* Posts by Paul Crawford

3482 posts • joined 15 Mar 2007

Jesus walks away after 7,000lb pipe van incident

Paul Crawford
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Re: You said it, man.

Not even Mary Magdalene?

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IETF moves meeting from USA to Canada to dodge Trump travel ban

Paul Crawford
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Re: Trump is a Troll.

"And its under threat from politicisation. Net neutrality"

Eh? How, exactly, is net neutrality a threat to the internet?

A threat to ISP profits perhaps, but hardly a threat to the functioning of the internet. Quite the reverse really.

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Paul Crawford
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Re: Didn't May say the same in Wales?

Probably, but no one was listening.

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Paul Crawford
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It seems to be an oddly US-centric aspect of how Americans see/idolise the president that you don't really get elsewhere. Its almost like criticising their father or similar.

Even something contentious like Brexit in the UK has less of a knee-jerk support for the leaders (e.g. many pro-Brexit commentards would not be so outraged by others pointing out the current PM is an uncaring cockwomble, for example, but would defend their political goal).

Even a symbolically powerful role like the monarch that also divides opinion fails to ignite the same pro-Trump/anti-Obama frothing as most UK 'republicans' may be against the idea of the monarchy but don't feel need to launch verbal rants against Liz herself.

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What can you do with adult VR, some bronze gears and a robotic thumb? On a Friday?

Paul Crawford
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Re: "Let me introduce the Sex Gauge"

Well El Reg already has already invented the "kilowrist" as a unit of bandwidth:

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/11/12/arizona_boffins_grasp_fat_pipes/

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Paul Crawford
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Linux

And for us Linux lovers we have the south-pointing penguin:

http://www.stirlingsouth.com/richard2/south_pointing_penguin.htm

You can never have too many penguins =>

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Want to kill your IT security team? Put the top hacker in charge

Paul Crawford
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Best advice

"The biggest mistake he sees companies making is also one of the most common – finding the best team member and making them the boss."

That applies SO OFTEN in science/engineering were the only option for a pay rise or other benefits within the company structure is to move in to some form of management. As a result many, many, companies end up losing a good engineer and gaining a mediocre manager.

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Amazon mumbles into its coffee when asked: Will you give app devs people's Alexa chats?

Paul Crawford
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Re: New battery

Exactly! A New android phone typically manages 36-48 hours!

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Sleuths unearth 'Panic Mode' in Android, set off by mashing back button

Paul Crawford
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REISUB

Yes, might be useful if Android did support the magic sequences:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magic_SysRq_key

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Set your alarms for 2.40am UTC – so you can watch Unix time hit 1,500,000,000

Paul Crawford
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Re: Year 2106

Some system's C time libraries act as if they use unsigned internally so they work fine post-2038, but others are more pedantic or just obstinate and consider the "negative signed" range as invalid.

Certainly its a simple fix for a while for cases where you have a 4-byte space only (e.g. structures that have to map to a file) or some embedded stuff where 32-bits is still used to avoid the speed/power penalty of emulating 64-bit maths generally.

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Paul Crawford
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Re: Signed Integer

"So you can represent dates before 1970"

Not really, as many time_t related stuff uses -1 to indicate an error.

You have to remember that the likes of time_t was created for the computer's sense of linear time (for more general uses where date/time format was commonly used) so UNIX creators cared not about pre-1970 and 1970 was therefore as good an epoch as any since 32-bits (or 31 really) put the range so far in the future that no one cared. Similarly DOS time and FAT file systems don't do pre-1980.

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AI vans are real – but they'll make us suck at driving, warn boffins

Paul Crawford
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Re: Obvious study is obvious

"driver doesn't need those skills, so what does it matter if they lose them?"

Because for all the AI hype, there are still worrying gaps in current capability where the car will shit on the driver by saying "Ooops, can't handle this - you take over NOW!!!" with possibly seconds till impact.

When you see all of the news/discussions saying automated cars need good connectivity, need accurate GPS/mapping, need road junctions/signs redesigned, and where insurers have got a cause proposed that implies you are only covered where the car is using automated driving for "appropriate conditions", it seems we still have some way to go.

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Uncle Sam says 'nyet' to Kaspersky amid fresh claims of Russian ties

Paul Crawford
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"AV software is the best possible agent to carry a cyberwar payload"

So not pushed Windows 10 updates then?

Or a complete lack of Android updates for many phones?

Or anything that involves interaction with Adobe software?

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Two-factor FAIL: Chap gets pwned after 'AT&T falls for hacker tricks'

Paul Crawford
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If you can reset the account with only access to the phone it is single factor, not two.

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G20 calls for 'lawful and non-arbitrary access to available information' to fight terror

Paul Crawford
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The problem is not even so simple. Yes they can block, for example, WhatsApp servers, but they would be stumped by any alternative app that simply used encryption over other channels such as SMS or email and banning those would be a step too far for even our muppets due to the impact on pretty much everything else.

It would also be pretty trivial to write a word-substitution app so the resulting cypher text had similar statistics to plain text and so would not be found by looking for high-entropy test.

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Former GCHQ boss backs end-to-end encryption

Paul Crawford
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Joke

Re: Hooray.... but..

"That means we either need to hide them from the OS makers"

You either forgot the state of the phone market, or forgot the icon =>

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Paul Crawford
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Currently they would hack in to a phone using any one of numerous vulnerabilities, and from there install whatever "back door" was needed. Generally this is a good approach, as in the least-worst for all of us, as it has to be targeted to the device in question (hardware / software version, etc) and is not universally available to anyone as a deliberate back door feature would be. Also widespread (mis)use would tend to show up and things would get patched*.

Down side to us is the then hoard vulnerabilities like "Eternal blue" etc that ended up in the NHS being screwed over, etc.

[*] - yes stop laughing and the majority of Android users like myself who get bugger-all patches even when bugs are publicly disclosed and in use.

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Paul Crawford
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@ Charlie Clark

That was my point exactly: the majority of "us", as in "UK citizens", voted for parties with a strong authoritarian bent and a distinct lack of technical knowledge on both sides of the house.

Some of us might have voted Lib-dem precisely because they don't want the big brother state, but finding others who have a clue is difficult.

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Paul Crawford
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Lets face it, most (all?) of the recent incidents did not rely on secure encrypted communications. The talking point was the 1st of the bridge nutters who sent a WhatsApp message shortly before, and even that was eventually traced and the recipient has AFAIK no terrorist connections at all.

So really we are mostly looking at a few angry and often not terribly bright people cracking, people who often were already known because folk at the mosque had reported them as trouble makers. So only a moron would put the majority at risk of cybercrime due to the actions of a minority where such a law would have made no difference.

Oops, we voted for them :(

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Paul Crawford
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But will our current shower of shit glorious leaders have the sense to listen to someone who actually knows about the issue, or do their usual dance to the red-tops' bile-spewing?

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OMG, dad, you're so embarrassing! Are you P2P file sharing again?

Paul Crawford
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"escort services, which are carefully targeted to the copyright infringer"

Escorts that provide a better experience due to a lack of DRM?

[*] DRM = dick restriction service, apparently a feature of some marriage-licensed models.

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BOFH: That's right. Turn it off. Turn it on

Paul Crawford
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Re: Hello. Is that the help desk?

Stop watching those "speciality videos" then, it does your eyes in! Eventually. After the wrist RSI has gone.

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U wot M8? Oracle chip designers quietly work on new SPARC CPU

Paul Crawford
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Re: Perhaps they've discovered the hardware is more important than they realized?

As already mentioned, a normal compiler will align structure members to avoid this sort of problem.

Unless you use some packing directive to override that sort of thing, and most commonly that is done for faster/simpler binary file access. So it could be to run other CPU's software more simply, or it could be to speed access to binary data created for/used by another CPU architecture.

Either way it is nice to see the SPARC is not totally dead, just a shame it is Oracle and their eye-watering prices, licensing terms, etc, in the way.

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It's time for a long, hard mass debate over sex robots, experts conclude

Paul Crawford
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Come now! Were you never at school and tittered about the debating club?

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Paul Crawford
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Re: Plastic Pal

"a bunch of mindless jerks, who'll be the first against the wall when the revolution comes."

Wow, and I thought this thread would avoid discussing systemd

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PCs will get pricier and you're gonna like it, say Gartner market shamans

Paul Crawford
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Value for money?

Prices going up is not always a problem if you get a MUCH better machine from it. SSD is generally an improvement (except for big volumes of data) and more RAM is always needed to cope with the muppets behind web browser software, but also what of display quality?

Will see an end to shitty sub-HD resolution laptops? Will we ses desktops coming with worthwhile monitors like 2560 x 1440 at 27" as default?

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New work: Algorithms to give self-driving cars 'impulsive' human 'ethics'

Paul Crawford
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Re: Masturbation is never useless.

"masturbation is often useless."

Surely that is what Viagra was invented for? OK there is some risk of heart failure but we all have to go sometime.

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Paul Crawford
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Re: Mind my ass

"HM sends a pack of corgis to chew the developer's ass..."

Can we have this applied to more UK gov projects? Might just improve the on-time and on-budget chances.

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Happy 4th of July: Norks tests another missile

Paul Crawford
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Re: Preemptive strike

"Story goes that no-one knew at time that lithium in the lithium hydride broke down to tritium and made H bomb way more powerful than intended."

Nope, they know that well. The case was Starfish Prime, as described here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Starfish_Prime

What they did not appreciate was the EMP mechanism, or if they did they did not realise it would cause damage so far away. And this was largely in the pre-semiconductor era where a few hundred volt spike was laughed off by a thermionic valve. Today even a smallish bomb could cause serious EMP damage to a lot of our critical systems that are not EMP-hardened for military use. More technical info here (PDF doc):

http://www.empcommission.org/docs/A2473-EMP_Commission-7MB.pdf

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For all the chaos it sows, fewer than 1% of threats are actually ransomware

Paul Crawford
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Re: fewer than 1%

1% of, say, 640 million vulnerability is 6,400,000

Thus if I have 5,000,000 vulnerabilities I have fewer than 1%

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Paul Crawford
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Re: fewer than 1%

Exactly, that 1% is already an integer value of some 6 million or so.

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Bonkers call to boycott Raspberry Pi Foundation over 'gay agenda'

Paul Crawford
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Joke

Path?

How do I know if a path is heterosexual or homosexual?

I mean I can sort of tell if a path is straight or curved, but that is not helping me know how the path feels about other well-trodden routes. Also how would such a path pass on its inclination?

Oh dear, now I have to contemplate if I like my asphalt...

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How to pwn phones with shady replacement parts

Paul Crawford
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Re: This is news?

I am also thinking, why would they do this? As in, why would a cheap repair shop be using more expensive parts to compromise phones that are probably mostly used by customers on lower budgets?

Sure it might make sense to do such a nefarious swap on some drug baron's phone to bypass security as part of a CIA sting operation, but I don't see enough general revenue for the risks to make a cheap repair shop go down that route. Not with Google already whoring most of your data from advertiser to advertiser as a "legitimate" business.

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Shock: NASA denies secret child sex slave cannibal colony on Mars

Paul Crawford
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Alien

School boy mistake

To assume you harvest alien sex slave's organs. You just periodically drain them of their bodily fluids at said orgies.

Really, where did this Robert David Steele guy get his education? OK boys, he clearly needs a refresher course (or three) of The Probe. Got enough lube in the ship's hold?

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In touching tribute to Samsung Note 7, fidget spinners burst in flames

Paul Crawford
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Re: Spinny things with loudspeakers?

Not sure, but he regretted nothing..

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Fancy fixing your own mobile devices? Just take the display off carefu...CRUNCH !£$%!

Paul Crawford
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Re: It's the way things are going

Time perhaps for a mandatory 5 year warranty including battery replacement at advertised rate/costs given with the initial sales price?

That would focus them and the buyers on the benefits of not selling easily broken shit and being able to fix stuff instead of throwing it away and getting a new device with even more data slurping built it.

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Talk about cutting-edge technology! Boffins fire world's sharpest laser

Paul Crawford
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Of course, don't you know that The Register is a well-known lesbian publication?

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/05/06/indy_reg/

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Ubuntu 'weaponised' to cure NHS of its addiction to Microsoft Windows

Paul Crawford
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Cost is the smaller concern

“Ultimately, open source allows you to be in control of you own destiny.”

Is probably the most important aspect. More so with the future of Windows being forced updates and data slurping that we hope is not going to be part of the 'enterprise' version, but we just don't know how that will go.

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European Commission chucks cash at UR – the universal language of mind your own biz

Paul Crawford
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Re: He's missing the point.

"Is it really easy to educate people about an entirely new browser and how to use it, rather than to educate them how to install a couple of plugins on the browser they're already using?"

Yes.

See how Google managed to push Chrome over all other browsers by pestering promising it would be "better". Most users are not El Reg readers and can just about grasp the idea that "Install XYZ and you are safer" but not the list of plug-ins, settings and a VPN subscription (and matching network changes or app to manage it) needed to achieve the same goal.

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Concorde without the cacophony: NASA thinks it's cracked quiet supersonic flight

Paul Crawford
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Engines

More precisely it was due to the use of reheat for take-off (or "afterburners" as the Yanks call it) which is normally only used by the military since (1) it is fuel-inefficient and (2) it is damn noisy.

More detailed reason is you get more thrust from heating the existing mass-flow of engine exhaust to increase the speed and hence the momentum-rate. Down side is noise is approximately related to the 8th power of exhaust speed so 25% extra thrust comes with about 6000% extra noise.

A major reason why most modern aircraft are cheaper to fly and quieter is the use of the wide "high bypass" engines where much of the thrust comes from a large volume of air at lower speed from the part that goes past the actual engine.

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Honda plant in Japan briefly stops making cars after fresh WannaCrypt outbreak

Paul Crawford
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Re: The price you pay for using generic OS for industrial control

I suspect it is more down to shitty vendor's software that breaks easily with MS patches, and/or the risk assessment that such problems were more likely than an infection.

Maybe in said assesment they were wrong, of course.

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Breach at UK.gov's Cyber Essentials scheme exposes users to phishing attacks

Paul Crawford
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Coat

Re: the Morissette Scale?

I read that initially as the Morissey scale. Not sure if that counts as ironic or not.

Its the one with the book in a pocket about being miserable now =>

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Avere: You're going to see tighter integration between us and Google

Paul Crawford
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Encryption?

Now if only you could trust such an appliance to encrypt all cloud-stored data with a key that only yourself had access to...

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F-Secure's Mikko Hypponen on IoT: If it uses electricity, it will go online

Paul Crawford
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Re: Freedome will be illegal in the UK

Come now, the snooper's charter was only ever about catching the dumb and technically ignorant out there. Admittedly, that is most people.

As for trying to crack down on VPN services that would end up as another pointless whack-a-mole game and seriously piss of business users. Of course the gov often dances to the red-top paper's stupid suggestions so there is a fair chance they would try, but again I suspect the real experts know your biggest risk are the local muppets who can buy knifes and rent a van, as we have seen recently.

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Costa Rica complains of US govt harassment over Pirate Bay domain

Paul Crawford
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I am surprised The Pirate Bay has not developed an up-datable bit torrent model that allows the "web site" to be shared like any other torrent, with local searching by pointing the browser to it and some signed-key method of pushing out incremental (rsync-like) updates to it.

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South Korean hosting co. pays $1m ransom to end eight-day outage

Paul Crawford
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Lets face it, they can probably decrypt the lot and come back in a couple of week's time to find the systems *still* vulnerable to being screwed over again.

Lord, praise the profits!

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'OK, everyone. Stop typing, this software is DONE,' said no one ever

Paul Crawford
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Re: Hammers

U can't touch that!

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Stack Clash flaws blow local root holes in loads of top Linux programs

Paul Crawford
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Re: Why am I not surprised to see sudo there?

"Why can't you just give the permissions you need to the relevant user? Reliance on sudo seems pretty hacky...."

The reason for 'sudo' was to allow no root account being enable, so (1) any attacker has to know both a sudo-enabled user name AND the matching password, and (2) also to avoid the temptation to log in as root for general work.

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Paul Crawford
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Re: @Robert Carnegie

To provide a slightly more useful answer, and as said it is 'no' because Linux searches your path only, so even if its not in your path but in your directory it won't be run. This is unlike Windows where it will look in your current working directory and with trying various extensions like .exe .com .bat etc.

So if its not in your path you need to use a fully resolvable path such as:

/home/me/sudo (from anywhere)

./sudo (from /home/me or similar as your current working directory)

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Report estimates cost of disruption to GPS in UK would be £1bn per day

Paul Crawford
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True, but how many cell phone tower systems use anything but the USA's GPS?

Having the satellites up there is no good if a large proportion of time/frequency/navigation systems use the lowest common denominator.

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