* Posts by P. Lee

4659 posts • joined 4 Dec 2007

Firefox Quantum: BIG browser project, huh? I share your concern

P. Lee
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Re: Keep shuffling those deckchairs...

>I use an old version of Opera as a standalone mail client. But not enough people are "crying out" for this stuff.

I think you can blame corporate security for that one. Boneheaded policies such allowing http but not imap lead to webmail being the only reliable external mail you can use. The lag in switching between server-to-server mail on port 25 and client-to-server mail on 587 for clients fed fears of worms using open mail relays didn't help. Blocking mail protocols allowed Security plausible deniability when it came to enforcing the use of corporate mail systems. The latest craze for "Application Awareness" (checking the "CONNECT" string) finally has the chance to enforce the intended policy, but now there are few players left in the market for standards-based email and calendaring and everything runs over https. The established players like this, because it means you have to already be important to get an entry on the web-filtering (or web-allowing) databases in security products. It just keeps the status quo in place.

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Alabama joins anti-web-smut crusade with mandatory opt-out filters

P. Lee
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Windows

>There's no way anyone is going to pay any attention to this.

Except advertising-supported news sites...

<emperor-voice>And so the circle is complete</emperor-voice>

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Microsoft beefs up Skype for Business as Amazon Chimes in

P. Lee
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Re: Oooo

>Welcome to what a basic PBX has been able to do for 30 years.

But now it has been patented for use, "on a Microsoft Cloud Server device."

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FYI Docs.com users: You may have leaked passwords, personal info – thousands have

P. Lee
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Re: Weakest link

Was the security locked down?

I do have to ask why MS needed a special website to do file sharing That seems to be a basic function as far as I can tell. Don't they make some software which is supposed to do that function which they could make available to all businesses, which does this easily in a relatively secure manner? Perhaps not.

MS - partying (and writing software) like its 1999.

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How Ford has slammed the door on Silicon Valley's autonomous vehicles drive

P. Lee
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Re: Not yet speedy

>rather than your precious vehicle data, to insurance firms who will then adjust the premium to suit both grannies and boy racers.

Yeah because a careful 18yo is going to get lower premiums, right? And no-one has both father and child on the same car, right?

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P. Lee
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Re: Not really a fan

> More things to break more things to become obsolete.

Did you really believe him when he said, "the gold is the data"?

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Astroboffins stunned by biggest brown dwarf ever seen – just a hop and a skip away (750 ly)

P. Lee
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Re: "It was invented to prop up existing theories"

>Nobody is talking about dark matter as a means to sweep an issue under the rug.

In the purest form, you are correct. The problem is that the phrase "dark matter" is used (particularly in the media) as if it is a real thing and it disguises the fact that the physics just doesn't work.

You just have to keep believing, even if the theory doesn't fit the evidence.

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UK Home Sec: Give us a snoop-around for WhatApp encryption. Don't worry, we won't go into the cloud

P. Lee
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Re: Here we go again. The 'Claire Perry Test'

>Perry test : failed. Yet again, minister, this time one holding one of the great offices of state, hopelessly out of their depth when talking about something even slightly technological.

I think you've missed the point. Government is mostly about keeping the media managers happy while building up business contacts and accumulating favours owed to you by those with the real money. That's why you get the same messages coming out of governments of all stripes. They no longer believe in different things, they just try to keep a couple of USP's so that people will vote for them.

I doubt she's stupid, she just has the impossible job of saying two contradictory things so that she can sound as if the government is doing something. Techies know that "no place for a "terrorist to hide" is exactly the same as "no place for anything to be private" but surely we also know that the the government is never going to come out and say that. Even if the sensible newspapers agreed with us about the defeat of encryption there would be howls of outrage, calls to ditch the "powerless, lame-duck government" and to "do something!" from those who never have to justify their words or work through the issues. It would be lapped up by those (probably the majority) of people who read newspapers not to be informed, but to confirm their own pre-existing viewpoint.

Therefore, the requirement is for completely safe righteous indignation. So WhatsApp is picked because (a) its trivial, (b) there is no chance of actually having to achieve anything with it and (c) it isn't anti-Islamic to attack WhatsApp, so you don't get labelled "racist" by the soundbite media.

Should we dig a little deeper? Was Khalid Masood a "terrorist"? Did he make any demands? Was he using fear to advance a political agenda? The government's own definition states:

"the use or threat is made for the purpose of advancing a political,

religious or ideological cause." (https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/228856/7052.pdf)

He was certainly murderous, but was he doing any of the above? The police have already said that he was working alone, so unless he has a one-man religion or political or ideological group, he wasn't a terrorist and his communication is irrelevant. So we get canned statements which sound vaguely relevant but don't require any action. "All sound and fury, signifying nothing."

That doesn't mean the government action is harmless, but we do need to not be under the illusion that it has anything to do with Khalid Masood.

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Why do GUIs jump around like a demented terrier while starting up? Am I on my own?

P. Lee
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Re: CP/M?

Ah, Elite!

Disk hex editor = military lasers

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P. Lee
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Re: Microsoft time

>Nah, I rode that dinosaur (486), long after it was supposed to be extinct!

Was it as frustrating as having a 286 with 512k base memory and 512k extended memory and no way to get at the extended memory?

Moving GUI elements? In my day, we 'ad an IBM text-only display... an' we were glad of it!

But yes, I'm looking at you, iphone, with your "all appearing buttons shall be in this place, especially the 'reject call' button when pre-empting my current application."

One of my favourites is MS having the menus alphabetically for (file) explorer, so "edit" and "delete" are next to each other.

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Microsoft loves Linux so much, its OneDrive web app runs like a dog on Windows OS rivals

P. Lee
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Re: I wonder why so many commentards came to exactly the same instant conclusion

>While the slow-down when using OneDrive might be the result of coders cutting corners working under time-to-market pressures...

Except that it isn't the use of a user-agent that's the problem, it's the lack of use of it. This is internet-software and they didn't bother to test it with browser? It looks malicious and that is a problem.

It is a two-edged sword for MS. There's a good chance that getting good one-drive for business access from linux would encourage linux use in the enterprise, but they want to be seen as the good guys.

So we are back to square-one: MS does something, badly: Linux chaps refuse to trust it, even if there a decent work-around. Management (rightly) does not implement a strategy that utilises MS-based linux facilities.

Bring on IPv6 and sshfs.

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P. Lee
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Re: Loved to Death

>Inferring unintelligence holds very strongly when you look at statistics over larger samples.

FTFY

Humans in large groups are stupid.

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Blinking cursor devours CPU cycles in Visual Studio Code editor

P. Lee
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Re: bring back vi and assembler on command lines

>Did not we all use DOS DEBUG to write machine code into .com files once as an exercise ?

BSAVE <filename>, <start_address>, <length>

Apple products as they should be!

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P. Lee
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Re: The solution -

>vi

No need to be a masochist.

Let them eat vim!

Er, well you know what I mean.

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We're 90 per cent sure the FCC's robocall kill plan won't have the slightest impact

P. Lee
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Forget the numbers, follow the money

Update the telephone protocols (SIP?) to include the call routing with caller-ID.

e.g.

BT (UK)

TelecomIndia->BT(UK)

Telco's know these details because they bill incoming calls. It doesn't need to be a perfect solution, it only needs the border telco in your jurisdiction to identify the previous telco and pass that on. Most robo-calls are to homes so if you aren't expecting a call from an Indian call centre, you can ditch that call. Not expecting a call from Germany? You can ditch that call too. Or you can take the call, aware it may be a scam. If it is a scam and it is a voip connection to your local telco, you can give them the time and your number and they can trace who made the call.

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As ad boycott picks up pace, Google knows it doesn't have to worry

P. Lee
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Re: Counterintuitive

>Actually it's not even for a terrorist group it's the Britain First YouTube channel

I suspect it is both and this is where it gets messy. I would guess that the video is an Islamic-extremist video (based on a very superficial assessment of dress and beards) reposted by Britain First as a "discussion point." How do you tell if a post is supporting the video content or is opposed to it?

We have a UK political group posting into which a Guardian advert was inserted. If that's the case, Google's algorithms seem to be working pretty much as expected. My understanding from this article and previous ones is that the US doesn't want to censor videos as it provides an opportunity to insert "counter-messaging," which is exactly what happened here. My message to the Guardian is, "that's what you get when you use a cloud-based AI advertising system from another jurisdiction. You have zero control." Maybe there should be a way for advertisers to manage a list of posts they don't want their adverts to appear in.

I do have to question if the BBC had done the same thing, would the Guardian be as outraged, or is this really about the Guardian being annoyed that it helped fund the BNP?

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Huawei's P10 breathing on Samsung's shoulder

P. Lee
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Re: Replacing the battery

>'Replaceable': I have an iPhone 4 that has had its battery replaced twice and still works well.

AU$120 to have my kid's iphone 5 battery replaced.

With laptop batteries from Dell coming in at $50-$100, $120 for a tiny phone battery seems... excessive.

It's the vendor's way of taking a slice of the second-hand market. There is no real need for sealed-in batteries. I was going to suggest that it is driven by the "thin and light" but I suspect it's the other way around: "thin and light" is driven by the vendors' desire to seal in the battery.

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Gift cards or the iPhone gets it: Hackers threaten Apple with millions of remote wipes

P. Lee
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Re: The Dr. Evil picture is appropriate

>$100,000 is ridiculously cheap if they actually had a half billion accounts they could wipe!

The trick to getting the cash is to make sure its a no-brainer to pay, even if Apple think they probably don't need to.

But... I think they picked the wrong target. I don't think "paying other people" is Apple's style.

And even if you wiped the icloud data, wouldn't it sync back from the phone?

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Linux-using mates gone AWOL? Netflix just added Linux support

P. Lee
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re: I have no interest in streaming or renting TV shows and movies

Agreed. Linux users are probably more anti-streaming/anti-cloud than OSX/WinX. Which is interesting since that's what the cloud is built on.

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P. Lee
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>Awesome. Netflix is about to get another 3 customers...

It isn't really about a few more customers. Its about platform independence and it probably isn't a large cost for them. Probably more about removing dumb errors and testing, than new coding.

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Microsoft IE11 update foxes Telerik dialogue boxes

P. Lee
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Paris Hilton

Re: Yet more proof MS fails.

>Stop the mega-patch SNAFU, go back to individual patches

Then they would have to tell you what each patch does. It goes completely against cloud philosophy.

And it assumes that they could back out the patch if it goes wrong. Well, Apple doesn't do that so obviously there's no good reason for MS to do anything different.

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Microsoft cloud TITSUP: Skype, Outlook, Xbox, OneDrive, Hotmail down

P. Lee
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>how much of Windows 10 is reliant on cloud services?

Just the telemetry uploads.

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P. Lee
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>My Hotmail is a bit like the grand old duke of York. When it's up it's up and when it's down it's down.

and when its only halfway up?

That's when Shroedinger is the happiest!

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Confirmed: TSA bans gear bigger than phones from airplane cabins

P. Lee
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Re: I'm sorry for my country.

>I doubt this is trump, even he isn't *this* stupid.

Stupid?

Ah, I see you'll be needing a touchscreen tablet with separate keyboard! Do I have an offer for you!

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'Sorry, I've forgotten my decryption password' is contempt of court, pal – US appeal judges

P. Lee
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>Try not entering the password for a few week then remember it?

My inbox is littered with password reset emails.

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P. Lee
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Re: Actual case aside

>That's where you are absolutely wrong. Evidence on an encrypted drive is the same as evidence in a safe

... and the police have complete physical access to it. All the data is in plain view - go ahead and search. What they are demanding is some thoughts in a person's head. Sending someone to jail because they won't tell you the thoughts in their head is incredibly dangerous law.

It is literally, "we don't have the evidence against you, so we'll put you in jail."

It doesn't matter if the guy is a complete scumbag - and I assume that he is. This is bad law.

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Linux, not Microsoft, the real winner of Windows Server on ARM

P. Lee
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Re: SBSA is the real threat to Intel.

MS' real problem is licensing. MS need to find a way of making ARM licensing as fair as x86 licensing without impacting revenue. This is difficult because ARM isn't as capable core-for-core as x86 but it might be capable-enough for many uses. Do they over-charge for ARM or lose revenue by scaling down the cost for ARM? Or do they make a single-user license free and bump up the CALs?

Windows may not be the future, but there is still a stack-load of profit in it. I think MS have miscalculated. If people are going to rewrite apps for the cloud, I think they are more likely to go AWS. What MS should have done is put effort into useful server stuff. Work with the vendors so that they can interrogate the power supplies in the servers and routers so data-centre power management becomes easy. They should have made some decent load-balancing - perhaps worked with Intel to build hardware load-balancing into NICs. They could have shifted their server pricing model to opex, rather than promoting cloud, which will eventually eat their lunch. They should have done "Automation for Small Business" (on-premise) where latency and accommodating legacy applications is key. Their server products focused on the large enterprise at the expense of making things "cloud-easy." A tweak to their licensing model away from per-core and per-cpu and they could have sacrificed performance for ease-of-use and made all those SaaS threats go away.

If SQLServer for Linux actually becomes a thing, it will morph into Postgres for Linux. First for the less critical applications (which will pre-package it) and then for for the more important stuff.

I smell the whiff of burning platforms. It is still quite a long way off, but it is there.

Instead, they were faffing around with Vista, Windows 8 and 10.

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Be our Guetzli, says Google, to make beastly JPEGs beautifully small

P. Lee
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Re: Needs to be able to efficiently use multiple CPU cores before it's worth anything

>Now if it could scale across your CPUs, so your 8 to 16 core workstation can chomp through it in a minute or less

What about a graphics card?

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Azure storage browns out for eight hours, nobody notices

P. Lee
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>A power loss is, however, something a cloud operator cannot always control. And it is a far more more acceptable reason for an outage than the typo that took down Amazon' S3 service.

Really?

I thought the point was that that the cattle are stateless and everything is resilient. Otherwise, what's the point of the cloud? I can provision a non-resilient server myself, really cheaply.

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Fire brigade called to free man's bits from titanium ring's grip

P. Lee
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Re: Please tell us

His name was "Dick" or, at the very least, "Willie"

Well, black and white, so, "Free Willy"

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P. Lee
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Re: I keep seeing these

>YOU CALL THE JEWELLER.

Ah, the voice of experience!

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Microsoft kills Windows Vista on April 11: No security patches, no hot fixes, no support, nada

P. Lee
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Re: well duh

>Probably because no enterprise in their right mind deployed Vista

and no back-ported, er, "Telemetry."

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Spammy Google Home spouts audio ads without warning – now throw yours in the trash

P. Lee
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Re: Too gay for words

>Ok first of all, I thought Disney already made "Beauty and the Beast" which I still never got around to watching, because, hey I'm busy alright?

I think Disney only did an animated version. There is a beautiful French live-action version with Vincent Cassel and Lea Seydoux. As for the gay stuff, wow. Using sex to sell a film? How very avant-garde! How very... "reality tv."

The film's director, Bill Condon, has said Le Fou "is confused about his sexuality" and that the film shows a brief "gay moment". Punting sexual confusion at children? Not so good. Little girls like fairy tales because they love fancy clothes, magic, luxurious things, horses, castles and being queen, not snogging a queen. The handsome prince, kissing, getting married and happily ever after is just part of playing grown-ups - being like mummy and daddy. It is not an expression of eight-year-old lust.

And before I get on the wrong side of adult gender politics (ok, maybe that's too late) maybe those who think there is support for the gay community in the film, you might want to look up the French-to-English translation of "Fou".

For my money, the scene is a ploy to get adults worked up and to generate publicity for the film. Nothing makes a film popular like getting it banned. So they aren't going to get my money. Offer me a nice story and I might be interested. Try to manipulate me or punt sex to my children and I get resentful. If you want to make an adult version of the story, go ahead, but don't punt it to children. Without a scene like that I'd probably takes the whole family to see the film, but I dislike that kind of corporate behaviour so that film goes to the naughty step for punishment; which brings me back to Google. This is not their finest hour either. They've done it once, I don't trust them not to do it again. Duckduckgo is already in place. Time to NAT 8.8.8.8:53 to an OpenDNS server and plans are in place to kill off gmail.

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P. Lee
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Re: A company

>If it's Google, you are the product.

Not necessarily.

I think it would rather fun to put Google Home, Siri and Alexa in a room together get them all started and leave them chatting to one-another. Come back at the end of the day and see what they've been talking about.

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Barrister fined after idiot husband slings unencrypted client data onto the internet

P. Lee
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Re: Why store them on a shared computer in the first place?

>Now I hate to be the voice of reason when we could be laughing at lawyers

It may not have even been shared. Maybe hubby was asked to do the IT maintenance and organise backups etc.

It highlights the problem that people still think they "have the internet on my computer" and that what is on my local screen is on my local hardware. It isn't your personal computer any more.

More importantly, what kind of backup system immediately shoves the content at a search engine?

More interesting than the barrister's name would be the backup system's name.

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Algorithms no excuse for cartel behaviour, says European commish

P. Lee
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Re: Artificial stupidity

>I have a theory that the bots are set to make the price 20p more than the cheapest copy, but that two bots with the same rule then bid each other up to silly levels

I just assumed it was scammers going for those with one-click ordering turned on. Misspent MMPORG youth....

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San Francisco reveals latest #Resist effort – resisting sub-gigabit internet access

P. Lee
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Re: Big Cable is why we DON'T have fiber to our homes

Companies are interested in ROI. Maximising return on investment.

They don't care about coax or fibre, they care about not spending money if they can get away with it.

Add some competition and they will match the service because if they don't they will lose business and future revenue drops to zero.

Competition is better than free trade.

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Dark matter drought hits older galaxies: Boffins are, rightly, baffled

P. Lee
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Re: Fractal, innit?

>"Normal" matter seems to be distributed fractally all the way through from planets, solar systems, star clusters, galaxies, galaxy clusters, etc.

Not just those. Spiral galaxies, sea-shells, bodies, faces, sunflower seeds, bird flight patterns, fingers and hurricanes all made with mathematical precision around a single ratio.

http://io9.gizmodo.com/5985588/15-uncanny-examples-of-the-golden-ratio-in-nature

Of course the universe doesn't have consistent design principles. It just looks like it does.

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Zombie webcams? Pah! It's the really BIG 'Things' that scare me

P. Lee
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Re: Credibility Lost

>Hardly life-changing? Bieber on a loop? Good Grief!

"Ending!" He meant "ending"! Self-inflicted. With a spoon.

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P. Lee
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Re: Access Denied

>It costs peanuts. BT will install a phone line for a few hundred quid + monthly rental. In the exchange it's "connected" (via some digital tricks) to a trunk & thence to a phone line at the control centre.

I think you'd find that all you've done is outsource the packet-switched VPN to BT.

That might be a good thing if your security expertise is low, but it isn't going to be a direct connection and if someone is targeting you (rather than just using your resources) there's nothing to stop them tapping your analogue system.

There is no substitute for security expertise and good procedures.

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Dungeons & Dragons finally going digital

P. Lee
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Trollface

>I'm old school. Paper, pencil and splat book.

But can you sell a subscription to paper?

A troll sits in the corner, smirking at you.

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Scott McNealy: Your data is safer with marketers than governments

P. Lee
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Re: Well, McNealy is right about market discipline

>a Canadian vibrator manufacturer is caught gathering data on its customers...

Oh, I'm sorry, did you think your <insert cloud-connected device here> was cloud-connected for your benefit?

Whenever someone says "cloud" it reminds me of Melbourne Metro's Myki "ticket" system. It isn't a ticket system, its a way of getting people to provide interest-free loans to the company. It also does a bit of ticketing on the side.

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Apple urged to legalize code injection: Let apps do JavaScript hot-fixes

P. Lee
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Re: Pretty sure Apple (and Google/MS) never allowed this...

and they never should.

Though, as I'm not a developer, I'm curious as to the patch procedures. Patches for things like skype always seem to be far larger and more frequent than I would expect. It is nice that the software is being maintained but the size and number of bug fixes indicates it has flash-sized coding issues. /usr/bin/skype is 35M. Typically IOS Skype patches are 75M. Skype for Linux doesn't appear to need bi-weekly upgrades, so why does the IOS version? I don't think even Skype for Windows gets the same patching as IOS.

Is there something else going on? Are they using patch downloads to boost their apparent popularity rating, classing it as a full download?

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White-box slingers, Chinese server makers now neck-and-neck with US tech giants

P. Lee
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Has anyone thought about automation?

Does China have more than cheap labour?

Am I the only one who finds it strange that no-one has automated server production? Why do we still do system designs which need human beings to plug bits in? Has no-one thought, "Hmm, maybe if we had slots instead of pins, we might be able to take the humans out of the loop and put these things together with robots." Even if you need a bendy cable, the circuit boards are precisely shaped, so getting a robot to plug in a connector shouldn't be that difficult.

If we built them using robots, wouldn't we pretty much nullify the cheap labour advantage?

My pet theory is that the multinationals like being multinational because they can shift profit around as required and play governments off against each other. It doesn't have a great deal to do with cheaper resources per se, though that helps too. No large company wants to be resident in only one country.

Is China's rise merely a reflection of the decline of the West's consumption of IT and people are just sticking with local companies in both parts of the world?

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Can you ethically suggest a woman pursue a career in tech?

P. Lee
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Re: "We need to promote women disproportionately, pay them equally or better..."

I spent a year at a US (ok, Texas) university and I have to say, "juvenile" is how I would describe it.

I also found it weird how social groups tended to be single-sex, almost as if everyone was fourteen years old. Having said that, I've found Australia to be similar - is it a big country thing or an isolated country thing?

IT is split into tech and management. The tech side requires extreme focus on details, long hours and pedantry. It basically self-selects for those veering to one end of "the spectrum" and these characteristics are somewhat damaging to relationship-building. The only people who can stick it out are those not interested in relationships. Only those people not interested in relationships can stick being around those people not interested in relationships.

I couldn't ethically recommend the industry to men, never mind women. In my experience, its women who hold the social fabric together, though I accept that may be from my viewpoint at the end of the spectrum!

However, I do have to come back on the article author. Smartphones are not about relationships. Bring up a copy of "Scramble with Friends" and then take a look at a on-armed bandit machine. See any similarities? It's about advertising and using gambling techniques to keep people using their phones so they can shove more adverts at them. My wife spends far more time playing scramble with the retired lady across the street from us, than actually talking to her. How many times have you seen families at restaurants all with their phones out, or at least with the kids on devices rather than the family talking all together? Is that a really good pitch for "the soft feminine side" of IT or is it "the soft feminine side" as viewed by a sociopath with an advertising plan?

IT is really, really rubbish at relationships. At its very best, it works as a telephone for videophone - that's when the computer gets out of the way. As soon as a third party starts injecting content, things go downhill, but that's not all. My family think I'm a broken record and maybe I'm old-fashioned but I think you should interact with those people who made the effort to be in the same physical space as you, rather than typing "LOL" to someone who is probably also ignoring those who are around them. I hate smartphones for that. They should go into a bucket as soon as you step through the door at home.

Am I the only one who's family is often so wrapped up in "social" media, that they ignore each other?

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Microsoft nicks one more Apple idea: An ad-supported OS

P. Lee
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Re: I presume

>That as I'm being forced to watch adverts, the cost of all their services will be drastically reduced?

Haha! No.

It just pays for more advertising.

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Telstra wants civil litigants to pay up front for access to metadata

P. Lee
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Re: Civil Litigation?

>isp metadata not telecommunications data

"The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which."

George Orwell, Animal Farm

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Is that a phone in your hand – or a gun? This neural network reckons it has it all figured out

P. Lee
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>In the future, police officers will be able to skip to the scene of the crime quickly without having to trawl through useless hours of CCTV footage.

...and criminals get away with murder using the fiendish ruse of sellotaping random cardboard shapes to their guns.

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Force employees to take DNA tests for bosses? We've got a new law to make that happen, beam House Republicans

P. Lee
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Re: LDS Sure it will lower employer costs and promote an healthy workforce...

>For a company, pregnancies are not "a risk". They completely depend on them.

Too imprecise.

Your own employees getting pregnant is a cost risk. What you want is to externalise that cost and have other companies' employees get pregnant.

However, if this is entering your thought process, you are probably either in a business which is failing anyway or you think you are contributing to the business when really you are hastening its downfall by pushing policies that ensure all your employees hate you.

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P. Lee
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Re: Bryant @GATTACA

There is what I would consider a fatal flaw in your argument: there is a difference in between what you are and what you do. They are asking for genetic information - that's not something you can change. Think of it like having, oh maybe black skin.

Now if they were asking if you smoke or run 5 miles every day or eat at McDonald's, that would be ok - that's behaviour that can be changed.

Let's take the information request to the extreme. If we had perfect information about health problems and behaviour, we wouldn't have insurance. Everyone would just be paying for themselves because we would have precise premiums which match circumstances.

In this case, we are creating a class of people who are uninsurable because no-one will want to take on the risk. So they get no healthcare. The genetic analysis may even be wrong but there's no harm to the companies in jacking up the prices or excluding them completely. Who think big data produces accurate relevant results for every data point?

The family car vs Ferrari argument doesn't hold water with health insurance unless you think that some humans are expendable and others should be preserved at great cost.

That's why the government should be providing healthcare. The market doesn't do it well. It may turn a profit, but universal service provision is not something markets do well.

... and we haven't even touched on whether its a good idea to have a large database identifying all the Semites. Was one of your grandparents from a Muslim country? Do we have some "extreme vetting" and a "travel plan" for you!

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