* Posts by P. Lee

4707 posts • joined 4 Dec 2007

Risk-free Friday evenings, thanks to Office 365 license management

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: License? What license??

>LibreOffice is your friend.

Unless you need Visio.

Or a mail system which allows delegation.

LibreOffice is great, but we still have more work to do.

2
0

Uber cloaked its spying and all it got from Apple was a slap on the wrist

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: Are fingerprints not public in the US

>I don't think they mean actual fingerprints from fingers, more a "fingerprint" as in a profile of the user

True, but if you wipe the door handle between customers, you can probably pick up their fingerprints too.

0
0

Alert: If you're running SquirrelMail, Sendmail... why? And oh yeah, remote code vuln found

P. Lee
Silver badge

Do I understand this correctly?

Only an authenticated user can run this attack?

0
0

CompSci boffins find Reddit is ideal source for sarcasm database

P. Lee
Silver badge
Paris Hilton

>it is important for chatbots and intelligent assistants to be able to understand when a person is being sarcastic

Who said Americans don't understand sarcasm?

0
0
P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: Early Failures In Sarcastic Computing Technology

There will be cake when you get to the other side.

3
0

Qualcomm's Windows-capable silicon will land later rather than sooner

P. Lee
Silver badge

>What on earth do these chips have that is necessary for (ARM) Windows 10, that their previous chips don't?

x86 emulation? So you can run Windows' massive legacy software base.

MS was stuffed by Intel's exit from the mobile market. Without their legacy software MS has little to offer.

Intel's problem is that they don't want to do cheap. Why create a cheap Atom system when an i5 is so much more lucrative? MS' problem is that most users don't want underpowered Windows and those that do, don't want to pay full-fat licensing. It is a lethal combination for any mobile Windows solution. Essentially MS will have to give mobile licenses away as a bundle with something else. Hence... Cloud. With cloud the low-power cpu issue goes away and you can tie licenses to named users, preventing mobile licenses from being used simultaneously with desktop ones by different users.

2
0

Script kiddies pwn 1000s of Windows boxes using leaked NSA hack tools

P. Lee
Silver badge

>Forget the fact that these might be old versions of the OS. Forget the fact that they're not patched. Why are these idiots exposing SMB services on the open net?

Realistically, if SMB is open on the net, they've already been pwned. Its just now that the script kiddies have got hold of the machines and are making it obvious.

4
0

Base specs leak for Windows 10 Cloud – Microsoft's wannabe ChromeOS assassin

P. Lee
Silver badge

>hat low-end machine is vastly more powerful than my desktop 10 years ago, so there's no excuse for not running a fullfat OS.

And did I read the spec's correctly, the 64 bit version gets double the RAM?

That implies it's 32bit by default!

3
0

FCC greenlights small cell free-for-all in the US

P. Lee
Silver badge
Childcatcher

>America's favorite watchdog

As in, it isn't a guard dog, it just sits there an watches things?

4
0

So few use Windows Phone, Microsoft can't be bothered: Security app is iOS, Android only

P. Lee
Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: The latest version on Windows Phone 10...

So... the phone is a password or certificate vault.

Just how hard is it for MS' coders to develop a tiny app for Windows phone? This is a tiny ui to a cloud authentication service.

Forget revenue, this makes ms look fickle and incompetent. It is a disaster for MS, not just Windows phone.

8
0

Chap 'fixes' Microsoft's Windows 7 and 8 update block on new CPUs

P. Lee
Silver badge

>Scratch that - I don't even bother any more.

That's my view. Window is just too hard.

Difficult because something is powerful and flexible is one thing. Difficult because of an inappropriate UI or because a vendor is attempting social engineering or licensing shenanigans is something else.

14
0

Good job, everyone. We're making AI just as tediously racist and sexist as ourselves

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: Lets find something to be offended about

>Well erm no. The story indicates that AI systems are more likely to associate certain ethnicities (for example) with negative words, and white ethnicities with positive words.

Or just words.

Google "baby pictures" and you only get white babies (in the first results). "Oh the horror!" cried the BBC.

Maybe white parents are more obsessed with putting baby pictures on the 'net?

More likely, the problem is that AI isn't real intelligence and is making assumptions based on "word proximity." I don't see many articles actually saying "women are bad at maths." What I do see is plenty of feminists writing articles decrying the idea that "women are bad at maths." Maybe the AI is being misled by all the complaining articles but isn't able to tell the difference between complaining about something which doesn't really exist, and the actual thing.

1
1

'Nobody's got to use the internet,' argues idiot congressman in row over ISP privacy rules

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: Privacy in wire communications??

Seeing as people are not communicating with their ISP for all their traffic, how can this be anything other than wire-tapping?

1
0

Regulate This! Time to subject algorithms to our laws

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: Not just computers

>is a picture illegal?

I wonder if this article off the back of the BBC article which suggested that Google's algorithms are racist because if you ask for baby picture you only get white baby pictures? I'm just going to take a moment to laugh at the SJW's... ok I'm back.

I'm with you in that it "isn't just computers" but mostly processes are relatively observable and have audit trails. However I don't think "processes" is where the article goes. We're into knowledge/decision systems. The problem I see with these is not the "AI" or whatever, but the massive consolidation in many industries and the lack of competition. This may be via corporate consolidation or merely that all the corporates are running the same software. Either way, that is unhealthy and intervention may be required to stir things up and bring back competition. Perhaps we do need to think about splitting Google, AWS or MS up. Hmmm... I'm guessing that won't happen for the next four years.

The point about cartels offloading decisions to software with the objective of maintaining the cartel is interesting, but again, I think we're talking about business practice rather than particular algorithms.

1
0

BT's spam blocker IDs accident claims as top nuisance call

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: it could divert 1.6 billion nuisance calls a year.

>Lets assume BT make a profit of 1 pence per call......

And I'll bet voicemail counts as "connected"!

A much "better" solution than stopping the spam in the first place or adding call origination & routing information to CLI!

2
0

Machine vs. machine battle has begun to de-fraud the internet of lies

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: When trust verification is automated, it WILL NOT work as expected..

>See the form? "X said Y".

Wasn't this what CNN did, reporting what Buzzfeed had reported, but omitted all the caveats and buzzfeed's "we think this isn't actually true" statements?

You don't need to tell untruths to lie.

0
0
P. Lee
Silver badge
Paris Hilton

Re: Who could possibly design a good fake news algorithm?

Whenever I see AI/ML I read A/S/L

I suspect the level of truthiness is about the same...

0
0

TCP/IP headers leak info about what you're watching on Netflix

P. Lee
Silver badge

and all available to your US ISP for collection and sale

eom

4
1

An echo chamber full of fake news? Blame Google and Facebook, says Murdoch chief

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: Hillarious

>.It's just sour grapes on their part. They are having trouble finding people to pay for their shit news.

and as the number of eyeballs they attract plummets, the advertising money (i.e. their real customers) moves to google and facebook.

It does appear that in the US at least, the news is massively partisan. They appear to be willing to go to extreme lengths make sure their side wins, willing to edit video clips to make them say the opposite of what was what going on. (think Kelso in that 70's show) and cut interviews if they appear to be "going the wrong way." When you dig into why Trump called CNN "fake news" its becomes quite entertaining.

Not only is it not news, even if it is what you want to hear, it won't be interesting for very long. I don't think Google and FB are healthy for the internet, but I have little sympathy for "old media" either.

0
0

How their GDPR ignorance could protect you from your denial

P. Lee
Silver badge

Purging convictions

What is this all about? Why would you delete the data? Just flag the currently online data as no longer valid. *Why* do you need to erase all traces?

0
1

WD unveils grown-up USB stick in My Passport slab form

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: Sigh....

I wonder how many users do you think we could have running WP5.1 and Lotus 123 on a single modern server?

Memory-wise, what are we looking at, 1 MB/user ... 192,000 users?

How much is our modern software costing us?

3
0

Steppe thugs pacified by the love of stone age women

P. Lee
Silver badge

>When will humanity evolve?

Is there any evidence that humanity has "improved"?

The Romans used to kill unwanted children via "exposure." We do it a bit earlier and make sure the corpses aren't seen, but we still do it - over thirty-six Legions-worth (half the empire's army at its peak) every year in the UK alone.

A society which not only allows its children to be killed, but celebrates it as a sign of "progressiveness" may be rich and technologically advanced, but "evolved" it is not.

1
3

Webcam sex blackmailer faces extradition to Canada to stand trial for bullied teen's suicide

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: Murder in the First

From your wikipedia link:

Murder is a sub-category of culpable homicide which is defined as causing the death of a human being,

1) By means of an unlawful act;

2) By criminal negligence;

3) By causing that human being, by threats or fear of violence or by deception, to do anything that causes his death; or

4) By wilfully frightening that human being, in the case of a child or sick person.

I'm not sure any of these cover suicide. (3) is probably the closest but I'm not sure the intention of it fits. I suspect "threats or fear" is to cover things like, "I'll shoot you if you don't jump the gap between these two buildings." I'm not sure (4) fright counts either.

From Fifth Estate's program it appears that she exposed herself on a webcam to two hundred people. The blackmailer pushed the pics towards her facebook "friends" and a lot of the issues came from the people around her. The threat to "push her to suicide" was empty without the cooperation of those around her. Had they supported her, the blackmailer would have been powerless. If the Canadian police had investigated, she probably wouldn't have died. If Dutch police had investigated, she probably wouldn't have died. Nobody cared, because nobody considers internet (teenage) sexual activity much of a problem.

If we can't rely on the law to protect us, what do we do? We have take responsibility for ourselves. Really that comes first. We need to change the what we teach our kids about sex. It isn't just a bit of fun, it involves immense trust, and physical and psychological vulnerability. Without absolute security, it will lead to intense pain when that trust is broken, be it by some stranger on the other end of a webcam or a boyfriend who dumps you. What is "absolute security"? Well, I'd suggest a legal document and a public commitment by the other person in front of family and friends to stick with you for life. Ok, that may not be absolute, but lowering the bar indicates that you think you don't really deserve that.

The blackmailer is scum who deserves to go away for a long time. However, let's not go "punching nazis." Making the crime out to be something that it is not does not help the cause. Tragic though this is, keep the emotions as fuel for rational action, not lashing out. Why are kids saying "yes" to requests for sexual activity online? Maybe we need to stop normalising under-age sexual activity on TV and in music aimed at children. Make it easy for children to say "no" rather than thinking "everyone is doing it."

4
6

Startup remotely 'bricks' grumpy bloke's IoT car garage door – then hits reverse gear

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: Why would you need to control your garage door

How about a garage door phone app. You send an email or sms to your brother-in-law with an authorisation code. His phone then uses bluetooth to connect locally to garage door opener.

There are plenty of reasons for IoT. This one is stupid, like all of the others I've ever heard of.

6
1

Mac Pro update: Apple promises another pricey thing it will no doubt abandon after a year

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: We've let you down...

>Clones pretty much almost killed Apple last time. Why would they go down that same road again?

I can't see them ever licensing OSX. That would be a bad plan as it would tarnish the image. Far better just to turn a blind eye to the enthusiast hackintosh arena (those people are not your customers anyway).

However, they do need to lift their game. I don't mind proprietary as long as it is appreciably better. The touch-bar ain't it!

How about...

Chasses where components are accessible from the outside? Memory, disks, graphics cards etc. Graphics cards don't have to be hot-plug but how about a format which allows them to be exchanged without opening the box?

Some hot plug components would be good - especially disks/ssd's. It isn't that hard!

Drobo-style storage arrays? How many SSD's can you fit in a mini-tower? Would water-cooling help to give you a smaller form-factor?

10G Ethernet - dual ports. Seriously people, given the price of this kit, that isn't an unreasonable request. Any non-laptop is going to be wired, so wire it seriously. Include a couple of 1G ports as well if you want.

Optical Thunderbolt? I've pretty much given up on expecting this, but it would be a nice surprise.

How about hotplug CPUs? I"d like a lower power CPU for email and browsing on the big screen, but I don't really need a couple of Xeons for that.

3
1

As Trump signs away Americans' digital privacy, it's time to bring out the BS detector

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: I'm not convinced it's BULLSHIT yet

Sorry, Facebook and Google are not in the same industry as communications carriers, that is why they don't fall under the rules.

Essentially, its wire-tapping that was forbidden and now isn't.

Should F&G fall under the rules? Google shouldn't be able to tap their ISP cables, but gmail and search is voluntarily handing over data and there are alternatives.

Now Mozilla, where's that Tor client?

7
0

It's 30 years ago: IBM's final battle with reality

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: OS/2 and PS/2 Memories

>the usual IT Fix, "Turn it off and back on" became, "Turn it off, DON'T turn it back on yet!"

Weirdly I have this problem with an x79 ASRock board. I have to cut the power to it for 5-10 minutes before it will power on again. I've resorted to turning it off at the wall when I'm done.

5
0

Canadian court refuses to let Feds snoop on Megaupload servers

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: Am i too simple to understand .....

Surely a good case for having your own legal team

0
0

Android beats Windows as most popular OS for interwebz – by 0.02%

P. Lee
Silver badge

>Remind me - what game were we playing again?

Indeed.

Linux "winning" is only important if it enables other Linux solutions which users want. A closed Linux system is just a closed system.

All the evidence (replacing the kernel, restrictions on the Play store) points to Google wanting more lock-in. As Google's hold on the market increases, I have no doubt we'll see more monopoly-type behaviour.

2
2
P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: Well it's just counting people who do not block junk @Updraft102

>Cos we will have installed blockers for them as a matter of course, for our own peace if for nothing else.

Adblockers and fake agent strings.

Why risk malware for your platform when you can request malware which won't work and avoid deliberately hobbled versions of websites?

1
0

Drive-by Wi-Fi i-Thing attack, oh my!

P. Lee
Silver badge

>9to5Mac notes that while 10.3 left older 32-bit devices off the list, 10.3.1 includes them – indicating how serious Apple views the bug.

and how arbitrary the obsolescence is.

15
0

Snakes and bats cause more blackouts than criminal haxors

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: Flying foxes

>BEWARE THE 'DROP BEAR' !!!

Check out Path of Exile - an everyday story of criminals exiled to a far continent, featuring drop bears which are a real nightmare.

The game is only half the story. The trees they drop out of are called "widow-makers" because even healthy ones have a tendency to drop large branches without warning.

0
0

Trump sets sights on net neutrality

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: I'd equate Trump to Hitler but...

>The US needs to step out of the 2 party state system and First Past The Post voting and switch to a better democracy by using proportional representation.

You mean, like the Weimar republic?

I think we actually need both. We need FPtP to maintain local representation and accountability and we need PR to help break the two party system that tends to result from FPtP. Do a 50/50 split. That allows smaller parties to build up support without voters feeling their vote is "wasted" but at the same time allows the larger parties to over-ride the really small fringe interests and get things done.

1
0

Confidence in £70m customs system has 'collapsed', warns Treasury Committee

P. Lee
Silver badge
Trollface

Troll icon added :)

0
0
P. Lee
Silver badge

>Hmm, doesn't Spain own our air traffic control and at least one of our biggest high street banks......

>Give it a try and see where it gets you.......

Well, if they don't play ball, you nationalise it.

0
0
P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: Requirements?

>The CDS is needed in order to handle a possible five-fold increase in declarations that could occur when the UK leaves the EU.

Or you could, you know, not bother with recording the transactions, just as we do at the moment, at least, if it will cause the system to fail.

I'd like to think someone didn't design a system that was only vertically scalable. I see duties as a reconciliation system, nowhere near as difficult as a telco payg system. Record the transaction locally, update the central system. I'll bet they didn't do that. It seems no-one can resist doing a single database updated by everyone in real-time these days.

So the GBP 70m project is in difficulty. I wonder how much of the GPB 140m they are going to gain from IR35 is going to get blown on trying to fix the damage the measure causes?

0
0

Forget robot overlords, humankind will get finished off by IoT

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: Pavements

>Never mind the constant barrage of buggies etc.

Even if you couldn't get into them, cowbot-tipping would surely become an urban pastime.

You'd have to actually make them heavy mobile safes, not mobile lunch-boxes.

Like autonomous cars, the practicalities are going to kill it.

The best way to streamline logistics is to combine them. Get Amazon to deliver to your local supermarket or sandwich shop along with their normal deliveries. They you pick it up your self.

1
0

Y'know CSS was to kill off HTML table layout? Well, second time's a charm: Meet CSS Grid

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: Formatted email messages

>(Perhaps especially columns: emails are inherently infinitely scrollable, so why waste time and effort and eye movement on obsolete columnar layout?)

Because most screens have stupid 16:9 ratios which means we want to spread the data across rather than having to page down. I think the correct resolution is to have portrait A4 + a bit screens but that won't happen unless someone gets really clever with laptops.

Unfortunately, it is really difficult to read text running straight across a 27" screen. What we want is to break it up into something like A5 width columns/screen height (or maybe A4 if you have work documents) and have the display system add A5/A4-width columns as space allows. Basically, like the firefox epub reader.

0
0

WONTFIX: No patch for Windows Server 2003 IIS critical bug – Microsoft

P. Lee
Silver badge

That's the joy of "tightly-coupling" applications with the OS - it makes upgrades so much more... exciting.

If you had written your applications in perl or php, do you think you'd be stuck being unable to upgrade to a later OS or a later httpd version?

Of course, if you're still running the old stuff just because you can't be bothered to upgrade, well, that's another issue.

7
6

Time to make up: Realtime collaboration comes to Excel

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: Less of a breakthrough . . .

>This brings it to the desktop version.

So it is a database with row/field level locking? And its being shared from a desktop?

<shiver>

0
0

Is this a solution to Trump signing away your digital privacy? We give Invizbox Go a go

P. Lee
Silver badge

>Tor has become the go to network for illegal activities

Well, the internet is the go-to network for illegal activities.

I think the point is that Tor is generally too technical for the masses and little device might make things easier. The NAT router of layer-7. By making it clear that privacy has been sold, there should be an impetus for people to take responsibility for themselves.

Even if the NSA is running most of the tor exit nodes, at least they are probably keeping your browser history mostly to themselves.

7
0
P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: So who's worried about the browser vendors?

>we really don't know what we're running when we launch its executable.

But that is also not under the control of the ISP's. Compromising that would be illegal and unlikely. I would be inclined to redirect traffic to 8.8.8.8 to somewhere else and not use Chrome, though.

2
0

Minnesota, Illinois rebel over America's ISP privacy massacre, mull fresh info protections

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: Trump revitalizes America...

>In the real world; "Trump wastes America's time"

BuSab.

I mean, democracy is very inefficient, but that doesn't mean we shouldn't have it. Individual States don't need to debate everything from scratch. Listen to what other states are doing and build from that. Maybe some areas really do prefer cheap internet to privacy. The smaller the democracy, the more your vote counts, the greater power people have, the easier it is to organise an effective campaign, the easier it is to influence politicians, the better "we the people" can express ourselves in law.

Trump is just making obvious what the normal political process is.

6
1

IT contractors behind IR35 calculator to leave HMRC... because of IR35

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: easy pickings

>Oh yeah, they can and will fight back where us the single contractor cannot do that

Who do you think paid for all those lunches and campaign contributions?

Once the contractors leave, who do you think will pick up the work?

2
0

Europe to push new laws to access encrypted apps data

P. Lee
Silver badge

>What it will do is try to pacify politicians screaming "stop checking my expenses!"

FTFY

11
1

Windows 10 Creators Update: Clearing the mines with livestock (that's you by the way)

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: Wish I could use it

>Try setting the close lid option to hibernate instead.

All fun and games until you have 16G+ RAM on board...

2
0
P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: Wish I could use it

My favourite is when I get a system where the OS doesn't include the NIC drivers. My mind goes back to having a box of 3.5" disks on the desk...

0
0
P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: What MS giveth MS taketh away

>3D is the last thing that should be a priority.

There's two aspects to this. One is that using 3D in the GUI offloads work to efficient GPUs, so MS will want this for mobile (on Android, I suppose).

Secondly, they know they are losing the home market and perceive gaming as a strong point in that area. However, a very large number of games are coming out with Linux support. Croteam are even backporting Serious Sam to Linux and providing it free to those who bought the game on Windows. That kind of behaviour should worry Microsoft a lot.

MS have themselves to blame. Desperate to be seen as a leader, they are pushing to the cloud in the enterprise space and abandoning their lower-end user- and developer-base. The lower end of the market doesn't care so much about software roll-out because their user-counts are so low. Often the application only needs installing on one machine. If you're applications are cloud-based the client doesn't matter, so more people will look at OSX (or rather, robust unibody prestige products)... so cross-platform is key. Once you've gone to that place, the dev's themselves are likely to be using Linux for work and you're into a self-defeating spiral.

As usual, it comes back to the contortions product licensing pushes vendors into. They have to make themselves look good against Amazon's cloud, to be seen as a "winner" when what they should be doing is improving their OS to include all the nice things cloud provides. Rather than enabling the tech departments, they are pitching directly to managers.

2
0

Firefox Quantum: BIG browser project, huh? I share your concern

P. Lee
Silver badge

Re: Keep shuffling those deckchairs...

>I use an old version of Opera as a standalone mail client. But not enough people are "crying out" for this stuff.

I think you can blame corporate security for that one. Boneheaded policies such allowing http but not imap lead to webmail being the only reliable external mail you can use. The lag in switching between server-to-server mail on port 25 and client-to-server mail on 587 for clients fed fears of worms using open mail relays didn't help. Blocking mail protocols allowed Security plausible deniability when it came to enforcing the use of corporate mail systems. The latest craze for "Application Awareness" (checking the "CONNECT" string) finally has the chance to enforce the intended policy, but now there are few players left in the market for standards-based email and calendaring and everything runs over https. The established players like this, because it means you have to already be important to get an entry on the web-filtering (or web-allowing) databases in security products. It just keeps the status quo in place.

0
0

Alabama joins anti-web-smut crusade with mandatory opt-out filters

P. Lee
Silver badge
Windows

>There's no way anyone is going to pay any attention to this.

Except advertising-supported news sites...

<emperor-voice>And so the circle is complete</emperor-voice>

1
0

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017