* Posts by P. Lee

4780 posts • joined 4 Dec 2007

Heaps of Windows 10 internal builds, private source code leak online

P. Lee
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Trollface

Re: I'm done with Windows.

The funny thing is that all the IP laws around software are designed to stop people grabbing other people's work.

Then I tried to think of anyone who might have the slightest interest in stealing MS' code so they didn't have to code things themselves... and I came up blank. Who would ever want to steal MS' code?

All those IP laws and they only thing they could be used for is to stop people finding out about MS' bad coding.

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It's fluffy bottom line time at Adobe. That's a good thing, if you were wondering

P. Lee
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Re: Adobe is actually the only one I would subscribe to

And as revenue goes up, so do the incentives to compete.

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Microsoft admits to disabling third-party antivirus code if Win 10 doesn't like it

P. Lee
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MS's "business" is making money by creating (and maintaining) a monopoly.

Fear, Uncertainty, Doubt

They don't need complete lock-out, just enough FUD to sustain them.

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Brit uni blabs students' confidential information to 298 undergrads

P. Lee
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>"Could you please delete this without opening/reading. Thank-you very much."

Should have read, "A spreadsheet possibly infected with the Wannacry ransomware has accidentally been attached. We recommend immediate deletion."

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P. Lee
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Mushroom

Re: Another reason to ban Outlook.

>'A' priority, not 'THE' priority.

Which would correctly tell you absolutely nothing. It is a priority, just slightly lower in ranking than cleaning my toenails.

Forget banning Outlook, ban "Excel as a database".

Ok, that's harsh. We just need Excel with a data store which isn't a file. Then at least you can keep hold of the access control even after the mail is sent.

I was tempted to use the "c" word, but we probably don't need that kind of language around here!

Mushroom c....

A bit of DLP would be nice too. If you ditched the proprietary formats it would be even easier and cheaper to implement....

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Migrating to Microsoft's cloud: What they won't tell you, what you need to know

P. Lee
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Happy

Re: Re: One way trip

I see what you did!

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P. Lee
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Facepalm

What you need to know

It's hard to do well and even if you did do it well, it is intrinsically worse than on-prem.

Or did I misunderstand the article?

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Uber sued after digging up medical records of woman raped by driver

P. Lee
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Re: But But But but ....

While I agree Uber is a nasty company, I'd be surprised if any other largish company wouldn't hire investigators to track down *anything* they could use to compromise a case against them. They just wouldn't be so dumb as to do it themselves.

This has everything to do with normal corporate culture and nothing to do with the taxi business.

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Teen girl who texted boyfriend to kill himself guilty of manslaughter

P. Lee
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Re: Do you have kids?

>She LISTENED TO HIM DIE AND DID NOTHING ABOUT IT.

I'm curious about what that sounds like. Not from a morbid POV but I'd be curious to know whether I'd actually recognise it for what it was, over a phone, from someone who had repeatedly threatened to kill themselves. Would I think they really were dying or would I think they were attention-seeking and only realise afterwards what it was?

It does appear she's not a nice person and certainly has moral culpability. I do somewhat worry about whether this should carry over into legal culpability. If you accidentally text, "drop dead" to the wrong number and they do kill themselves, are you liable? At what point does liability become a thing? If she was a minor, what responsibility do her parents have? What responsibility did his parents have?

And what of the sentence? Will it be punitive? If she got 20 years, would that actually help anyone? Would a shorter sentence be "protective"? Do we decide she'll always be a danger because she's a sociopath and lock her up forever? How far into "pre-crime" do we go?

I guess my concern is that hard cases make bad law. Whatever happens, I hope this case doesn't create more bad law.

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EPYC leak! No, it's better than celeb noodz: AMD's forthcoming server CPU

P. Lee
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Re: disappointed

>forcing people to buy dual socket servers just to meet their I/O requirements.

How much SSD storage and how many 10/40G ports do you get in a box before the CPU just can't pull data in and push it out fast enough? What happens when you use put FreeNAS on the new chip? Software defined networking? Media servers?

In these scenarios (unlike gaming or transcoding), you don't need massive FLOPS, you need I/O throughput.

I'm not sure it makes sense to compare AMD and Intel and say one is "better." We probably need to ask which is more appropriate for a given application. Intel generally wins in CPU-bound operations, it looks like AMD will win on I/O.

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FOIA documents show the Kafkaesque state of US mass surveillance

P. Lee
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Big Brother

Re: Super secret court

Missed it by --><-- that much!

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Sorry to burst your bubble, but Microsoft's 'Ms Pac-Man beating AI' is more Automatic Idiot

P. Lee
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Re: I don't see problem with hard-coded knowldge

>When someone plays (Ms) Pac Man for the first time*, they have to learn that ghosts are deadly unless you eat the pills and then they give you points. They also have to learn how (Ms) Pac Man moves and so on.

Well, you learn facts. But is that Intelligence? How much intelligence (vs memory) do humans use when playing?

Intelligence generally involves guesswork. Even without seeing the effect, do you guess that ghosts are bad? Do you guess that the aim of the game is to eat all the dots and that the flashing ones mean something special?

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Uncle Sam █████████ cloud so much, AWS █████████ it another kinda-secret data center

P. Lee
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Big Brother

cp -r AWS SAM

done

# _

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Ever wonder why those Apple iPhone updates take so damn long?

P. Lee
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Paris Hilton

Re: no no no no no no no, Apple

>No risk? this update bricked my girlfriends iPhone quite spectacularly, took forever to get the thing to boot again after re-flashing through iTunes.

So... not bricked, but requiring a restore from backup. It was an OS update...It was done with permission and suggesting that it was the fs test which borked it seems like a bit of a leap of logic.

Does anyone here work in IT?

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P. Lee
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Re: no no no no no no no, Apple

>who would be liable for data loss.

Well you would, obviously.

Wait, you didn't back up your data before doing an OS upgrade? No silver el-reg badge for you!

During an OS upgrade, when you might conceivably get a file system upgrade anyway would be the perfect time to do some testing. Would you prefer it to be rolled out without a roll-back plan?

If I were rolling something out, I'd want to do some real-world unit testing too.

I rather despise most of Apple's business practices but this isn't one of them.

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Two leading ladies of Europe warn that internet regulation is coming

P. Lee
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Re: How to evolve a smarter criminal in easy steps

>Driving the issue off the internet, for terrorism, means physical monitoring approaches, and this is vastly more expensive that internet monitoring.

Terrorism was never on the internet.

It is simple and its low-tech, because that is reliable. Given that nearly all terrorism is Islamic, they tend not to worry about surviving. People willing to die a almost impossible to stop. Smarter terrorists are not required for effective terrorism.

Terrorists are like celebrities. The only thing worst than being hurt is being ignored.

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Microsoft Azure adds OpenBSD support. Repeat. Azure adds OpenBSD support.

P. Lee
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Facepalm

Re: Microsoft has extended BSD support in Azure.

Upvoted... who knows why you got downvoted?

The problem isn't just with MS though. AWS a larger problem purely because it has been far more successful.

I've heard AWS people say that when they have a problem, a third of all web-sites are affected.

That is stupidly concentrated IT. We are pretty much at the stage of "if one company fails, we are all in trouble."

The internet was designed to be a dumb network with smart end-points (the opposite to the telephone network) but the vendors are rushing back to the IBM mainframe model because that is far more lucrative. We may as well bring back SNA.

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P. Lee
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Re: But, why?

>Who is the customer for this?

Potential cloud end-users with onsite appliances.

"Look! We can host all your IT - we have VM versions of all your appliances, you can just boot everything up to our cloud."

"Then we'll offer you a free Windows firewall."

"Then we'll make you pay for a Windows firewall." Ooops, did I say that out loud?

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Microsoft officially hangs up on old Skype phones, users fuming

P. Lee
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Re: How long before Duo is killed too?

>Good thing mobile phone numbers and email addresses stay put as the technology changes around them. (GSM, 3G, 4G, 5G, POP, HTTP, IMAP, etc.)

Which is why standard interfaces are important, no matter what the tech behind them and why I loath the cloud regardless of which OS it is built on.

Cloud replaces things like SATA with onedrive or S3. You then have a proprietary disk drive. That is one of the stupidest ideas I can imagine - vendor-specific data where the hardware is controlled by not-you but by a really reliable long-term organisation like ... a cloud company. I mean it isn't like MS have form for removing support for other vendors' stuff, like, say, HPFS under Windows... leaving Office to rot under OSX... removing third-party support to kill Novell logins...

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P. Lee
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Holmes

Re: Never count on MS

>Fair comment, but which tech supplier would you suggest counting on?

IETF

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Please do not scare the pigeons – they'll crash the network

P. Lee
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Linux

Re: We had a laser link between two nearby buildings

>a vulture was landing on the LNB arm and pushing it out of the dish focus

Ah, microwaving its lunch.

Smart birds, them Vultures!

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Infosec guru Schneier: Govts WILL intervene to regulate Internet of Sh!t

P. Lee
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Good, fast, cheap. Pick two

Good, cheap.

We are past the point where "fast" is a problem for consumers, especially for IoT. Fast is usually relevant only to over-consolidated vendors.

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Australia to float 'not backdoors' that behave just like backdoors to Five-Eyes meeting

P. Lee
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>What happens if terrorists simply flood the internet with tons of false leads, using botnets?

What happens when terrorists talk to their buddies at the local mosque or at picnic in the park?

Just because middle-class millenials are obsessed with internet services doesn't mean everyone is. How many of the recent attacks required any internet usage?

Go buy a gun or a knife and stab/shoot someone. Rent an Avis van and drive into a crowd. No WhatsApp required. No email trail. No iTunes purchase of "The Dummies Guide to Terrorism" epub.

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Microsoft totters from time machine clutching Windows 10 Workstation

P. Lee
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Re: great ideas at the top

>Desktop configurations - no tiles as an option?

Haha! Have you seen what happens to tiles when your proxy requires authentication *before* it allows access to the internet?

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Break crypto to monitor jihadis in real time? Don't be ridiculous, say experts

P. Lee
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Coffee/keyboard

re: Dear The People

Agreed.

And all the terrorists know you shouldn't trust your IT. Surveillance is about stopping people like Snowden who embarrass governments, not terrorists. Once you know you shouldn't trust your IT you leave it out of your planning.

Terrorism is not high-tech and doesn't need high-tech. There is no high-tech solution to it.

We have to engage the values and historical context which nurture it. Sadly, no-one wants to discuss morality, in case an uncomfortable conclusion is reached or logical inconsistency is noted. So we make vague statements about "extremism" without saying what it is that is extreme. If "extremism" is bad, should we not be extremely committed to safety? Is May extremely committed to Brexit? Is Juncker extremely committed to "ever closer union"? Was Mohammed an extremist or moderate?

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Vodafone to block its ads from appearing next to 'fake news'

P. Lee
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>outlets that are "fundamentally at odds with their values and beliefs as a company"

This does appear to be the working definition of "fake news" for most organisations. It isn't about truth, it is about values.

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Bixby bailout: Samsungers bailing on lame-duck assistant

P. Lee
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>Digital assistants - don't really care about them, just as long as I can disable them.

Samsung need a new strategy. Following Google (lots of free stuff, lots of snooping) won't work because Google does it better. Following Apple doesn't work because you can't charge a premium for what is essentially Google stuff.

Why not team up with Canonical? Someone with enough software expertise to do a phone which doesn't track you. Minimal effort for Canonical; Geek cred and kudos for Samsung, poke in the eye for Google & Apple.

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Microsoft's cunning plan to make Bing the leading search engine: Bribery

P. Lee
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FAIL

> Over 7% I didn't think it was that high.

Its the number of people who are looking for FF & Chrome stub installers.

Seriously, IE11 doesn't appear to accept urls any more, it just dumps you on a bing page.

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WannaCrypt: Pwnage is a fact of life but cleanup could and should be way easier

P. Lee
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Re: @LittleTyke

While I love oss, the article is correct about malware being inevitable for all os types. Where nix gains is its diversity. That forces loose coupling between components, which means fewer breakages during updates.

Now, who thinks AWS APIs are going to be stable for 13 years? With cloud you don't get to run that custom application on a dedicated pic in the corner. Once the vendor isn't interested, your application dies with the next API change.

Especially if you are a small business, build that application rewrite cost into your plan. Elastic compute and storage may sound cool, but most businesses don't have rapidly changing requirements. Glacier may be cheap, but I'll bet they aren't using commvault so are you sure you need to?

Keep it simple and put some common sense into whether you consolidate or preprovision.

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WebAssembly fandom kills Google's Portable Native Client

P. Lee
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I'm curious

Is this really about generic web or is it about heavy-weight application distribution?

Should we actually be working on web distribution of "portable-apps" rather than trying to shoe-horn applications into JS?

If JS isn't fast enough on a PC, it certainly won't be fast enough for a tablet, so you've lost your cross-platform-ness.

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Google can't spare 113 seconds of revenue to compile data on its gender pay gap

P. Lee
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Re: Bullshit

Diversity reporting is a no-win scenario.

There are plenty of good reasons why the resulting figure calculated as an average seems to imply something it doesn't.

e.g.

a) many women like flexible jobs with lower hours because they actually care about their families

b) In general, flexible jobs are in lower-paying job categories

c) women often take a career break to have families, which means they don't climb the corporate ladder to the higher-paying posts

Even if you do the break-down and show you aren't discriminating, someone will summarise it to make you look bad and create a story out of nothing.

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Microsoft Master File Table bug exploited to BSOD Windows 7, 8.1

P. Lee
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Applications are vulnerable?

Isn't the os responsible for the security of the file system?

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BA's 'global IT system failure' was due to 'power surge'

P. Lee
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Re: Ho hum

>Resilience costs money.

And it is grossly inefficient. Right up to the point when you need it.

IT is often way too focused on efficiency.

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Windows 10 love to see PC market grow again. Future iPhone to be clear. Elvis to re-appear

P. Lee
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Re: Please take mine

>No, but my laptop, if you're including that in devices, is often displaying a document I'm working on and one of the documents I'm working from side by side.

Better yet, a system with a couple of 24" screens. Even with a laptop, having a desk to work on is optimal. Fewer devices means a clearer desk, not no desk.

Having a printer/multi-page scanner is also not dependent on the pc/tablet debate.

My desktop sits under the drawers of my desk. Assuming the desk is required, even a mid-tower pc can have zero additional footprint.

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British prime minister slams Facebook and pals for votes

P. Lee
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Re: Media editing

>The best way to fight extremists and their supporters is not to ban them and censor them ... but to drag them out into the daylight and force them to discuss their views with people outside their own little circle of haters.

Oh for a thousand upvotes to give.

Ok, maybe dragging them out forcibly is the wrong approach, but why not encourage discussion of various values? Our increasingly PC legal and social environment is so preoccupied with making sure someone's feelings are not upset that it forces the disengagement of those with less fashionable views from the rest of society. Forced to keep their beliefs locked away, they fester in the dark, reinforced by people who may be less extreme, but also have to insulate their beliefs from the tempering influence of the outside world.

This appears to be driven mostly be secularists trying to eradicate religion, sometimes overtly, sometimes under the guise of "equality for all". It is a misguided strategy. What we need to be able to do is to defend our values and our positions. We need not just dialogue, but debate. We need to evaluate Islamic, Christian, Jewish, Buddhist, Hindu, New Age and Secular positions and apply some critical thinking. Rather than name-calling, we should encourage people to elucidate why their position is the best and should be adopted. "Should we punch a Nazi?" "Should we eat pork?" Sometimes the answer will be, "because X said so," an we can give that the attention it deserves, but we should encourage, not stifle the debate. Name-calling and trying to exclude people by "no-platforming" is a sign of a cause without reason.

Sadly I don't think it will ever happen. Increasingly the debate platforms are advertising-funded and they thrive on eternal conflict and true-believers. As the protagonists become professional and/or commercial, their economic interests become aligned with with "keeping the conflict going." Even when they've won, they can't let the issues go.

The aim should be to win your opponent to your position, not to try to demonstrate a third party that you are more intelligent or pious than the other man. What we need is increased tolerance - the ability to disagree with people without trying to destroy them just because they hold "sub-optimal" beliefs.

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EU ministers approve anti-hate speech video rules

P. Lee
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Re: Free speech is for governments

An assault is carried out by a threat of bodily harm coupled with an apparent, present ability to cause the harm. It is both a crime and a tort and, therefore, may result in either criminal or civil liability. Generally, the common law definition is the same in criminal and Tort Law. There is, however, an additional Criminal Law category of assault consisting of an attempted but unsuccessful Battery.

- http://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Assault

Saying mean stuff is not assault, whatever you may feel.

I would be the last one to defend hateful speech, but the scope for abuse of such legislation is massive. We can't always safely legislate away everything bad.

How do we decide what is "fake news"? Who is going to do the research to determine the truth? How long will it take to sort out the arguments? Who foots the bill?

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Network-sniffing, automation, machine learning: How to get better threat intel

P. Lee
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sigh

Machines are really good at working on a narrowly defined problem. The classic example is chess. A massive possible data set, but the rules for what can be (how pieces move) are very strict and very few. There aren't that many areas where that kind problem domain and definition holds true.

The problem with AI is that the promise of AI is that you can replace human analysis with machines. Unfortunately machines can easily miss what humans may not, because humans have real intelligence and intuition. How will AI end up being used - to augment humans and do what they can't, or to try to replace humans and so end up losing the more intelligent part of the team?

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Windows 10: Triumphs and tragedies from Microsoft Build

P. Lee
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Re: The store is unattractive for developers ...

>who needs "the store" when you have your own web site already?

People who want to sell to people running Windows S?

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Ireland to make revenge porn, cyberstalking criminal acts

P. Lee
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>Importantly, it will cover both indirect communication and the creation of fake accounts.

I think the accounts are real, the data provided by the creators just isn't what the provider can effectively turn to cash.

In other news, freely available stuff on the internet gets gamed!

Next you'll suggest putting an AI chat bot online.

As for revenge porn. Stupid laws to protect stupid people. For all the talk of the age of reason, teaching science in schools and rational humanism, the concept of cause and effect seems to have eluded a lot of people. The scope for abuse far exceeds the good these laws can do. I'm sure there are worthy edge cases, but don't go there. Life is harsh, take the precautionary principle.

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US judges say you can Google Google, but you can't google Google

P. Lee
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Re: If Bing was more popular

Except on NCIS, where you can even find the Less Spotted Windows Phone in its last remaining natural habitat - the sponsored pitch.

"Let me Bing that for you."

Say Whaaht?

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Microsoft to spooks: WannaCrypt was inevitable, quit hoarding

P. Lee
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Re: If you cannot patch it quarantine it

>The NHS IT is run on a very constrained budget, and what you're suggesting needs someone to look at what's on the network, and work out a plan for sorting it out.

The incompetence doesn't necessarily refer to the techies, but would more properly be assigned to those who made the decision that funds would be better allocated on something other than security.

Now where is their cost saving?

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WannaCrypt ransomware snatches NSA exploit, fscks over Telefónica, other orgs in Spain

P. Lee
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Re: WTF ..., WT actual F ?????

>So what happens when a patch for a Cat I vulnerability broke something critical in the process, creating a dilemma because the critical machine was inoperable either way?

You reduce the attack surface by making sure critical systems are segregated and get extra protection. For example, you don't run web browsers or email clients on critical servers. Maybe you don't map drives to large swathes of critical files, make sure write access is only granted to those who really need it; maybe provide terminal server access for things which are important, so you can control the environment more easily.

Standard security precautions really. How much have you saved by not hiring a security team? Are you sure you've saved money?

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Uber is a taxi company, not internet, European Court of Justice advised

P. Lee
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While I like the reasoning, does it hold up?

Are uber drivers beholden to uber or can they also work for lyft? (I don't know) If they can, then they would be economically independent from Uber.

"the provider supplies the whole service... so that the two services form an inseparable whole..." is that different from any employment agency going out to market via its website and saying, "I know of a network admin you can have at $x/day. Let me know if you want me to send him for an interview and I'll take a cut of the final payments"?

Its late and I haven't thought it through, but what seem obvious doesn't always turn out to be so.

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Microsoft is on the edge: Windows, Office? Naah. Let's talk about cloud, AI

P. Lee
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>With the disclaimer that I may be tripping up on semantics, how is that not also a 'client and server' model?

It is the terminal model. Client server puts logic on the client and data on the server. Endpoints these days just display the data and take user input. You wouldn't have a phone executing SQL queries across the wire(less).

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On today's a-gender: Axing net neutrality will harm America's women, say women senators

P. Lee
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Re: Press releases daily

In other news, "Pushing people's buttons generates page impressions."

And later, "Why the 'targeted advertising' model might be driving partisanship."

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UK General Election 2017: How EU law will hit British politicians' Facebook fight

P. Lee
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Re: All your data belong to us

Ah, Facebook - that well-known seething pit of pro-Trump, pro-Brexit alt-rightism!

I'd be curious to know how many people switched their opinions in the run-up to the election, but couldn't say why. My guess would be almost no-one. I doubt even the explicit arguments made by the campaigns influenced many people. People already had their opinions and kept them.

I find it slightly amusing that the guardian, so much in favour of having our lives governed by unelected foreigners should write such a lengthy expose on a conspiracy regarding how our lives are being run by, er, unelected foreigners. Whether you think that is good, bad or indifferent, the lack of awareness speaks of a complete irony detection failure or extreme partisanship, turning the news into the image of American news.

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DSL inventor's latest science project: terabit speeds over copper

P. Lee
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Re: Pointless excercise

>Can we just, finally, let it die and put fiber in the ground.

Is it just the Oz press getting the wrong end of the stick based on DSL being a long(ish) range tech and this is by the same person?

Surely this is more for "inside-the-data-centre" where the exponential drop-off isn't an issue?

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It's 2017 and Windows PCs are being owned by EPS files, webpages

P. Lee
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Re: Modern software philosophy

>I'd dispute "modern" and "philosophy"

My observation is that most of the problems lie in GUI software.

The first is "blob" input. When input is text, parsing and checking is relatively simple and the dodgy inputs are not expected to get past the person entering the data. Passing a pointer to spreadsheet object leaves the receiver wide open to a great deal more abuse.

Where I see a great failure on modern OS design is the inability to set resource capabilities at run-time from the OS. MSOffice's "protected view" etc is all well and good, but how about telling the OS to open execute Excel without network capabilities and disk write capabilities except to a quick-provisioned RAM disk for it and its sub-processes?

That would kill attack vectors dead, even if the application is vulnerable to corruption.

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Sorry, Dave, I can't code that: AI's prejudice problem

P. Lee
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Re: AI main issue:

>trying to predict the future using the past.

Worse. Humans can come to recognise bias when its bad because we have morality.

The whole purpose of AI is to implement bias and it has no morality.

AI isn't intelligence, it is merely statistical analysis. Complicated stats, but still just stats. It can make correlations, but not assess causation. It is incredibly dumb.

Stupid and morality-free. It is only useful when you really don't care too much about the outcome.

If AI is used to determine if you get parole, it is because the judicial system doesn't really care about the outcome, only that the process is cheap. I think its fairly easy to assess the morality of those who commissioned that.

What happens when everyone moves to AI and we no longer have humans doing the job? Where do you get your training data? No-one can tell how decisions are made and there's no way of measuring quality of the output. How do you know if someone has found an algorithmic flaw and is exploiting it? How do you catch the outliers?

AI has a place, but there are dangers. One that immediately comes to mind is that we try to do too much and it pushes policy to places we shouldn't go. Why check only the fingerprints of criminals when you can check everyone's? What happens when systems trained on a little data from California are exported to Kenya? Does anyone know? What happens if you go back the other way - take your data from Kenya and use it in California?

Part of the problem is that the vendors hawking AI systems have no vested interest in their correct use. Problems are compounded when those buying and using such systems don't have too much interest in the outcome either, just as long as an outcome is reached and more cheaply than a human could do it.

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Facebook is abusive. It's time to divorce it

P. Lee
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Re: Life without facebook is easy!

>Quite a few of us realised this up front.

Techies perhaps. Everyone else just thinks it is web-based email. The seductiveness of receiving email was documented way back by "You've Got Mail." The more you share, the more "mail" you get. The larger the social network, the more constant the stream of affirmation.

It is a sad reflection of where people get their self-worth, even before you get to the privacy invasion.

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