* Posts by Adam Jarvis

424 posts • joined 17 Nov 2007

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So what does EE's 5G test really signal?

Adam Jarvis

Not a single mention of the word 'fibre' or fibre backhaul in the article.

Not a single mention of the word 'fibre' or fibre backhaul in the article.

Was that deliberate?

Does EE put some sort of embargo on these type of articles not to mention how data is transmitted to/from the mobile mast? aka. the backhaul, so Joe Public think there is some sort of magic continuous 'God-like' blanket mobile data signal in the sky that carries 3G/4G (and eventually 5G data) to different points in the UK?

Let's get real/practical here, every single 5G mast will require an extensive fibre backhaul network for both control/handover and delivering that amount of data to/from each mast. 5G Rollout will be 100% reliant on extensive ubiquitous Fibre rollout deep within the local loop, to succeed, in terms of cost/coverage and price.

Yes, those fibre backhaul contracts are commercial BTWholesale/VM Media, CityFibre etc, but smaller cell 5G, mounted from street lights will only ever be cost effective if it is able to "piggyback" fibre as part of a rollout of FTTP to residential/commercial premises.

Without lots of fibre in the ground already (as a result of a national rollout of FTTP), 5G is a pipedream, especially rurally.

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Automatic for the people: Telcos forced to pay for giving you crap services

Adam Jarvis

More of Ofcom's Pointless Fire fighting "seen to be doing something" that achieves nothing/zilch.

Anyone who has had dealings with an incompetent Energy Provider: Incorrect billing, failing to pay back credits on leaving etc, locked out of a failed system upgrade, knows what an absolute merry-go-round waste of space, these compensation schemes are.

There is no way of making a complaint that affects a large number of customers at once, it relies on individuals, each making their own complaint.

You'll spend an initial 30min-2hr minimum to make a complaint, wait 8 weeks, then raise the issue with Ombudsman Services, who get more in fees per complaint than the customer does, in terms of the average level of compensation paid. For 18 months of hell as a result of a failed system upgrade, CoopEnergy ended up paying an average of £7 in compensation per customer.

Often contacting Ombudsman Services is more a case of being told your complaint is outside their remit. For instance, with Energy, Ofgem does not regulate companies to make sure their online systems/Portal are 'fit for purpose'. If a company implements a 'lemon' of a system upgrade, where you can't read bills online properly, billing is incorrect or the system doesn't accept meter readings, there is absolutely nothing you can do about it, other than wait for an investigation by the regulator, because it falls outside the remit of Ombudsman Services/Ofgem.

To me, it's pointless fire fighting that just reinforces Ofcom (self-serving) weasel role, it doesn't address the problem of problematic 'up to' obfuscated, bamboozled copper carcass Broadband over long lines 500m+ lines. Everyone is ignoring the real problem here.

In effect, it's £142M+ paid in compensation that could be spent on putting in more real Fibre, instead of propping up a weasel regulator that has achieved absolutely zilch, so far in terms of getting BT to ditch new copper installs.

So many self-interested parties that are completely failing the customer and completely missing the point. None of this solves the problem of crap 'up to' broadband over long 500m+ copper/aluminum, the usual reason for the Engineer visits.

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Openreach: Comms providers 'welcome' our full-fibre 'ambition'

Adam Jarvis

Re: Sit on Hands, became show hands slightly, BT still act like the drunk blocking the Pub doorway.

Well, you can pretty much say goodbye to ubiquitous 5G then too, going forward, because it won't happen without a lot more consumer FTTP in the local loop to piggyback off cheaply, to keep the rollout costs of 5G reasonable.

People understand the concept of a 4G data communicating between a Phone and a 4G Mast but seem to lose sight of how the data is transmitted from the mast elsewhere. It's done by a fibre optic/or part microware backhaul.

Mobile 5G is cloud-based in terms of signal processing/hand-over (to keep the cost of the hardware 5G cells lower, simpler - as you need far more/more densely populated cells, to get the data throughput 5G offers.

Each 5G cell uses the fibre optic backhaul to coordinate cloud-based signal processing/hand over between phones/adjoining cells. Yes, you can have limited focus 5G in cities without FTTP rollout in the local loop, but I doubt it will happen elsewhere without pure FTTP rollout much deeper into the UK's network, so you can easily connect up 'piggyback' small street light 5G cells to the nearby laid fibre.

If you don't want improved 5G mobile either then you'll be fine Richard. The point is, so much else in the future (e.g. self driving cars) will be dependent on a decent fibre backhaul. We have to start now, with some joined up thinking to match.

Any talk by Ofcom of 5G is 'pie in the sky' in terms of the practicalities of 5G rollout otherwise, it just won't happen.

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Adam Jarvis

A Tax on longer copper lines could work, either per metre or lines over 500m/250m-as the crow flies

Replacing the legacy copper. One option.

A Tax on legacy copper lines based on their overall length from exchange/FTTC cabinet could be an option to force BT to use more pure fibre FTTP, without penalising against G.fast, if BT still want to go that route for certain types of rollout i.e. tenements.

For blanket Ultrafast "up to" 100Mbps+ G.fast to work, it requires much shorter copper lines < 250m/125m-crow flies. As a ballpark figure, G.fast doesn't work for anyone on 2 pair copper lines longer than 500m/250m, so tax any line longer than that. Make the tax incremental over the next 7 years till 2025, so the longer BT takes to shorten their length, bring fibre closer to the subscriber, the more it costs them.

It would be a better approach than limiting/regulating the margin BT can make from "up to" 40Mbps FTTC lines, as Ofcom has currently proposed.

This could simply start with a tax on BT on any legacy copper lines longer than 500m, with an even higher tax on Aluminium (so aluminium is replaced first). It could offer tax incentives in order to force BT to scrap the copper in longer lines (realising the copper's scrap value) to offset the tax on those longer copper lines.

We have to level the playing field as regards location, in the UK, in terms of Broadband availability.

The weasels at Ofcom have got it so wrong at the moment and it's such a cop-out by the regulator. The regulation of Broadband shouldn't be technology agnostic, as Ofcom currently define it.

Broadband should be location agnostic, but not technology agnostic, so people can work and live anywhere (within reason) while still having the best broadband speeds London has to offer, that has to be key, going forward.

Broadband has shown its importance to the UK economy in a very short space of time, we need to embrace that fully, the UK as a whole, can't afford not to, even if BT thinks it can, for it's own benefit.

We also need a method to automatically move any customer to the best delivery platform available for free for 12 months, with the (hidden) option then to downgrade after 12 months, back to the lower price, so they can test new technologies like pure FTTP, to see how it benefits/allow customers to get used to it/try it out.

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Adam Jarvis

Sit on Hands, became show hands slightly, BT still act like the drunk blocking the Pub doorway.

BT/Openreach are still making out full FTTP is difficult.

The Welsh Superfast Cymru rollout has shown, that they can deliver Fibre via overhead cables via existing Telegraph Poles, with the caveat of having to avoid Overhead Power Lines (due the conductive reinforcement used within the fibre optic cable, not the fact the optical signal is affected).

Much of this cabling has been attached to Telegraph Poles so quickly, locals fail to even notice when the work is carried out. The overhead fibre is delivered to Green Splitter boxes at eye-level on Telegraph Poles, near to properties, ready to be connected up.

The end of year 2017 deadline for the Superfast Cymru contract is approaching fast. Communication regarding the rollout has been dire. Many have asked the question will rollout continue into 2018, but without an answer from either BT/Ofcom/Welsh Assembly. For years, enablement dates have delayed.

But as the deadline approaches, areas like Ceredigion are currently swamped with Contractors, to avoid fines being issued for late deployment. By the looks of it, the loose coils of fibre that have sat there for 2-3 years or more, are finally being joined up, and builds are reaching the 'ready for ordering' stage.

It's showing full Fibre can work, when BT is really pushed, but it takes a lot of effort to get BT to show its hands,

When BT get to it (as they have been of late), even in the remotest rural locations, FTTP can be deployed rapidly and isn't the headache BT always try to make out it is.

It seems BT mostly make it out to be more difficult than it is, in order to justify their massive wasted investment in Pointless G.fast, which is now looking more and more like a lame duck.

Ofcom, we desperately now need a cut-off date for any new Copper installation. Enough is Enough.

10
4

Microsoft gives all staff a marked-up 'Employee Edition' of Satya Nadella's new book

Adam Jarvis

An 'Employee Edition' of Satya Nadella's Book...

I bet that went down well with the Windows 10 Mobile Team, an abridged ebook for them maybe?

21
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Windows 10 Creators Update will add app-level privacy controls

Adam Jarvis

Can we even trust Microsoft anymore? (if we ever did?)

This week we found out Windows 10 Pro Anniversary Update 1607 'Defer Feature Updates' toggle switch works back to front, so for users with the option 'on' (to defer feature updates), they are pestered constantly to upgrade to Creators Update 1703 and for users with this option 'off', not to defer feature updates, they will never receive it. (Unless a patch is released, correcting the operation of the switch). Is this malicious intent or just extreme stupidity?

You can have all the privacy switches you want, but if the fundamental operation of the toggle switch doesn't operate as you'd expect, who knows what is actually being sent to Microsoft and when. What is protected, what isn't.

Of course, when it comes to the crunch, this is their (Microsoft's) get out, "Oh we made 'a mistake' with how we presented the Privacy option to the user, Sorry", but they still have your data, so it matters little to them.

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Microsoft fixing Windows 10 'stuttering' bugs in Creators Update

Adam Jarvis

Facepalm! Windows 10 1607 Aniversary Update "Defer Updates" setting is back to front.

EddieD, you must have missed my comment regarding Creators Update the other day, but here is the reason you haven't received Creators Update. (and how to fix it).

Microsoft really do have 'egg on their face' regarding this.

Previous Comment (from 8/09/2017)

------------------------------------------------

Here's another major flaw too.

Could it be someone at Microsoft got their wording/digital states: 1 and 0 (true and false) mixed up? Seems so.

For those people running Windows 10 1607 AU wondering why they haven't been offered Windows 10 1703 Creators Update, it turns out:

Windows Settings->Update and security->Advanced Options->Defer Feature updates

This toggle switch appears to be operating back to front. (This might sound odd that no one has noticed this before, but it does appear to be the case)

(Check first that on your system the toggle is off (i.e. no tick in the box), the system is set "not to defer updates")

Select 'Defer Feature updates' (i.e place a tick in the box) then go back and check for updates, it then finds the update. (The switch operation seems to be the wrong way round).

If you break the 1703 update process (to test) i.e. don't complete the update at this point (you'll get a failed update in your update history though), then toggle the switch off again (i.e. remove the tick in the box to 'Defer Feature updates'), when you check for updates again the 1703 update option disappears.

Which seems to prove the switch is working opposite way to the way it should. Well done Microsoft.

(Seems crazy to think a Company the size of Microsoft could make such a simple fundamental mistake, which has such massive consequences to the roll out of new versions of the Windows 10 OS, but these things happen).

If this is the reason, there are so many not getting this update, that is highly embarrassing for MS, an 'egg on face' moment, especially given they've been quite coy regards the latest figures for number of active installs of Windows 10.

MS are not going to get many 1703 upgrades in the interim before 1709, if they have all been 'deferred'. But maybe MS saw it as a way of dealing with complaints of 'upgrade overload', to give users/consumers a break.

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Microsoft says it won't fix kernel flaw: It's not a security issue. Suuuure

Adam Jarvis

Facepalm! Windows 10 1607 Aniversary Update "Defer Updates" setting is back to front.

Here's another major flaw too.

Could it be someone at Microsoft got their wording/digital states: 1 and 0 (true and false) mixed up? Seems so.

For those people running Windows 10 1607 AU wondering why they haven't been offered Windows 10 1703 Creators Update, it turns out:

Windows Settings->Update and security->Advanced Options->Defer Feature updates

This toggle switch appears to be operating back to front. (This might sound odd that no one has noticed this before, but it does appear to be the case)

(Check first that on your system the toggle is off (i.e. no tick in the box), the system is set "not to defer updates")

Select 'Defer Feature updates' (i.e place a tick in the box) then go back and check for updates, it then finds the update. (The switch operation seems to be the wrong way round).

If you break the 1703 update process (to test) i.e. don't complete the update at this point (you'll get a failed update in your update history though), then toggle the switch off again (i.e. remove the tick in the box to 'Defer Feature updates'), when you check for updates again the 1703 update option disappears.

Which seems to prove the switch is working opposite way to the way it should. Well done Microsoft.

(Seems crazy to think a Company the size of Microsoft could make such a simple fundamental mistake, which has such massive consequences to the roll out of new versions of the Windows 10 OS, but these things happen).

If this is the reason, there are so many not getting this update, that is highly embarrassing for MS, an 'egg on face' moment, especially given they've been quite coy regards the latest figures for number of active installs of Windows 10.

MS are not going to get many 1703 upgrades in the interim before 1709, if they have all been 'deferred'. But maybe MS saw it as a way of dealing with complaints of 'upgrade overload', to give users/consumers a break.

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Openreach pegs full fibre overhaul anywhere between £3bn and £6bn

Adam Jarvis

"The interest on the capital borrowed to lay it".

Capital Borrowing, which has probably never been cheaper. If you are going to do it (a full fibre local loop), the Window of opportunity of high Copper prices (rose 15% last Nov), and low interest is probably about now.

These type of opportunities don't last forever.

0
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5G is not just a radio: Welcome to the fibre-tastic new mobile world

Adam Jarvis

I'm fairly read up on this...

But I struggled on this article, glad to know other's did. I hate Acronyms at the best of times too.

No sure who it was written for, but if you fully understand it, in terms of the software overview/hardware overview - you're a Telecom God, compared to me (and I feel I'm conversant in Electronics/RF Radio/Analog Circuits and Software Development/Virtualisation,Cloud interoperability).

Even then at times, it can often feel too much like a jack of all trades, master of none, to get some sort of overview of what 5G entails, boy this can be complex.

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Virgin Trains dodges smack from ICO: CCTV pics of Corbyn were OK

Adam Jarvis

Re: You can bet...

No, if I was to show a video of the fact there was no seat. I still have the right to privacy, if I make a complaint regarding anything via video, that doesn't somehow give the right to shoot the messenger, to justify your (weak) position.

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Openreach kicks off 'rebrand' by painting over BT logo on vans

Adam Jarvis

Re: Will it really make any differece?

Phill, and if we cut your wage from BT, it would be a start.

0
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Feelin' safe and snug on Linux while the Windows world burns? Stop that

Adam Jarvis

Re: How do people find the time for Win10 1607 Post install Bloatware?..And its getting worse.

Windows 10 1703 is still in pilot, or just hitting production (it's certainly hasn't been rolled out fully), according to Microsoft's own Windows 10 update timeline. Therefore Windows 10 1607 'is' the current production release.

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Adam Jarvis

How do people find the time for Win10 1607 Post install Bloatware?..And its getting worse.

July 4th. My Day.

I've just done a full install of Windows 10 1607 from the downloaded MS 1607 ISO. In fairness (speaking like a MS apologist), most people may not bother to get fully updated there and then, post-install but even so. I didn't even make the post install step here to 1703.. Here goes...

I opted to update offline (just because I hate the annoying double selection delay in choosing the online update options, then rechoosing what to keep, aka. the spinning throbber* - "getting things ready" section). I then install updates - Post installtion via Windows update online. The HP laptop used was no slouch.

Initial installation was fairly quick, but (not even) a year of Windows 10 1607 Patches took 5+ hours (I'd say 7 once I got everything right) to fully make their mark, post installation, even via a FTTC Broadband connection.

FFS Microsoft, 5+ hours to Post install from the standard 1607 ISO install? And that is just one laptop.

Linux Mint 18.2 installs in 10 minutes, all done, fully updated. (and also nicely seems to start downloading in the background while you are selecting your username, password etc). Yep, its a clever clean installation routine.

Why are we all still using Microsoft bloatware?,

Linux Mint 18.2 Cinnamon, even (without being biased here) has the nicer, cleaner simpler interface (than Win10), with the latest update.

Microsoft seems more and more about restricting what technology can do for people, protecting its interests, using the money they have, to protect Micrsooft's incumbent OS.

People in positions of influence (that can make that change) really need to start pushing the Linux message home, enough of the Microsoft all things to all men, scatter brain approach, to see what sticks. By that, I'm actually saying bluntly:

"No More Microsoft Desktop Upgrades For the NHS, Let's Go Linux".

I think it's finally turning against Microsoft. Microsoft need to back off with the constant pointless changes.

*-Yes, throbber is its offical name, for the spinning process wheel.

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SpaceX nails two launches and barge landings in one weekend

Adam Jarvis

Re: Things are getting interesting

Obviously, the more Iridium Satellites SpaceX send up, they better the landing barge live video link will become ;)

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Intel pitches a Thunderbolt 3-for-all

Adam Jarvis

Re: Dare I ask

"I use it everyday on my iMac..."

And what a royal pain in the arse that implementation has been using the mini display port cable 'as the carrier' / slight differences between display port / thunderbolt 2 / thunderbolt 3 implementations across the mac range, over time.

You can't just buy one type of mini "display port / thunderbolt cable" to connect different mac/iMac devices.

Target display mode (best feature of the 27" iMacs, allowing you to use it as a monitor) only works on the 2009/2010 iMac, for display port to display port outputs (not thunderbolt). You can't connect display port to thunderbolt (on newer iMacs), or thunderbolt to display port. There are problems with Thunderbolt 2/3 to Thunderbolt 3/2 in this regard too. You have to buy the specific cable to do the job, DP to DP or TB to TB which looks/fits exactly the same as the other, but different markings/specs.

It's a confusing mess for the end user.

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Openreach hints at fibre network strategy rethink

Adam Jarvis

Re: Oh dear god, please no...

That 2 month ball keeps getting kicked into the long grass regarding Superfast Cymru. Standard practice as regards BT. Not helped by the fact that all of the new non-existent publicity has been taken back, controlled by BT. It's almost as though BT have forgotten they signed a BDUK contract to have deliverables by a certain date.

0
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America's mystery X-37B space drone lands after two years in orbit

Adam Jarvis

It's tiny compared to the Space Shuttle.

I'd never really being able to gauge its size, until this landing. I always imagined it to be much bigger than it actually is. It looks tiny compared to the Shuttle.

If you watch the full landing video, they are currently refitting the Space Shuttle (Atlantis?) for the Museum and it can be seen in the background, as the X-37B lands.

El Reg: It would make a much better screen grab for the article too, showing both the X-37B/Space Shuttle in the same shot.

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Windows 10 S forces Bing, Edge on your kids. If you don't like it, get Win10 Pro – Microsoft

Adam Jarvis

Microsoft Teams!

After watching the #MicrosoftEDU Keynote (after skipping past Satya Nadella, yep - I know everyone else did too), I had real trouble taking the whole keynote seriously.

Why? Microsoft Teams! / IT Crowd.

MS Marketing would be better to licence this clip from IT Crowd, if they really want Microsoft Teams! and Cortana to become common knowledge with the general public.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1nPVAh78n34

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PC sales are up across Europe. You read that right. PC sales are up

Adam Jarvis

Re: "but Brexit-blown Blighty misses out"

Cheap SSDs staples such as the Integral 120GB Series-P / Series-V were £25 this time last year, now £50-60. Thankfully, we made hay while the sun was shining (last year).

SSDs are still the best type of upgrade "on the cheap", though.

Other brands were/are also good, like Sandisk Plus (were MLC, then TLC) - now branded WD (not tried) and of course, Samsung.

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Base specs leak for Windows 10 Cloud – Microsoft's wannabe ChromeOS assassin

Adam Jarvis

Re: Not price

That is just embarassing. 4 Free Games? Pittance.

Seems more like a deliberate flaw.

3
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Leaked NSA point-and-pwn hack tools menace Win2k to Windows 8

Adam Jarvis

Re: Pays to be running Windows 10

Looking forward to next Andrew Marr / Amber Rudd's take on this. I'll go by whatever Amber Rudd says and do the complete opposite.

New Tact/Approach?

(If you can't win the PR War consensus* after a terrorist attack (she didn't), to get the Public to give up their Encryption/Privacy, maybe the next best approach is to target all those mainstream IT Tech products "with a release of hacking tools in the public domain" to make those products feel as insecure as possible.

So in effect, "the default", feels like there is no Privacy anymore, so in future you'll feel less likely to argue/stand up for the right to Privacy).

* We never did get any real clarification/proof that WhatsApp was used, by WhatsApp themselves. It seems to have all gone quiet on that front.

5
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Mac Pro update: Apple promises another pricey thing it will no doubt abandon after a year

Adam Jarvis

Touchbar needs on screen display below the dock.

The Touchbar wouldn't have been so bad if its design was reflected/mirrored on screen with highlights (to show current finger position) just below the dock, to save having to look down at the keyboard.

The fact that Apple missed that, shows the lack of progress of late.

1
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Ofcom pressuring BT to slash wholesale prices for superfast broadband

Adam Jarvis

Re: No one has mentioned monthly download Caps.

>BT Agreeing to FTTP on all lines longer than 500m is starting to look inevitable.

Ofcom are saying to BT, charge what you need to commercially, but lay pure FTTP and start offering the service. Stop withholding things on the basis of what you think people want, give them the choice. Elsewhere in the World, it seems commercially viable, so stop whining, asking for subsidies.

Above all, get on with it, because you won't make any profit from those lines longer than 500m, any other way, we're regulating those customers.

BT/Openreach obviously need to concentrate on streets/towns at time rather than individual properties to make it worthwhile.

I think if BT were to cause nearby towns to compete for rollout 50/50, you'd see much better uptake.

Ofcom have realised what a bamboozed mess G.fast will be if its rolled out en-masse.

0
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Home Office accused of blocking UK public's scrutiny of Snoopers' Charter

Adam Jarvis

Re: Google Maps/Streetview - Westminister Bridge.

Didn't make it totally clear. I was accessing via an iPad/iOS earlier which does actually prevent you from continuing and does 'stump' you, i.e. it's not obvious how to continue across the bridge. On a laptop its less obvious, as it just switches lanes, to oncoming traffic. Just thought it was an interesting anomaly, as its exactly the point he got frustrated and flipped.

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Adam Jarvis

Google Maps/Streetview - Westminister Bridge.

Sometimes, we look for complex 'terrorist reasoning' why someone did something when it can be the simplest, the most straightforward reasons that can get overlooked.

Things that cause frustration and people to snap, and our daily reliance on technology to get things done.

Driving in London is frustrating, especially without working Sat-Nav.

If Khalid Masood was simply trying to find a particular location, one of the interesting things is that using Google Maps (in a web browser at least), just at that key point where Khalid Masood 'flipped' prevents you from crossing Westminster Bridge on that side of the road.

https://www.google.com/maps/place/WestminsterBridge

(Click the arrow one place forward on Google Maps/Street view, to see you are prevented from continuing on that side of the road). You have to move to the right lane, to use Google Maps/Streetview (traffic heading towards you to cross the bridge) using the mapping.

Maybe Google maps has being restricted to prevent showing the bridge since the incident.

An interesting anomaly, all the same.

0
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BT's Openreach to hire 1,500 engineers

Adam Jarvis

Re: The Elephant in the room - PIA / FTTC/Vectoring by two or more Telcos.

WarwickNET (as an example-I have no link to them) has rolled out FTTC (Fibre to its own cabinet-Hybrid Copper Fibre) using the BTOpenreach access rules of PIA to ducts and poles, but (importantly) also has implemented newer vectoring technology (one of the first Telcos to do this).

Where WarwickNET has done this already, they effectively "own" that local loop in terms of "cheaper" FTTC/G.fast technologies. No other Telco (including BT) can then roll out G.fast Technology within the same local loop, because of the interference issues between two lots of competiting G.fast/vectoring technologies.

There is no equipment - Huawei etc, out there that syncs the signals of competiting FTTC/Vectoring/G.fast based equipment within the same local loop, to allow the two Telcos equipment to work side by side.

You can't physically have two different Telco operators installing their own copper based FTTC/Vectoring technologies with the same single local loop, one will interfere with the other. Whoever installs FTTC Vectoring Technology/G.fast first prevents any other Telco from using the same type of hybrid copper technology.

In those situations, the only way the second Telco can compete is by rolling out (expensive-in BT's own words) pure FTTP. The second Telco wouldn't be able to use (cheaper-in BT's own words) technologies and PIA access to Poles/Ducts to use the existing copper technologies, connected to their own equipment.

Hence why BT wants to move quickly to getFTTC Vectoring/G.fast in place, before the Regulator Ofcom realises its massive "Elephant in the Room" mistake. The rules are completely biased in favour of G.fast/BT's Hybrid Copper technologies, by allowing BT to continue to rollout such tech.

Hence why BT should not be permitted to rollout FTTC Vectoring/G.fast until this has been resolved, as it means Openreach operating outside its legal status to treat all customers fairly/equally.

0
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UK.gov 5G strategy 'mostly sensible', says engineering brainbox

Adam Jarvis

In terms of SillyCon, yep- there is far too much hot air / blue sky thinking.

Whether you like Facebook or not, what it has shown is how, it can quietly just get on with the job of scaling its software/hardware businesses, as more users come on board (inc WhatsApp, Instagram), pretty seamlessly, using (pretty much) a best in class open approach to problem solving those issues.

BT/EE could learn a thing or two, regards less headline grabbing hyping of selective, untested "cutting edge" technology products and the realities of just quietly getting on, admitting when existing copper tech has been sweated enough, and instead switching, using the tried and tested tech, pure Fibre optic on lines longer than 500m (by copper cable), which is what needs to happen.

BT/EE just come across as reluctant tech couch potatoes at times, unwilling to change their blinkered approach, when every pointer around them is saying they need to move on, from their copper bias.

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Anti-TV Licensing petition gets May date for Parliament debate

Adam Jarvis

Re: Good going cobber

Given the Guardian CiF (Comment is Free) replies to the recent article on £200, 6 Point Mobile Phone use while driving, it seems like there is the equivalent of a paid oppressive right wing 'DM Style' army filling the comment section with conformist 'just accept it' comments, many accounts recently.

This Government seems to have a skewed agenda for disproportionate fines against those who can least afford to pay it.

A revenue raising, "Head clipping" agenda taking proportionately more money from the poor, for what often are just genuine mistakes, lapses in concentration without intent.

Often where self policing, has been deemed at a certain statistical level (i.e. 80mph on the motorway), and by setting the technology to trip slightly below this level, and do this 24/7 'blanket approach' is massively revenue generating.

There is a equally bad deceitfulness 'grabby attitude' to the revenue raising methods been used, to the crimes being committed.

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'At least I can walk away with my dignity' – Streetmap founder after Google lawsuit loss

Adam Jarvis

One Show's Matt Baker...

In true David Cameron style, we need Matt Baker to ask Eric Schmidt, "Wonderful, Wonderful, just very quickly. How on Earth do you sleep at night?"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VbcACpriZ9s

0
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If USA wants a say in 5G, Cisco HAS to buy Ericsson

Adam Jarvis

5G Cloud based, Managed Software RF processing doesn't have borders.

One of the principles of 5G is many more, simpler, smaller RF cells, where RF processing isn't done on local standalone dedicated hardware located at the mast, but managed centrally in the cloud, to reduce firmware/maintenance costs.

Is Trump planning ring fenced localised to US, processing of such data too? Could be tough to enforce in terms of Global companies - Google etc.

The companies to be watching here are Facebook with its open standards, its Switches and huge processing power. Their next move will be 5G Cloud based RF signal processing.

1
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BT's profits plunge 37% following Italian Job

Adam Jarvis

We need to cut this Pizza into more manageable slices.

How do we get this through to thickheads at Ofcom and the powers that be,

A Pizza Piechart?, with Openreach slice split off*

*With a bitter-sweet topping of Anchovies (to represent the slimey oily fish).

1
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Microsoft's Linux love-in continues with SUSE support in SQL Server

Adam Jarvis

Installing Spotify on Linux Mint.

Electron Shepherd you really haven't a clue. Get your facts right at least.

How do I install Spotify on Linux Mint?

Click Menu (Bottom left like Windows Start), Click Software Manager from static left pane (Brown Box Icon)

Software Manager opens...

Type 'Spotify' into search box

Click 'Install'

Close Software Manager.

Under Sound & Video, click Spotify to open.

Enter Username and password, job done.

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EE slapped with £2.7m fine by Ofcom

Adam Jarvis

Re: IPA 2016 (not the Ale!)

Back in 2012, Collective Switching wasn't the norm.

It also takes a minimum of 8 weeks for the Energy Supplier (in this case CoopEnergy) to respond and attempt to take corrective action, before you can raise an escalated complaint via the Energy Ombudsman or attempt to raise a side complaint through Ofgem (which is very hard to do).

Even though in this case, it was very obvious on day one that the problems would not be correctable in these first 8 weeks, as there were so many, i.e. regards their systems "The whole caboodle was fcuked".

Ofgem stating June 2015, actually means, complaints to CoopEnergy were much earlier. Ofgem 'knew' , whichever way you want to dress this up, with no action until November 2016, which was by then, too little, too late. CoopEnergy paying out a pittance of £7 average payment per customer. (none of which has been validated).

Ofgem effectively did nothing, no fine, nothing, all they seem to do is shady hidden backrooms deals to keep things below radar, because the Energy Market is such a fcuk up.

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Windows 10 Anniversary Update crushed exploits without need of patches

Adam Jarvis

Re: Windows is the lowest form of Desktop Experience available

In the UK, we get (well I do) a full page ad for Microsoft Edge, when I type in "mozilla" into bing.com.

Not sure what's worse, the malware link (got that as the second top, Mozilla Official was top link) or the MS Edge ad, forcing you to scroll down to see the actual link for mozilla. It's a full on, in your face advert, it's not subtle.

....

Microsoft Edge is the recommended browser for Windows 10

Ad by Microsoft · microsoft.com/microsoft-edge

Get up to 69% more battery life than Firefox when streaming video with Microsoft Edge.

The malware link does mention "free download" though, which could catch/attract some:

"Mozilla Firefox - latest version 2017 free download"

1
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Oi, Mint 18.1! KEEP UP! Ubuntu LTS love breeds a laggard

Adam Jarvis

Re: Cinnamon Stable ?

I know this sounds like a Microsoft apologist, but are you sure you don't have an Nvidia/AMD Hardware Graphics BGA solder fault on that laptop/machine. I only see freezes of Mint (generally) on machines that also freeze/BSOD under Windows 7 / Windows 10.

I actually use Mint Live USB (because its so stable) to check machines that are causing a Windows BSOD, to check it isn't a software issue/driver issue with Windows. If it freezes with Mint Live USB, 9/10 is either a memory or BGA Nvidia Graphics hardware fault.

5
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Microsoft's Blue Screen of Death dead in latest Windows 10 preview

Adam Jarvis

Re: Windows 10 Conveyor (belt) Edition

Metered Wifi Tweak as mentioned, in detail. Along these lines...

-------------------------------------------

Only the metered Wifi one mentioned. In theory (not tried it) that would allow you to download just this month's cumulative January security update manually (64Bit version is 974MB in size), allowing you to skip feature updates/new versions, just have security updates.

Trouble is, security updates only continue 9 months after the rollout of a new Windows 10 Version, i.e the Creators Edition in April 2017, so this method would allow you to this for Win10 AU1607 until February 2018 (I think).

https://support.microsoft.com/en-gb/help/4009938/windows-10-update-kb3213986

from the Windows Catalog

https://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/

(it can now be used in other browsers)

Setting Metered Wifi:

------------------------------

If you want to do this:

Click on the Wifi Icon on the taskbar.

Click Network Settings

Select Wifi on left (may be already selected, shown in blue)

Click on Manage Known Networks

Select the Wirless Network you are using.

Select Properties

Turn on Metered Connection Switch.

That would work, as long as you don't use Ethernet/a Wired conection at any point.

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TV anchor says live on-air 'Alexa, order me a dollhouse' – guess what happens next

Adam Jarvis

Could help reduce Piracy.

Maybe every pirated/ripped music album appearing on the Internet should have a mandatory voice intro, saying "Alexa, order me all of {Artist}'s back catalog of music. {pause} Everything". {to my Amazon music account}*

*added by Amazon.

2
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Networks in 2016: A full fibre diet for UK.gov

Adam Jarvis

The Internet has proved its usefulness both rurally and urban, stop faffing, its here to stay.

Regulators Ofcom, including a whole industry of so called experts has formed/grown up around trying to decipher bamboozed, obfuscated 'upto' ADSL/FTTC Internet speeds. It's all just become so bloody complicated no one can actually see a way of getting competition back in the market place with the current BT Openreach local loop infrastructure. BT is utterly entrenched, in part by market regulation, CMA allowing takeover of EE.

In terms of your 1983 IBM its like sticking with a 10BaseT 10Mbps Coxial Network within an Office Environment, spending hours monitoring transfer speeds, putting in place hundred's of manual procedures (copying to external devices etc) to provide a work-around because of the slow 10Mbps network speeds. Being completely frustrated, knowing that replacing the cable, network card, you can have 1000Mbps, for pretty much the same cost, if you go about it correctly.

Let's get rid of all the waffle, Pointless G.fast based on BT copper carcass tech is obsolete before its out the door.

Upgrade the local loop to true fibre, which enables households to take multiple services from different telecom providers. Job done. Follow Swiss model of 4-6 (redundant) fibres to the Premises for future proofing/wholesale open access.

Stop pampering/agreeing to a pointless USO limited to BT current legacy copper carcass infrastructure. Apathy will mean no one with an ADSL connection of 5Mbps upwards is going to pay BT £5000-15000+ for 10Mbps USO. It's utterly pointless regulation.

It's a situation Ofcom is never going to win against BT and will cost just as much in handouts/regulation costs. The only way is providing the redundancy to enable true choice, true fibre optic FTTP with wholesale open access to redundant fibres.

At least start now (because its going to take a long time at this rate) insist all new installs/end of life upgrades are FTTP from now on Openreach's local loop. DO IT NOW OFCOM, enough is enough.

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