* Posts by P. Lee

4867 posts • joined 4 Dec 2007

Kentucky gov: Violent video games, not guns, to blame for Florida school massacre

P. Lee
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>Kids in the UK also play those games, and yet we don't seem to have the equivalent happening.

In the UK, he wouldn't have been classed as a "kid" he'd be classed as an adult.

But "An adult walks into a school and shoots people" is less of a heart-string tugger and generates animosity towards the individual rather than the "the system."

US politics is hyper-partisan. If someone came along and wanted to take away my free speech under the guise of "hate control" I wouldn't trust them with anything else either. That said, perhaps a minimum age of 25 on gun purchases might at least ensure there is two adults involved in the decision for those who are still young adults.

And at least half the video game comment is accurate. I don't think games cause the behaviour but the culture of being willing to kill those around you does appear to be an issue in America. The Swiss have plenty of guns, the Canadians have plenty of guns and neither of those two groups have the terribly high homicide rates found in the US. It is an American cultural problem.

And those saying, "but Trump..." need to start taking a less idiotic stance. There isn't a single problem which will be fixed by blaming Trump. Had Hillary won in 2016, nothing would have been different. Obama was in power for how many years? How did he change the situation here? Are you blaming Trump for the degradation of women? What was Weinstein doing during the Obama and Clinton administrations? What was Bill Clinton doing during the Clinton administration? What was Hillary doing when Bill was in power? Where was #MeToo during all those years? Now its all the President's fault? That's ... politically convenient.

Don't get me wrong, Trump isn't a good person. His moral aspirations set a fairly low bar, but his opposition seem to be able to go even lower. They are ok will killing hundreds of thousands of children before they are born every year. Those supporting gun ownership will look at that and tell those advocating gun control just what they think of that kind of morality.

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Microsoft's Windows 10 Workstation adds killer feature: No Candy Crush

P. Lee
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Re: Cores n sockets and a license to print money...

We've seen it from VMware already, just wait until the application vendors start charging based on how much RAM you have, CPU cores or mips consumption.

With more and more applications going to the cloud, MS seems to have seen the writing on the wall and are looking to bundle licensing up so you get all the base applications cheaply. Then you pay for all the useful bits you need when you realise you need them. Its a good strategy for them - you save nothing from going elsewhere until you get rid of of all their software.

Personally, if I controlled a large company, I'd be funnelling cash bounties to libreoffice et al for features I wanted as part of my strategic plan to bring it up to spec. 28 cores for SQLserver? You can get that on a single CPU. How much is that dual-proc server going to cost you?

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Facebook gets Weed-whacked: Unilever exec may axe ads over social network's toxic posts

P. Lee
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Re: Some say...

Fake accounts, real accounts... what's the difference?

Real stories, fake stories; persuasion and manipulation - does it actually matter if the origin is the Kremlin or the US?

The West's problem is that it has rotted from the inside - it has abandoned its moral compass and descended into partisanship. No-one is pleased or supports the other team when they do something good or call out their own side when they do something wrong. This situation is poisonous to both morality and effective government. Both sides become invested in narratives and influence rather than reality and acting morally. That pushes them to undermine anything that would expose them. Critical thinking has to go so that The Cult of Party can go on.

The good news is that I think the rot is far deeper in the media and academia than in society in general. The bad news is society in general gets very little voice and battling the media and education establishments in all their forms is very difficult.

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IBM's chief diversity officer knows too much and must be stopped!

P. Lee
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Re: Chief Diversity Officer?

If I had that title, I'd want to leave too.

Can you imagine the ridicule at the directors meetings?

- What's your job?

- I make sure we don't hire too many straight white men.

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Why aren't you being arbiters of truth? MPs scream at Facebook, YouTube, Twitter

P. Lee
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Re: There is no truth

>A good principle, but how does it translate into real life? What is "provably false"? What if you had no way of knowing, when you made the claim, that it was "provably false"? What is "harm", and how do you demonstrate it?

> the devil is in the detail

Oh no it isn't. The devil is in the worldview - the idea that we can control the environment sufficiently well to police it reasonably. We can't even do this well in the playground with children who aren't given the rights we give to adults.

A large part of the reason for allowing free speech is that policing it is really difficult and leads to oppression when you try.

The problem is that the big internet corporates' centralised platforms provide a central point of control. This is very attractive to politicians whose central purpose is "to protect you." Especially as corporates started exercising editorial control over the content, shaping the political environment by covert means, politicians now covet their influence even more.

We should resist not only the politicians' attempts to leverage these control points we should also resist the centralisation of power which creates this scope for abuse.

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Women beat men to jobs due to guys' bad social skills. Whoa – you mad, fellas? Maybe these eggheads have a point...

P. Lee
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Trollface

Cutting the spin

It appears the author is saying that the increase in women being hired into cognitive skills industries leads to the collapse of those industries, as demonstrated by the dot.com bust of 2000.

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Two things will survive a nuclear holocaust: Cockroaches and crafty URLs like ғасеьоок.com

P. Lee
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Re: Fix it in-browser

Why not fix it with dns?

The TLD has a record which sets the encoding and deviations are flagged in the browser for the URL.

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Smut site fingered as 'source' of a million US net neutrality comments

P. Lee
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Re: American democracy

The paint by numbers thing is (I believe) a result of trying to bring separate states into the union. No sparsely populated state would join if it knew it would always be out-voted by big cities.

The solution should be to repatriate power to the States. Democracy is supposed to be a means to achieve self-determination not a moral fig-leaf for you to impose your will on those you consider deplorable.

Decentralise power and Trump becomes less important. Shouldn't that appeal to both sides?

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P. Lee
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Re: I weep for my country...

Wikipedia:

Totalitarianism is a political system where the state recognizes no limits to its authority and strives to regulate every aspect of public and private life

I think you are just throwing unpleasant words around without knowing what they mean.

The FCC is failing to regulate, not over-regulating. In this case, the lack of competition in the isp market indicates a requirement for them to step in.

By definition, totalitarianism means an increase in government intervention. If you want to get political, ask who tries to do that.

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Twitter breaks bad news to 677,775 twits: You were duped by Russia

P. Lee
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Fake news

The idea that political persuasion is electoral interference is indeed fake news.

The corollary is that only approved organisations can speak on politics, in which case, welcome to the United Soviet States of America, comrades!

It seems some people and organisations think that the free dissemination of ideas between and through societies should be sacrificed to keep a particular political party in power.

The prevalence and pervasiveness of these views in the media is what scares me. Trumps idiotic tweets about building walls things are irrelevant compared to so many powerful organisations trying to arbitrate speech.

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YouTube turns off cash tap for automatic video nasties

P. Lee
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I have a question!

Do they not put adverts on low-traffic sites or just not pay out?

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Facebook settles landmark revenge porn case with UK teen for undisclosed sum

P. Lee
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Or don't take the photos. It seems to me that this should have fallen under kp laws not be used to justify revenge porn law idiocy.

It could be that the pictures were taken involuntarily but the weight of experience goes the other way. In which case, while I feel for her pain, the root cause was entirely within her ability to control and unless Facebook was exceptionally slack, it bears little responsibility.

Purveyors of traditional values don't do so because they are sex-negative or are intent on spoiling your fun. It is demonstrably true that expecting others in society to compensate for your lack of modesty is ineffective and thus foolish. Stop expecting that others can or will fix individual failure.

Digital is designed for copying. If you want to keep your modesty, you have to be modest. Parents should teach their kids values which will keep them safe and actively discourage, with reasons, unsafe values. Schools can also help by using every data breach news story as a lesson in safe internet and device usage. Ram the lesson home at every opportunity: Digital is inherently unsafe. Demonstrate how phones sync photos and data.

We need to disabuse people of the notion that phone data is private.

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Frenchman comes eye to eye with horror toilet python

P. Lee
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Re: ah ha!

Frank Spencer?

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UK taxman told to go easy on transformation with Brexit in headlights

P. Lee
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Re: If there are still any serious farmers left

My question would be, if three quarters of British farms are financially untenable, who is paying for them?

I get the feeling it isn't the Greeks. Being part of a superstate doesn't make wealth magically appear from nowhere. Someone is paying for it and it if isn't us, then the continentals should be glad to see the back of us.

If we aren't paying for our food, do we really have a right to eat it?

My guess is that to keep things the same, we'd need to keep paying the same subsidies.These might be more difficult to hide when its all in the UK budget. Ideally, we'd see lower taxes and higher food prices, because it is generally better to reflect reality than obscure it. However, there are always profiteers from change.

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Remember those holy tech wars we used to have? Heh, good times

P. Lee
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Re: No mention of systemd?

My bsd firewall dnats dns. It’s the right way to do it.

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US shoppers abandon PC makers in hour of need

P. Lee
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Re: to be expected

US software companies abandoned consumers in an effort to push them into their clouds.

They had little use for new hardware.

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Intel AMT security locks bypassed on corp laptops – fresh research

P. Lee
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Physically Separate, Dedicated, Management Interface

Job done.

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UK.gov admits porn age checks could harm small ISPs and encourage risky online behaviour

P. Lee
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Re: "blocking ... between 1 and 50 sites a year"

>Doesn't matter if the whole thing is dumb and unworkable.

Sadly I think the scheme is workable. As in, the plan is to turn the internet into a government-managed network.

It isn't hard to filter out all the video and audio providers and isp dns servers and then dpi remaining Udp for dns. I suspect those 30gbit nics with fpga's would be useful. You can do the dpi offline and once you've found the service, add in a redirect in an upstream isp network. Or don't do a redirect, just tag the source IP for "special attention."

Until we start building wholesale encrypted networks and/or manage to demand the removal of such features, the government control creep will continue.

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We translated Intel's crap attempt to spin its way out of CPU security bug PR nightmare

P. Lee
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Re: Old is new again?

>And people say I'm crazy for using SPARC.

I see you've already implemented the 40% performance hit fix. ;)

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This week in 'Bungles in the AWS S3 Privacy Jungles', we present Alteryx – and 123 million households exposed

P. Lee
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>Why does such an option even exist? That's barely one step above accessible to all.

Perhaps because it's Amazon Web Services?

In the olden days, when I was a lad, we had three tiers: Presentation, Application and Data in our networks. Only the first was accessible from the internet. There was a good reason for that.

Then, in order to cut costs, we cut layers out of the network and we put our data layer directly on the internet. That means that when we mess up, as fallible humans are wont to do, it immediately becomes both obvious and damaging. However, if you are a large enough company, the impact probably isn't that high.

Security is hard and it impedes the flow of money. So why not "simplify" the design and just blame the engineers for mistakes?

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Windows Store nixed Google Chrome 'app' hours after it went live

P. Lee
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Holmes

Re: Congrats!

But the story isn't really about Windows.

Its about:

1. The windows store doing the right thing (by its users) and junking third-party installers for big-name software. They are almost always going to lead to bad things.

2. The windows store doing the wrong thing (by its users) and blocking alternatives to MS products.

So its actually an ecosystem story and in that context, talk of ditching increasingly closed ecosystems is valid comment. In fact, I'm not sure how you can comment on app store policy without commenting on ecosystem issues.

And in the spirit of sharing, opensuse here (including steam gaming), though with xfce since kde stability has gone to the dogs on my particular kit. BSD (pfsense) on the firewall and mail servers.

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Firefox 57's been quietly delaying tracking scripts

P. Lee
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Re: So if it knows what the tracking stuff is

>Why doesn't it give us a way to "delay" it to infinity if we wish?

Those are two different objectives. FF's objective is to get you the content quickly. The "broker" sites are often slower than the content sites so it makes sense to "re-queue" them. Also, with any innovation there is disruption and you want to be sure your innovation doesn't break things unexpectedly.

As for giving you a way to delay things to infinity, It does. But you have to want it enough to make the small effort of looking for the add-on.

Kudos to FF for getting it right. 57 is much faster. I was dubious about bothering with "a faster browser" but I really appreciate it.

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Yes, your old iPhone is slowing down: iOS hits brakes on CPUs as batteries wear out

P. Lee
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>"Would you rather have battery time?"

What I'd like is transparency.

Yes it is clever, but have a notification telling you what is going on and a switch to turn it off.

Are we out of memory? Is there a problem with the app? Should we replace the battery?

Who knows?

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Tired of despairing of Trump and Brexit? Why not despair about YouTube stars instead?

P. Lee
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Big Brother

Re: If you think that is stupid

>Unless of course you don't care which president...

Of course not dude, I'm with Antifa. Bring on the revolution and lets party like its 100 years ago! We'll keep the Red (and Black) flag flying here!

I despair less over Trump than I do over the opposition politics which made him seem attractive.

Brexit? In shock news, sovereign nation keeps sovereignty! How dare they indeed! Give your legislative capability over to the so much more efficient Germans, French, Greeks and Italians right now!

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Australia's new Foreign Influence laws expand phone snoop powers

P. Lee
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How does this work?

At what point does influence become "foreign" and what should we do about it?

If Australians agree with Russians, are they disqualified from the public discourse? Do we try to hunt down all posts from non-Australian IP addresses on Facebook and make them disappear during an election year? Perhaps we are only going to be allowed to express views which co-incide with official Australian political parties. Do we silence media companies who are more than 50% owned by non-Australians? What if share transactions alter things during an election year?

What is an advert? I get that you might be able to identify this on TV, but what about youtube channels? Is Ben Shapiro an advert for a political side or an independent commentator? Does Putin have a channel? Is that different?

It all seems to tend towards oppressive rules and conveniently flexible legislation.

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Report: Women make up just 17% of IT workforce, paid 15% less than men

P. Lee
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>IT companies here are so desperate for skilled staff, there's no way any would turn down a competent applicant solely due to gender.

It is because men hate women dontcha know? If you've ever seen a woman close to a group of male IT people, you'll see how much they all shun her. Also white supremacists who are hiring more brown people because they enjoy ordering them around like slaves. I'm not sure why the women-hating men don't hire more women so they can order them around too. Its all very confusing.

Does anyone else see "Diversity Report" and immediately think, "Minority Report"?

My recent favourite is shoe0nhead's contravention of Matt McGorry ("wokest bae of 2015") advice to give your gf/so "the gift of feminism" for valentine's day: "Don't - stick with the chocolates and flowers!"

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Guilty: NSA bloke who took home exploits at the heart of Kaspersky antivirus slurp row

P. Lee
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Re: The mind boggles.

>It's definitely not useful in a high-security setting with an advanced threat model.

I guess TAO doesn't count as an advanced threat then, since Kaspersky picked it up.

Seriously, if AV picks it up, the code is useless - don't be distracted by "Ooooh - magic source code". Maybe its just the American AV that's rubbish and wouldn't quarantine it.

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Arm Inside: Is Apple ready for the next big switch?

P. Lee
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>You might need to wait a bit before Non-App Store apps and Steam games are available on the new machines though.

Unless its basically two systems in a box with ARM picking up all the lower power/always on work and x86 running high-power applications with a fast interlink between them. You could "sleep" the x86 side while keeping ARM running to save power.

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US govt to use software to finger immigrants as potential crims? That's really dumb – boffins

P. Lee
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>How has that only got 21 upvotes in as many hours? Proof I suppose that there is no justice.

Perhaps not everyone thinks that the justice system outcomes are determined by "likes" and that virtue signaling is not yet compulsory.

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Google says broader right to be forgotten is 'serious assault' on freedom

P. Lee
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>The lack of a right to be forgotten was often used as a means of oppression by some users on other users

Citation needed

Yes we need privacy and yes I think google intrudes far too much on privacy. However, I don't really understand how you can have a right to force amnesia regarding what was public.

What would be reasonable is to have google delete all information it has on me which I have provided. So if I terminate my gmail account, I expect all that data to be deleted and any youtube and search data it may have linked to my user id. Removing links to newspaper articles about my youthful indiscretions is not part of that deal. It doesn't make sense unless you are also planning on ordering the burning of said newspapers as well.

Man up and own your mistakes.

Teach the next generation about the importance of integrity and the foolishness of thinking that internet services operate for your benefit.

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Munich council: To hell with Linux, we're going full Windows in 2020

P. Lee
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Re: Not sure about Office?

>Well that is what they would actually need to use in 99% of workplaces!

Shouldn't they be in school?

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Universal basic income is a great idea, which is also why it won't happen

P. Lee
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Re: Welcome back Stalin

>When will these post-modernists realise they won't win?

Warning: approximate descriptions follow...

Both modern and (what is often called) postmodern thinking are the result of the move to atheism. They both run into problems when philosophy rubs up against reality.

Modern "Scientific" thinking says there is no purpose or reason to anything in the universe because it comes from randomness. Dawkins will tell you that. The problem is that people see their lives and their relationships and world events and instinctively know that they must have some purpose, and that "evil" is a real thing. Only a sociopath, not even Dawkins, can run his day-to-day life in harmony with the truth of a meaningless universe. There is an explicit disconnect between what is "fact" and what is "valued." Values are disconnected from reality.

The post-modernist tries to remedy this problem of modern thinking. This came from shortly after the enlightenment (rather than being chronologically after the modern era) and was the reaction against the meaninglessness of enlightenment thinking. Rather than taking the external physical world as the starting point for truth, they take the view that the mind is what senses the physical world and therefore reality is in the mind, not the external world. Truth is therefore what we collectively agree is reality and therefore, anything which is "true" is a social construct. This thinking show up when we see "scientific consensus" being equated with "truth" (which may or may not be the reality of the situation) and also things like "gender is a social construct." The problem is that we have no way of stepping outside of our minds to test anything and therefore we've given up on, and are un-tethered from, "objective reality." Again, values are explicitly disconnected from reality.

Once values are disconnected from reality, we get more and more irrational behavior. Logic and truth become twisted or irrelevant. Look at CNN, the BBC, the Guardian, Salon, student protests and mass shootings for evidence of this. I think Collectivists (Left and also Alt-Right) with their historical predilection for explicitly embracing secularist ideology and penchant for class (worker/capitalist; race; gender etc) warfare fall prey to this problem in a particularly identifiable manner.

Once objective reality is disconnected from values, narrative and perspectives become paramount. Everything is viewed through a very limited lens leading to a warping of common sense. Yelling at the sky becomes a thing. Denying Trump is your president is a thing. Race warfare by any means necessary becomes a thing. Denying that Socialism ends in human catastrophe, becomes a thing. This isn't to say the Right doesn't have its problems - it is just that the Left has gone full-lunatic first.

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Sean Parker: I helped destroy humanity with Facebook

P. Lee
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Re: sloppy coding

<philosophical>

If a tag is only a parody of html, does it need closing?

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Where hackers haven't directly influenced polls, they've undermined our faith in democracy

P. Lee
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>There are two sets of hackers in this world: those targeting the machinery of voting and those seeking to corrupt the debate

The first set of hackers are dangerous.

Those who consider the second set of people dangerous are dangerous.

"Corrupting the debate" by adding ideas (good or bad) implies the debate should only follow along a prescribed line of thought and that alternative viewpoints should not be heard.

That is a corruption of democracy. I despise those who would rather win power than have and promote moral and logical ideas. De-platforming is for those with no argument.

We need to promote a culture of truth over one of winning.

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Microsoft goes to bat for Dreamers: Windows giant sues Uncle Sam to block staff deportations

P. Lee
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Re: Because Microsoft has no employees outside the USA?

Does anyone read the news or do they just spew blind hate for Trump?

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/14/us/politics/trump-daca-dreamers.html

Trump supports the Dreamers staying and is pushing for legislation to allow them to do so, which is required. Obama exceeded his authority in saying they could stay without passing any legislation.

Don't get me wrong, I think Trump is an idiot, but he doesn't deserve the irrational and irrelevant hate being directed at him.

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Dashboard pushers: Dark here in containerised server land, innit sysadmins?

P. Lee
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A car analogy?

Rather than the analogy being one car, lots of cars going all over the place might be a better analogy of a container farm.

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OK, we admit it. Under the hood, the iPhone X is a feat of engineering

P. Lee
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Re: "Why do you think Linux users do not spend money?"

>There are two groups of people using Linux.

A bold and possibly incorrect statement.

I like linux because it provides flexible tools which can be customised to solve the problems I have. Technically, any old unix (including MacOS) would do, but linux does it in an easy-to-use manner which also happens to be free.

I have more than one mac and iphone per person in the house, but I run linux (and vmware-windows) on the machines I use for work because they are just easier and therefore more suited to those tasks. There is an element of cost control - with at least eleven running systems in the house, there's no way I'd be buying Mac's or Windows all round.

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OpenSSL patches, Apple bug fixes, Hilton's $700k hack bill, Kim Dotcom raid settlement, Signal desktop app, and more

P. Lee
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Re: I wonder what the Trump apologists' excuse will be this time?

I would hate to be thought of as a Trump apologist, but using the wrong email client might be a little different from setting up an off-site email server. Setting up postfix is easy, but it isn't something you do by mistake.

However, by all means, lock them both up!

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Subsidy-guzzling Tesla's Model 3 volumes a huge problem – Wall St man

P. Lee
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Clarifying the situation

I think the question is not whether a fledgling industry is being subsidised or not.

The question is whether a very rich person, with a fig-leaf of car-making, is unduly enriching himself further, pretty much risk-free, by collecting government incentives, while accruing all the IP benefits should the research pay off.

Is the problem that the payoff to the people who are funding the subsidies is unclear?

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Oh, Google. You really are spoiling us: Docs block cockup chalks up yet another apology

P. Lee
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>"a code push that incorrectly flagged a small percentage of Google Docs as abusive."

Am I the only one concerned that Google Docs are being flagged as "abusive"?

Even if they did decide to pass judgment, er, categorise, on what people write, why would they be connecting such an evaluation system to a delete function?

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Vlad the blockader: Russia's anti-VPN law comes into effect

P. Lee
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Re: I bet Trump......

>was justified as a necessary measure to prevent the spread of extremism online.

It's a good job our governments don't have this attitude... oh wait.

Don't confuse a difference in individual measures with a difference in desire and capability.

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Official: Perl the most hated programming language, say devs

P. Lee
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Re: Sad really...

>Not really - Perl was created in 1987 and Python in 1991

But four years in computing then was far more than four years in computing now.

Perl is great for small and ad-hoc tasks - its great for gluing things together. My fondness for it stems from my first unix job, a simple netscape web server-cgi thing on solaris. I installed linux on a partition so I could get proper perl running and taught myself vim. Having grown up on BASIC and C, I was blown away by how it just did stuff. My Windows partitions have declined in use ever since.

Having said that, I tend to default to Ruby now. It isn't serious programming, but more complex data structures are easy and I like the way you can just feed something to something else and it does what you expect with minimal effort.

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P. Lee
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Mushroom

Re: Forth

> "It's COBOL I despise."

Says the one who has never seen Miranda.

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P. Lee
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Coat

Why not? Is it considered harmful?

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Google slides DNS privacy into 'Droid developer stream

P. Lee
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Re: Weird

TLS?

It appears they've noticed that I redirect 8.8.8.8 to the openDNS servers at my firewall.

I suppose they don't want other ISP's to cash in on your browsing habits.

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HMRC boss defends shift to AWS, says they got 50% knocked off

P. Lee
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Competition is great!

But 50% off? That sounds like predatory pricing - using past profits / profits made elsewhere to push a smaller competitor out of business.

That's a bad thing.

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HMRC's switch to AWS killed a small UK cloud business

P. Lee
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>The extra capacity can be (automatically) switched off and forgotten about as soon as they are no longer needed.

You can turn off the power to your own devices too, if you don't need them - it isn't against the law.

With openstack you can at least move between providers. Using proprietary APIs is bad strategy, even if it provides savings at a tactical level.

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Do fear the Reaper: Huge army of webcams, routers raised from 'one million' hacked orgs

P. Lee
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Re: Code monkeys X don't-give-a-f**k PHBs X time to market --> IoT

Default passwords are rarely a problem if they are located on serial port consoles.

But no, someone wanted to combine production and management interfaces and make them all ethernet.

How hard would it be to have the management port issue an L2 broadcast and shut itself down if it finds the production ports responding? How about trying to contact google or a public DNS server and shutting itself down if it succeeds?

We know the security will be bad. We know the vendors don't care about maintenance. How about something easy to make sure user hasn't done something stupid? Writing secure software is hard. Reducing the attack area is so much easier.

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Apple Cook's half-baked defense of the Mac Mini: This kit ain't a leftover

P. Lee
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Re: The 2011 one still works

re: soldered RAM

Apple don't want to make computers, they want to make appliances.

If you make some devices upgradable, people will notice the restrictions on the appliances.

Compute-power and RAM now generally exceed what people need - so we don't upgrade. Apple is busy downgrading compute and upgrading screen resolution, adding the "touch bar" and soldering in memory to create a future upgrade requirement.

I came across a similar thing in the enterprise space. A vendor (the market leader) put a large price tag on the hardware (which was just a branded PC) rather than the user-count. The client didn't know their capacity requirements up front. If they bought too low, adding more hardware was prohibitive; pushing them to over-provision - the upgrade. The client did the sensible thing - they ditched the vendor and went for a provider who billed per user - i.e. cost scaled with function.

Apple appear to be going one step further, they restrict the memory in things like the MBA so you can't over-provision and either purchase twice or buy newer kit which has a higher-price-tag for lower cpu specs. Yes it has a better screen, but I need glasses - that ultra-high res is all slightly blurry for me anyway.

So yes, I still run a desktop, with a large screen. If I need something small/quiet, I run an old laptop and hide it like a book near or inthe cupboard under the telly. I find the AI in WOPR frequently ahead of its time - "The only winning move is not to play."

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Let's dig into how open source could KO the Silicon Valley chat silos

P. Lee
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>open ecosystems cost money to run and in turn charge their customers.

There's that, which is probably the main reason.

There is also the reason that the open source crowd try to do things properly, usually using a new TCP port which then fails by default at every firewall. We build an open protocol with a proprietary port.

Closed providers build proprietary protocols over an open port.

IMAP is going to fail over corporate firewalls where facebook messenger succeeds.

The one way this could succeed is through phone use. These days, phones bypass the corporate firewalls so we could use any protocol we fancy. What we do need to do is to enable presence information without enabling spam.

Personally, I think we need a handshake protocol for swapping certificates over email. We need to hold addressbooks in email, so email servers can run the handshakes without needing the clients to be online. Once we've identified "friends" (essentially we all have to run our own CAs) we can communicate presence info without spam problems. If someone's email get's hacked, we revoke the cert and issue a new one.

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