* Posts by Rob Crawford

595 posts • joined 21 Mar 2007

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SPY-tunes scandal: Bloke sues Bose after headphones app squeals on his playlist

Rob Crawford

"Connect app and while it's certainly very grabby on data – you need to have both GPS and Bluetooth turned on to use it"

While I do not see the need for the GPS I do have some sympathy for wanting the Bluetooth to be enabled what with them requiring the Bluetooth for Yer actual connectivity.

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I need an ISP that offers IPv6. Virgin Media: Whatevs, nerd

Rob Crawford

Re: Considering

I had more difficulty not shouting at him to be honest, though according to other office denizens I was very close to failure.

That was noticed when I started suggesting that my current certifications actually may mean that I know a little about Wi-Fi <sigh>

Still it entertained everybody else.

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Rob Crawford

Considering

their tech support claimed that you can't use the 5GHz channels unless you are using Apple devices as it is specifically for Apples use.

My new network kit arrived about 90 minutes later (10 days early) and surprisingly enough within an hour of arriving home my VM router was in modem mode and Meraki kit has been doing everything else.

So the prospect of IP V6 arriving doesn't really strike me as something that is likely to arrive until somebody actually forces them (and then their 'tech support' staff will deny it's existence unless you are using Apple devices.

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How to leak data from an air-gapped PC – using, er, a humble scanner

Rob Crawford

Oh look a Daily Mail April fool

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Drones will be able to carry 120GB footage of you in the shower if Seagate has its way

Rob Crawford

Re: @Cynic_999 - being seen from the air while naked

Have added the quote

"That said, drone enthusiasts can prevent a lot of irritation and upset if they respect other people's privacy. There is plenty of room to avoid problems, and even where it cannot be avoided a polite knock on the door and a quick, friendly chat goes a very long way to avoid misunderstandings and unpleasantness."

Actually 'drone pilots' shouldn't have to do that, for the simple reason that they should not be flying that close to people and structures. There are regulations that flyers are obliged to adhere to.

Although I do get irritated with the scare stories I have never had any compunction to tell people to stop flying somewhere inappropriate or in the past report them to the cops (flying model plains at the end of a commercial runway) or posting horrendously dangerous content to youtube (when the CAA used to want such material reported)

The majority of flyers are the same as they are responsible people who do not wish to lose their hobby due to the actions of a selfish few

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Rob Crawford

Re: @Cynic_999 - being seen from the air while naked

So what you are pointing at are modified cameras that permit updated lenses.

In the case of DJI you are flying through the same camera as used for photographic purposes and for the most part these days they are DJI specific items

Additionally so that isn't going to go too well as you need a wide FOV to fly the damn thing and there is no method of changing the 'zoom' when in flight.

For most consumer kit the weight of any useful long range lens (even these days) will limit it's usefulness and by the time a suitable gimble (as it would need to be a good one that copes with more than an ultra light action cam) the weight and therefore the machines size goes up again.

I have a lightweight gimble for a small DSLR & associated lens that I am repairing (for a commercial pilot) and I could assure you no DJI available in an electronics store would be lifting it off the ground even without a camera in place.

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Rob Crawford

Re: @Cynic_999 - being seen from the air while naked

Somehow I don't think anybody will be spending a few grand on building a large machine to hoist a camera with a large lens into the air to photograph you in your house.

You do realise that any commonly available machine doesn't have much more than a go-pro on board, even the nice DJI cameras are fairly high quality but still have action cam type optics.

The behemoths that carry the kit for what you are referring to are large, loud and expensive (I know enough licensed commercial operators)

But then again who is worried about reality when you can simply invent deviants to rail against

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Rob Crawford

Re: Please tell me you don't believe in the voyeur/pedophile/pervert and a drone crap.

What are you talking about, are you making up statements I have not made?

What is the problem with me flying my radio control aircraft around an area where the flying of model aircraft is permitted?

What is the problem with proximity flying within abandoned buildings?

There is none, but for some reason you have decided to classify me as a moron, I'm afraid that you really need to educate yourself and on more than the matter of flying radio control models (because that's what they are)

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Rob Crawford

Re: Where are the Drone Jammers then?

I take it from your comment that your experience of multi rotors and the cameras they can lift is non existent.

FYI they're noisy, very obvious and the cameras they carry are very limited unless you are going to spend a hell of a lot of money to hoist a DSLR into the air.

Remember when mobile phones with cameras where banned for the same reasons.

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Rob Crawford

Re: Where are the Drone Jammers then?

Please tell me you don't believe in the voyeur/pedophile/pervert and a drone crap.

I mean really please return my faith in the IQ of people

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Joe Public likes drones and regulations, finds UK.gov 'public dialogue'

Rob Crawford

Oh look a method of taking money of people.

I'm rather confused how my 130mm racer will carry any transceivers for identification, also wondering how my 150mm racer will manage to carry anything apart from the minimal configuration it already has.

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Apple sued by parents of girl killed by driver 'distracted by FaceTime'

Rob Crawford

So how?

So how does the phone detect if it's the driver or a passenger using the phone.

I would not be overly happy if I couldn't use my phone on a bus, train, tram or while a passenger in a car.

I understand the family's anguish, anger and the desire to make anybody even vaguely connected with the accident responsible and I'm sure that my anger and distress would cause me to to try and do something.

However I do see this as a lawyer steering them in the wrong direction (and more for his own benefit than the family)

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If you bought a dildo in Denver, the government must legally be told

Rob Crawford

In the UK they would already know and based upon diameter you may end up on a watch list

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Mirai variant turns TalkTalk routers into zombie botnet agents

Rob Crawford

Surprising

Not that Talk Talk are being crap, I'm simply surprised that so many Talk Talk users had an internet connection good enough to even get infected

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Angry user demands three site visits to fix email address typos

Rob Crawford

Easily fixed

Such issues are easily fixed by making such calls chargeable.

If the contract didn't cover such calls being chargeable then the people involved in the bid should be sacked

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Swedes ban camera spy-drones for anything but crime fighting

Rob Crawford

Re: Muppets

Nurse Ratchett his meds are wearing off, swat him with his Daily Mail

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Drone idiots are still endangering real aircraft and breaking the rules

Rob Crawford

Re: Bit miffed and surprised

In sport mode it can hit around 40 => 45 MPH though that probably isn't enough to stay in front of an aircraft and climb 150 metres at the same time.

Once again I will make the proviso that there are stupid people out there who do stupid things, but where are the events likely to occur, close to the ground and close to locations nobody should be flying anything larger than a piece of folded A4 paper.

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Rob Crawford

Re: Heavy regulation

Wi-Fi isn't used (that's info coming from people who don't know what they're talking about, or who are talking about toys)

Output is limited to 100mW and in the case of the very common FrSky Taranis the absolute max range is about .9 of a mile on a standard setup and perhaps 2.7KM with the long range TX.

Further ranges can be gained by shifting down to 433MHz and going mad with antenna trackers.

I've never sent a machine out past 150 metres as a 450mm machine is difficult to see even with nice LEDs installed.

Personally I don't like FPV flying, but even then with a totally illegal 600mW 5.8GHz transmitter the range isn't massive. Those who want long range go down to 1.2 GHz (those require physically large antennas)

On the whole the people who are causing issues are idiots and who buy a ready made machine and fly somewhere stupid, usually through ignorance.

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Rob Crawford

Re: Heavy regulation

If you are referring to me then I suggest you read what was actually written as opposed to making accusations.

There are issues, I have personally reported flyers to the cops on 3 occasions for flying in and around airports (and a couple of times in city centres) and will continue to do so, so watch where you point fingers.

However the altitudes (and speeds) quoted simply smell of piss for consumer (and even commercial) machines.I have no doubt that several such sightings in the US where very large turbine powered fixed wing machines (which everybody insists upon calling models, so that's OK)

I have watched the PSNI UAS flying within the Belfast City Airport approach path so maybe the police force mentioned where dicking about at the time with some monster machine they own.

As such sightings have been going on for donkeys years what where they called before multirotors became available?

There are issues but they aren't DJI Phantoms 2 miles up, they're in and around entirely inappropriate locations and probably much more dangerous.

Perhaps the Daily Mail have a job you may wish to apply for?

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Rob Crawford

Re: Heavy regulation

Firstly you are presuming this ever actually happened.

Frankly the technology simply can't do what is claimed in this 'article' (by article I'm wondering if a pair of tongs, bleach and a boil wash would be appropriate for the offending item)

At best it would point to military kit if the claims are to be believed. In times past when such claims where made pilots where breathalyzed, maybe they should start that procedure again

Secondly you are presuming you have a clue regarding what you are commenting upon

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Rob Crawford

4000 feet at 200 knots, I think not

Flying around the nose of an A340 at 9000 feet yeah right, what speed and altitude do they think these things fly at exactly?

Full out racing machines are lucky to get much over 60mph and are lucky to reach 4.5 minutes flight time

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Fujitsu to axe 1,800 jobs across the UK

Rob Crawford

What! you worked for Fujitsu 3 times ;)

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UK copyright troll weeps, starts 20-week stretch in the cooler for beating up Uber driver

Rob Crawford

Anybody think his contact details need to be updated?

http://www.robertcroucher.com/contact/

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Rob Crawford

Re: 20 wks in prison! He's a kid for fucks sake!

Sorry I will ignore the reference (if you had any confidence in your humour you wouldn't have hidden anyway)

He fucked his own life up

Ever had to look after somebody who has only had a couple of kicks in the head, no I thought not.

Land somebody on the ground then kick them in the head is a damn good reason for somebody to go to prison.

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Tesla driver dies after Model S hits tree

Rob Crawford

Re: standard operating procedures

BTW: FoboFool should actually be RoboFool

Also although the machine that crashed yesterday didn't have autopilot (it seems) none the less it's the autopilot facility that is the reason much more attention will be paid to any incidents with the Tesla product line.

Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence and considering the the meatbags are pretty poor at driving I consider claims of safe computer controlled driving pretty damned extraordinary

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Rob Crawford

From memory a Lithium fire will strip the oxygen from the carbon, that's why water doesn't work so well either

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Rob Crawford

Re: standard operating procedures

Ever experienced a LiPo fire even a small one?

They can do anything from sit and lurk, bend, attempt to swell, emit smoke and steam, burn (nice and hot) with lots of smoke and pretty colours, or simply detonate as they see fit.

Also you don't know how many batteries are left inside the machine.

As for clickbait, well for the most part other cars aren't performance cars and can have "FoboFool" driving while the fleshy idiot is watching a film on his iPad (or whatever they do)

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Height of stupidity: Heathrow airliner buzzed by drone at 7,000ft

Rob Crawford

The vast majority of multorotors don't have any GPS capability.

The vast majority of fixed wing and helicopter models also don't have GPS either

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Rob Crawford

Question

Is the story a bigger load of crap than the comments being posted (I'm not sure)

No doubt this won't be approved, but look at the statements made before unwrapping the pitchforks and lighting the torches

The statements in the story smell of wee and I'm surprised that Saturdays episode of Causality wasn't mentioned as additional evidence.

Firstly there are idiots with ready to fly machines that's why the DJI Phantom is known as The Phantom Menace within the flying community but anything at 7000 feet wasn't one of them.

A twin bladed drone at 7000 feet, firstly that is called a helicopter or a plane in common parlance so No that's not something some moron bought in Maplin or online.

To me that smells one of the following : Commercial, Military or Police.

Commercial wouldn't risk their ability to make money and most commercial machines wouldn't stand a chance of getting that sort of altitude.

Military is possible, particularly if they probably forgot to set the home point and it was trying to fly back to the US or Israel (ask the Irish army about that one and the second one as well)

The Police are arrogant enough to fly anywhere they want and they have been spending a hell of a lot of money on UAV systems (see I know the lingo) but unlikely

5 years ago a pilot would have said UFO, a strangely common occurrence and probably made slightly less common by pilots being breathalyzed upon landing.

Any remotely operated vehicle is a drone (including your kids toy car) but as usual the Daily Fail would have you believe only drug smugglers, pedophiles, psychopaths and abortionists have such devil machines.but

As an aside one commenter who said model planes and helis require skill and multirotors don't, well tell you what try a 250 racer in acro mode and see what you make of it.

BTW stupidity is common everywhere I have had to call the cops about people flying both fixed wing models and kites less than 200 feet from the end of a UK airport, no doubt the story would have become satanic drone pilots as the other story would only have involved really stupid normal people

BTW a LiPo fire in your pocket, car or ear would be an unpleasant experience, however the energy carried and heat generated is probably a gnats fart compared with the untold millions of Jules and hundreds of degrees C the jet engine is producing.

No it wouldn't be good to bung anything into a jet engine, but a consumer grade machine is a plastic shell, (perhaps some glass bubble impregnated nylon), 4 small PCBs, a credit card sized computer, a few small motors and a soft(ish) battery pack.

Not a good thing to be ingested, but I would be a damn sight more worried about the damage a flock of geese or seagulls would do.

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Google killing app format used only by The 1%

Rob Crawford

Oh Bugger

The 1% probably multirotor owners (no it's not a drone)

Anybody who runs Cleanflight, Betaflight or Baseflight or wants to flash SimonK speed controllers will be very irked

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If you use ‘smart’ Bluetooth locks, you're asking to be burgled

Rob Crawford

<sigh>

Dunno why the said Masterlock was OK as only takes 2 hammer blows to open their bluetooth padlock.

Actually it's fairly easy to break modern double glazing and it's quieter than regular glass, you just have to know how.

The purpose of any lock is to cause a thief to think it's too much bother, I will rob somebody else instead.

If the average thief knew how vulnerable many modern locks are then we would be in a considerably worse position.

Instead I have seen window frames pulled out, holes cut in the side of bungalows and caravans, snapped euro locks, slates lifted (and piled very neatly) from roofs, flat roofs cut through, melted uPVC frames and hundreds of broken windows.

Main entrance method though is the already open window or unlocked door.

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Google's Nexii stand tall among Android's insecure swill

Rob Crawford

Having switch to using a Nexus last year I am fairly happy with the update situation these days.

However I had an unlocked Samsung S4 and was getting almost monthly updates which cheered me up.

However those who are locked to carriers are pretty much doomed because carriers obstruct updates to keep their bloatware in place (don't tell me it's for network compatibility)

Samsung are not blameless for not so good updates but carriers should also be held to account

4
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Apple WWDC: OS X is dead, long live macOS

Rob Crawford

The word you are searching for is Autumn

"For the Apple TV, this Fall"

No, simply no, only Americans (and Canadians who are Americans too as they have the same country code) call it Fall

Or did you mean "this Fail"

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Surveillance forestalls more 'draconian' police powers – William Hague

Rob Crawford

Re: Missing the point

While attempting to ban decent padlocks

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Wi-Fi hack disables Mitsubishi Outlander's theft alarm – white hats

Rob Crawford

Oh well now I know what those 5 entries in the SSIDs logs are, I'm was surprised that there are so many Mitsubishi WiFi access points roaming past my house

Along with the Skoda, Vauxhall, Ford, Porche, Audi, Mercedes and BMW.

3
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Tivo's new owner ponders binning its own boxes

Rob Crawford

Looks like the MBA crew have taken full control and see hardware (and R&D) as unessicary expense

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60 per cent of Androids exposed by new attack on mediaserver

Rob Crawford

Let me get this right

This is a news story about a "researcher" that is using a bug that was patched by google back in January.

Bit of a non story, apart from the shite service provided by phone manufacturers and carrier branded phones which we all know about anyway

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Catz: Google's Android hurt Oracle's Java business

Rob Crawford

Want to try that again

Google co-chief executive Safra Catz

Are you sure?

1
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Manchester cops to strap on 3K bodycams

Rob Crawford

No doubt only the footage they want will survive the holding period and like a friends medical records anything inconvenient will vanish.

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'Bitcoin creator' Craig Yeah Wright in meltdown

Rob Crawford

You call that a meltdown?

Personally I was hoping for a meltdown resembling Jason Russel's (of Kony 2012 infamy) meltdown.

But instead all we get is a whining post on a website.

Tell a pack of lies and then whine when you get caught, yeah either a banker or a politician wannabe

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Official: EU goes after Google, alleges it uses Android to kill competition

Rob Crawford

If Google have a monopoly due to the play store then what have Apple got with their app store?

I can choose to purchase software from alternate stores and frequently do (from Amazon for example and Samsung when they had their awful option and I had a Samsung phone)

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When Steve Jobs was away, Apple's designers snuck out a penis-shaped remote control

Rob Crawford

Guess I don't spend as much time thinking about penises as other do

Even after the alleged similarity was pointed out I still don't actually notice it

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Google tried to be funny, cocked it up, everyone thought it was a bug

Rob Crawford

<sigh>

Would be more mortified about somebody I know sending me prayers than receiving an embedded gif of a minion

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Google spews critical Android patch as millions of gadgets hit by Linux kernel bug

Rob Crawford

Android devices with a security patch level of 2 April are patched against the flaw. ®

Should I break out my time machine or just travel through time the slow way?

4
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Mystery Kindle update will block readers from books after Wednesday

Rob Crawford

Nope it's not entirely publisher choice

Periodicals MUST have DRM, the guys at 2600 are not at all happy about the must have DRM (it also enforces a limited number of editions on the device, so it deletes older editions and you have to redownload them)

If you unsubscribe then you lose all purchased material.

Needles to say 2600 printed my letter describing how to unDRM their publication

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Flying Scotsman attacked by drone

Rob Crawford

I would be more concerned about the build quality and choice of materials if even a large multi-rotor managed to break through a carriage window.

Doesn't excuse the idiots that ruin radio control flying for the rest of us though.

(I still have the scars on my forearm after assisting an idiot photographer with his bloody (quite literally) DJI Phantom several months ago)

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Google-backed British startup ‘stole our code’, says US marketing firm

Rob Crawford

Re: The best anecdote I remember...

I had a habit of including numeric constants which where MD5 hashes of certain strings, these constants where never used.

But it was interesting to listen to a certain individual and an supposed expert Lotus Notes dev accounting for these constants in a Lotus script to track 2 ton newsprint rolls.

They had taken my prototype application (constants and all) changed the colours, added a couple of images and claimed it as their own (adding no functionality whatsoever)

The Notes expert claimed that they wrote it over 3 days ans I could have as I wasn't a registered developer.

I almost felt bad asking them about the constants then supplying the strings to pass through the hashing package.

No I didn't feel bad about their written warnings from HR

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Rob Crawford

Maybe if we searched the internet we would find what site Bounce carried out the original copy and pasted operation from

The example looks very close to a chunk of tutorial code to me

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Cisco says CLI becoming interface of last resort

Rob Crawford

Re: Overpaid arrogant gits

Or perhaps you simply havn't a clue?

It's a bit like UNIX boxes vs windows in the 90s.

You want the job done properly use a UNIX box, you want a machine where anybody can make changes get a Windows server so the less skilled person can click on something in the GUI.

The UNIX box, restore the OS, run the install scripts, create the mount points, copy your scripts back on to the machine, get your startup scripts in place, get your cron jobs and it's fine.

OK so it's a few hours of hell but it's back to the original state (that is supposing you do not have a proper backup)

When the Windows box dies or the monkey pressed the wrong button, dear God it was awful and a restoration was never managed in less than a day and the fallout lasted for a week or so.

Needless to say windows boxes are used almost everywhere because you don't have to pay for arrogant gits protecting their jobs because a monkey is cheaper most of the time

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Rob Crawford

Re: History repeats itself

Considering the number of products where the GUI gets things wrong or functions are simply not implemented in the GUI (Aruba and Citrix comes immediately to mind)

Couples with the additional joy an fun that web interfaces bring either through security concerns (hello all vendors) or that require you to use ancient versions of browsers to work (hello Cisco ACS) or insist that you must have a particular browser plugin to view the statistics pages (would you install THAT Adobe plugin?)

Nope I think I will stick with the CLI thank you very much

Oh BTW I do very much like the Meraki Dashboard as it actually works and does let you implement a lot of stuff very quickly and they have actually paid attention as to how it should be done.

But I don't see it adopted for datacentres any time soon (well at all) even though Cisco are trying to incoroporate it into Prime

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