* Posts by Vic

5801 posts • joined 7 Dec 2007

Blighty's buying another 17 F-35s, confirms the American government

Vic
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Re: civilian Intercept

And a teeny tiny fuel tank that would be empty in 15 minutes at full engine power with afterburners on.

That depends on which aircraft you ere flying; the Mark 6, for example, had a big belly pan which could be used as an additional fuel tank.

I know a few Lightning pilots :-)

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For now, GNU GPL is an enforceable contract, says US federal judge

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Re: Good writeup, I guess

And really, does anyone who isn't self-loathing call himself a hippie?

Yep.

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Re: Technical Point @frank ly

You do not have to give everyone access to your source code - the only requirement is you have to give the source to the people you distribute the software to and are unable to restrict them from further redistribution - you have no obligations whatsoever to third parties.

That is true for a section 3(a) distribution under GPLv2, but utterly incorrect for a distribution under section 3(b), which is what most redristibutions fall under.

For 3(a) to apply, you must ship source code *with* the binaries.

If you do not ship source with the binaries, either 3(b) or 3(c) applies. 3(c) is only permissible for non-commercial redistribution of unmodified code. So 3(b) is the norm.

And 3(b) says :-

Accompany it with a written offer, valid for at least three years, to give any third party, for a charge no more than your cost of physically performing source distribution, a complete machine-readable copy of the corresponding source code, to be distributed under the terms of Sections 1 and 2 above on a medium customarily used for software interchange

(Emphasis mine)

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90 per cent of the UK's NHS is STILL relying on Windows XP

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Re: Extended support?

So the IT Director of the Trust takes the fall. What good does that do in ensuring the department pulls it's socks up and we don't get a repeat?

Maybe - just maybe - the next IT Director might actually take some interest in directing the department?

Directors claim large salaries because they "take the risks", they "have responsibility". This is what responsibility means - if you took the cash when things were going easy, you take the fall when they're going hard.

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Beeb hands £560m IT deal to Atos. Again

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Re: Fun with statistics

I will have to go through Atos's fitness-for-work exam sometime in the future

The first time through, they will declare you fit for work. Do not take this. Keep appealing - they are financially-motivated to get you to give up in despair.

My missus spent two years after her operation being told that she was fit to work. When - eventually - we got in front of a doctor to assess her, his comment was simply "I have no idea why you are here - there is no doubt as to your inability to work". She got her early retirement.

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Cloudflare goes berserk on next-gen patent troll, vows to utterly destroy it using prior-art bounties

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Re: Policing websites

Should Cloudfare boot El Reg because they posted nasty articles against Santa Cruz Operation (SCO)?

I don't think ElReg has ever posted a nasty article about the Santa Cruz Operation.

The SCO that everyone railed against was a different company - formerly Caldera. The confusion appears to be deliberate.

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Agile consultant behind UK's disastrous Common Platform Programme steps down

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At which the users gaze in desperation because there's no documentation on how to use it.

Then it wasn't Agile.

Agile prefers working software over complete documentation, not over any documentation.

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Yes, no design, no documentation, minimal testing. Just working software. Yeah, right.

That isn't Agile!

Agile simply asks you to prioritise working software over complete documentation. Nowhere does it say that the documentation should be absent, nor does it place anything other than working software above documentation.

It should be patently obvious to all that failing to go through a conventional design process never produces anything of value; it becomes development-by-evolution, and almost all evolutionary experiments become extinct.

An old colleague of mine had a wonderful phrase: "A week's worth of keyboard-bashing can sometimes preclude the need for an hour's thought". That pretty much describes the approach of so many people who claim to be "Agile" (and clearly aren't).

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Facebook is abusive. It's time to divorce it

Vic
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Re: Linked-In?

But what really pisses me off is getting e-mails from linked in from someone I've never heard of, saying they want to join my network

I get quite a few of those to addresses I've never given to LinkedIn[1].

It's quite apparent that there are LI spammers, who just target every email address they get hold of...

Vic.

[1] I have a *lot* of email addresses. Each new contact gets a unique address for me, so I can tell who's leaking what.

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Re: Pintrest

If that is indeed the case, then you've essentially ceded copyright and the claim in the EXIF data would be meaningless

Except, of course, that you can't possible cede copyright you do not own...

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We are 'heroes,' says police chief whose force frisked a photographer

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Re: Power tends to Corrupt...

Sorry, but you have that completely backwards

No, the OP is correct.

The whole point of continually exaggerating the risks of terrorism and lying about the causes of it is to give governments plausible justifications for restricting personal freedoms and dismantling personal privacy

That's a different point - and also true. So we have the situation where authoritarian governments and terrorists feed each other's agenda.

There's only one way that ends...

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Re: Power tends to Corrupt...

By US law (and much of the first world) you are obliged to obey a flight crew's reasonable instructions

*Technically*, you're obliged to follow the Captain's lawful instructions.

But in practice, there's precious little difference.

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Don't stop me! Why Microsoft's inevitable browser irrelevance isn't

Vic
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I think Edge gets a bad rap just because it's an MS browser. It works, it doesn't do anything flashy, it just shows web pages

I crashes frequently[1], it changes focus at random when closing windows[2], it ignores certificate decisions I've already taken[3], it doesn't respect the settings I've given it[4], ...

I'm hoping the boss will let me change this machine quite markedly. W10 is bad enough, Edge is appalling.

Vic.

[1] Usually when I try to open a new tab or window with a few PDFs already open - but not normally from the "open in new tab/window" option on a link

[2] When closing a maximised window, I would expect to see the window underneath it - the one I was using previously. But over the last few days, Edge seems to want to give me something else I'd been using at another time...

[3] I deliberately have an invalid certificate on my server. Edge will accept this for some time - occasionally, even for days - and then will suddenly throw up a certificate warning. The certificate hasn't changed...

[4] The BBC site is the worst for this at the moment: it wants my location. I don't want to give it my location, and have explicitly disabled that in Settings. But Edge insists on telling me every single bloody time that the BBC wants my location, and I'll have to enable that in Settings....

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TVs are now tablet computers without a touchscreen

Vic
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Re: qulaity

MPEG has blocky artefacts

All Digital TV has blocky artefacts. It's a lossy encoder system based on a block structure.

MPEG 2 can't cope with colour gradients

Yes it can.

All these issues are simply down to the trade-off between bandwidth and quality - different encoders get a different trade-off, usually at the cost of processing power. If your display is poor, that usually means that someone's wound the Q up to deal with a smaller bit budget...

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Uber engineer's widow: Stress and racism killed my husband ... Uber: Let's make flying cars!

Vic
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Re: Flying nightmare

Uber will of course claim they have no need to take heed of any aviation regulations such as licences, flight plans, or safety.

They seem to be ignoring a number of laws - including that of Gravity, Conservation of Energy, ...

VTOL aircraft are extremely power-hungry, for reasons I hope are obvious. Battery-powered VTOL passenger aircraft are quite remarkably unlikely.

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Hackers uncork experimental Linux-targeting malware

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Re: A built-in password list

memorable passwords may not be as obscure as I think they are. Where can I check?

John is your friend...

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Stanford Uni's intro to CompSci course adopts JavaScript, bins Java

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Re: I thought we needed to encourage new developers ...

The only way to teach JavaScript (like PHP) is to have a huge list of things which are labelled "DO NOT USE AT ALL" or "DO NOT DO IT THIS WAY, DO IT THE OTHER WAY".

This image says it all...

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Re: Biggest problem is the apostrophe

Pop!

Stack underflow!

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Re: Introductory

most serious JavaScript stuff is now done using 3rd party frameworks as the language isn't up to scratch

I'm not entirely sure that's correct.

Most serious stuff is *started* using a third-party framework, but then things need "modifying", because the framework doesn't actually do what you wanted.

I've seen projects where the framework over-rides are double the size of the framework...

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systemd-free Devuan Linux hits version 1.0.0

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Re: Honest inquiry

But what if you're pressed on the other side of the coin: It's a "five nine's" service that's gone down, and because it's a holiday or whatever, no one's around to verify its state if it goes down, so you're caught in a dilemma

SysV always gave you a very simple way of causing services to respawn if you wanted them to. Systemd has not solved any problems in that[1] area.

Vic.

[1] Or any other, AFAICT...

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Re: confusing script-based system

The new unit files ... Sure, they work

Not always.

I had to write some systemd unit files the other week. One of them had to start after the DM - lightdm in this case - had started. So I used systemd to control the dependency.

Except that it doesn't work; my unit was started after lightdm had started to come up, not once it was functional. I ended up having to do the synchronisation by hand in a script - so it had the worst of all possible worlds.

SysV is so much simpler...

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Farewell Unity, you challenged desktop Linux. Oh well, here's Ubuntu 17.04

Vic
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Re: How times change..

In Mint 18.1 KDE, GIMP is shown in the application menu as "GIMP Image Editor"

On Centos7, it's "GNU Image Manipulation Program".

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Alert: Using a web ad blocker may identify you – to advertisers

Vic
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Re: Sorted.

advertisers know that they can ignore the bottom 16 bits and the rest is basically fixed by your ISP and not CG-NAT'd or anything

s/16/64/ ...

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Back to the Future 2: Gasp! America's trade watchdog discovers the risks of 'free' movies

Vic
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Re: Actually not -illegal-

<blockquiote>File sharing is copyright infringement, a civil matter</blockquiote>

That depends on your jurisdiction.

In the UK, for example, Section 107 of CDPA88 makes copyright infringement a criminal offence if it's performed in a commercial situation.

We have some crap laws...

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Boss swore by 'For Dummies' book about an OS his org didn't run

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Re: But the real issue is

I present Hersheys kisses

I'd rather you didn't...

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Official science we knew all along: Facebook makes you sad :-(

Vic
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Re: get off that computer and go outside and play with your friends

But the computer /is/ my friend.

It isn't. It's plotting against you. It told me so...

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Software dev cuffed for 'nicking proprietary financial trading code'

Vic
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Re: The point in trading

So I think the bit your missing is understanding what it is they are trading - shares and bonds are ways of injecting cash into a company, which allow the company to invest in new projects that they otherwise wouldn't have the capital for.

That's long-term investors, and it's a good thing that we have a few of them left.

What does it benefit a company for a trader to own some stock for a fraction of a second, creaming off a profit by exploiting moment-to-moment fluctuations in the share price?

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FCC kills plan to allow phone calls on planes – good idea or terrible?

Vic
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Re: Thank goodness.

It could be the spouse with a sudden medical condition you're worried about

If it's a genuine medical emergency, pretty much all aircraft are fitted with radio that will work at any stage of the flight that a phone will.

If it's not sufficiently important to use the aircraft radio systems - it's probably not a real emergency after all...

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Aviation regulator flies in face of UK.gov ban, says electronics should be stowed in cabin. Duh

Vic
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Not only am I a techie, but a (student) private pilot

Good luck!

The *only* downside of getting your licence is the kicking you give yourself for not having done it ten years earlier :-)

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Boeing-backed US upstart reckons it'll be building electric airliners

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Re: Reality check time?

I think if you did the math, solar energy at ANY altitude [vs the weight of the panels to collect it] would be a net LOSS if you tried to implement it on an aircraft.

You'll note that I said it was the "most viable" idea, not that it had any merit :-)

There have been solar-only aircraft. It can work if the plane is designed for that sort of flight. But getting any passengers aboard is, AFAIK, non-viable, as is getting a choice in where/when you fly...

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Re: Reality check time?

so why paraffin? makes no sense.

Because that's what aviation jet engines typically burn...

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Re: Reality check time?

I'm pretty sure they do not plan to power the aircraft by solar power.

Solar would actually be the most viable idea here - once above cloud, there really is quite a bit of sun to be had. But you'd still need fuel for below-cloud operations - including all the usual reserves for emergencies, and you'd be force to operate daylight-only. Airlines won't like that...

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Re: Just a matter of timing

Fuel makes up a huge part of airplane operating costs, so if a hybrid can improve consumption by even 10-20% that's a big win.

Not necessarily. Batteries are always heavy, so the more you carry, the less revenue-earning cargo gets airborne. It's no use trimming your fuel costs by 10% if you carry 30% fewer passengers as a result.

The numbers I did the other day came out at 4.3TJ in a 787's tanks. Think about the batteries you'd need to save 10% of that - 430GJ. That's a lot of battery; the large Tesla pack holds 85KWh, which equates to 300MJ. So you nominally need 1400 of those to save 10% fuel - in practice, rather less, since a heat engine cannot be 100% efficient. But I doubt you'd get the effect with fewer than 500 packs[1] - and they're 544Kg each. That's 272t of the carrying capacity taken up in batteries; the 787-9 only has 126t to start with...

Competing with hydrocarbon fuels really is rather difficult.

Vic.

[1] That's an efficiency of 35% for the jet engine - that strikes me as reasonable, but I don't have figures to hand to back it up.

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Germany gives social networks 24 hours to delete criminal content

Vic
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Re: Pssst

I think we underestimate their capacity for appreciation of Properly Funny Stuff!

Indeed.

It's often said that the Germans have no sense of humour.

I put some lighting systems into a shop in Berlin a few months back; whoever designed the cabling system there had a particularly dry and wicked one...

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Crafty Fokker: Norfolk surgeon builds Red Baron triplane replica

Vic
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Re: I wish him well

Probably a lot easier with that flat-4 engine that it would have been with the original rotary

Perhaps. The O-320 still generates a load of gyroscopic movement as you manoeuvre...

What it will be is much simpler to get serviced; the Lycoming is quite an old engine, but there are thousands of them in daily use.

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Re: You have to love...

a set of plans that tells you how to build the things you need in order to build the end-product you want!

It used to be fairly commonplace - I've got some pages from Practical Mechanics from the early twentieth century which tell you how to build the "White Monoplane". It looks like a fun piece of kit to fly :-)

It's only comparatively recently that we've got into the "it's far too difficult for your little noggin" attitude...

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Ubuntu UNITY is GNOME-MORE: 'One Linux' dream of phone, slab, desktop UI axed

Vic
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Just give me a Linux Desktop with the look and feel of OSX 10.6.8 (peak OSX) and I'll be a happy chappy.

There used to be a KDE project called Baghira that allowed you to make your desktop look like various versions of OSX.

I don't know if it's still usable - I stopped using it many years ago.

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Boeing and Airbus fly new planes for first time

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Re: Yes, they look beautiful

produces issues with both connecting flights and noise/pollution (aka Not in My Back Yard).

I went to visit a gliding site a couple of weeks back. They only run winch launches - no aerotow.

The guy told me they'd experimented with the idea of running aerotow - and the noise complaints started before the first powered aircraft (on its way in for the day) had come anywhere near the airfield...

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Re: Yes, they look beautiful

The function of the wing is to generate lift from the air flow over it. The amount of lift you need is related to the weight of the airplane.

Yeah, mostly.

To achieve more lift for the same airspeed, you need to raise the nose slightly to increase the Angle of Attack. This gives you more lift at the cost of an increased drag coefficient Cd.

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Joke

Anyone who has previously 'enjoyed' BA's 3-3-3 cattle class will doubtless be thrilled that the company is now refitting long-haul aircraft - beginning with 777s - to 3-4-3 at the back of the plane.

It's been a while since anyone posted the Delta Seating Chart

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Re: Yes, they look beautiful

Yes you are stupid

Nice to see the standard of debate is so high.

that's assuming no other opposing forces once you have attained said velocity

And that's exactly the point. Drag is everything. All that energy in the tanks is there to overcome drag. Your KE figure is entirely irrelevant; it is somewhere around 0.1% of the energy required for the flight, which is why my initial post mentioned that it was irrelevant. Drag is everything - have I said that? Drag is everything. That's where al the energy goes, and that's why I mentioned the drag equation in my first post. You keep harping on about KE, and now even you seem to have realised that it is irrelevant.

hey shall we throw in drag per second then add gravitational downforce per second

Now you're just making stuff up. Look at the units of what you've just attempted to throw in the air, and it should be obvious even to you that that is nonsensical.

It's the opposing KE force applied to the equation.

No, it isn't. There is a square term in there - as there are many square terms in mathematics. But if it were related to the KE of the aircraft, it would have the mass of the aircraft in there as well. You might notice that it does not.

You are quoting total available fuel energy, try realising all that energy at once, you'll have might big fucking bang

And now you are confusing energy with power. I thought you were a chemist and thermodynamicist?

By the way what is the difference between velocity and speed, a very important concept ?

How is it relevant in this context? You're just throwing irrelevancies around now in the hope of having something stick. Your earlier posts were indicative ofd someone who'd not properly thought through what he was posting. Now you're just into nonsense territory.

WTF ? I've already done it for you as proof.

And yet you still haven't addressed how that energy is so much less than the energy required for flight. Even if we take your worst-case figure for an aircraft doing over 1000mph, you're still a rounding error in the energy required for flight. Yet you cling to this attitude that even 28GJ is somehow of any significance whatsoever to the flight; it simply isn't.

Now stop bullshitting you know what you are talking about.

Yeah, pot, kettle, ....

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Vic
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Re: Yes, they look beautiful

Do you not understand simple physics ?

One of us doesn't.

Double it

KE = ((119,950)/2) * (502*502) = 15.11GJ

Even if you could do that - which you can't - that's still a very, v ery long way short of the energy required for a flight. 101,000Kg of Jet A-1 at 42.8MJ/Kg is over 4.3TJ. Your maths is still three orders of magnitude out.

I don't know where you get:

"The KE of a 787 at MTOW and at max cruising speed - a situation you'll never actually achieve - is less than 5.7GJ. "

Simple mathematics. MTOW of a 787 is between 228t and 254t, depending on variant. Max cruise speed is 511kt. Even you can work out the KE from those numbers.

Clearly bollocks.

And yet surprisingly close to your nominal figure of 3.78GJ. And both numbers are so very, very different from the 4.3TJ in the wings.

So now perhaps you'd like to address that discrepancy, rather than just throw around meaningless numbers? You've got three orders of magnitude to account for.

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Re: Yes, they look beautiful

No I'm a Chemist, thermodynamics is par for the course.

But you're still going to argue subjects over which you have no knowledge. Is that also par for the course?

why does fuel consumption increase with payload ?

There are a number of factors, none of which are similar to the crap you've been touting so far.

The KE of a 787 at MTOW and at max cruising speed - a situation you'll never actually achieve - is less than 5.7GJ. With Jet A-1 quoted at a minimum of 42.8MJ/Kg, that's the energy of less than 133Kg of fuel - or less than 450Kg if you assume a 30% engine efficiency. The same 787 has a fuel capacity of over 101,000Kg - almost 3 orders of magnitude higher than the amount required to propel the aircraft to the KE that you claimed was the dominant factor in fuel use. So either Boeing are massively over-specifying their fuel needs, or - just perhaps, just putting this out there - you might be completely wrong when discussing topics you clearly know nothing about.

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WWW daddy Sir Tim Berners-Lee stands up for end-to-end crypto

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Re: Sir Tim versus Amber Rudd

Can't see Amber Rudd going past the second round in a high-minded debate with anyone let alone Sir TBL

I can't imagine her faring well against a stuffed iguana, for that matter...

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It's 30 years ago: IBM's final battle with reality

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Re: Too much credit

You give the company way too much credit. They didn't really have a strategy at all

Indeed.

I was working at an IBM Systems Centre when the PS/2 launched. We had to go to customers to tell them how wonderful this MCA thing was - without having any knowledge of whether or not it was any better than ISA.

And that was a shame, really - MCA *was* better. But no-one found out until it was way too late. And the Model/30 didn't have MCA anyway...

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UK Home Sec: Give us a snoop-around for WhatApp encryption. Don't worry, we won't go into the cloud

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Re: perhaps itself encrypted with a key known only to law enforcement

The big assumption of course is that GCHQ have to be at least as good at keeping their private key secret as Alice and Bob are

No - you've made two assumptions :-

  • The one you mention
  • That the message sent to GCHQ is indeed the same as the one you sent to Alice

The first of these we know to be false straight off the bat - look at the CIA and NSA leaks to show how they actually aren't all that good at keeping secrets. And it gets worse once you need international cooperation - because that means giving all the keys to the Russians, the Syrians, the Iranians, the North Koreans, etc. Failure to do so would mean you don't get their cooperation - and guess where all the traffic goes instead.

The second is a fundamental flaw in that it requires the bad guys to play by the rules in order to catch them - so Bob sends a message to Alice that says "Attack at Dawn", whereas GCHQ gets one that says "Mary had a little lamb". Bob *swears* both messages have the same content.

So what we're left with is a system that is fundamentally less secure for everyone and no use whatsoever for catching bad guys.

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D'oh! Amber Rudd meant 'understand hashing', not 'hashtags'

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Re: Pity the poor civil servant

Maybe if more people were willing to engage directly rather than moaning about it to others who already agree with them, then just maybe we'd get politicians to say something slightly more sensible.

Have you tried engaging with MPs?

Anything that requires a second's thought will be ignored, palmed off with a letter written by an office junior about how wonderful some idea of their own is that sounds almost like it might be pertinent to your question as long as you don't actually read any of the words...

Been there. Got sick of the T-shirt.

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Hundreds of millions 'wasted' on UK court digitisation scheme

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Re: Introduction to CJS Common Platform Programme

'We’ve developed the video (below)

I don't dare click. It's a rickroll, isn't it?

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Re: Agile is OK for ...

This is a common misconception - agile doesn't mean "no design" or "no planning", you should be doing that regardless of the size of your project.

This. A thousand times, this.

The trouble, I reckon, is that people fail to read sufficiently accurately; the Agile Manifesto says:

we have come to value ... Working software over comprehensive documentation

That's an entirely reasonable position, IMO - it is better to ship something that works and is not fully documented than to ship something with plenty of documentation that doesn't work. But countless groups have decided to interpret the above as "we don't need no steenking documentation", and have included all facets of project planning in the above.

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