* Posts by P. Lee

4568 posts • joined 4 Dec 2007

Alleged $17.5m fraudster accused of duping HPE out of 42,000 servers

P. Lee
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What it really comes down to is that the bulk end of the market can't be sustained so the vendors skim from the smaller purchasers (who expect lower "economies of scale") to fund it. That only works if you can prevent the bulk market redistributing.

As for the argument that you own the asset but not the IP in the asset, that's morally rot. If I buy a DVD, I can sell it on. If I start selling copies, that's a different issue. The fact that the US (and EU) government colludes to outlaw the grey market through IP law is irrelevant. Its indicative of a society in economic and moral decline. As for not selling stuff to "bad" regimes... really? That that fuss over Cuba while the US messes around in Vietnam, Central and South America, Libya, Iraq, Afghanistan? Do you really thing the Iranian government can't get its hands on plenty of compute power? Is this about, stopping them doing bad stuff or retarding their economic development? Maybe half the country dislikes their president - perhaps the government should be toppled and one more friendly to foreign powers installed...

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HPE CEO Whitman says everything's 'on the right track' as sales are literally decimated

P. Lee
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Re: It gets even worse

See how much easier it would be if you used their cloud?

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Amazon goes to court to stop US murder cops turning Echoes into Big Brother house spies

P. Lee
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Re: Warrantless mass surveillance is one thing...

>First, it's not warrantless.

I think the point point is: the police's surveillance isn't warrant-less, but Amazon's is.

The whole thing looks fishy to me. It would be easy to comply with this request and say, "see, we keep nothing" which would make them look good. If on the other hand, they are snooping more than they should, then things would get ugly and no-one would trust them, or Siri or Tay....

Of course, if he yelled, "Alexa, call the police!" and Amazon did nothing, that would look bad, even if it is entirely excusable.

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How to nuke websites you don't like: Slam Google with millions of bogus DMCA takedowns

P. Lee
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Easy and established procedure

Punish vexatious legal action.

And perhaps do the proper thing, which would be to force the DMCA notices to go to the website providing the content, not a search engine.

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I was authorized to trash my employer's network, sysadmin tells court

P. Lee
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Re: "I wish for world peace"

>If this guy wins, expect your next contract to be like something written by Tolstoy.

He won't. We have juries to even out the edges and maintain the spirit of the law, which in the US is, "tough luck for the employees."

More likely, there will be clauses concerning the requirement to "ensure the continuity of corporate systems' functionality as required by the company for operational activities..."

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More brilliant Internet of Things gadgetry: A £1,300 mousetrap

P. Lee
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Re: Get a cat.

Well you have to pay for the dedicated fibre link and the salary of the guy who sits there and watches the videos... of the cat catching the mouse.

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BBC admits iPlayer downloads are broken

P. Lee
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Its this new fangled "internet" thingy.

We're still developing the tech to allow you to download a file from the interwebs.

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Get this: Tech industry thinks journos are too mean. TOO MEAN?!

P. Lee
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>Rather than place the blame for this shift on privacy invasions, defective products, unsavory employment policies, or toxic corporate cultures...

or the fact that, unlike in the 80's and 90's, the industry isn't making significantly better tech, or our lives either better or more fun.

I do not want your rubbish app,

It looks just like some 80's tat,

That I purchased long ago,

It isn't worth having, "on the go."

Those 35 years have made you rich,

But its clear, you've had no creative itch,

Since in your garage you hatched a plan,

To take the tech of some other man,

Its all about the patents now

And the milking of that one cash-cow

You tell us lies 'bout what the product can do

And drip feed features 'til we're blue

Your AI stinks, bright - it is not,

Your code, it suffers from bit-rot,

We cannot trust your new software,

Not to take our data, store it who-knows-where,

To be stolen by some nasty hackers,

Who behave better than your advertising-backers,

You try to feed us browser enhancements,

That's really pants, in all departments,

You want your cloud to be our controller,

I think I'd rather get ebola,

I remember when every day,

We'd run a spreadsheet in 48k

The money that we've spent upgrading,

Is consumed by your awful coding,

Those layers and layers of virtualisation

I've now come to the realisation,

Solve problems of your own devising,

And this is just my own surmising,

That you do not deserve that brand new yacht,

You don't deserve it, not one jot.

IT was fun, IT was cool,

Now its just a huge cesspool,

Of lawyers, http spam

You've made it like,

Green eggs and ham.

So I'll take it back from you,

With Linux and all things GNU,

I may do less, be less connected,

Than you think should be expected,

From all the things that do not matter,

That incessant, inconsequential chatter,

I'll go outside, take my children too,

I'll give no more of my cash to you,

I'll visit friends and drink some wine,

I'll vow to spend more time offline.

I do like tech, I really do,

Tech is still cool - but not from you,

I like to make it do my thing,

All that Chrome - I don't like bling,

It isn't fun when you do it all,

And try to keep me in your thrall.

I do not need your streaming service,

All that slurping makes me nervous.

You do things in an inefficient way,

Far better to broadcast FTA,

So I'll tinker with my PVR,

As some would tinker with their car,

I care not for content though,

MKR? I hate that show.

Recording it, getting it for free,

Is what really motivates me.

I have no interest in your content,

I'll record it all, then auto-delete it.

A billionaire I'll never be,

And that's really fine with me,

I see what happens to a company,

When all it cares about is money,

Unpleasant both to foe and friend,

Flexible morals, truth to bend,

And dodgy accounting in the end.

Those who remember "Pretty Woman"

Can learn a very important lesson,

No, prostitution will not make you lucky,

Its that you don't want to be Stuckey.

I should end this rhyme right here,

Though I'm sure it'll make you sneer,

At tech that does not turn a buck,

I loath your tech and that's tough luck,

For when tech lovers have departed,

Your downfall, it will then have started,

Open source your profits will consume,

You may bored customers' profiles exhume,

Pretend they're valid like Yahoo,

Like like like like on Facebook too,

But when all is said and all is done,

And ads are all "One weird trick, for your tum."

Though in this life you'll do ok,

There is one thing to cause dismay,

That golden parachute, which works so well,

Will land you gently down, in hell.

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US judge halts mass fingerprint harvesting by cops to unlock iPhones

P. Lee
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Re: Weasel words

I think the problem is the scope of the request.

This would appear to be a one-time prosecution device. No-one involved in this type of crime is going to use their fingerprint for unlocking in the future.

However, rejecting the request does stop the government from abusing the system when they want to trawl for fingerprints.

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Facebook scales back AI flagship after chatbots hit 70% f-AI-lure rate

P. Lee
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Re: The problem with Facebook

>it's overkill and painfully distracting and ultimately unnecessary.

I disagree - and I'm someone who can't stand fb and doesn't have an account.

What facebook does provide is an authenticated presence. Not authenticated in terms of who you are, but authenticated in terms of, you're the same person attached to that facebook account as you were yesterday. - at least for people who already know each other offline.

It is a bit like a telephone number - once you know the right one, you can call it and be reasonably sure of the person picking up.

People use fb like an address-book + group chat. It's power is in the data that is already in there - the pictures that we assume will be around forever, but won't be.

What we are in desperate need of is a point of presence protocol and sophisticated address-book and identity management. We need to ditch single-identity communications systems, such as skype.

I think we'll need to see a revenue collapse at facebook which leads to service degradation, before anything changes. There's too much historical data that people want to keep in fb for them to move to another service just because its trendy.

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Blundering Boeing bod blabbed spreadsheet of 36,000 coworkers' personal details in email

P. Lee
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Re: Here we go again

>there are a few solutions, but most are fairly draconian, and even they are rarely bullet proof.

What was the error? Hiding data and mixing formatting with data.

Do not do unexpected things with data processing. If you have the data there, keep it in plain sight. If it shouldn't be in plain sight, don't just pretend it isn't there.

Keep a canonical list of templates which have no data in them and have reports populate them. If you must import the data to provide a snapshot, don't hide it, put it in a separate sheet and have your formatted report reference the data.

Of course, if MS could, you know, innovate in security, it could get the mail client to check attachments when they are added and run the "ready to publish?" checks it already has in its own products which pick up on hidden fields and so on.

Maybe they could add an "attachment" api to windows so that picking up a file will run it through checks based on the file type and system configuration. It always looks a little weird that you "open" a file when you are actually not.

But hey, people will buy Windows and Office anyway, so why bother spending any money on developing it for security?

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Dying for Windows 10 Creators Update? But wait, there's more!

P. Lee
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Re: ugh

>I'm trying to figure out why that is a bad thing.

Best case: its a pointless upgrade

Worst case: they might make it work

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Your next PC is… your 'Droid? Remix unveils Continuum-killer

P. Lee
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Re: Luddite here

There are a couple of things worth mentioning.

I was working for a company which had everything on citrix. I had my own laptop, but mostly it was a citrix client. A phone with a decent video-out capability could easily take that role and mean I can ditch a large lump of metal from my bag.

We are constrained quite a bit by battery power. Even a phone running as a smartphone can suck the battery down quickly if you have the screen brightness up and you're running a game. If we can add a power to my screen-docking, we can really open up the CPU.

Instant-on and quiet. I have a powerful PC desktop, but web and email are the most used functions. These are bad on a small screen with no keyboard and mouse, so just adding that would be worthwhile. A phone doesn't replace the PC, but it does mean I only need to turn the PC on when its really called for.

And the downside? I don't trust mobile OS's. I don't want them transitioning to my desktop, I'm going to need a new linux OS for this to be a thing.

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Google agrees to break pirates' domination over music searches

P. Lee
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Re: Its all posing

>Google actually sells advertising on many of these tunes videos while the copyright holder gets nothing.

Possibly true, but look a little closer at many of the music videos.

Product placement much?

There are also two more things:

1. if the illegal stuff on youtube disappeared, would you go out and buy it instead?

2. if the illegal stuff on youtube was allowed, but it became unprofitable to produce more of that kind of thing, would the world be a worse place?

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P. Lee
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Re: Time to switch to yandex.ru for media files, then

or a firefox extension which returns page 2 from google results.

See? This is why open source is such good indicator of criminality!

We should ban it.

Or maybe, we should pass a law which says that google can only ever return one page of results. Maybe remove the "search" button and just leave the "I feel lucky" one.

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Is your child a hacker? Liverpudlian parents get warning signs checklist

P. Lee
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Re: Overcomplicating it

Only one question required: Would you steal a policeman's helmet and go to the toilet in it?

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P. Lee
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Re: Being a criminal has little to do with the list as given.

>It says "has multiple social media profiles on one platform".

>I'm fine with ridiculing the advice, but at least ridicule what it actually says, not what you hallucinate it to say.

Most of the kids I know do this - one public profile (maybe for school too), one for close friends.

It's much easier the managing the ever-changing privacy settings social media companies play with.

I create email addresses for almost every organisation I talk to. Then I can track their data sharing.

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Software glitch, not wind farms, blacked out 60,000 in South Australia

P. Lee
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>Yesterday, the power station's owner Engie said that's because its number two unit was accumulating losses and has been mothballed since July 2015.

>Ever since last year's blackouts in South Australia, the state's high proportion of wind power has been blamed as the reason for blackouts, leading to a push for “clean coal” to provide “stability” to the grid.

The gas generator wasn't being used enough to be profitable, so they want to use coal instead?

It looks to me like the company just didn't want to carry enough spare capacity to cope with the spike in demand during the heat. A bit like the water companies in the UK selling off their reservoirs for building on and then cutting supplies during hot summers due to "drought."

I know nothing of the industry, but it appears to me that if energy usage spikes during the heat, then solar might be a better bet than wind. At least at night, demand should ease off as office-blocks turn off their air-conditioning. Either way, you need to cater for peak rather than average, capacity, which is going to be "a financial burden" on the generating company.

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BS Detection 101 becomes actual University subject

P. Lee
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>Tugging strongly on The Register's heart-strings, they call out some of the world's richest known sources of bullshit: “the TED talk you watched last night … the latest New York Times or Washington Post article fawning over some startup's big data analytics”...

>We almost weep with joy to see them ask “Can you tell when a clinical trial … is trustworthy, and when it is just a veiled press release for some big pharma company?”

Actually, that was the subject of a series of TED talks, "Bad Pharma" where they look at how clinical trials are manipulated to the point of being "less than optimal."

There are a couple of issues. The first is morality. There is a difference between showing off your thing in a good light and completely manipulating the message for the purposes of misrepresentation. We seem to have a distinct lack of morality in our vendors and a surprising willingness on the part of customers to tolerate it rather than blacklisting them.

The second issue is the models. The problem with stats is that you have so many variable factors that your models can easily fail to reflect reality. There are also so many shades of meaning attached to data before it goes into the lake that get lost by the time the data comes out.

Big Data is what big companies do when they can't be bothered to get to know their customers/internal management and their customers problems. There is certainly a place for stats and multi-discipline analysis, but I'm not sure that throwing it all together into chaos and hoping order comes out is a model worth banking on. Even matching up things like network traffic and latency issues can be a non-trivial exercise.

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Connected car in the second-hand lot? Don't buy it if you're not hack-savvy

P. Lee
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Second-hand cars not safe?

I see the entire car industry weeping huge tears as they glide to the edge of the river and sun themselves on the bank.

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A webcam is not so much a leering eye as the barrel of a gun

P. Lee
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Would you trust a hardware switch?

Why not?

Just load an os with no specific drivers and see if the USB device disappears when when you flick the switch.

The vendor could fake it but there would be big trouble if they circumvented their security device.

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In colossal shock, Uber alleged to be wretched hive of sexism, craven managerial ass-covering

P. Lee
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A hive of donkey coverers?

Only in America...

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UK Snoopers' Charter gagging order drafted for London Internet Exchange directors

P. Lee
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Re: Didn't this behavior collapse the Empire?

>I am not completely familiar with British history, but somehow I recall hearing that a blind overly-nationalistic belief was the primary flaw in the later empire which eventually led to its collapse.

Er, no.

WWI bankrupted the empire.

From the British point of view, neither of them were in the cause of patriotism. Actually, it was mostly to help out other nations not fortunate enough to have a strong border with their neighbours.

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Dead cockroaches make excellent magnets – now what are we supposed to do with this info?

P. Lee
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Re: Seems legit

Phase three: cockroach maglev trains

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'I'm innocent!' says IT contractor on trial after Office 365 bill row spiraled out of control

P. Lee
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Devils and details.

If it was: contract cancelled, service cancelled. What were they expecting?

If on the other hand, they had paid their O365 bill but had cancelled his support contract and he turned off the service because he still happened to have admin access, that's another story.

Either way, I'm sure I won't be the first to think: it wouldn't have happened if it was wasn't Cloud.

Let's take another example... say you run an abortion advice service which relies on government funding. Trump cuts off your government funds and you have a cash-flow issue. If you don't pay your subscription, your entire operation pretty much shuts down immediately. No Excel for the finance team, no Word for the mail merges, no Excel for the tech team IP addressing "database."

Or maybe you run a Muslim humanitarian aid agency, and Trump decides it should be shut down because its aids terrorists. Maybe a rogue employee is helping terrorists - unlikely but possible. Flick a switch and your infrastructure as a service is gone. No media to install from, no offline usage is possible for the OS or applications. Accounting and payroll running as SaaS? It's gone - you can't pay bills or employees. It isn't just that a court order could put you out of business, its the fact that you'll be in no position to fight it. If you can't fight it, the government is going to be able to far more heavy handed.

How fragile do you want your infrastructure to be? How much fragility do we want in the ecosystem as a whole?

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FAKE BREWS: America rocked by 'craft beer' scandal allegations

P. Lee
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Re: There's no grounds to sue

>There is no legal standard of what constitutes "craft beer" in the US.

I'm guessing that even below 6m barrels, the "craft" part of it is well and truly gone.

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US visitors must hand over Twitter, Facebook handles by law – newbie Rep starts ball rolling

P. Lee
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Black Helicopters

>This is what you get...

when your party machine wants to keep the media occupied with something inconsequential.

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Zuckerberg thinks he's cyber-Jesus – and publishes a 6,000-word world-saving manifesto

P. Lee
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>so long as you maintain this level of delusion over the actual role that Facebook has in people's lives and in society, you are actually a big part of the problem.

Indeed. Isolating liberals from reality in the world largest echo-chamber. Enticing them to abandon action in the real-world in favour of self-absorbing involvement with their phones; bombarding them with all the things they "like", distracting them other, more important things; channelling them into commercially safe causes - turning on rainbow filters on their profile pictures, instead of worrying about whether the war on terror might be killing far more people than its saving. Maybe they should stop focussing on which toilets 2.5% of the population want to use and contemplate how to support the 50% of the world's population who live on less than $2.50 per day. Maybe they should question whether prisons should be a commercial venture and if that has an impact on law-making. Maybe they should organise politically to support a candidate who does not have funding ties to big-business.

So many options. Maybe some of them are more important than seeing what the cat of a school-friend from twenty years ago is doing with a ball of wool.

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P. Lee
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Re: meh

>What's freindface and why do i need it?

So that you realise the truth that you need more Cuke in your life.

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Why I had to sue the FCC – VoIP granddaddy Dan Berninger

P. Lee
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>it's independently powered, which is one reason it's still usable (and sometimes essential) in the event of a power failure (because the telcos keep backup power running just for that reason--911

Until you have a phone with an answering machine on the end of the line, in which case, once the power goes out, you'll lose the whole lot, self-powered line or not.

There is a case for battery-backup in this case, much as there is for fibre-connected phones.

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P. Lee
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Re: less gummint regulation is nearly always a good thing

The problem with tagging packets is that you get companies like MS who tag all their packets to get the best speeds.

And yet again the Net Neutrality is misconstrued. It isn't about all packets being equal, its about all packets of a particular function being equal, regardless of source and destination. So netflix gets, "streaming media" priority equal to any other "streaming media." They are welcome to buy their own links into an organisation (priced equally for all purchasers), and they are welcome to buy their own colo cache servers (priced equally for all purchasers), but they must not be able to do a deal which gives them priority over other providers.

Where it gets hazy is when someone starts a new service with a new (say) port number which makes it onerous for ISP's to work out how to treat data. That SSL VPN means voice is no longer treated as high-priority. Streaming over https (hello youtube!) rather than RTSP hides the data content, which is bad. Tunnelling everything over https is bad, but we do need to be able to do encryption, so transport-mode IPSEC rather than tunnel-mode needs to be a thing.

Government regulation is required because these organisations tend towards monopolies and as companies grow they also influence the legal situation to their favour. This must be stopped and the power of its stopping must not be dependent on funding.

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Enterprise IT storage – where being fat and very dense is, um, a good thing. Right, Cloudian?

P. Lee
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Coat

Looks at logo and name

Cloudians of the Galaxy, fighting the Evil Decepticons!

Cloud! Ah-ah! Saviours of the data-verse!

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Haven't deleted your Yahoo account yet? Reminder: Hackers forged login cookies

P. Lee
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Re: Oh dear

>These are technology companies who cannot manage simple security activities and treat their customers' data with contempt.

I think you've misunderstood who the customers are. Their customers are the ones paying for the advertising. Who are you?

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Global IPv4 address drought: Seriously, we're done now. We're done

P. Lee
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Re: IPv6 is fundamentally broken

Remote parties have many ways to track users across sessions. IP addresses are a very crude proxy for a user and as long as there is the possibility of NAT, proxies or multi-user hosts, the user-to-ip mapping is far too fragile to be definitive.

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P. Lee
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>How many users actually need a permanent real IPv4 address?

Anyone who wants a VPN?

Part of the call for all these cloud services (gotomypc, onedrive) is the lack of proper infrastructure.

We need ipv6... and we need decent firewalls. One without the other isn't much use.

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P. Lee
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Re: IPv6 is fundamentally broken

>Haha, check it out guys. This one wants NAT.

Yeah! Let's use a firewall to break the whole connectivity model instead of just blocking access.

There's lots that is hard and probably wrong in IPv6, but not needing NAT ain't part of it. We need to use it and iron out the kinks, not avoid it.

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Infosec pros aren't too bothered by Trump – it's his cabinet sidekicks you need to worry about

P. Lee
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Re: Elections

>1 Person = 1 Vote (majority wins)

That would be better than the electoral college for a presidential election. However, the result was pretty close. This would not be a reliable way to make sure you don't get a Trump.

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P. Lee
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Re: What an asshole

>if you didn't vote for Clinton, you voted for Trump by throwing it away to an (unfortunately) useless "third party."

And that, ladies and gentlemen, is how you always end up with two rotten candidates from the same two rotten parties.

Actually, as for as the UK parliament goes, I think we should double the number of MPs. Half run as FPtP and the other half as PR. That keeps direct local representation while giving the smaller parties the chance to build support.

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IT bosses: Get budgets for better security by rating threats on a scale of zero to Yahoo!

P. Lee
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Re: Compliance and secure safe network frameworks

>'compliance' .. no amount of form filling is going to secure your network.

Was the article referring to legal compliance, or configuring things in compliance with the corporate standards?

Compliance is the verification and documentation that you have done things right. If you don't do the paperwork, you'll spend your life rechecking things which don't need to be rechecked.

Compliance should be done by the plan/design/build/run teams at design gates and for changes, and then done again by the (separate) auditing team on a regular basis.

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WTF is up with the W3C, DRM and security bods threatened – we explain

P. Lee
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>DRM is not about preventing piracy. DRM is about market control and consumer lock-in.

This.

There are valid concerns over piracy, but DRM on web streaming is not a fix for them. Cryptography is great for keeping things secret. If giving people access to things is your business, there's probably nothing you can do to squash piracy.

I find going to a DVD rental store more fun than downloading or streaming and it has far more selection than the legitimate online options. But the studios don't seem to support their retail rental outlets. I'll be playing more games and I think I'll take up the violin since both of our local shops have closed. I used to spend way more on DVD's than a netflix subscription would cost. My impression is that the studios thought getting rid of most physical media and streaming instead would be a great way to reduce piracy and increase revenue. I think they will find that they just lose mind-share - the halo effect around streaming is very small. I watch far fewer shows since I got mythtv running because I no longer have casual exposure to new stuff.

The internet was supposed to enable "the long tail," but apparently, it doesn't.

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Brave VMs to destroy themselves, any malware they find on HP's new laptop

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There seems to be some confusion in the article as to whether it is tab-based or application-based. I'd assume application if its a VM and there's no reason why it shouldn't be persistent if it is not asked to wipe itself.

This is more along the lines of how things should work, but its a little sad that its a third-party thing and not an OS thing.

Downloads do need to be handled. The right way to do it would be to have the browser ask the host OS to pick the file up from a download cache area. The host OS would then ask the user if they want to retrieve the file into the host OS data area and initiate the transfer. The guest vm should not have outbound (to the host OS) capabilities beyond very simple message passing.

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IT guy checks to see if PC is virus-free, with virus-ridden USB stick

P. Lee
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Re: seriously??

PXE-boot lan segment to re-image? Surely faster than replacing the drive?

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Ex-FBI man spills on why hackers are winning the security game

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Article upvote!

The veneer of knowledge and capability is very thin.

Ooh we can identify facebook games even through https! Yeah, big deal. Now, about the real threats...

We need policy-based endpoint protection based on application profiles, not user rights. That's inbound/outbound network access, peripheral and storage access and we need better alerting.

We need to stop playing the fools catch-up game of scanning for malware and make sure that a compromised application isn't allowed to mess with anything else on the system. I know we've got EMET et al, but it needs to be baked into the OS and packaged with the application, not an afterthought.

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Linus Torvalds decides world doesn't need a new Linux today

P. Lee
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Re: Sarcasm

>Do we need a sarcasm icon.

No, it would cost too much.

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Oz consumer watchdog: 'up to' speeds shouldn't be in broadband ads

P. Lee
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Re: As I have said for the last two years

>the words "up to" are replaced by law with the words "at least"

This is only ever going to refer to the link speed. What we really need is for link-speed to not be artificially restricted. I don't think the cable providers throttle the links speed so that's not an issue. It really is only a marketing gimmick. It should be the maximum ADSL2 supports given the physics or at least 1gb/s for fibre for home connections, unless 1g transceivers are vastly more expensive than 100mb/s ones.

If speed is not a cost for the provider, take it out of the equation. I'm happy to pay for capacity but stop doing silly stuff.

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Get orf the air over moi land Irish farmer roars at drones

P. Lee
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Re: A perfect opportunity to get creative

How about a drone that hunts for unknown wifi points?

Losing a cheap drone is a cost of being criminal - getting your face and transport known to police? Priceless.

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P. Lee
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Re: Quite Right

>I did have a right hand which went someway to giving his jaw a new alignment.

A somewhat more proportionate response than the use of a submachine gun.

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Voila! Bazinga! Amazon turns Alexa into an annoying 'cool' aunt

P. Lee
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Re: "the more Alexa sounds...

>The more it sounds like a human conversing with me the more creeped out I will be.

With apologies to Razer, "by the socially incompetent, for the socially incompetent."

But maybe that's the plan. Maybe they are aiming at 14 year-olds because they want to capture the next generation. As the media industries can tell you, it is far easier to influence children than adults.

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Crims in £160m broadband scam facing 44 years of porridge

P. Lee
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Re: £160m split 4 ways over 10 years.

Any news on what happened to the money?

Go to jail for 15 years, get £40m.

Apart from the moral issues, if you're single, that sounds like a good deal, even before you consider parole.

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Life after antivirus: Reinventing endpoint security

P. Lee
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AV is a sign of the failure of Windows security policies.

Where are my switches for starting applications? /nochildspawn /nonetwork /nochangeprivs /nopermwrite /flagsecviolations /noproxyuse /nopublicipaccess /currentdoconly /noforeignmimefiles etc?

Putting in some sensible defaults would kill most security issues, since they are mostly down to users not knowing or caring and being hit by drive-by infections operating at the level of the user. We need to be more fine-grained that than.

Set the security policy to sandbox the application before you start. Maybe even get the OS to add metadata used by the original application security policy when the file was written. These would be worthwhile OS upgrades, not the "Modern" interface.

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