* Posts by Lennart Sorensen

209 posts • joined 1 Jan 2008

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Windows 10 networking bug derails Microsoft's own IPv6 rollout

Lennart Sorensen

Re: Sigh

I certainly use IPv6 a fair bit at home since my ISP supports it.

My modem happens to have a rather odd bug, where once in a while (every few months) it suddenly stops sending packets for IPv4, while my IPv6 packets get through fine. I don't know how it does this, since all it sees is PPPoE packets from my router, so the modem should have no clue, but somehow it does. Rebooting the modem fixes it.

The funny thing is that it takes hours for me to realize that the problem has happened, since google stuff (gmail, etc) all works fine, facebook works fine, but links to other things stop opening and I start to wonder what is going on, before finally remembering the stupid modem problem and go reboot it and suddenly gain access to the IPv4 world again. Quite a bit of the internet does work with IPv6 only these days it seems.

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Lennart Sorensen

The limit may have come from there, but since the limit exists everything was designed and built around it. You can't just change it. Jumbo frames only work on network segments where every single device on that segment supports it and all have it enabled. It's not easy to get right.

At least IPv6 mandated that the minimum was 1280, which is much better than the minimum allowed by IPv4, so at least when using IPv6 you could use a pretty decent size and not worry about MTU discovery at all.

But too many routers and switch chips and network cards (wired and wireless) and all sorts of tunneling protocols, etc all know 1500 or so is the standard, and most have hard limits that don't allow you to exceed that by very much.

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"Front Page" layup issue

Lennart Sorensen

Well I couldn't find any links on the front page about how to report problems. Maybe a link to webmaster would be in order somewhere at the bottom. Too many places don't have a webmaster@ address working, so it never occurred to me to use that.

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Lennart Sorensen

I see about 6 stories and that's it. The rest going down is just lots of white emptiness. Mobile version seems to be fine however.

Opera shows broken image icons for the blank space, but still no stories.

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Ye Bug List

Lennart Sorensen

Front page broken.

Speaking of bugs: The front page is only showing about 6 stories, with the rest being blank space (some browsers show broken image icons throughout the remaining space, but that's it). Mobile version is fine though.

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Lennart Sorensen

Oh but there is an excuse: The ad serving infrastructure is shit and doesn't do https yet. That seems to be the standard excuse for not doing https on sites these days.

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… in a loop. Cisco warns Nexus 3000 upgrade could get you stuck ...

Lennart Sorensen

Re: MD5 is error detection, not the fault

It is trivial to get USB adapters for IDE, parallel, serial and other things, so at least any hard disk from the last 25 years is easy to connect to a modern machine and access. If your DVD drive can't write CD-R, then it is junk. All mine can, as can my BD writer. SCSI adapters still exist (including USB to scsi, although pretty expensive), so scsi devices can be accessed too, although with a bit more effort.

Things are actually surprisingly good when it comes to dealing with old stuff.

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Bluetooth-enabled safe lock popped after attackers win PINs

Lennart Sorensen

Any modern efficient vehicle will not warm up while just idling. So remote start would only be helpful if you have a crappy car that is inefficient.

And yes fortunately it is also illegal to have your car idling in many places.

The insurance terms are interesting, since remote start does not involve the keys being left in the car, so you can't take the car out of park (remote start is for automatics only of course).

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Broadcom quietly dismantles its 'Vulcan' ARM server chip project

Lennart Sorensen

Re: No call for them, Sir

At my previous job we had wanted to buy a couple for 3 years now, and nothing ever announced was ever apparently actually able to be bought. Lots of press releases, pictures, etc, but nothing actually for sale.

Step one in getting a market is clearly to actually bloody well let people buy the damn stuff.

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Debian putting everything on the /usr

Lennart Sorensen

Re: "...a relic of the small disks in Linux's early days"

Yes the split /usr is an old unix leftover, not a linux invention.

Also since deboostrap is a script, and not compiled, the --merged-usr is a command line option, not a compile time option (which would also be rather stupid if debootstrap was in fact a compiled program. You want things optional at runtime, not chosen at compile time).

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Lennart Sorensen

Re: I don't like change

Except if you wanted to keep compatibility, adding a symlink of /usr -> / would give you /usr/proc, /usr/boot, /usr/root, etc, which is a mess and not nice. Adding symlinks for /lib, /bin and /sbin to /usr/lib, /usr/bin and /usr/sbin on the other hand does not give you the mess.

So as far as cleaning up by merging /usr/lib, bin and sbin with /lib, bin and sbin, the way it was done was the cleaner option while keeping compatibility with all the scripts that assume where things will be located.

I am not convinced it had to be done at all, but I am not going to argue with people over it.

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Veeam kicks Symantec's ass over unpatentable patents

Lennart Sorensen

No. That was used to tell if it had been backed up yet or not. Every time you changed a file, the A bit got set. When it was backed up, it was cleared. Nothing more than that.

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Lenovo downward dogs with Yoga BIOS update supporting Linux installs

Lennart Sorensen

Re: How about testing it ?

In this case Lenovo removed access to features that were still in the BIOS code which is what caused the problem. Those features were useful and needed by some people. If Lenovo had done nothing to the code they bought, this problem would not have existed. They put actual effort into making the product worse for their users.

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Did Apple leak a photo of its new Macbook Pro in an OS update? Our survey says: Yes

Lennart Sorensen

Re: Carbon - not so good copy

If they wanted to try a new dynamic strip for extra keys, then sure fine. But don't remove the existing function keys to do it. Add a new row above the function keys and see if people start using them. A lot of people do know and use shortcut keys and taking them away is NOT going to be popular. But yes they are probably a minority and Apple clearly doesn't care about any minority user bases.

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Lennart Sorensen

I thought users already hated touch panel buttons instead of function keys when Lenovo tried it. I guess Apple thinks they can just do what they want and their users will thank them for it. No thanks. Keyboard keys need to be real keys, not stupid touch panels.

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Microsoft keeps schtum as more battery woes hit Surface sufferers

Lennart Sorensen

Re: Business model

Where is the evidence of Windows 1 having stolen code?

You could claim the "stole" the idea of the GUI and look and feel from the Lisa, but it "stole" it from the Xerox PARC.

I highly doubt Apple let Microsoft have the OS or GUI source code in the first place.

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Video service Binge On 'broke the internet' but 99pc of users love it

Lennart Sorensen

Is 99pc some new weird way of writing 99% (which is of course way more readable)?

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Half! a! billion! Yahoo! email! accounts! raided! by! 'state! hackers!'

Lennart Sorensen

Whoever said they were yahoo webmail accounts? Lots of people have yahoo accounts for yahoo messenger, yahoo groups and many other things. Is it perhaps that list of users accounts that was stolen? Yahoo accounts does not equal yahoo webmail.

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Reg Programming Compo: 22 countries, 137 entries and... wow – loads of Python

Lennart Sorensen
Happy

Re: Not quite what it said in the rules...

I guess the judges forgot to read the rules.

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Lennart Sorensen

Re: Not quite what it said in the rules...

The rules also say there won't be two competitors with the same score, so not sure why they talk about the behavior of programs when that happens.

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Legend of Zelda cracked with 6502 assembly language glitch

Lennart Sorensen

Re: Things have moved on.

Well if by inspired you mean "Definitely don't do it that way." Acorn wanted a 32bit chip and the 6502 makers were making a 16 bit chip next and the Acorn guys thought what they were doing looked easy and decided they could do that themselves, and someone happened to be reading some IBM document about RISC at the time as far as I recall and thought that looked easy too. It probably wasn't actually easy but clearly they were in fact that good.

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Samsung wants your exploding Galaxy Note 7. Have a new one instead

Lennart Sorensen

Re: 60% Battery Charge?

Well the smart move would be to go exchange it for one that has a fixed battery and no 60% limit. Seems a lot simpler really.

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Oracle settles with State of Oregon for US$100m, by locking it in

Lennart Sorensen

Peoplesoft at no cost? There is no such thing. It costs a fortune in time to get set up and then forces you to change your processes to match what it wants, not what you want. It's not free at all.

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Childcare app bods wipe users' data – then discover backups had been borked for a year

Lennart Sorensen

So they deleted the current system before setting up the new one from the "backups"? Why would they do that? It's a cloud, can't you just create another test instance to do it in, and then shutdown the old one when the new one is ready?

I guess the users got what they paid for.

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'Neural network' spotted deep inside Samsung's Galaxy S7 silicon brain

Lennart Sorensen

Re: Most Surprised

And stupid naming choice by Samsung causes confusion already.

These are Samsung M1 cores, not ARM Cortex-M1 cores. Apparently the Samsung M1 is a full ARMv8-A processor, not an ARMv7-M.

I was puzzled initially why a CPU with an M1 was a big deal, but the 3W power consumption, and clock speed and then instruction set made it clear it was not talking about the Cortex-M1 but rather some other M1. Very annoying naming choice.

I hate Allwinner's chip names too, with calling everything A# where a lot of them end up matching the Cortex-A# models while not being those of course. Of course Apple is doing it too, although at the rate they are counting up, I think ARM will be long past before Apple gets to a given number.

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Your wget is broken and should DIE, dev tells Microsoft

Lennart Sorensen

Re: Cool down

As clearly documented at the bottom of the strace man page, strace was written for SunOS and inspired by the trace tool. It was ported to linux later, and then many features of truss were added to it. It did not start out with all the truss features at all.

Mr. Torvalds had NOTHING to do with that. Neither did anything Linux related for that matter.

As for GNU versions of commands, at least they do implemented the required POSIX features, and then add to them. The aliases in this case have hardly any of the functionality of the tools they claim to be. You can treat the GNU tools like posix and they will do what you wanted, you can't do that with the powershell aliases.

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Five-storey Blue Screen Of Death spotted in Thailand

Lennart Sorensen

Hmm, ftser2k.sys. I wonder if ftdi decided to do "nice" things to a a "fake" ftdi chip user. Wouldn't be the first time after all.

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OMG: HPE gobbles SGI for HPC. WTF?

Lennart Sorensen

Re: Bye, Bye, pretty SGI

Nope, since SGI got rid of MIPS long ago, and tried to move to the Itanium. What a disaster. So now the company that did the least bad with the Itanium (and consists of two companies that threw away good CPU designs to move to the Itanium) is buying one of the others that was essentially destroyed by moving to the Itanium.

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Uncle Sam set to flog Silk Road's Bitcoins

Lennart Sorensen

Re: Bitcoins are not considered currency in the US

That was 3 years ago.

This was this year: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/07/26/ponzi_bitcoin_case_kaput/

It says bitcoin are goods, not money.

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TP-Link fined $200k, told to be nice to wireless router tinkers after throwing a hissy fit

Lennart Sorensen

Well two years is a LONG time in the electronics market. I would suspect that means the current models that are locked down will NEVER be unlocked, and only new models in the future will have a different design for locking down the radio while not locking everything else.

So really, it sounds like bad news for the current owners of such products.

The result of the new FCC rules is exactly what everyone (except the FCC) said it would be. The FCC of course insisted the rules didn't require locked down firmware, since there were other ways to implement the rules. Unfortunately the simplest and cheapest solution is to lock down the firmware, so that is what most companies are now doing for the US market.

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No, the VCR is not about to die. It died years ago. Now it's VHS/DVD combo boxes' turn

Lennart Sorensen

Re: Stop making me feel old

Yes DDS tape. And it was total shit for reliability as one would expect from helical scan. About 10 writes and the tape was dead, and you had to do a read verification pass after the write to try and see if maybe it was a good backup.

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Lennart Sorensen

Re: Tape?

No, there are lots of 4 and 6TB and even 8TB drives that are not helium filled.

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Diablo conjures up hell of a DIMM: 128GB NAND pretend-RAM summoned

Lennart Sorensen

Re: Data? What data?

Because they made it that way. What they don't say is how they ensure it is erased on poweroff. How would I trust that it is done at poweroff and not at poweron (which would mean it is actually quite insecure, unlike what they claim).

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Lennart Sorensen

Not interested without proper support

Until they even try to get the drivers for this (and their previous teradimm) included in the OS, I would not touch it. The support could disappear at any time and you could be left with a system you can never upgrade.

I don't see any indication they have even tried to get their linux drivers included in the official linux kernel source. Throwing stuff on github and then ignoring it for over a year is not support.

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Microsoft to rip up P2P Skype, killing native Mac, Linux apps

Lennart Sorensen

Finally.

The P2P was the worst part of skype. It was the bane of network admins. If you tried to block people running p2p file sharing, you would accidentally kill skype even if you wanted to allow it, and there was no fixed port you could exempt. Such a shitty design. Glad to see that gone.

As for security, well if you ever thought your skype conversations were secure, you were almost certainly delusional.

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Juniper: Yes, IPv6 ping-of-death hits Junos OS, too

Lennart Sorensen

Re: I'll have a go at translating that into English

And we didn't actually follow the IPv6 spec that said we were not allowed to route these packets in the first place and were not allowed to look at them if someone else had routed them by mistake.

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Cisco warns IPv6 ping-of-death vuln is everyone's problem

Lennart Sorensen

Well at least Linux appears to correctly validate the TTL must equal 255 on ND packets, and has done so at least since 2.6.12 (when it started using git in 2005), since the check was already in the code at that point. Apparently a number of other OSs out there, especially on routers used by ISPs and telcos on the other hand seem to be failing to follow that requirement in the IPv6 standard. How unfortunate. Of course just because linux checks doesn't mean someone didn't use linux on a router and use a 3rd party network stack or hardware accelerator that does the wrong thing.

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Samsung: Don't install Windows 10. REALLY

Lennart Sorensen

Re: If proof is needed...

Well I have upgraded an Asus EEEpc 1008HA (from mid 2009) to Windows 10, no problem. I just upgraded a 10 year old Core 2 Duo (P965 chipset) as well, no problem.

Certain device makers are just terrible at updating drivers. Broadcom has been pretty bad. Samsung is terrible (just look at the pathetic state of their tablets, which hardly ever get any of the updates they promise).

Of course if you want to avoid support for your hardware going away, best bet seems to be running Linux. Strange how we got to that state.

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This is what a root debug backdoor in a Linux kernel looks like

Lennart Sorensen

Re: Mr

The only way to remove it is to patch and rebuild the kernel without the code that creates it. /proc is virtual and not a real file system you can change.

And the file is 0 length since you activate it by writing a string to it (with echo for example). Since it is virtual, the file size will not change from doing this.

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Vinyl LPs to top 3 million sales in Blighty this year

Lennart Sorensen

Re: The irony is

So you are saying if you listen with a crappy system it sounds worse than if you listen with a good system? A good system with digital will be even better than the analog.

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USB-C adds authentication protocol

Lennart Sorensen

Re: Security?

That would be wrong. USB type C will allow a single cable to carry both power and data. It does NOT make a single wire within that cable do both. The author of the article is wrong. Of course all USB did that but power was expected to only go out a USB host port, not in, while type-C allows both directions (as the new Macintosh devices take advantage/abuse of).

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Lennart Sorensen

Re: I can't wait

Oh good, so it was standards compliant. USB 1 and 2 explicitly allow up to 500mA and no more. USB 3 allows 900mA. Of course you can support more, but that's all the spec requires a port to support.

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IEEE delivers Ethernet-for-cars standard

Lennart Sorensen

Re: Ethernet for real time?

Ethernet hasn't had collisions since we started using switches, so that is not much of an issue any more. Temporary block in the switch though because some other packet is currently being sent out a given port is still an issue though. And there are Ethernet extension standards to deal with bandwidth reservation and such for those cases where that matters.

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Linux lads lambast sorry state of Skype service

Lennart Sorensen

Except NetMeeting actually used SIP, as in the standard that existed long before skype barged in with their own stupid peer to peer protocol.

SIP does have the issue of not being a fan of NAT on firewalls which has become rather common for just about everyone. It is an old protocol after all. Some firewalls do manage it OK though it seems.

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Lennart Sorensen

Re: Just hack your own version per the open source spirit

Ekiga is one of many SIP clients. It is a quite nice one. Of course SIP predates skype by many years and being a standard, it is supported by lots of software and hardware. But it is slightly harder to use than skype, but on the other hand it isn't evil and proprietary.

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WD CEO: We ain't getting Unisplendour's $3.8bn. But we'll buy SanDisk anyway

Lennart Sorensen
Happy

I love that they got the year of their special shareholder meeting wrong consistently everywhere in the press release, while getting the year right for everything else.

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Debian 6.0 about to take flying leap off long term support cliff

Lennart Sorensen

Re: LTS is a joke

Debian follows the FHS (File Hierarchy Standard) and any upstream that doesn't will be fixed before being packaged. Upstreams that think they know better than everyone else and go their own way are best avoided. Just too much of a hassle to deal with things that want to do it their own way.

So no, the upstream wordpress is not better. It's wrong and actually hostile to proper packaging and installation.

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Lennart Sorensen

Re: LTS is a joke

Trying to maintain security while using PHP is a joke. The Debian LTS tries to do security updates pretty quick with limited resources. This means things like firefox (well iceweasel) are out (It is just hopeless to try and keep up with the security problems in that), and I can imagine PHP being neglected too given how fundamentally insecure it always is.

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Khronos releases Vulkan 1.0 open graphics specification

Lennart Sorensen

Re: OS X and Windows?

It doesn't matter what Microsoft thinks. If intel, AMD and Nvidia all support it in their drivers, then it doesn't matter if Microsoft officially wants to support it. They already did it back when OpenGL wasn't what Microsoft wanted, and they are doing it now with Vulcan.

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'Unikernels will send us back to the DOS era' – DTrace guru Bryan Cantrill speaks out

Lennart Sorensen

Re: 80386 vs 80286

Then Pentium Pro was perfectly capable of running 16 bit code the same as any other x86 and is fully compatible. The issue people had was that it wasn't very fast at 16 bit code compared to 32 bit code (which is what it was optimized for with the new microcode pipeline). So 16 bit code didn't run any faster than on a Pentium, while 32 bit code was much faster, so if you ran DOS or Windows 3.1, then you might as well save your money and get a Pentium instead. The PII and later improved on the 16 bit performance again and were hence much better upgrades.

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