoy... or having a character throw a hissy fit because the store was out of Lucky Strike cigarettes because all the other brands taste like crap. ) [Think reference to sponsored radio shows in the 30's and 40's. ]

For example, if you had a girls who was between the ages of 6 and 12, and you asked Alexa for today's weather forecast... "Hey bob, today's going to be rainy and miserable all day. Rather than stay indoors, why not take Sally [your girl] to see the new 'Beauty and the Beast' that just hit theaters yesterday! I can order you tickets if you'd like." ...

There's your ad placement and you may not realize it...

Now imagine what would happen if you tied Google in with Tinder... That would be scary.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Chatbots could totally be a trillion-dollar industry

" Chatbots could totally be a trillion-dollar industry

If true, it would prove either that Marketing are geniuses or too many consumers are dumb."

There's this guy named Gruber... ;-)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Mushroom

Re: A company

Yes, and the sad thing is what they said here in their 'corrected' political speak...

" We’re continuing to experiment with new ways to surface unique content for users and we could have done better in this case."

Translation is that they are sorry that their attempt at monetizing the stream further didn't go off so well, and they'll think of other ways to further profit from your device.

Think about this. You bought the device, you pay for the internet connection and they want to spam you with ads? Not to mention that you have no clue as to how much data they are slurping... er I mean streaming from your home without your knowledge. So you are paying for the privilege to not only be spied upon but also spammed.

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Fire brigade called to free man's bits from titanium ring's grip

Ian Michael Gumby
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Facepalm

@Ledswinger ... Re: Titanium?

Leeches?

If they could get that tongue depressor inside the ring, there's still enough blood flow.

I would have thought they would have put the bloke in an ice bath, and used a dremel tool.

I really have to ask what the guy was thinking? Is that what you guys do for fun on that side of the pond?

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IBM could have made almost all the voluntary redundancies it needed

Ian Michael Gumby
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@Mpeler Re: The good people

Not all of the 'good' people have left.

IBM UK could have almost filled its quota for voluntary redundancies in the Technical Services Support division given the number of folk that had put their hands up to leave, but will make some compulsory cuts instead.

Translation:

Many of those willing to take voluntary redundancies had the skills that IBM wants/needs and could get jobs elsewhere. Its the staff which don't have marketable skills who didn't want to take the redundancy were the ones who they wanted to RIF. IBM wants to clear out the dead wood and doesn't want to lose skilled staff that they still need.

Not every customer will want to hire IBM because of the lesser skilled and lower paid offshore work. Here in the US, India is roughly 12 hours out of sync. So its their night when its our day. Want to discuss something? Its either a 5-7am call or its a 9-11pm call so there's a delay unless the staff enjoys working nights.

So its a downward and death spiral unless IBM can offer them something that they can't get from the offshore companies like Tata, etc ...

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NASA finds India's missing lunar orbiter with Earth-bound radar

Ian Michael Gumby
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Alien

MMM. Space 1999 or UFO?

Ok, so maybe I'm aging myself because I remember watching these shows when I was a kid.

Too bad I didn't save my models and lunch box from Space 1999. Or Lance Link for that matter.

What made me think about this was that on UFO they had to monitor space around the earth for alien ships...

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Is that a phone in your hand – or a gun? This neural network reckons it has it all figured out

Ian Michael Gumby
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Devil

Re: Can it detect someone armed with a pointed stick?

Fresh fruit like a bunch of grapes?

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: So at a little above 5fps it can identify that someone pointing a gun at the camera...

Actually less.

The trick is to ignore the background and to focus on the people and their immediate surrounding.

This reduces the amount of image that you have to process and then you can isolate on the hand.

So first frame, you have the most work to find the people, search for hands and then once isolated, you can track the hands to see if they are holding something in the subsequent frames.

To your point, yes, in a video or movie, the lighting is usually done to make the gun stand out.

But suppose we took a video of a group of men standing and wearing dark clothing. Then one pulls out a gun, while another pulls out a cell phone, both black and the phone's screen is dark. They just pull it out and have it at the hip. Do this again with the people wearing dark gloves. Then again in dimmer light.

You'd be surprised at the results. (maybe not.) I guess the resolution would also matter.

BTW, on the James Bond Reference.... would the system recognize the gun that was made out of a cigarette holder, and the cigarette case and lighter? (What if he was palming the gun with only the cigarette holder showing? Would a pencil held like that also trigger the system?)

And of course, the gun Daniel Craig is holding is most likely a Sig Sauer P226 but could be a P220 (You can make out the de-cocking lever and its a full sized frame) It also looks to be an older model since its missing the front rail. [Yes, I own and shoot Sigs. ;-) ]

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Haku ... Re: Can it also tell the difference between a real gun and a Sega light gun?

Well as a Yank...

1) Cleveland Ohio. There was a 13yr old who was big for his age, looking like he was 17. He was also mentally challenged. He was sitting on a swing with an airsoft pistol where the orange plastic part of the barrel was broken off. This gun, looked real.

Someone called in to the police and reported him. The person told the 911 operator that the gun was probably fake.

The police rolled up on him and the kid reached for the gun. The younger officer shot and killed him.

2) In Chicago, we have gang bangers who are as young as 13 or 14 years old carrying real pistols.

3) We also have kids carrying airsoft guns and show them to people on the street in an attempt to rob them. (While IL passed a CCW law that took effect Jan 1, 2015, most do not own guns and fewer have CCW permits which is on the rise) So, how do you tell a real gun from a fake gun that was made to look real?

Every morning, I open up the Trib site to see how many shot and killed over night. (Yes, its that bad in some neighborhoods.) The issue isn't guns but the gang violence over turf. Due to the recent lawsuits and BLM protests, the police are less likely to be aggressive because they want to keep their jobs and don't want to face a civil suit. The gang bangers are more afraid of their higher ups than of the police and there's even video of them taunting the police who were working a crime scene. (Including firing off a gun in an alley a block away)

But back to your point... you can make a homemade gun that fires a .410 shotgun shell using stuff you can buy at a hardware store. (Google zip gun) And it won't look like a gun.

In terms of police hostage situations. Police have killed attackers who had small knives and were high on drugs (L. McDonald [Chicago]) or had a base ball bat and was walking towards the police.

The point is that when you have a hostage situation, even if he's not armed but is in a position to cause harm to the hostage, you will have the police in a situation where they may need to use deadly force. Most times, they'll wait it out.

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UK Home Office warns tech staff not to tweet negative Donald Trump posts

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

"However I don't see how re-posting anti-Trump tweets on your home social media would get you in trouble, its not like disliking Trump brings the civil service into disrepute."

Unless said person is visiting the US and their social media is examined along with their other details such as current employer.

There are a couple of issues that are being conflated.

1) On the internet, things are remembered for a long time. So while you have your first amendment freedoms, you may want to think before you post. Or use an alias.

2) DHS using your social media profiles to question you when you isn't a bad thing. In a prior post I talked about being able to flag a potential terrorist. There is evidence that during the screening process, social media posts were not considered. If they were... it would have been easier to spot and deny entrance to would be bad guys.

3) What would cause you to be flagged in the first place?

Saying negative anti-Trump things? Hardly unless they were actual threats. (He's the sitting POTUS so threatening him is a crime.) But saying something like "I don't like Trump because he lies and claims that his plants are bugged ..." Or something even sillier, isn't going to get you in trouble.

The whole idea is that when they swipe your biometric passport, they can pull up your social media accounts. Actually they would have pulled up the profiles prior to your boarding or even while on the flight.

Its a non issue. If they want to pull up my social media accounts, all they would find is my LinkedIn profile.

There's nothing there that would be of interest to anyone from any country.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@AC ... Re: Yes, good idea

Seriously?

The point is that if you post something online, it will haunt you as long as its available.

With respect to DHS scanning your online social media profile... there's a very good reason for that.

Perhaps you don't remember the San Bernardino shooting?

The investigation found that the guy was radicalized by his wife that he brought in to the US to get married. Had they scanned her social media account during the immigration process, they would have found her comments and caught her in a lie. In fact her profile was filled with a couple red flags.

So there is a reason why DHS is now attempting to do this.

Facebook is pulling a brain dead stunt, of course, all your data is theirs.

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Lloyds to outsource 2,000 staff in IBM deal

Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC ... Re: Is Offshoring that profitable now

Unfortunately it is.

Remember IBM will outsource Lloyds and within 4 years, the jobs will all be offshored to India or some other cheap resoruce nation where its not only the exchange rate, but also employees will be paid salary in local currencies.

So IBM will make coin off the deal. Also they'll downsize the staffing requirements too.

Watch Lloyds sue IBM in 5-6 years when IBM screws this up. Of course those doing the deal will have long since left the building laughing all they way to the bank.

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Force employees to take DNA tests for bosses? We've got a new law to make that happen, beam House Republicans

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Tom 38 ... Re: @Orv

I'd take the US healthcare over the UK system any day.

So to explain how it works...

Prior to the ACA... if you were part of a group, you couldn't be denied coverage, even for a pre-existing condition. So if you worked for a company that offered health insurance, you would be covered.

If you were on an individual plan or in a group and then left the group, its possible that you could get coverage but have a rider for the pre-existing situation. (e.g. pregnancy).

If you were disabled and couldn't work due to a medical condition, you could go on medicaid. If you made too much money and were uninsurable. You could fall in to a group and the state would cover you. However you're going to be limited in your options.

What most people don't realize that if you are really sick or injured, you can go in to a county hospital. They will treat you regardless of insurance if your illness or accident is life threatening. Think Chicago, Think wounded by gunfire. They keep you alive regardless of your ability to pay.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Rattus Re: @Ian Michael Gumby

You live in the UK?

Funny, I was in the UK for a year. Kept seeing the morning news on TV where they talk about the fact that doctors and nurses haven't had a raise in many years, and how they had trouble keeping ERs clean.

The NHS is breaking at the seems.

You slip on the ice, and hurt your back. You need PT, but you have to wait 6 months before you can see someone. But if you have private insurance, you can see a doctor right away, most of the time its the same doctor or therapist.

You have no clue about the ACA. It was designed to fail so that you have a single payer system.

Oh and BTW, as a Yank, I was outside of the NHS but when I had to see a doctor... I got to see first hand on how the system doesn't work.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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WTF?

@Yet anbother anonymous coward... Re: @Orv

No offense, but your comment doesn't make sense.

Every group is part of a risk pool. Its not the existence of a risk pool that's the issue.

My company is a small company so its grouped together with other small companies in the same plan as a way to establish a risk pool. IBM is large enough that not only could it self insure itself, but it could be its own risk pool.

Your insurance rates are based on factors like age, and medical expenses.

The ACA capped the ratio of expenses between the young and the old causing the insurance premiums on younger adults to increase significantly more than older folks however overall they went up for everyone.

The issue wasn't the existence of a risk pool. The issue was that companies came on to the exchanges pricing insurance with no prior history to base their actuarial formulas. Obama promised to make the insurance companies whole, with funds he didn't have. So the insurance companies under priced for the actual risk and lost BILLIONS. Now these insurance companies that got in to the game with Federal Loans, got hammered and all have gone under. Because insurance is regulated by the states, they can only raise premiums by a certain percentage each year, so in year 2, they also lost billions.

The reason they lost billions is that the young healthy people didn't want to pay for something that they didn't want or need. They could have purchased a catastrophic insurance policy that would meet their needs. So the risk pools got skewed and more 'unhealthy' older people jumped on the insurance.

So its not the issue of having risk pools, but the insurance companies not being able to manage their risks. Obama et al thought that could balance the risk by forcing younger people in to buying something that they didn't need. Didn't work out.

This is why the ACA is DOA. There are one or two counties where you can't buy insurance because no one is offering it. In most markets only BC/BS is offering policies once UHG pulls out. And if BC/BS pulls out... what happens when you can't buy insurance and the law requires it?

This is why Trump and the Republicans have an opportunity to fix things. Only problem is that while they agree that ACA is crap, they can't agree on how to fix the damage.

There's so much more but its hard trying to explain it when many here don't have a grasp on both sides of the industry.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@ST Re: Won't past muster.

That's the problem.

There are so many reasons why and how this data can be abused.

And yes, its so easy to say that you chose another candidate for over half a dozen reasons and there's no way to prove any sort of trend in terms of hiring without exposing a privacy issue of all applicants.

This goes back to the late 80's and aids scare and why there needs to be medical records privacy.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@ST ... Re: @ST Kinda misses the point

Son,

1) I am licensed to sell health insurance. (Yeah really. )

2) I purchase health insurance for my corporation.

3) Back in the 90's when you were still in diapers, I purchased individual plans when you could and had to deal with the limited plans that were available.

Again, you really don't know the half of it. Talk to hospital administrators and the problems that ACA created for those in small practices.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Orv

Actually no.

There are a couple of ways to become a member of group healthcare.

The IEEE used to offer health insurance for its members. They stopped because only older members would take advantage of it because most of the younger members were getting their coverage from their employers who also paid a portion of the insurance if not all of it. Chambers of Commerce used to offer the same thing, some may still do. The problem is that each of these groups are in their own risk pool such that it can get expensive for members because the insurance companies still have to make a profit. (Note: Their profits are limited and they must spend at least a certain percentage of their premium incomes. )

IEEE stopped doing this in the 90's because the premiums became to expensive.

If you're an independent, you can make your wife or significant other an employee and pay them a salary and get group coverage. It only takes two people to become a group.

You also dont' really understand the pre-ACA market.

If you had a pre-existing condition, depending on the condition, you may or may not be able to get coverage. The insurance company could write a rider so that you get coverage for everything but your condition. If you are an employee of a company that offers group insurance, you cannot be denied coverage.

There's also medicaid if you can't afford medical coverage and you make less than the maximum allowed. There were also risk pools for those who can't get coverage.

And yes, I do know a bit about this. I'm also a licensed agent. ;-)

Health insurance is a bit confusing and this is just on the consumer side. You should see what its like to run a small practice.

Obamacare really fscked up the healthcare environment. Socialized medicine is a failure waiting to happen.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@ST Re: Kinda misses the point

Man, you have a really warped view of the world as well as healthcare.

You must be in the UK where the NHS is broken and you have a two tier system. Those only on NHS and those who have a supplemental insurance or those who can afford to pay cash.

You have to realize that under the ACA not everyone has coverage or can afford coverage. You can make too much money to get any discounts, and/or the remaining balance would be more than you could afford.

Prior to the ACA, each state would create funds for risk pools for those who couldn't get insurance. Also there was medicaid. And if you had group insurance you couldn't be denied coverage.

You have no clue about health insurance.

Obamacare/ACA is in a death spiral and is collapsing. No point in having a health care market when you have no insurance companies willing to provide coverage at a loss. Removing ACA is the best thing Trump and Congress can do.

Replacing it with something... that's the hard part because Obama did way to much damage, which was his plan in the first place.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@LDS ... Re: Sure it will lower employer costs and promote an healthy workforce...

Had to down vote you.

Minimal Risk means you want them. High risk you want to fire.

It doesn't work. It hurts the company in the long run.

Just like firing your older workers and replacing them with young 'ins. (Millennials.)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Intersting to see what are the *real* priorites of this government.

If the HR policy says that your employment is based on passing a mandatory drug screening or that they can do a random drug test, you're fair game. If they added it after you were employed and then made it conditional of your employment, you can go after them thru the EEOC.

There's more things that they did in an effort to try and become 'healthier' in order to reduce their insurance costs. Like weight ....

All it takes is a good trial lawyer to get a case certified as class action and the company melts.

This is why I run my own shop and it only takes two people to be a group for group insurance.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Won't past muster.

It would violate HIPPA.

As others point out, it would allow employers to check for hereditary risk for diseases like cancer and some how disqualify a candidate. Its a lawsuit waiting to happen. There's more but that's a start.

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Spy satellite scientist sent down for a year for stowing secrets at home

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: And the rest...

Actually she did have a security clearance.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Tom Dial ... Re: He needs to raise the Hillary defense...

You need to really read the law to understand that there's a gross negligence clause. Placing classified material on an unauthorized server will hit this. Communicating classified material w Sidney B. where his account was hacked and there were at least 3 foreign intelligence agencies who had his emails, not to mention this was how Guccifer exposed Clinton's hidden server.

There's more to it. Most argue incorrectly the need for intent. There was intent, because setting up the server is an intentional act.

There doesn't need to be an actual hack or proof of a hack to be guilty of gross negligence.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC Re: He needs to raise the Hillary defense...

You really don't know your facts.

The point is that Hillary did commit a crime but her friends in the WH and at the DoJ rigged the investigation. I could go down the list of things done, or you could spend about a week Googling the facts.

There's more... ;-)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Black Helicopters

He needs to raise the Hillary defense...

"Mohan Nirala, 52, a former employee of the US National Geospatial Intelligence Agency, received a prison sentence of 12 months and a day on Friday for storing national defense information in violation of the law."

So his crime is storing classified material on an unauthorized system at home.

Didn't Hillary do the same, if not more with her personal server?

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Pennsylvania sues IBM for fraud over $170m IT upgrade shambles

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: 3 year bidding cycle?

Au contraire mon ami.

You have to understand the larger the project, the longer the due dillgence cycle because there are so many moving pieces and when it involves the government, there's a complex dance which is supposed to show that there wasn't any special favors done.

The problem isn't being able to prove that IBM mislead the State during the procurement process, but to show that it was why they couldn't get the job done. IBM will make arguments that it was the State they mislead IBM in their representations. The law isn't black and white but gray. And in a civil trial things can get wonky. It depends on the judge, the lawyers and even interpretations of the facts.

IBM will end up with a slap on their wrist.

The failure here was in trying to get a single throat to choke and relying on internal IT folks to mange the program office.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Codysydney ...

You need to learn US law.

This isn't a criminal lawsuit but a civil lawsuit.

So this isn't anything about a plan to defraud, but about the claims IBM made during the procurement process to win the contract. Its more of a question on their ability to actually deliver the promised solution.

These suits are hard to win and end up either in arbitration or settled out of court. As you point out, scope creep is one issue, however it depends on the contract.

Having written quite a few SOWs and negotiated MSAs, you'd be surprised what goes on.

(Yes, I escaped from the borg many moons ago)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Etatdame Re: Only Me

I don't know if you've ever been thru such a procurement process.

You end up going through several rounds of RFIs RFPs interrogatories and interviews.

In many cases IBM could be helping to write the RFIs RFPs such that they become the obvious choice.

When you have an RFP process that runs 3 years, it requires an investment on the part of the bidding company. Not many companies have the stomach to go through a 3 year process.

When you consider that the state probably has both mainframe and Unix/Linux with some AS400 tossed in, it will end up being IBM or an IBM partner. Again, not many IBM partners can go across the board on these platforms. They will either have to partner or outsource / subcontract specific skills. The long due diligence will source these shortcomings out and force them to drop out.

Its not a fault of due diligence, but a desire for a single vendor to do it all thus a single throat to choke.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Facepalm

@Alien fear not!

More than likely senior people who were to be on this project left IBM. (You figure out the hows and whys)

Their junior replacements weren't up to snuff.

I know nothing, but just an educated guess on IBM's recent RIFs.

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Western Digital CTO Martin Fink refused El Reg's questions, but did write this sweet essay

Ian Michael Gumby
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If SCM possible... then ...

You have to go back to the bottleneck of the network.

It also changes the current paradigm where storage is cheap.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Luis Re: Fink disappointed me

Fink side stepped the questions for a couple of reasons.

Most importantly is that you have to understand and accept the concept of a convergence between storage and memory.

He's hedging his bet because there are several competing ideas, each with their own strength and or weaknesses. Regardless of the individual tech, its the ultimate goal of SCM that is important.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Steve Re: Well said, Martin!

Absolutely.

Chris did write a good article and Martin was right in bypassing answering his questions.

For the convergence to occur there has to be parity in speed and at the same time have the ability to match current storage density. Imagine a small server having 4-8 TB of SCM per core. (That's roughly what you'd see in terms of storage per core on a Linux server, if not higher due to improved density.)

But that convergence point is still a while away.

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AMD does an Italian job on Intel, unveils 32-core, 64-thread 'Naples' CPU

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@Hans1 No catch up from Intel.

I think Moore's law failed because there was no need to innovate in terms of core performance, just shrink the die and reduce the power and TDP output.

The question is which chip will better support virtualization and open source software like Hadoop. (Intel paid $$$$$$$ for a chunk of Cloudera)

Looking at AMD entails risk in an environment that is supposed to be risk adverse. So AMD has to offer something over and beyond that risk. Can they do it? We'll have to see what SuperMicro or some of the other well known server board / white box manufacturers do.

I wish them luck, we need that competition to keep things evolving.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: @Titter

Yeah, I agree Uno and Duo are tourist traps. Uno franchised I think...

Depending on your style... Roots out on Chicago Ave is one nice place, or if you want Piece Pizza up in Wicker Park.

Apart is too far North.

Chicago Pizza and Oven Grinders in Lincoln Park is ok too.

There are others and everyone has their favorites.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Tom Re: @Titter

You should have gone to Lou's a couple of blocks away if you wanted a good deep dish.

And if Deep isn't your thing, Lou's does a good thin too.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Pint

@Titter

Sorry mate, you get down voted.

In Amerika, its Pizza Slut not Pizza Hut.

In terms of 'strong arm' marketing, its 'Pappa Johns' (see their tie in w NFL)

But here in Chicago, if you want good pizza, you have a lot more options. Thick or thin, or even as a Calazone or Oven Grinder. So call me a snob.

BTW, the slice looks more like it came from a DiGiorno commercial than a pizza chain.

Pizza and Beer is what makes technology go around and my gut hang over my belt.

(Hence the beer icon)

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Shopping for PCs? Ding, dong, the Dock is dead in 2017's new models

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Or we can read this as

Dude, you must not have had to deal with a lot of Enterprises and their PCs.

I've been in several major Fortune 100 companies where they have generations of PCs

You have generations of power supplies, docs and even video cable connections.

So this really isn't a new issue other than you don't need a dedicated port and that you can just use USB c connector.

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America halts fast processing of H-1B skilled worker visas

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

@Adam52

Actually its not racist but pointing out a stereotype.

I work with a lot of Indians in the US where are here on H1B and or have a green card.

Over coffee at a conference, one of the speakers who is Indian and a graduate of IIT in India, slammed the bulk of the Indians who are here under H1B visas.

Had either you or I said the same things he said, we would be labeled a racist.

I can tell you first hand, there's a lot of truth to what he said.

This is because the companies are gaming the system.

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