* Posts by hammarbtyp

647 posts • joined 28 Nov 2007

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Your roadmap to the Google vs Oracle Java wars

hammarbtyp

Re: Oh dear...

"Convention doesn't trump the law."

No, but the question is whether copyright law is appropriate when dealing with API's, which although are technically "published", their purpose is far more extensive than just a paper representation.

Copyright law concepts was written way back,and just was not designed for this. To be honest this is just another example where the way information is used, distributed and disseminated shows that current copyright law is not fit for purpose.

The only people cheering for this judgement to come down on Oracles side, is the author, Oracle and IP lawyers. That's not a group that any sane person would want to be associated with

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hammarbtyp

Sun had no problem with this, until they were taken over by Oracle

This is just another long line in money grabs from Oracle. After their initial failure to argue that the code had been copied, they have tried to expand the argument that API's were copyright-able, despite virtually the entire software industry being based on the fact API's were open.

It is an interesting case, but this article is so one sided it would make you wonder why it has taken 7 years ti get to this point. Pity that the analysis has been done by the registers answer to Sean Hannity

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Britain's on the brink of a small-scale nuclear reactor revolution

hammarbtyp

Re: Global temps have been static for nearly 20 years.

Obviously graphs and scales are not your strong point.

Let XKCD simplify it for you...

https://xkcd.com/1732/

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hammarbtyp

Re: £875 per household per year!

We know that's you Donald, your handle gave you away

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Project Gollum: Because NHS Caring means NHS Sharing

hammarbtyp

A less broken broker

I initially misread the article as

"Here I was, with the cream of top British digital talent around the CORBA table"

and I thought, well there's your problem....

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Britain shouldn't turn its back on EU drone regs, warns aerospace boffin

hammarbtyp

Re: Here be snowflakes...

@codejunky

You might not of noticed that EASA covers a lot more than drones. It covers all Europe air regulations. So if we leave, it will affect more than just the ability to fly a drone ins Europe

and yes, we can write our own regulations, but at what cost? Writing and certifying a set of regulations for 500 million people is far more cost effective than maintaining your own separate standards.

And the Problem is with aircraft is that they habit of flying abroad, and the most likely destination for UK aircraft is Europe. So you can have one set for UK and one for the EU, but in the end you are just duplicating effort, cost and regulation, so why do it?

The stupidity comes from the belief that world revolves around us, where we are about to find out that our importance on the world stage has been severely over stated.

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hammarbtyp

Re: Here be snowflakes...

and where do you propose to find the people to write the UK regs @codejunky and who is going to pay to employ them and regulate them? Maybe Nigel F can do it, since obviously he told us it will be easy and has lots of time on his hands

And while we are waiting for these new regs to be certified by Europe and US as compatible, what do you propose the people who rely on the certification do in the meantime?

Some of us unfortunately have to live in the real world and not pretend taht everything will be OK, because a few deluded politicians told us so...

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US Navy developers test aircraft carrier drone control software

hammarbtyp
Joke

Re: Really??

To be truly hacker proof, they will have to upgrade to the SHA-2 Done

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FTP becoming Forgotten Transfer Protocol as Debian turns it off

hammarbtyp

Our company disables all outgoing ftp requests for security reasons (something IT forgot to mention for about 6 months). so my heart sinks when I go to a company website and see only a ftp link for uploading patches/software etc.

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Mastercard launches card that replaces PIN with fingerprint sensor

hammarbtyp

To be honest, most fraud occurs due to card skimming and the cards being used in areas where two factor authentication is not standardized (That technological tour-de-force, the US is the biggest culprit ).

If you wanted to fix security you close the weakpoints 1st, so they would be better off just disabling all non chip and pin cards worldwide

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hammarbtyp

Re: Really?

The difference is that most transactions use Chip and pin in the Europe, which means loss and mis-use of the card is far harder. In the US it basically comes down to your word against the retailer with the only proof being a illegible scribble, therefore banks has fewer ways to verify true loss against fraud.

Saying that if it was a choice between better security(a.k.a chip and pin) and trying to recover lost money from a bank, I would go security every dat

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Brexit factor lacking in Industrial Strategy, say MPs

hammarbtyp

Re: IIRC HMG put up £5.5 Bn over a certin period to EU R&D nad got back about £8Bn

@Dave15

Ah, the man who judges success and value through an excel spreadsheet. I'm glad the human race does not use your metrics when deciding to have children, otherwise the human race ill be dead soon.

The equation is not as simple as we put so much in, put we only got so much back, but more the value in what the shortfall paid for.

In terms of R&D there was not even a shortfall, the UK was very good at getting the EU to pay for research projects.

So the government have said in the short term they will stump up the difference, but how do you value the value of sitting on the top table when the projects are decided, how do you value influence in large basic research projects. How do you value the loss of worldwide influence of universities, business and government in cutting edge research and the subsequent loss of top foreign researchers and academics?

Answer: You can't , but you would be a fool to assume that the value is not considerable to UK PLC

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US border cops must get warrants to search citizens' gadgets – draft bipartisan law emerges

hammarbtyp

Re: There is a positive side to this...

FYI Just ask Chicago how well tough immigration controls played with the IOC

https://intransit.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/10/02/chicagos-loss-is-passport-control-to-blame/

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hammarbtyp

There is a positive side to this...

The chances of L.A. getting the Olympics in 2024 under the present regime is approaching zero, and Paris on only an hour away

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WWW daddy Sir Tim Berners-Lee stands up for end-to-end crypto

hammarbtyp

Re: Email this to your MP

and a backbone...

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Trump sets sights on net neutrality

hammarbtyp

Its getting like April the 1st should be the one day of Sanity, because it feels like the other 364 have turned into the joke

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How Ford has slammed the door on Silicon Valley's autonomous vehicles drive

hammarbtyp

Re: Security ???

I though CAN was being usurped by TSN ethernet (on high end vehicles anyway), due to greater bandwidth for AV applications?

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Airplane bomb fears spark America's laptop, tablet carry-on ban

hammarbtyp

Re: Dont fly Emirates/Etihad/Turkish/etc...

As the washington post explains, this is less likely to be security related and more likely to be a trade war masquerading as a security matter.

Welcome to the new world

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Brit firm lands £58m EU spy drone 'copter contract

hammarbtyp

Alternative Headline

"British drone firm wins EU maritime safety contract "

It was a real pity that the author decided to conflate their prejudices with an otherwise interesting technology story about the use of drones to replace expensive manned services.

There is nothing here about Brexit. The firm already supplies drones for maritime pollution emission testing and therefore they were front runners to extend the contract. Of course it only runs for 2 years to give the contracting agency a get out clause at the end (If you wanted a Brexit angle you could of mentioned that the UK will have to fund a presently shared service, presumably at extra cost after Brexit)

As for the mention of the european army, well it might of escaped the authors attention that the drones are unarmed and the EMSa is a purely civilian agency tasked with Maritime safety. As for the cheap "troubled political project" jibe, well, if i wanted that sort of biased reporting I would go and read Breibart

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'Password rules are bullsh*t!' Stackoverflow Jeff's rage overflows

hammarbtyp

Its not the users fault...

The whole problem of measuring security through password entropy is that you are putting the emphasis on the security on the weakest link and the area you have least control. The only reason that this seems to happen is that it reduces the provider liability.

As has already been stated, far better than longer and longer passwords is to introduce 2FA and login delays on incorrect logins. But this takes effort on the providers part, so we blame the users for choosing relatively easy to remember passwords.

The argument that if users choose short passwords means that passwords files are easy to decrypt again misses the point. It is not the users fault if a password file is stolen, nor is it there fault is the password is not stored in a salted method which should be at laest as good protection against dictionary attack as other password methods

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America halts fast processing of H-1B skilled worker visas

hammarbtyp

Re: why was this called 'discrimination'

The nature of a Nation State is that it has Citizens, and Visitors. A civilised state treats its Visitors well. But fundamentally, citizens of other EU countries are as much Visitors as UK citizens in the EU are.

Even visitors have rights, such as equal access to the legal process and due process of law.

EU citizens are also a special case. They are not visitors but given have equivalent rights as UK citizens to settle and work as defined through treaty and agreement that the UK signed up to.

To arbitrarily and unilaterally remove those rights is akin to ethnic cleansing, because if rights can be retroactively removed what is to stop a government redefining the meaning of citizenship at any stage based on colour, ethnicity or religion?

EU citizens have settled here legally and have every right to expect that right to be protected even when the UK leaves the EU. The idea that their rights should be a bargaining chip as some sort of hostage shield show how low morally the UK government has fallen.

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Dyson backs Britain plc with $2.5bn AI and robotics investment

hammarbtyp

So you know what the rules will be post-brext do you. Well, do us a favour and tell the rest of us, because the UK government don't seem to have a clue, but obviously you have inside knowledge.

That is the big difference between remainers and leavers. Remainers acknowledge the risks of leaving, while Brexiters promise rainbows and unicorns. You, I, the government have no idea of what the trading rules and regime will be post-brexit, but for certain they will be different.

No doubt there will be winners and losers, but to suggest that things will be just the same in our trading relationship ijust shows how delusional the argument has become

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hammarbtyp

How hard can it be - nearly everything in your house is made in china / taiwan.

Well, we could start with labour costs. Knock those down to China levels and they will offset the increases. Lets kill environmental controls as well, I mean whats a little mercury and smog between friends. Lets kill any employment laws so that people can work 80 hour weeks with no pension/overtime etc.

Hey look we can now sell everything as cheap as china as well...

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hammarbtyp

EU rules on non-discrimination and mutual recognition, as well as supra-national EU regulations, allow most UK producers of goods and services to sell directly to EU customers without having to navigate through additional domestic government regulations. The rules are broad and have a strong enforcement mechanism. Generally speaking, if UK companies comply with domestic regulations, they may sell in the rest of the EU (as noted, with a few exceptions).

That's the whole point of the single market, a level playing field across all members with the same rules. Now you may tell me about increased sovereignty, controls on immigration or whatever other fantasy you are reading in the daily express at present, but to suggest there will not be a fundamental cost in our trading relationship with our biggest market after Brexit is just la la land.

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hammarbtyp

I guess he has no interest in selling into the EU market, where I assume he will still have to follow EU laws and regulations which the UK will have no influence.

Not only that but on Brexit every product produced in the UK, will now have to have the paperwork and administration costs of any external company.

But hey, its only 500 million potential customers, I am sure our new trade deal with New Zealand will take up the slack.....

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Up close with the 'New Psion' Gemini: Specs, pics, and genesis of this QWERTY pocketbook

hammarbtyp

Re: Hardware keyboard is new... again?

Good point. That's why I keep my old atom laptop around.

Pity it does not have a dedicated Ethernet port however

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You're Donald Trump's sysadmin. You've got data leaks coming out the *ss. What to do

hammarbtyp

I think the point is being missed a bit

If you treat your workforce like a proles in dictatorship, you will only incentivize the workforce to break the system such as make a hated boss look bad, leave the company or just to see it fail.

Basically sysadmins are being used to try and overcome the shortcomings of management, but unless you happen to have the powers of a North Korean dictator there is no way to stop all leaks. Even if you lock down every service, who watches the watchmen?

The whitehouse is not leaking due to lack of security, but the desire to circumvent it driven by a administration who want to act like a 3rd world dictator. Good luck with that

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Experimental satellite-slinger seeks cargo: What could go wrong?

hammarbtyp
Joke

I have a small package I wish to deliver to permanent orbit

The Test Release Unrecoverable Missile Program will be a go, just once we have obtained the necessary payload

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Git fscked by SHA-1 collision? Not so fast, says Linus Torvalds

hammarbtyp

Re: SHA1 still "useful" then?

Just imagine how Paul Neil Milne Johnstone of Redbridge feels...

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Who do you want to be Who? VOTE for the BBC's next Time Lord

hammarbtyp

Re: Victor Meldrew (Richard Wilson)

I wouldn't believe it

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Brexit White Paper published: Broad strokes, light on detail

hammarbtyp

Re: Business must be delighted

Tariffs are not the issue here. The UK at present has relatively few tariffs.

The issue is regulation. At present any product made in the UK is capable of being exported to a 500 million person market on our doorstep with no extra checks delays or costs.

By leaving the union, we lose that capability. We could mirror the regulations but without agreement we will still be liable to checks as we cross the trading zone border. This will make the UK a less attractive place to build things.

I doubt if we will find another trading deal with that level of access

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God save the Queen... from Donald Trump. So say 1 million Britons

hammarbtyp

Re: Bot boosting?

or perhaps Trump is just really, really unpopular?

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US Navy runs into snags with aircraft carrier's electric plane-slingshot

hammarbtyp

Re: What?

I will take a guess that this is due to the amount of Energy stored within the system.

Due to the power and voltage levels involved it is not as simple as just flipping the off switch. Somehow the stored energy needs to be safely discharged and this could take sometime.

We are talking about more than 240V and a few electrical capacitors here...

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Assange confirmed alive, tells Fox: Prez Obama 'acting like a lawyer'

hammarbtyp

Be careful who you choose as your heroes

I have lived long enough to know you should always be careful who you make your heroes.

There are good arguments to be made that Snowden should be pardoned due to the fact he highlighted illegal activity in the NSA.

Assange however is not in that category. Apart from the fact is is trying to escape unrelated charges, he has shown himself over the the last years as a narcissistic, thin skinned individual with a penchant for the dramatic. No wonder the president elect seems to like him so much.

During the election campaign he deliberately tried(and may of succeeded ) in trying to sway the election to the republications by using the wikileak material in the most damaging way, and by constantly adding hints and innuendo about the material. Whether the material came from Russia or not is a moot point (although he would deny it, wouldn't he) , his agenda could not of suited the Republican party any better in its timing and content. Whatever you feel about Clinton, he consciously tried to subvert a democratic process.

Rather than a purveyor of truth he has shown that he is a man willing to push his own agenda and the world be damned.

There are many people who have done brave and selfless things to make the world a better place Julian is not one of them. Look somewhere else for your heroes.

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Swiss defence firm snaps up Brit security outfit Clearswift

hammarbtyp

To Summarise

“This deal highlights the continued global success of UK-based technology companies. Since the EU referendum, we have seen a resilience in UK and European mid-market M&A in the technology sector, despite the ongoing market volatility. We continue to see the UK as a hub for technology, and demand for UK companies is set to continue into 2017.”

To paraphrase, since the referendum the 3 has dropped through the floor against most major currencies meaning foreign firms can cherry pick the best UK companies for a pittance compared to a few months ago...taking control indeed.

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Poor software design led to second £1m Army spy drone crash

hammarbtyp

Different TLA

Strange in my day the Weight on Wheels sensor(W.O.W) was called Weight on Ground.

No idea why they changed it :)

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Galileo! Galileo! Galileo! Galileo! Galileo fit to go: Europe's GPS-like network switches on

hammarbtyp

Re: Meh!

"So whats the point"

1. It ensures that Europe has strategic control over a critical infrastructure

2. the satellite placement is optimised for European latitudes

3. It extends the accuracy to the present GPS and Glosnass network

4. It allows the use of additional services such as automatic rescue position detection

5. It allows European firms to build expertise and technologies in important technology areas

6. It allows European firms to compete in a lucrative positioning market

7. It creates high tech jobs in Europe

Apart from that...Can't think of any good reasons.

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Woman rescues red pepper Donald Trump from vegetarian chilli

hammarbtyp

If there is any karma in the world.

"Let it fry, Mr Wintler. Let it fry"

The Truth - Terry Pratchett

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Apple drops dongle prices to make USB-C upgrade affordable

hammarbtyp

Re: How on earth

As far as I can remember Nikon D5 is about the only DSLR which does not have a SD option. Yes some cameras allow other options, but since they are dual slot it means that you can support both.

SD cards are still the majority choice for 99% of photography, even more so if you do landscape, so the lack of a dedicated SD slot is a bit of a bind

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British firm to build world's first offshore automated ship

hammarbtyp

Some day, but probably not yet

I think we are a long way from truly automated vessels, but certainly more semi-automation is possible where a ship can be run for a long time with the minimum of human oversight.

What we are more likely to see in the short term is convoy automation where you get one master ship manned with engineers, command staff etc and a number of fully automated vessels taking the lead from that ship.

I know Rolls Royce are doing a lot of concept work. However I think the biggest issue will be inherent conservatism of the marine industry, some who still think that the move from Wind to steam was a bit hasty

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Brexit may not mean Brexit at all: UK.gov loses Article 50 lawsuit

hammarbtyp

Re: Econ 101

Buy British. Simple.

Oh yes really simple.

Let's buy a British car

You mean like a Nissan?

OK not perfect but at least it is made here

But a large % of the parts, as in all cars, are made overseas and imported in, which the low £ will reflect eventually

OK bad choice..Buy British fruit then

What like Oranges?

OK, maybe not Oranges, However there is always Terry's Chocolate Orange

You mean the ones that are made in Poland?

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Marmite's not the only national treasure hit by Brexit. Will someone think of the PCs?

hammarbtyp

Re: Stupid?

@Dave 15 Haven't you ever wondered if it was that simple why all countries don't just devalue their currency?

Pound down can be good if you are a company who exports, but for the people who live in the country (assuming they do not own exporting companies) it is not so good.

Basically the £ in your pocket is worth roughly 10% less than it was a few months ago. So yes we export more, but our pay can buy less. Is that what you really want?

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Early indications show UK favouring 'hard Brexit', says expert

hammarbtyp

Re: "Great Repeal Bill"

From what I can tell there may be debate, but the laws will be able to be repealed through the use of statutory instruments, which is basically a government minister signing it off without the need for a commons vote.

So we will have taken back control only to give it all up to a government minister.

So potentially goodbye working time directive, Environmental controls et al without even a vote in parliament

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hammarbtyp

"to have the freedom to make our own decisions on a whole host of different matters, from how we label our food to the way in which we choose to control immigration,"

I think the government may quickly find that in a global economy there is far less freedom than they would like to think. The main difference will be the loss of any influence on many of those rules

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Linus Torvalds admits 'buggy crap' made it into Linux 4.8

hammarbtyp

Re: now,now children

To be honest, worse things are said in development teams to people who screw up a release.

The difference is linux kernel development is very public and in the spotlight. If you just treat it as any other software development it does not appear out of the ordinary

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hammarbtyp

Easy Answer

Just implement a BUG_REMOVED() feature

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The wait is over: MoD releases latest issue of Ship Paint Monthly

hammarbtyp

Re: Obviously what Warpaint needs

Why is there no Bake-off of Brangelina angle?

It's clear the magazine editors do not have a clue how to get a audience

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Brexit at the next junction: Verity's guide to key post-vote skills

hammarbtyp

Re: While we're at it

Wow, the 1st computers I either worked on (GEC.Elliot) were 18 bit and those 2 extra bits had confused me for years.

Mystery solved...thanks for that

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A-dough-be: Photoshop flinger pumps profits 50 per cent

hammarbtyp

amateur photographers like me

Amateurs tend to subscribe because they think that's what the professionals use. However the majority rarely use PS for much more than cropping or a bit of cloning.There are far more cost effective tools to do that.

Most of the processing photographers do, can be done in RAW processing This can be done in lightroom, DxO, Capture one etc and do not need a subscription. If you feel you need to add or remove items (which is a big no-no if you want to enter landscape competitions), PS elements will do most of what you need.

PS is used as a photo manipulation package, but is in fact a supremely capable graphic design tool. Unless you are creating images from scratch, you will hardly touch the surface of what it can do and be wasting your money.

So get a RAW processing package, a cheap photo manipulation tool such as elements, zone, paint shop pro and after 18 months you can start putting that money you've saved towards better lenses, which will actually make a difference to your photo quality

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hammarbtyp

The Extra Cost

People always tell me that the subscription price is great value. However to me it feels like those higher purchase deals where the monthly cost looks so affordable, until you add up the lifetime costs. Also once you stop paying, you lose access, so it is difficult to ever leave.

Of course the other argument is that you get lifetime updates.

There is some benefit in this, but no one ever seems to question whether the updates have any value. The truth is when PS went subscription it was a mature product. There has be nothing revolutionary in photo-processing since CS6. There has been a few tweaks, and UI improvements, but nothing that stands out. Also do not underestimate that a lot of the power of PS comes not from the product itself, but the 3rd part add-ons such as Topaz and NIK. Take those away and it would be like nn iphone without an app store.

And that is the big problem with the subscription model. It makes the supplier lazy. There is the old Dilbert cartoon where Dilbert is rotating his hands and says to Wally, "we are getting paid for this". If Adobe never did another update, they would still rake in the cash from their existing subscription base. It makes companies lazy and inhibits innovation. The only way Adobe have got away with it for now is because of their gorilla position in the market. If someting comes along with 90% of the features, but at a non-subscription price, they may find they have lost the ability to react

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