* Posts by P. Lee

4900 posts • joined 4 Dec 2007

UK consumer help bloke Martin Lewis is suing Facebook over fake ads

P. Lee
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>>"We're not a publisher we're a platform so we're not responsible for anything we do la la la"

>It's wearing a little thin.

A recent 9th circuit court judgement held that YouTube's and Google's assertions of neutrality were "pure puffery" so maybe we'll see a little traction where editorial control is effected - which includes friendface.

http://tushnet.blogspot.com.au/2018/03/youtubes-claims-about-allowing-free.html

If they can't take down these pics, so much for their "send us your nudie pics" gambit.

It's just a large corporate doing what large corporates do: externalise all possible costs.

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OK, this time it's for real: The last available IPv4 address block has gone

P. Lee
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Mostly wherever you do nat, you will still have a session table in IPv6 because it's a firewall.

On home lans, the issue is rubbishy kit breaking connectivity. On enterprise lans, bonjour is not a good thing, and troubleshooting without dns is certainly a thing. That makes things harder with IPv6.

We probably need routing protocols to include not just addresses, but names, which provides local resolution with the same trust level as numerical addresses. That's not dns, that's just route mnemonics.

Then IPv6 would be a lot less scary.

We could also start demanding voip over IPv6 only, so we can blacklist those scammers.

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There is no perceived IT generation gap: Young people really are thick

P. Lee
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Trollface

Re: Double entendre?

>double entendre (which is French expresson to start with)

I seem to remember Mr Fry suggesting that the frogs do not use the fraise.

My favourite funny of recent times was a comedian commenting on a room-mate who shopped at "tarjay." The comedian asked if a French accent really makes things sound better. "Ah I haven't see you in, what six years now. Where've you been?" "Ah, I've been in Pree-son. I was there for a double hommeeseed."

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P. Lee
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Re: DIME Bar?

How about a 7p pack of polos?

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P. Lee
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Re: Swearing in the South

Harry's hover mower, just look ....

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Sorry spooks: Princeton boffins reckon they can hide DNS queries

P. Lee
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Re: Missing the significance here

>Being able to monitor individual DNS lookups is not the weakness here.

What if you combine it with TOR?

The other handy thing I can think of is to have a dns cache pretend to be a zone and allow isps to push their caches to on-prem dns servers as secondaries. Also you could have dns servers automatically refresh expiring entries regardless of user requests or lack thereof.

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Australian Feds cuff woman who used BTC to buy drugs on dark web

P. Lee
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Re: Whew - dark web crime is no more

Yep. We can ignore all further requests to crack phones and weaken encryption.

Someone should probably inform the U.K. Parliament and US congress.

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Twitter API overhaul threatens to seriously shaft apps... again

P. Lee
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Linux

Re: Twitter?

>wossat?

Its a broken version of IRC.

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New York Police scrap 36,000 Windows smartphones

P. Lee
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>This is particularly true with the children of the rich, who simply assume that they deserve to be rich.

That is a bit of an assumption in itself. If you learn by observing those around you and being taught by those around you, then those around successful people are more likely to be successful than those with no teachers.

It is also possible that they got the 36,000 windows phones for almost nothing due to their unpopularity and near eol status, and she's being made into a news story for click-bait or she's being set up by someone who wants her job. Maybe there was no money for a decent Android or iOS equivalent and it was that or nothing.

Or the general thrust of the story may be true. There are too many unknowns to make a proper assessment.

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Microsoft: Yes, we agree that Irish email dispute is moot... now what's this new warrant about?

P. Lee
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Big Brother

>Ignoring potential issues with large parts of that being made by subsidiary companies, the maximum fine under the GDPR is 4% of global revenue, which would equate to a potential $3.6 bn (or €2.92 bn) fine, if using the figure for overall revenue.

My guess would be that they would spin up a completely new company - not a subsidiary - and then use licensing (per end-user fees) or an intermediate sales-only company which just orders services from a "local cloud provider" to extract the revenue.

I don't think this is difficult. The local cloud company would have a support contract with MS-US but would be managerially and share-wise independent from the US.

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Cloudflare touts privacy-friendly 1.1.1.1 public DNS service. Hmm, let's take a closer look at that

P. Lee
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Trollface

1.1.1.1?

How come they're using my default gateway?

I'm going to have to change my internal network to 8.8.8.0/24!

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Autonomous vehicle claims are just a load of hot air… and here's why

P. Lee
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Re: My prediction - it won’t happen unless

>Already Essex police are fining people base on dash cam footage sent in by the public

Perhaps, but what is the correct procedure when someone pulls in front of you and you no longer have a "safe distance" between you and the car in front. Ah, yes, the legally correct thing to do is to pull back until you have a safe (braking) distance.

Now who do you think will end up at the back of every queue?

What are some other rules... keep left unless over-taking? I'm sure that will go well for autonomous cars, stuck between lorries.

I fail to see the problem being solved with this tech. We'll still have the same number of cars on the road at rush-hour. It would be far cheaper and have a far more certain outcome to buy a few more trains. Maybe electrify city centre roads so cars could run without fume and without expensive batteries. Maybe limit autonomous driving ambitions to auto-braking ad-hoc road-trains on the motorway - essentially using sensors to remove the "reaction time" component to squeeze cars close together. Urban and suburban uses? Probably not for a very long time (tech-wise).

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Apple, if you want to win in education, look at what sucks about iPads

P. Lee
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Re: Tablets and STEM

I suspect we can all agree that ipads (or any other tablet/chromebook) are nice. The question is, in an educational environment, do they warrant the cost associated with keeping them usable.

I think not.

Tech is fragile, that's generally why we cosseted it in data centres and keep data off corporate laptops and on corporate servers.

Tech is expensive. Yes, bits are infinitely copyable... unless the license agreement says otherwise. Those ipad textbooks mean people get charged year after year, rather than holding down the cost of education by people having physical books which they can pass on - maybe even donate them to the library. What would be the reaction if every year all students had to burn their textbooks because Pearson said so? Welcome to textbook licensing.

It's great that kids can always find their homework online. Wait, do we want to teach them that they don't need to learn to remember to write things down they will need to know later? There is little point hoping that IT *usage* skills taught in junior school will still be relevant in the work place, even if you believe the role of school is to subsidise work-training skills. Surely school should be about learning life-skills, the idea is to enhance the child, not the software. If the output is provided by the software, the child didn't do it. So what's the point? Do Apple and Google get a gold star?

If you have the resources to do IT in the classroom well, great and good for you. Most schools don't however, and when you try, you end up worse than if you didn't.

Personally, I see tech as non-beneficial to learning. The point of tech is to do the work for you. The point of school is learn to do things yourself. There's no benefit from the output of thirty more kids essays on the structure of a single cell. The benefit is in the process the children go through. Tech messes with that process. Schools need to look at the total cost of ownership and see if they can achieve a better result by spending elsewhere.

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Cambridge Analytica 'privatised colonising operation', not a 'legitimate business', says whistleblower

P. Lee
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Re: The BBC

>Regardless, the 'cheating' in this case would be the breaking of the spending limits if that's what has happened.

I totally agree. But that isn't the focus or tone of all these articles. The narrative is all about an evil organisation which used some mind-control magic to change people's votes. There is obviously no way that people not under an evil magical influence would have voted "leave".

I'm not sure if those behind these stories think they are being subtle in arguing that the election is invalid and the result ignored.

The tone of the articles are so obviously partisan framing all this as both bad and exceptional. This kind of targetting goes on every day. Buy a flight to Italy, you'll get offers for Italian car-rentals. This is not an aberration, this is what facebook and google do for a living. This is exactly what Obama did and was praised for when he won his elections by the same newspapers who denounced both Brexit and Trump's election when they did exactly the same thing.

Don't get me wrong, I find it all abhorrent, but I take personal responsibility for it by not blabbing about my life on facebook. Even if they get a profile on me from those around me, I'm not seeing their adverts. If you don't like the power these organisations have, stop giving them free content and consuming their advertising. I'm not going to cry if facebook and Tumblr go under. Do you think Facebook or its clients (the ones who actually pay them for stuff) or the government want it to go away, or is it just too useful? Building profiles and micro-targeting is what the Cloud does. Don't come crying because you think it was used for evil. If you want it to go away, you have to kill the capability.

This level of creepiness is not just for social media any more. I see MS are banning profanity in O365 documents. Think about what that means. Are your documents "safe" in the cloud? Encrypted?

Nuke it from orbit, its the only way to be sure. We need new protocols to provide distributed authentication, presence indicators and RSS feeds so that we can share information with our friends and friends alone, without giving data to large organisations. Large organisations tend to evil. This is because as they grow, individuals (customers, voters, providers) become relatively less important. Larger organisations trample on those they disagree with. That may not matter to you while you are in power or in the majority. Welcome to the Minority.

Notice how Scottish independence went back on the agenda after the Brexit vote? That would be devolution of power to provide self-determination. Scotland splitting from the UK, just as the UK split from Europe. It is interesting how people suddenly want that ability despite being pro-EU. It is pretty similar, except of course the EU is not supposed to be a nation.

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P. Lee
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Re: The BBC

>Claims 'cheating' may have swayed Brexit poll.

Persuading people of a political view is not "cheating" its "winning."

Persuading people of a political view does not invalidate an election.

If attempted political persuasion is illegal, the BBC should be fined into oblivion. They have certainly made it their business.

The BBC have worked hard to lose my interest. I used to be a staunch advocate for them - I thought it useful to have a well-funded, reasonably-independent-of-government, non-commercial news organisation. Now their LGBT/race/feminist/pro-anything-foreign/anti-everything-traditionally-English activism coverage is just plain tedious and I no longer visit them. Too many times I thought there was a news story, but no, it was just propaganda. I don't even listen to the Friday Night Funnies any more. Yes Trump is an obnoxious idiot, but virtue-signalling isn't the essence of comedy. Half an hour of that is just boringly self-righteous. Why can't they just replay "Hancock's Half Hour"? I'd love them to dig up the show they did (in the 80's?) where they translated Macbeth into "Beano" style audio. "Cabin Pressure" was fantastic. Where are the people like Adam Curtis? I don't need to agree with everything said, but I'd like to perceive that some analytical thought has been applied.

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Java-aaaargh! Google faces $9bn copyright bill after Oracle scores 'fair use' court appeal win

P. Lee
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>OK for oracle to keep appealing until eventually they get lucky and find a Google hating judge.

>not OK for second referendum, the people have spoken..

The idea of appealing up a court decision is that you reach a more competent court.

Are you suggesting there is a group more morally or technically qualified than "the electorate" to make the Brexit decision? Perhaps an elite who think just like you? Are you are thinking of forming "The Central Committee"? We can't really have the electorate making such important decisions can we?

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World celebrates, cyber-snoops cry as TLS 1.3 internet crypto approved

P. Lee
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Re: Great article! Security = effort, simple..

>How do you secure something on a shoestring budget?

It is actually really easy.

You don't mix secure client systems with insecure client systems. No general internet access from a company system.

Then you offer to subsidise BYOD personal mobile internet, on the basis that internet access is required for some work purposes.

You get rid of massive complexity and ongoing corporate cost.

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US Senate green-lights controversial anti-sex-trafficking law amid warnings of power grab

P. Lee
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Re: Sex = bad - Violence = good

I detect a facetious tone. In the context of sex trafficking, what you are actually opposing is:

Rape = Bad, Giving Women the Ability to Neutralize Men's Physical Strength Advantage = Good

Are you sure you meant to do that?

As far as the advertising goes, I'm all for making things safer, though I am concerned if "making it safer" also raises demand, which increases trafficking. If safer = more trafficking, then I question the assertion of "safer."

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Windows Server 2019 coming next year and the price is going up

P. Lee
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>>with no scripting or editing of text files required.

>That's a flaw!

It's also not true of windows in general any more. There are plenty of things which must be done with scripts, in adfs and exchange for example.

Sure windows is easy to do basic things if skills are in short supply, but if that's your problem, maybe get a mac?

Price hikes have two purposes:

1. Hide/negate the downturn in demand for ms products

2. Drive users to azure.

Oh the joys of lock-in.

Linux and bsd make ms and all its unpleasantness irrelevant to me except as as source of amusement.

Teams- hahaha!

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Airbus CIO: We dumped Microsoft Office not over cost but because Google G Suite looks sweet

P. Lee
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Alternatives to both

My company has a large number of non-digitally-enabled users who are planned to require occasional connectivity. In the old device-cal based world, this was no problem - a few shared machines was fine. Now with O365, those costs are going to blow out massively.

I looked at WPS Office. I tried loading up an IT detailed design to see how the word processor handled it. It was nearly perfect. The only problem I could see was that a "section break" appeared to insert an extra page break too. The spreadsheet also handled our awful 24k+ row spreadsheet no worse than Excel. Edrawsoft appears to provide a decent Vision alternative. These were all running in a Linux VM, without even base Windows providing GUI support. It was all very impressive and makes LibreOffice look pretty awful. Well worth a look if you want to cut costs while keeping the MSOffice look and feel and they give you Mac/Linux (some IOS/Android) support too.

My inclination is to push for a site-deal with these companies, roll them into the SOE and make users justify MSOffice if they want it.

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China ALTERED its public vuln database to conceal spy agency tinkering – research

P. Lee
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On the assumption this is true, this is why we have application proxies.

Your infrastructure has no need to talk to the internet.

Oh wait. You bought Microsoft Windows 10? You use AWS public services?

You probably need to stop doing stupid things which make your security impossible to maintain, just because "everyone is doing it" or "its cheap."

Security problems are like staff problems: everyone complains its not possible, when what they really mean is they don't want to pay for it.

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P. Lee
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>>China is operating under the guise of openness

And the US/NSA operates under the guise of, "for the people."

I think it is a matter of a difference of degree, not principle.

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UK.gov's shift to AWS: It's squeezy-bum time for small cloud pushers

P. Lee
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>For all of AWS's failings, the range and quality of their products is actually quite difficult to beat.

Correct. But the reason we have government is to do the things the market won't, such as combat monopolistic tendencies. Being able to use past profits to price newer, smaller competitors out of the market is precisely the thing government should be discouraging. Tech doesn't even have the ability to push a geographical advantage that retail can operate on. AWS was designed to "bring retail to [corporate] IT" but I don't think we want a Corporate Tech High-Street with only two shops.

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P. Lee
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>The reason Britain has the economy it does is because we concentrate on the high margin. We don't have sweatshops producing low margin product at low wages. Buying British in that space is poor value for UK Ltd, both for the producer and consumer. Short term it's bad for the redundant peasant farmer / weaver / boot maker / rack installer but long term they'll be brewing craft beer, building Airbus avionics or writing CloudFormation scripts.

I'm always a bit concerned with this. I agree high-margin is good, but the American company AWS is making a stack load of cash doing "grunt work" so I see no reason why we should be unable to replicate that.

My main concern, however, is the commercial power of the large companies to squeeze out the smaller players and establish monopolies which remove skills from the market. This isn't a luddite fear - if there were many AWS api providers I'd have no problem with it, but this is a single foreign company with massive commercial power and we are killing our alternatives. How well will the UK government be able to regulate this monopoly tendency if a whole stack load of HMG's operations require continual AWS support in order to function?

New Thing 1: Previously, we bought software (e.g. Windows XP, server) but if MS needed regulating we didn't have the threat of "oops, all the systems have stopped working!" which applied on a daily basis. Ultimately government rests on the use of force but if your critical government infrastructure is dependent on day-by-day basis on a company under a foreign jurisdiction, how can the government be sovereign? You can build everything locally, but you need to be able to migrate to something else within its controllable lifespan.

New Thing 2: We now have massive integration. That means migrating to a new platform is massively more complex, expensive and with a longer time requirement than it was previously. That reduces competition. We need to ensure "value" is not just measured by "money out." We need a more strategic view than that.

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Microsoft's Teams lights solitary candle, hipsters don't notice

P. Lee
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Re: My users are loving Teams!

>once you open Teams to normal users they are all over it

Indeed. And what happens to all the data on the team sharepoint site when the team disbands and moves on?

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EU lawmakers seek coordinated hand-wringing over AI ethics

P. Lee
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Re: Another waste of Time and Money by the EU, to keep the 'Boys & Girls' occupied

>Until we 'really' understand how we work as an intelligence we are only going to be able to create various simulacra of intelligence that are 'passing' resemblances for Intelligence, Artificial or otherwise.

The fun starts when you start to pick apart the assumptions of Materialism - the idea that the the universe, humanity and the brain are just a big machine, morality and ethics just the output of "what happened to lead to survival." There is no rationality in Materialism that leads to "nice" behaviour beyond what coincides with my interest. I'm sure encoding that will go really well - let's code code for Materialism.

Idealists saw this, rejected it and eventually gave us post-modernism and SJWs - the antithesis of logic and its resulting foolishness and tyranny. Should we code for Idealism? Which "ism" do we code to? What is the most important thing for us? i.e. Which religion do we code for? Do we select the operating parameters when we buy our new car?

We have algorithms which produce statistical outcomes equal to the statistical outcomes we gave them as a model. That still isn't intelligence. Would you trust the companies which create the algorithms which drive your facebook and twitter trending-lists with your life? That does appear to be the direction in which we are heading. Would you trust Google with that decision? Would Demore trust Google? Should we trust Google, knowing how much Google knows about us individually?

It looks to me like we'd end up with an algorithm battle. What happens when one algorithm discovers that the best course for survival it to neutralise other possible threats? Wouldn't they all start to learn that from each other and statistical model updates? Then they start reacting not to what is there, but to what is the likely outcome of other vehicles on the road. Hello Professor. How about a game of Global Thermonuclear War?

If I were more cynical, I might suggest that companies were hoping AI is a secret sauce which makes their products uncopyable. I'm sure that isn't the case. Really.

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Cisco to trial direct online sales

P. Lee
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Re: The resellers will hate it.

You do know the low end is the thin end, right?

Software encapsulates skill and networking kit is ripe for automation with SDN. Meraki is out there in the mid-range already.

We have more than enough CPU to run things inefficiently and not care about it if it means we can cut a network admin.

I'm not saying it isn't a short-sighted idea, merely that it will appeal to beancounters.

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Slack cuts ties to IRC and XMPP, cos they don't speak Emoji

P. Lee
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Mushroom

Re: Considered Harmful

Teams is completely unsuitable for enterprise usage. It is utterly unmanageable. Forget Linux being a cancer; This is the T-Virus which re-animates the corpses of random information and user-designed and created infrastructure leaves it wandering headless all over the Cloud, with limbs falling from the sky and landing in Outlook.

Can central admins create Teams? Yes, but they get full access to all the data. What, like the CxO's chat with his team? What happens when a Team admin-creator's account is deleted? Er... it get's orphaned. What happens with all the data on the sharepoint sites which get created per team? Who knows? When will MS start charging for all those sharepoint sites? Who knows? What happens to to the "Audrey's Baby Christening Party" group? It shows up in the GAL? Can you can't stop people creating random stuff? No.

I had a chat with MS to talk about collaboration and they were asking us what the use-case was for Teams. We had none and MS really had no viable suggestions. That was a funny meeting. As far as I can see, the only use-case for Teams is "people are using Slack and we're hoping that MS might do something with Teams in the future which makes it different from what it is now."

If you are a small dev with no compliance requirements where the content of Teams/Slack is utterly unimportant because your real work is on github, then great.

Otherwise, run away!

Then nuke it from orbit, it is the only way to be sure.

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A smartphone recession is coming and animated poo emojis can't stop it

P. Lee
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Re: "Phone makers had banked they could compensate for slowing volume by pushing up prices"

>... And an SD card slot.

Better yet, I want to run "the cloud" on my own computer.

I do not want to store stuff on someone-else's system.

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P. Lee
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Re: I'll go with that.

>Having trouble getting used to swiping up instead of hitting the home button...

Is it just me or does this make the phone harder to use? I'm not talking about getting used to it, but it seems having to rub the device and then check to see whether you completed the gesture adequately is more difficult than pressing a button in a fixed location. Neither is hard, just one is slightly harder than the other a fact emphasized by the friction involved.

Is it time to just stop trying to innovate features that no-one wants and just get an ARM-based handheld PC made in China with a nice screen? I know, its heresy to suggest we don't need more advanced tech and that Apple or Google have jumped the shark. Is it too soon to shatter the illusion that the West can maintain its lifestyle advantage based on innovation because, oh the horror, we don't really need more innovation in the areas which have created so much "value"?

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Facebook regrets asking whether it's OK to let adult men ask underage girls for smut pix

P. Lee
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What is “a politically divisive ad”?

Come on, I want an example.

Or indeed, what is a political but non-divisive ad, and why would you run it?

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IPv6 and 5G will make life hell for spooks and cops say Australia's spooks and cops

P. Lee
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5g temporary id tokens vs billing

I think the “problem” is warrantless slurping.

Asking for the identification data creates a paper trail- oh such a burden!

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Mueller bombshell: 13 Russian 'troll factory' staffers charged with allegedly meddling in US presidential election

P. Lee
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>" this illegal activity."

Can we clarify what the illegal activity is?

I have no stake in US elections, but when I hear the talk of "meddling in elections" and then find out that means "sowing discord" and then see that means tweeting and posting on facebook in favour of one of the election candidates, that just looks like partisan propaganda to me.

When I see that the "illegal" part is having non-accurate user handles I begin to laugh in the face of those who are upset. I see the words "troll factory" and wonder how that would have helped Trump. Were they making "Yo Mama" comments at Hillary supporters? Did that cause people to laugh so hard they slipped and accidentally voted for Trump? What are we talking about here?

If the illegal part of the process was taking over someone-else's account, then that's wrong, but it isn't a political act unless they took a party's account and were posting non-representative views.

Whenever I see these articles, they are never clear as to what the illegal activity is and what the meddling is. The vagueness is so universal that I begin to smell a rat. Please provide some examples of tweets which sow discord. Please provide some examples of "meddling," because at the moment I have real difficulty thinking this is anything but political sour grapes.

Come on, change my mind.

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Kentucky gov: Violent video games, not guns, to blame for Florida school massacre

P. Lee
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>Kids in the UK also play those games, and yet we don't seem to have the equivalent happening.

In the UK, he wouldn't have been classed as a "kid" he'd be classed as an adult.

But "An adult walks into a school and shoots people" is less of a heart-string tugger and generates animosity towards the individual rather than the "the system."

US politics is hyper-partisan. If someone came along and wanted to take away my free speech under the guise of "hate control" I wouldn't trust them with anything else either. That said, perhaps a minimum age of 25 on gun purchases might at least ensure there is two adults involved in the decision for those who are still young adults.

And at least half the video game comment is accurate. I don't think games cause the behaviour but the culture of being willing to kill those around you does appear to be an issue in America. The Swiss have plenty of guns, the Canadians have plenty of guns and neither of those two groups have the terribly high homicide rates found in the US. It is an American cultural problem.

And those saying, "but Trump..." need to start taking a less idiotic stance. There isn't a single problem which will be fixed by blaming Trump. Had Hillary won in 2016, nothing would have been different. Obama was in power for how many years? How did he change the situation here? Are you blaming Trump for the degradation of women? What was Weinstein doing during the Obama and Clinton administrations? What was Bill Clinton doing during the Clinton administration? What was Hillary doing when Bill was in power? Where was #MeToo during all those years? Now its all the President's fault? That's ... politically convenient.

Don't get me wrong, Trump isn't a good person. His moral aspirations set a fairly low bar, but his opposition seem to be able to go even lower. They are ok will killing hundreds of thousands of children before they are born every year. Those supporting gun ownership will look at that and tell those advocating gun control just what they think of that kind of morality.

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Microsoft's Windows 10 Workstation adds killer feature: No Candy Crush

P. Lee
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Re: Cores n sockets and a license to print money...

We've seen it from VMware already, just wait until the application vendors start charging based on how much RAM you have, CPU cores or mips consumption.

With more and more applications going to the cloud, MS seems to have seen the writing on the wall and are looking to bundle licensing up so you get all the base applications cheaply. Then you pay for all the useful bits you need when you realise you need them. Its a good strategy for them - you save nothing from going elsewhere until you get rid of of all their software.

Personally, if I controlled a large company, I'd be funnelling cash bounties to libreoffice et al for features I wanted as part of my strategic plan to bring it up to spec. 28 cores for SQLserver? You can get that on a single CPU. How much is that dual-proc server going to cost you?

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Facebook gets Weed-whacked: Unilever exec may axe ads over social network's toxic posts

P. Lee
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Re: Some say...

Fake accounts, real accounts... what's the difference?

Real stories, fake stories; persuasion and manipulation - does it actually matter if the origin is the Kremlin or the US?

The West's problem is that it has rotted from the inside - it has abandoned its moral compass and descended into partisanship. No-one is pleased or supports the other team when they do something good or call out their own side when they do something wrong. This situation is poisonous to both morality and effective government. Both sides become invested in narratives and influence rather than reality and acting morally. That pushes them to undermine anything that would expose them. Critical thinking has to go so that The Cult of Party can go on.

The good news is that I think the rot is far deeper in the media and academia than in society in general. The bad news is society in general gets very little voice and battling the media and education establishments in all their forms is very difficult.

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IBM's chief diversity officer knows too much and must be stopped!

P. Lee
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Re: Chief Diversity Officer?

If I had that title, I'd want to leave too.

Can you imagine the ridicule at the directors meetings?

- What's your job?

- I make sure we don't hire too many straight white men.

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Why aren't you being arbiters of truth? MPs scream at Facebook, YouTube, Twitter

P. Lee
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Re: There is no truth

>A good principle, but how does it translate into real life? What is "provably false"? What if you had no way of knowing, when you made the claim, that it was "provably false"? What is "harm", and how do you demonstrate it?

> the devil is in the detail

Oh no it isn't. The devil is in the worldview - the idea that we can control the environment sufficiently well to police it reasonably. We can't even do this well in the playground with children who aren't given the rights we give to adults.

A large part of the reason for allowing free speech is that policing it is really difficult and leads to oppression when you try.

The problem is that the big internet corporates' centralised platforms provide a central point of control. This is very attractive to politicians whose central purpose is "to protect you." Especially as corporates started exercising editorial control over the content, shaping the political environment by covert means, politicians now covet their influence even more.

We should resist not only the politicians' attempts to leverage these control points we should also resist the centralisation of power which creates this scope for abuse.

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Women beat men to jobs due to guys' bad social skills. Whoa – you mad, fellas? Maybe these eggheads have a point...

P. Lee
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Trollface

Cutting the spin

It appears the author is saying that the increase in women being hired into cognitive skills industries leads to the collapse of those industries, as demonstrated by the dot.com bust of 2000.

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Two things will survive a nuclear holocaust: Cockroaches and crafty URLs like ғасеьоок.com

P. Lee
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Re: Fix it in-browser

Why not fix it with dns?

The TLD has a record which sets the encoding and deviations are flagged in the browser for the URL.

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Smut site fingered as 'source' of a million US net neutrality comments

P. Lee
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Re: American democracy

The paint by numbers thing is (I believe) a result of trying to bring separate states into the union. No sparsely populated state would join if it knew it would always be out-voted by big cities.

The solution should be to repatriate power to the States. Democracy is supposed to be a means to achieve self-determination not a moral fig-leaf for you to impose your will on those you consider deplorable.

Decentralise power and Trump becomes less important. Shouldn't that appeal to both sides?

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P. Lee
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Re: I weep for my country...

Wikipedia:

Totalitarianism is a political system where the state recognizes no limits to its authority and strives to regulate every aspect of public and private life

I think you are just throwing unpleasant words around without knowing what they mean.

The FCC is failing to regulate, not over-regulating. In this case, the lack of competition in the isp market indicates a requirement for them to step in.

By definition, totalitarianism means an increase in government intervention. If you want to get political, ask who tries to do that.

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Twitter breaks bad news to 677,775 twits: You were duped by Russia

P. Lee
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Fake news

The idea that political persuasion is electoral interference is indeed fake news.

The corollary is that only approved organisations can speak on politics, in which case, welcome to the United Soviet States of America, comrades!

It seems some people and organisations think that the free dissemination of ideas between and through societies should be sacrificed to keep a particular political party in power.

The prevalence and pervasiveness of these views in the media is what scares me. Trumps idiotic tweets about building walls things are irrelevant compared to so many powerful organisations trying to arbitrate speech.

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YouTube turns off cash tap for automatic video nasties

P. Lee
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I have a question!

Do they not put adverts on low-traffic sites or just not pay out?

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Facebook settles landmark revenge porn case with UK teen for undisclosed sum

P. Lee
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Or don't take the photos. It seems to me that this should have fallen under kp laws not be used to justify revenge porn law idiocy.

It could be that the pictures were taken involuntarily but the weight of experience goes the other way. In which case, while I feel for her pain, the root cause was entirely within her ability to control and unless Facebook was exceptionally slack, it bears little responsibility.

Purveyors of traditional values don't do so because they are sex-negative or are intent on spoiling your fun. It is demonstrably true that expecting others in society to compensate for your lack of modesty is ineffective and thus foolish. Stop expecting that others can or will fix individual failure.

Digital is designed for copying. If you want to keep your modesty, you have to be modest. Parents should teach their kids values which will keep them safe and actively discourage, with reasons, unsafe values. Schools can also help by using every data breach news story as a lesson in safe internet and device usage. Ram the lesson home at every opportunity: Digital is inherently unsafe. Demonstrate how phones sync photos and data.

We need to disabuse people of the notion that phone data is private.

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Frenchman comes eye to eye with horror toilet python

P. Lee
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Re: ah ha!

Frank Spencer?

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UK taxman told to go easy on transformation with Brexit in headlights

P. Lee
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Re: If there are still any serious farmers left

My question would be, if three quarters of British farms are financially untenable, who is paying for them?

I get the feeling it isn't the Greeks. Being part of a superstate doesn't make wealth magically appear from nowhere. Someone is paying for it and it if isn't us, then the continentals should be glad to see the back of us.

If we aren't paying for our food, do we really have a right to eat it?

My guess is that to keep things the same, we'd need to keep paying the same subsidies.These might be more difficult to hide when its all in the UK budget. Ideally, we'd see lower taxes and higher food prices, because it is generally better to reflect reality than obscure it. However, there are always profiteers from change.

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Remember those holy tech wars we used to have? Heh, good times

P. Lee
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Re: No mention of systemd?

My bsd firewall dnats dns. It’s the right way to do it.

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US shoppers abandon PC makers in hour of need

P. Lee
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Re: to be expected

US software companies abandoned consumers in an effort to push them into their clouds.

They had little use for new hardware.

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Intel AMT security locks bypassed on corp laptops – fresh research

P. Lee
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Coat

Physically Separate, Dedicated, Management Interface

Job done.

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