* Posts by P. Lee

4468 posts • joined 4 Dec 2007

Annoyingly precocious teen who ruined Trek is now an asteroid

P. Lee
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Re: Blame the EU?

>Did I miss the episode in which it was explained why a man from France (Captain Picard) spoke with a British accent?

"In the 24th century, civilisation has progressed beyond..."

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P. Lee
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Re: And Picard is now a turd

>Well done for not saying anything about wiping out Klingons.

Everyone knows you scrape them off the starboard bow, starboard bow, starboard bow...

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One BEEELLION dollars: Apple sues Qualcomm, one of its chip designers

P. Lee
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Re: Business Model

>"...buy up small companies and shutter them..."

Sounds like you have a business opportunity!

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CIA boss: Make America (a) great (big database of surveillance on citizens, foreigners) again!

P. Lee
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Re: Huh! @Mystic Megabyte

I would expect premiums to rise if you're looking after more people. More people, more cost. That's expected.

Complaining that helping people get well who couldn't afford it otherwise impinges on your choices about which insurance policy you can buy... well, that's one way to look at the world, I guess.

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Apple sings another iTune following Brexit as prices rise by up to a third

P. Lee
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Re: For Once

Some many price rises driven by... what exactly?

Nothing has actually happened. Blaming a future event (the details of which we don't know) for the devaluation is a little spurious. If we joined the EEA, what would change, exactly, that would cost an extra 20%?

On the other hand, there has been plenty of war, which wastes resources, financial mismanagement of public debt, mismanagement/lack of oversight of the financial markets which has led to institutional misbehaviour and losses which the taxpayer has picked up.

We've been living on credit for years - check the UK public debt figures. Now its time to pay the piper.

Now, which of these are likely to cause a loss of value of the pound?

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P. Lee
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Re: Re:Nothing to do with being greedy bastards?

>Perhaps. Vote with your feet.

Exactly.... except have you seen how they went after Samsung over the most trivial cosmetic things? How likely is decent competition in that environment?

I'd be happy without the mobile ecosystems of Apple and Google, if I could have a mobile equivalent of my linux desktop, plus maybe maps.

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Microsoft Germany says Windows 7 already unfit for business users

P. Lee
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>If only there was a sensible Microsoft alternative then I'm sure companies would have it on their roadmap.

It's called Windows 10 Enterprise and you have to buy other stuff to patch it, you (apparently) don't get the spyware and the adverts. That's reserved for freeloading scum who would never pay and pay and pay, but would just get one measily OEM license and keep it until the hardware died.

Realistically, most people stick a few icons on the desktop and click them every now and then. Any OS can do it. The UI barely matters to the enterprise as long as the apps stay the same.

As for security, how about isolating every application's data access? Click on a file in the file manager, it gets fed to the application which can only write back to that file or a new file. Otherwise, the application has to ask you via the OS if it wants to write to an existing file.

So many security opportunities, so little effort.

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Dovecot mailserver graded 'nearly impenetrable'

P. Lee
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Re: Cool!

>she's the second most honest frontline politician in the last 10 years

There was no hint of any love for Trump either and well, you haven't set the bar very high...

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Smart guns are a neat idea on paper. They'll never survive reality

P. Lee
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Re: technology probably isn't the answer here

>Finally, sense. I wonder what the reliability is noted to be.

How about a lighter touch?

Swipe the sensor and get (say) 6 hours (rolling) of access, or until you "touch off."

That's probably enough time to get you through whatever you were doing which required the gun - i.e. from putting it on to taking it off, but would also help prevent children from finding a forgotten gun and playing with it.

You can mandate that type of control without actually interfering with those who want or need quick access.

It also gives people the choice of whether they would like a more secure gun or a faster-access gun. I'd imagine that there are plenty of people who keep a gun at home who don't generally carry them, for whom a 1.5 second delay is not a problem, but finding the key, going to the safe, in the dark etc, might be problematic.

I would put a levy on all publicly available guns so that control-free guns aren't cheaper (yes, I know criminals will try to avoid them, but you'll still limit the danger from stolen guns), but give people the choice and let that choice be based on safety rather than cost. It can hardly get worse than the current situation.

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Google floats prototype Key Transparency to tackle secure swap woes

P. Lee
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Is this what we really need?

I would have said we need something different:

1. Personal Certificate Authorities

2. Per-contact keys/certificates.

3. Simple distribution (email headers?)

4. Simple key acquisition (mail clients, social media?)

5. Simple point of presence servers, linked to addressbooks, address-book groups.

Do we mainly need foolproof encryption or do we need enough security to make scams, phishing etc mostly unprofitable? Do we need a way to easily recognise friends when they connect to our web servers. Even if their systems are compromised, it shouldn't compromise everyone else I know, because I've given them all their own certificates for connecting to my systems, so I can run my own "facebook-wall" which they can reference on their "facebook-wall" but which stays firmly under my control, on my servers.

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Europe mulls treating robots legally as people ... but with kill switches

P. Lee
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Re: Legal persons, not natural persons

>Suppose you're run down by a self-driving car, due to a bug in its enormously complex programming.

Complexity isn't a magic wand by which you wave away responsibility. I know - IT vendors have got away with it for years but if IT vendors want to play in the "life and death, mission critical arena" then we cannot let them get away with putting Tay in the driver's seat. Self-driving is a hard problem - far more difficult than the auto-pilot in an aeroplane, so we need at least aeroplane-like quality control which simply doesn't exist. Do the words "Volkswagen" and "diesel" give you any idea about how effective both corporate and governmental oversight is?

I suspect all this stuff needs to be firmly placed off the agenda while we deal with things which are more pertinent, like feeding people. Given the current and foreseeable state of technology, allowing humans to opt out of responsibility at either a corporate or driver level is an unnecessary techno-utopian-driven nightmare. Come back to me when you actually have a working self-driving car and I'll have a think about it.

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P. Lee
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Terminator

Re: AI hype?

>Where are the votes in this?

Entertainment - coming next, on C4, hosted by Rimmer, "Human Wars. Two humans are put in a ring where they try to bash each other until one of them stops working."

Oh wait...

It would be funny, if it wasn't sad.

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Putting the 'Port' in Portal: Old-school fan brings game to Apple II

P. Lee
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Paris Hilton

Re: On a watch, next

Caroline: A potato-powered watch, I hope!

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P. Lee
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Re: UCSD or Borland?

I seem to remember an awful lot of disk swapping just to get a list of Fibonacci numbers....

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Microsoft swallows up AI language biz Maluuba

P. Lee
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Re: Is that really the best that they can do?

A.I.

Is great for a canned demo and marketing.

Is not the ship's computer from Star Trek.

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Pirates, pirates, whatchu gonna do? Advertisers cop a visit from PIPCU

P. Lee
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Happy

Re: Tyrants

>Don't worry: Now that we've "Taken back control", we can, er, lose even more freedom thanks to the regulatory oversight that we won't have in future.

>Chairman May can sell the police, and whatever the f**k she likes to the IP tyrants (and anyone else who's bidding high), in an effort to keep the money flowing round while keeping the proles under control!

I don't doubt it, but do you think that wouldn't happen if we centralised more power in Brussels? Just because May is currently doing the wrong thing and Brussels is currently doing the right thing is no reason to alter the balance of power. The smaller the democracy, the more your vote is worth.

You now have more power than you did. Use it wisely.

You're welcome!

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Flight 666 lands safely in HEL on Friday the 13th

P. Lee
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Devil

Re: Friday XIII

I'll bet the lady in the picture with the open umbrella, closed it while she walked under the ladder!

Superstitious? I think not. Good solid science behind that one.

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Maps and alarm clocks best thing about mobes, say normies

P. Lee
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>So Mr Average uses his smart phone as an Alarm clock and map.

Well, I use it as an alarm clock every day.

I don't call people every day though. (What can I say, I'm antisocial!)

A smartphone's advantage is that its one device which does lots of stuff. I don't need to carry an extra map, though a map larger than 5" diagonal might be better. I don't need to carry a music player, I don't need to carry a book/ebook reader or a laptop for browsing/email or (at a push) a DVD player for video. I don't need to carry a diary and an alarm clock. Oh, or a phone.

Actually, an alarm clock and a GPS are probably the few functions for which a smartphone has a better interface than its standalone counterparts. Phone/SMS and podcasts are the other ones which spring to mind, but mostly, phones are a compromise of extreme portability over UI.

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Fedora 25: You've got that Wayland feelin', oh, that Wayland feelin'

P. Lee
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Re: Another major change no one is asking for

I hate to disagree with Trevor, but the widespread use of Citrix' "published application" portals and the increased usage of SaaS suggests there is demand for remote rendering.

X is far too bandwidth heavy, but the web protocols and languages are far too slow. We need some hybrid - open source Citrix+some extra smarts.

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FM now stands for 'fleeting mortality' in Norway

P. Lee
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Re: DAB+

>Yes it is a great idea. It means you get to watch TV in high definition, with more channels, while using less of the radio spectrum.

Ah yes, that's what we need, more TV channels.

>"Listeners will have access to more diverse and pluralistic radio content, and enjoy better sound quality and new functionality," said then-minister of culture Thorhild Widvey. "Digitisation will also greatly improve the emergency preparedness system, facilitate increased competition, and offer new opportunities for innovation and development."

Such a great idea, he moved on before the project completion.

Don't get me wrong, digitisation has some advantages, but they are mostly for vendors, not listeners. Listeners can almost certainly get radio stations digitally some other way - streaming or (usually better) podcast. Adding complexity for the same function is pretty dumb and radio is very much a car-based thing now which means that for most people, sound quality is not the be-all and end-all of the medium.

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FBI let alleged pedo walk free rather than explain how they snared him

P. Lee
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Childcatcher

Re: 'We...

>if you're not in the business of prosecuting? Get off my bloody law-enforcement lawn!

My guess would be that this is strategy, either hoping to get a judge to nod it through without them having to reveal or as a drip, drip, drip effect that they can use when they get around to asking to be officially allowed to not reveal the evidence. "See how many paedophiles we would have put away if it weren't for this pesky law saying we have to disclose the evidence!"

Hard cases make bad law.

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Assange confirmed alive, tells Fox: Prez Obama 'acting like a lawyer'

P. Lee
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>So what crime did Assange commit that would require a pardon?

He embarrassed high-ranking American politicians.

Is there any reason to think that would not be perceived as an act of war and result in a spell in Gitmo?

Do the Swedes see how their extradition agreements are impacting their ability to execute justice? Regardless of what they say with their mouths, what do their actions say about their valuation of politics vs justice? We need to kill extradition treaties with most European countries. Let foreign governments come and plead their case under local law and bear the cost of the trial and possible punishment.

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Uh-oh. LG to use AI to push home appliances to 'another dimension'

P. Lee
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Re: Constant 5C internally?

Open the fridge door, HAL.

I'm sorry, Dave, I can't do that.

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Drones will be able to carry 120GB footage of you in the shower if Seagate has its way

P. Lee
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>Well, most people don't pay much attention to Wang these days. Upgrade to something else, then hang that out the window.

Hang out with Windows. Something exciting is bound to happen to you and "your" er, data.

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P. Lee
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>Sustained speed is also an issue. Shooting 5,5K video is going to batter that SD card.

If the word "drone" is involved, I demand laser, er, "downlinks" of one sort or another.

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AWS chief: Tens of thousands flocking from database rivals

P. Lee
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>#AWS #Reinvent. DB freedom is a powerful thing.

Oh the shackles of Postgres and MariaDB! If only I could migrate my data to a proprietary vendor and have to rewrite my application to use it!

Ok, I can think of many instances when rewriting an enterprise application so that it deals with high-latency well would actually be a good thing, but even so - DB Freedom? #AWS #reinvent #mockHP #newspeak #twitterIsASelfPromotionVehicle

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Busted Oracle finance cloud leaves Rutgers Uni unable to foot bills

P. Lee
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Re: Oracle plus Cloud?!

This kind of reaction is what you get when your lock-in can generate price structures that are not warranted by your technology benefits.

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Those online ads driving you bonkers are virtually 'worthless for brands'

P. Lee
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Re: What a colossal waste of money!

You're missing the point.

Advertisers appear to spend on advertising for three reasons:

Big Brands:

Product positioning: it isn't an over-engineered, overpriced road-tractor, its an adventure lifestyle! It isn't an anti-social noise-generating device for distracting you from those around you, its a keep-you-connected-to-people mobile phone, entertainment centre and its all about YOU.

Excluding competitors: You don't want other companies appearing to be significant by being able to run saturation advertising campaigns (music shows, chewing gum, soft drinks, mobile phones, fried-food etc). The aim is to fill the mind of the advertised-to so that there is no room for other brands.

"Local" Brands:

Hello I'm here!: car/boat lots, mattress and tile outlets and family restaurants.

Most products are pretty generic, so there's little point giving out samples.

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Vinyl and streaming sales offset CD decline in UK music sales

P. Lee
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Gimp

Re: It's understandable

>>"There was always a simple pleasure in flicking through someone's record collection that could never be replicated with CDs."

>I used to have CD racks that allowed me to flip through CDs just like with proper albums. Now they're all in a cardboard box in the loft somewhere near the server that contains all the rips of them.I used to have CD racks that allowed me to flip through CDs just like with proper albums. Now they're all in a cardboard box in the loft somewhere near the server that contains all the rips of them.

With apologies to G Larson, the arguments are like sheep in the night.

One is, "its more fun to play vinyl," while the other is purely about a measure of sound quality. Given that music is for entertainment, some measure of sound quality may or may not be the [only|main] metric used to denote "good."

Some people enjoy interacting with the music collection. The shorter format vinyl offers more chances for interaction with the collection (you have to change the record more frequently), savouring the expectation and the memories of the tunes. CDs also offer some physical interaction, though compilations and the longer format reduce this. The upside may be that CD's can be ripped and re-created at home to work around physical damage to the media, though the generic blank CD is a soul-less thing. Almost as bad as a playlist.

Playlists on the other hand might be good for doing chores with headphones on or for when you're blasting zombies. There, the infinite length doesn't become a social faux pas.

Anyway, those are just my opinions and my point is not to convince you of the relative merits of various formats as much as to note that what we all want from a music collection may not be the same. The bit that we derive pleasure from may not even be the listening to the music - it might be the associated social interaction or the memories of events we associate with the music. That's something I fear the headphone generation will miss out on, Apple's blatant lies about their personal devices being social, notwithstanding. IT is all about standardisation and it is highly efficient at shepherding demand into the few channels which are profitable to a few companies.

<rant>

As an observation, we have at least two high-quality stereo systems in the house, both hooked up to CD players and gigabytes of server music, but apart from myself, everyone else either wears headphones or listens on horrid built-in iphone speakers. They can't even be bothered to download the stuff, they just stream from youtube. They don't even bother make their own playlists. I'm not too surprised though, the "music" is entirely disposable. I don't understand why anyone would want to listen to men who sound like a cat going through a mangler, and both male and females resolutely determined to take the sawn-off shotgun approach to hitting the target notes. I'd like the person to twisting the corkscrew through the singer's foot to take a break and use it on my eardrums instead, at least the pain will stop for me!

Icon: Maybe AI has taken over the music industry...

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New Android-infecting malware brew hijacks devices. Why, you ask? Your router

P. Lee
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Re: Infection Vector

>How about getting a new phone with a generic loader/backdoor installed at the factory ?

You mean like a hard-coded 8.8.8.8?

They might be redirecting you to malicious sites or merely stealing your browsing history.

Mine's the one with "Disillusioned with the Internet" written on the back.

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Did EU ruling invalidate the UK's bonkers Snoopers' Charter?

P. Lee
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Re: "access to retained traffic and location data is extremely useful to the police"

>Convenience should be about the last criteria for any kind of mass surveillance law.*

But it is the first thing on the agenda for IT. It is a classic case of focusing on what is easy/measurable rather than what is hard/useful.

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Amazon files patent for 'Death Star' flying warehouse

P. Lee
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Linux

Re: > It does have possibilities for international rescue operations.

I take it back, "Storks" got there first.

Patent denied - prior art and therefore not novel.

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P. Lee
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Mushroom

> It does have possibilities for international rescue operations.

Who would have to pay a licensing fee to use the "novel idea."

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Yorkshire council hit with prolonged web outage

P. Lee
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Re: On Ilkley Moor...

Is it not, "bar t' 'at" (bar thy hat) pronounced "bar t'at"? i.e. no ebay or (implied other) internet access.

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Government calls for ideas on how to splash £400m on fibre

P. Lee
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Re: Not all of London has 'superfast' Broadband

>That's fine as long as you accept that it will mean upgrading significantly fewer properties.

I seem to recall Verizon saying fibre cuts its space and electricity costs so much it pays for itself. I can see digging trenches might be expensive, but what about those with telephone poles and wires above ground? Can you just wrap it around the existing copper?

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US cops seek Amazon Echo data for murder inquiry

P. Lee
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Re: Interesting...

I think you're right. However, staking my privacy on the size of the buffer is not "secure by design." I wouldn't have one.

Of far more concern is the <INSERT COP SHOW NAME HERE> idea that if the police tell you its serious, its ok to break protocol. Protocol is specifically designed to ensure that that everyone does the right thing when emotions or other influences might be clouding the issue. If its serious, I'd suggest the police should stop acting like cowboys and do their job properly, so that Amazon and I are protected from the fallout from helping them. Why do the police keep doing this? Surely they know they are going to be rebuffed. Its so stupid and happens so often it seems more like a war of attrition, hoping that some day Amazon will break.

I doubt they are looking for voice data on whether Jeff ordered rope, quick-lime and concrete, though it is reasonable for the police to ask for data which may help them, even if its unlikely.

More likely, they aren't after Jeff's voice at all: "Amazon, Jeff stabbed me. Buy 2000 grand piano's on his credit card and have them delivered. Also, two cakes; one saying, 'I know what you did' and the other saying 'I'll be back.'"

It will be interesting to know what happens to the voice recordings in the long run.

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How Google.org stole the Christmas Spirit

P. Lee
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Paris Hilton

Re: F**k Google

What? And have them sell your vital statistics to marketers?

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Virgin America mid-flight panic after moron sets phone Wi-Fi hotspot to 'Samsung Galaxy Note 7'

P. Lee
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Holmes

Re: The only thing at credible risk of being blown up was a sense of proportion

Is everyone here too young to remember that we used to allow smoking on aeroplanes?

Yeah it was silly, but maybe it was set weeks earlier while firmly on, er, terra firma.

Maybe some simple triangulation equipment on board might be a cheap antidote to the forgetful and the pranksters.

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'DNC hackers' used mobile malware to track Ukrainian artillery – researchers

P. Lee
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Who benefits from this story?

<eom>

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This 'cloud storage' thing is going to get seriously big in 2017

P. Lee
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Re: 4.7 Tb blobs .. over a 1g ethernet at best

"Yeah? Well I've got a thousand DVDs! Ner!", said the MS engineer as he picked up his ball.

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Twas the week before Xmas ... not a creature was stirring – except Microsoft admitting its Windows 10 upgrade pop-up went 'too far'

P. Lee
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Linux

Re: M$ Long History

>It's easy to criticize Microsoft but I think they did magic getting Windows to run at all on the friggin' huge variety of hardware and different manufacturers drivers out in the PC wild world.

Unlike the BSD chaps and the Linux guys... I mean, you could never do it without charging money, right?

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Netflix US Twitter account hacked

P. Lee
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Re: "Not enabled 2FA" ???? FFS ?

and what happens if you have a UC system?

You get unexpectedly single factored.

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Amateur radio fans drop the ham-mer on HRD's license key 'blacklist'

P. Lee
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Re: Missing clause

>A company can decide not to sell you their product, but once they have sold you that product they cannot then retract that sale without a very good reason or with your consent.

Sure, if you *buy* the product. If you *license* the product then the license is generally based on some continuing agreement on both sides. Usually the terms of the agreement are stated upfront... "we can revoke it for any reasons at anytime without reimbursement" sounds like it would probably fail in court. I suspect they are banking on it being a trivial purchase that people will write off.

The root problem is the star-rating system. A few bad reviews even if they explain themselves and are obviously undeserved can ruin your business.

tl;dr: Internet-tethered (and especially mobile) commerce platforms and applications drive and allow anti-social behaviour.

Vaguely relevant but Obligatory xkcds:

https://xkcd.com/1098/

https://xkcd.com/937/

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Screw EU! Apple to fight back over €13bn tax bill

P. Lee
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Ireland has been operating as a tax haven

EU is annoyed.

Only small, disreputable hot countries, rich city-states and feudal fiefdoms are supposed to do that.

I suspect the loophole was/is legally valid.

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'Upset' Linus Torvalds gets sweary and gets results

P. Lee
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Coat

Re: Torvald's Tongue Back To Normal - XMas May Proceed

>Just hope Santa doesn't use Linus approach to compile his bad/good list... after all they come more or less from the same area of the world...

At least Santa's list compiles....

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FYI! – Your! hacked! Yahoo! account! is! worth! $0.0003!

P. Lee
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Re: That much for 3 yeard old data?

Paid for with proceeds from a 419 operation....

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Don't panic, friends, but the Chinese navy just nicked one of America's underwater drones

P. Lee
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Re: Upon Opening:

Tis a Quagaar chairot!

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Oz 'gifted education' program pitching WiFi, vax scare stories

P. Lee
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Re: Where's my sabot?

Oh for a thou-au-au-au-au-sand upvotes to-oo give...

Just because the radiation probably doesn't destroy your braincells directly, does not mean that wifi (and indeed television) signals are not a major cause of diminished cognitive abilities and awful academic results.

The brain "prunes" unused bits of brain. If you don't use it, you do indeed, lose it.

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A single typo may have tipped US election Trump's way

P. Lee
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Facepalm

Nothing to hide, nothing to fear, eh?

Wassat? You don't think its right that privacy has been invaded?

I see its quickly turned into a government & politician-only protection issue:

>“This cannot become a partisan issue," the senators wrote in the joint statement. "The stakes are too high for our country."

Does it really take some Russian hackers to bring into focus what the US gov does routinely?

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Linus Torvalds releases 'biggest ever' Linux 4.9, then saves Christmas

P. Lee
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Re: Since when cooking a Christmas Dinner is via a point and click interface?

If I point 'n' click at my Shel in an attempt to get Xmas dinner, I'd get a frownie-face exception error followed by mv dinner /dev/null; /bin/bash husband, kill -9 %1; cp patio husband

Or something like that.

Pointing and clicking only works when (IsOnFire? && IsOnTelephone?)

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