* Posts by Frank Bitterlich

329 posts • joined 9 Nov 2007

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How a QR code can fool iOS 11's Camera app into opening evil.com rather than nice.co.uk

Frank Bitterlich

Re: For info

The "port" part (":443" or any other number) is essential for the flaw to happen.

The location where it appears makes it, technically, a "password" (http://user:password@domain.org), but it makes the flaw see this as a port number and so the NSURL sees the whole fake domain part as valid.

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Frank Bitterlich
FAIL

The problem may be bigger...

I just did a quick test, and it looks like Apple's NSURL class generally has that problem of not getting the host right. Using NSURL -URLWithString:, the backslash version doesn't work at all - and the one with the percent-escaped backslash produces the wrong hostname when calling NSURL -host, namely: facebook.com.

This is bad.

5
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Meet the open sorcerers who have vowed to make Facebook history

Frank Bitterlich

Re: providing a good UX - Facebook?!?

How in hell is that a good UX? Can't find things, can't dig back, can't organise. It's just a dumping ground. Photos get resampled, cropped and generally befouled. Videos likewise. Coments don't thread. Ads are poorly targeted bollocks if I disable blockers. Recommendations for 'you might like' are nonsensical babble.

All true. But, as scary as it may be, hardly any FB user cares about that. They typical Facebonker wants to just dump their stuff in there. They do not care about about an interface that gives them control - they want an "easy" one, and the less control they have over their stuff, the "easier" it appears.

Ten or 20 years ago, many of those people would have operated their own blog or other website, but today FB to them looks like the same thing, but much easier. Heck, even businesses these day think that a FB page is equivalent to a prober website. I know a group of people who think their CMS is too complicated, so they post all news on FB instead. Don't have a Facebook account? Tough luck, customer.

Does beating FB mean playing it at its own crazy game? Interoperating with it?

If you want to make as much money as them, yes. You'll have to rip off your users, take sneak control away from them, and sell them out in any way you can.

For another definition of success, e.g. making the 'net a better place, combining a good protocol with a good UI will probably do the trick. If it really works out well, people will adopt it and operate services on that platform. If they have enouph pull, users will eventually adopt it.

There has never been a better time to pull this off than now.

9
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Reflection of a QR code on PoS scanner used to own mobile payments

Frank Bitterlich
Meh

Good research, but...

... some of the scenarios are somewhat constructed.

His tactic for such tokens was to surreptitiously turn on a smartphone’s front-facing camera to photograph the reflection of a QR code in a point of sale scanner’s protective cover. This attack also detects the configuration of the QR code and subtly changes its appearance to make it unreadable. The malware running the attack on the smartphone, however, manages to retain a perfect and usable QR code.

OK, so the targeted phone has already been compromised to such a level that the attack app has control over the screen. What's the point then to use the camera to try and catch the code? Why not just get it from a screengrab?

The technique can also be used to craft malicious QR codes that, when used for smartphone-to-smartphone payments, see the victim machine directed to download and run malware.

That's a vuln in the target smartphone's payment app. If it expects a payment token, and gets a "http:..." instead, it probably won't blindly say "oh, hey, why not, let's visit that site..."

All interesting techniques, and good that he did that research, but not very close to see that in the wild. Way more likely (and easier) to attack the payment service (for example with POS malware) directly.

13
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UK data watchdog raids companies suspected of 11 million nuisance texts

Frank Bitterlich
Terminator

That'll teach them...

Computer equipment and documents were seized for analysis at two Greater Manchester-based premises of the unnamed entities, the ICO said.

"... and we won't give it back until you have paid the fine. The whole £200 of it!!!"

11
0

Facebook Onavo Protect doesn't protect against Facebook

Frank Bitterlich
Facepalm

Who on earth...

... would, when looking to protect their data, turn to Facebook by any means?

/shakes head in disbelief...

1
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FBI chief asks tech industry to build crypto-busting not-a-backdoor

Frank Bitterlich
Facepalm

"You just don't *want* to solve that problem!"

The whole reiteration of "it's just not possible because you guys haven't invented it yet" reminds me of that Big Bang Theory episode, where Penny's idiot (ex-?)boyfriend proudly tells about the invention he just made – goggles that convert any movie into a 3D movie. How does it work? "I don't know, I'll let you figure that out."

Now there are two possibilities: Either all of those "the laws of Australia trump the laws of mathematics" statements are made honestly and those making them are really ignorant enough to believe in that; or that this is just a clever ploy to get Joe Public to sooner or later think "The tech companies just don't *want* to do it because they are evil."

Honestly, I don't know which one to believe. They both sound awfully plausible.

2
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Google: Class search results as journalism so we can dodge Right To Be Forgotten

Frank Bitterlich
Flame

Re: Fahrenheit 451

At which point, why do we bother having a system of rehabilitation and spent convictions?

That is precisely the point. "Rehabilitation" –– all good and fine. You shouldn't be discriminated against for things that have long expired. But this is about that insane idea of a "right to be forgotten". You cannot force anybody to "forget" anything. But you can force media, search engines, and other publishers to censor information that is correct and true.

Google (the search engine part, which this is all about) has one job: To give us an overview about the information that is available about a certain topic. I can't grasp how anybody can think it's a good idea to suppress this information.

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Does Parliament or Google decide when your criminal past is forgotten?

Frank Bitterlich
Big Brother

Re: Going back in time to modify history

It is not about re-writing history, the original articles aren't being taken down. The book isn't being rounded up and burnt.

No, not being burnt, but asking search engines (and possibly later retailers) to remove results that point to the book comes very close to banning the book altogether.

The whole concept of a "right to be forgotten" is kind of ridiculous. You can not force a person to forget something, and Google can not "forget" something either. It can only suppress information that exists. That is not "forgetting", that is censorship. No, it doesn't alter history. It just forces publishers, search engines, and other services to lie by omitting certain information.

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11

'A sledgehammer to crack a nut': Charities slam UK voter ID trials

Frank Bitterlich

Re: 44 allegations

Not being from the UK, I wonder how that works? Don't you have voter lists where every voter is being struck out when they have voted?

4
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Apple's new 'spaceship' HQ brings the pane for unobservant workers

Frank Bitterlich
Boffin

Re: Especially deadly...

That's why ARKit was invented. Just hold up your iGadget and ARKit will augment the glass doors with virtual manifestations. Problem solved.

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23,000 HTTPS certs will be axed in next 24 hours after private keys leak

Frank Bitterlich
Holmes

Tout, flog, peddle

Welcome to The Register, new reader!

14
0

Intellisense was off and developer learned you can't code in Canadian

Frank Bitterlich

Reminds me of the one time I installed an OS for an english-speaking customer. Asked him what language he wanted, British English or American English. He lowered his head to look at me over the rim of his glasses, then after a short pause he replied: "Proper English!"

15
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Firefox to emit ‘occasional sponsored story’ in ads test

Frank Bitterlich
Mushroom

Re: Easy as this:

Doesn't work for me. I can, however, close that "Recommended by Pocket" section - for now. Should it at one point re-open itself or become any more intrusive, then Bye Bye Firefox. You won't see me tinkering with my hosts file just to fight a browser pushing ads on me.

5
1

Bell Canada Canucks it up again: Second hack in just eight months

Frank Bitterlich

Re: Pop quiz!

And extra bonus points for any or all of the following:

  • "Bell Canada takes the security of your data very seriously."
  • "Our customers' security is our top priority"
  • "Bell Canada is committed to keeping you data safe."

How I love Data Breach Bullshit Bingo.

1
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Hospital injects $60,000 into crims' coffers to cure malware infection

Frank Bitterlich
Childcatcher

So, how about organ transplants?

A quote from an unnamed individual from the hospital which was transported back through time to me from the year 2023:

"Yes, we know it's a bad idea, but we were running out of kidney donors, so we made the conscious decision to buy a few from the black market. After all, it saved patients' lives!"

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UK's Just Eat faces probe after woman tweets chat-up texts from 'delivery guy'

Frank Bitterlich
Meh

A single case of a creepy...

... pizza delivery boy abusing the phone number of a client to stalk her. That is bad, but it happens all the time. Just because a intermediate (Just Eat) is involved doesn't make this case special.

Of course the phone number gets passed on to the local pizza shop, which in turn gives it to the driver for address clarification and such. And I bet that Just Eat has clauses in their contract with the pizza shops that prohibit the (ab)use of contact info for anything other than just the delivery.

Fire the delivery dude and report him. Case closed.

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3

Of course we don't spy on our users, giggles China's WeChat

Frank Bitterlich
Coat

In communist China...

... social media follows you.

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Shopped in Forever 21? There was bank-card-slurping malware in it for, like, forever

Frank Bitterlich
WTF?

Re: Question

Any number of ways from physical access to a terminal, back office server, head office PC, [...]

Not sure why you got downvoted for this – accurate answer to the question.

A few more questions pop up in my mind, though:

- Are there any penalties (fines) for losing card data (other than the risk of getting sued for damages by the victims, which AFAIK rarely succeeds unless you have actually lost money and have proof)?

- Is there any progress (or even intention) to move towards chip-based cards in the US to limit at least card-copying attacks?

- Isn't encryption mandatory by PCI DSS? What are the consequences for them if they "forgot" to turn it on?

1
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GoAhead ... and pwn us: Remote hijacking flaw in Internet of Things gear

Frank Bitterlich

Re: Detail on the set of vulnerable sites

My point was that patching vulns on IoT components simply does not work well. The patch will typically arrive on a tiny fraction of affected systems because the companies embedding it in their devices (a) don't give a f**k, (b) are ignorant, or (c) simply don't have a way to reach their customers after purchase. In most cases: all of the above.

If you sell a desktop or mobile OS, a flaw is bad but can be patched. If it is inside a component of IoT or embedded gear, it can't, for all practical purposes. That's why it is of such critical importance to get it right the first time – before the gear is built and sold. And too few companies are aware of this. S**t happens – but in this area, if you haven't done your utmost to prevent this, you're letting down your users.

That's my view - take it, or downvote it.

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Frank Bitterlich
Thumb Up

When BS meets PR...

"Most GoAhead customers do not use CGI as GoAhead has better, faster, smaller internal alternatives," a spokesperson told El Reg.

read: "We couldn't be bothered to make the standard (CGI) interface more secure, because we have brewed up our own interface, which is better. It's secure, trust us. We know how to make thing secure."

If you're using kit that uses a vulnerable version of GoAhead...

Easy to find out for the average user of some Chinese webcam.

, and uses dynamically linked CGI programs, ...

Even easier to find out.

then you'll need to install the fix by hand...

install fix by hand [Search]

About 67.800.000 results (0,40 seconds)

or pester the machine's manufacturer for a firmware update.

OK, to help you with this, as a complimentary service, here is the Chinese version of "I need a software upgrade":

我需要一个软件升级

Good luck!

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Security catch-up: Nigerian prince email ring cops collar ... Louisiana OAP?

Frank Bitterlich
Facepalm

No prince, just a mule...

That prince from Nigeria Louisiana seems to be just a money mule, not the main scammer.

Wouldn't surprise me if he got a Nigerian Prince™ email himself and thought he was "smart" enough to take part in the scam.

9
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So what happened with the patent judge and the Euro Patent Office?

Frank Bitterlich
Terminator

Do a little experiment.

1. Copy and paste the whole article (or any article recently about the EPO) into your favourite text editor.

2. Do the following search-and-replace pairs:

Benoit Battistelli => Vito Corleone

EPO => Legitimate Businessman's Social Club

Administrative Council => Capodecina Conference

3. Read the updated article again.

Suddenly, it makes much more sense...

13
0

Language bugs infest downstream software, fuzzer finds

Frank Bitterlich
Holmes

This is ridiculous.

I just read the section about the PHP "bug" that guy claims to have discovered. In reality, it is a known, documented, behaviour that occurs with buggy PHP code (ie. accessing an undefined constant). The described case (this is nowehere a PoC) actually relies on at least two coding mistakes in the PHP code.

It only proves two already well-known things: 1. Bugs in your code can cause vulnerabilities, and 2. PHP is designed in a way that makes it easy to mess up.

I can only assume that the other so-called "language bugs" also come frome the department of the bleeding ovious.

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Mirror, mirror on the wall, who's the failest mobe of all?

Frank Bitterlich
WTF?

Re: Really?

Did you know that 42% of all statistics use totally made-up numbers?

I don't get the whole "Figure 1" stats at all. What does "Worldwide" mean? Does it mean "Other world regions"? If so, the numbers add to 120 %. If not, 66 % of what? 66 % of all devices in Asia will fail, eventually? Or did fail in Q3 2017? Or 66 % of all device failures were in Asia?

The numbers are meaningless without more detailed explanation.

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1

ZX Spectrum Vega firm's lawyers targeted by empty-handed backers

Frank Bitterlich
FAIL

"Update" posted

Looks like they have just posted (an hour or so after this article was posted) an "update" on the progress of the project on the Indiegogo page... A video (low-res, low-quality) that shows some unidentifiable block of metal (tha case?) being worked on in some CNC rig. Oh, and a shot of several sheets of colored vinyl.

It's on https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/the-sinclair-zx-spectrum-vega-plus-console-games#/updates/all

And they wonder why they're getting bad press?

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OK, we admit it. Under the hood, the iPhone X is a feat of engineering

Frank Bitterlich
Alien

Re: Hell froze over

Nope, probably somebody hacked his El Reg account.

"And it comes with a beautiful notch."

And not a hint of sarcasm anywhere. No way that Andrew Orlowski wrote that.

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NSA bloke used backdoored MS Office key-gen, exposed secret exploits – Kaspersky

Frank Bitterlich

RTFA

No. It's a 7zip archive full of malware - source code, executables, libraries, resources.

If that wouldn't trigger even the most simple hash-based malware detection, anti-malware would be useless.

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1

Fear the SAP-slap? Users can anonymously submit questions about licensing naughtiness

Frank Bitterlich
Mushroom

Re: Who owns the data ?

Well, I can't speak for SAP, but I can speak about MS Dynamics (at the time still known as Navision.) Our vendor was trying to convince our company that data that was imported into Navision and later re-exported was subject to licensing fees for any and all future uses.

According to their interpretation of licensing rules pipe dreams, storing that data in a separate backend DB and accessing that DB from a web server would require a license for every user of the web portal.

That drove the last nail into the coffin of our use of overpriced CRM systems sold pimped out by such arrogant vendors.

5
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Footie ballsup: Petition kicks off to fix 'geometrically impossible' street signs

Frank Bitterlich
Coat

The laws of mathematics...

... are very commendable, but the only law that applies in the UK is the law of Australia the UK the FIFA.

13
0

Bill Gates says he'd do CTRL-ALT-DEL with one key if given the chance to go back through time

Frank Bitterlich

Re: BREAK

That button was still there on the original iMac USB keyboard.

As for shutting down (or going to sleep), pressing Ctrl-Eject on modern keyboards will still do the trick.

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Frank Bitterlich

Not responsible...

"he didn't say he was responsible for it, and to be honest I don't think he gives a flying monkey about it."

Sure, his company was not responsible for the choice of Ctrl-Alt-Del to reboot the machine.

But who exactly was responsible for "Press Ctrl-Alt-Del to log in" on various Windows versions? Was that brilliant idea also the fault of IBM engineers, or did someone at MS have a clown for breakfast?

The greatest achievements, and the greatest fails, in computer history begin with someone saying "Hey, I have a hilarious idea..."

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5
Frank Bitterlich

Re: BREAK

Right. The Macintosh "Developer Button" was an add-on "button" you could purchase from Apple if you were an ADC member; actually it was just a set of two clip-on actuators that would push the already present "Reset" and "Interrupt" buttons on the main logic board.

At the retailer I worked during that time, we used to make fun of it and offer our customers a "Mac Eject" - a straightened paper clip to push into the hole by the floppy drive to trigger the manual eject.

5
0

From the Dept of the Bleedin' Obvious... yes, drones hurt when they hit you in the head

Frank Bitterlich
Alert

Re: Do modern drones plummet?

Possible causes for sudden loss of lift:

- Battery malfunction

- Short circuit

- Software bug

- Loss of rotor*

- Operator error*

- ...

* Some, but not all, UAV can sustain flight with three of four rotors, and most prevent sudden downward acceleration - but not all.

7
0

AccuWeather: Our app slurped your phone's location via Wi-Fi but we like totally didn't use it

Frank Bitterlich
Mushroom

Re: You what?

100% agree. "...that is not user information... (simply because we wrote in our TOS that all your base are belong to us)..."

And also...

Despite insisting it was unaware such data was available and thus went unexploited, AccuWeather said it would remove the Reveal Mobile SDK from its iOS app until it takes privacy seriously.

Let me help you with that. By just uninstalling your spyware.

AccuWeather is close to useless anyway, as the data st displays is often directly contradicting the data on their own website for that very same location. But then again, it looks like they are not really in the weather forecast business...

Godspeed, AccuWeather.

3
0

DJI's Spark drones to be bricked by September 1 unless firmware updated

Frank Bitterlich
Mushroom

Re: WTF?

Looks like Sonos already did:

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/08/22/sonos_forces_revised_privacy_terms/

"If you choose not to provide the functional data, you won't be able to receive software updates," the Sonos spokesperson explained. "It's not like if you don't accept it, we'd be shutting down your device or intentionally bricking it."

I just hope that all of these companies that do this kind of blackmail will crash hard, economically. Otherwise this will become the new normal.

2
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Frank Bitterlich
Mushroom

WTF?

This is ridiculous. Remotely disabling a product you have bought? Blackmailing users into installing "upgrades"? They must have a very confident (or very incompetent) legal department.

Calling this a "top-down approach" is not even near the truth. That is blackmailing, and I'm pretty sure that this is also infringing on several hacking laws. After all they're messing with computer systems that they don't own.

Absurd to think that people are still buying from them.

15
0

London council 'failed to test' parking ticket app, exposed personal info

Frank Bitterlich
Pirate

Did they throw him into jail?

What happened to the dude hacker terrorist who discovered that fiddling with the URL allowed access to other people's data? Surely they must have thrown him into jail for this nefarious use of the URL bar illegal high-tech hacking tools?

12
0

US spies hacked our phones over the air, claim pipeline protesters

Frank Bitterlich
Black Helicopters

Tinfoil hat alert

“I had my iPhone turn on remotely and start transcribing my conversations and texting them out,” Dewey said. “This was quite obvious, and didn’t require any interaction on my part.”

Sure, it's not totally impossible that this was happening, just very very unlikely. Applying a bit of Occam's Razor here leaves me with a much more likely explanation: That Siri was triggered accidentally (had that many times on anything that sounded roughl like "Hey Siri"). If it then thinks to understand "Send Text" or similar, it will happily start transcribing what you're saying int a text message.

As for another phone draining the battery despite being in airplane mode - there are many possible battery hogs, including dumb apps that don't recognize that they have no network and endlessly try to connect somewhere.

IMSI catcher, yes, I believe that. Airborne ones, even, and that would be a pretty badass example of mass privacy violation (though it might be legal in the U.S., I don't know.) But I have trouble believing that the hardcore spook agencies were field-testing their most powerful tools there for world+dog to observe.

9
0

Ex-NASA bod on Gwyneth Paltrow site's 'healing' stickers: 'Wow. What a load of BS'

Frank Bitterlich
Alien

Skin marks...

From the Goop page:

"P.S. Leaving them on for the prescribed three-day period left a few goop staffers with marks on their skin, so be careful to stick them somewhere concealable if you’ve got an event coming up."

Maybe the "frequency" was somehow wrong.

4
0

Healthcare tops UK data breach chart – but it's not what you're thinking

Frank Bitterlich

Reported incidents

The numbers are probably skewed as they only consider reported incidents.

I assume that the percentage of breaches that are being reported is very high in the health industry - as they should be.

And I also suspect that the reporting threshold is lower there because of the sensitivity of data. Emailing a diagnosis to the wrong patient is a bummer; but if, say, a web hoster emails the contact details of a domain to the wrong customer, I doubt that they would run to the ICO.

The study would be much more interesting if it contained original research, ie. asking companies (anonymously) for all breaches, reported or not. I bet the numbers would be a lot different then.

7
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Identity management outfit OneLogin sugar coats impact of attack

Frank Bitterlich
FAIL

Comparison...

From their marketing blurb:

"Enjoy Peace of Mind – When your identity management system is secure and reliable, everyone in the enterprise enjoys peace of mind. OneLogin truly values transparency and building trust [...]"

From their TOS:

"ONELOGIN DOES NOT WARRANT THAT THE SERVICE IS ERROR-FREE OR THAT OPERATION OF THE SERVICE WILL BE SECURE OR UNINTERRUPTED.

[...]

TO THE MAXIMUM EXTENT PERMITTED BY APPLICABLE LAW, IN NO EVENT SHALL ONELOGIN, ITS AFFILIATES, [...] BE LIABLE FOR (A) ANY INDIRECT, PUNITIVE, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, CONSEQUENTIAL OR EXEMPLARY DAMAGES, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION DAMAGES FOR LOSS OF PROFITS, GOODWILL, USE, DATA OR BUSINESS OR OTHER INTANGIBLE LOSSES, [...] UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES WILL ONELOGIN BE RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY DAMAGE, LOSS OR INJURY RESULTING FROM HACKING, TAMPERING OR OTHER UNAUTHORIZED ACCESS OR USE OF THE SERVICE OR YOUR ACCOUNT OR THE INFORMATION OR CONTENT CONTAINED THEREIN."

Pro tip: Read the Terms of Service before signing up to a service, especially when it's a security-critical one. If their own legal department doesn't trust the service, run. As fast as you can.

14
0

DJI: Register your drones or no more cool flying vids for you

Frank Bitterlich
Big Brother

Way to go!

"This move seems to mirror the sort of compulsory registration measures that regulators in the EU and the UK are currently mulling over. [...] people are less likely to use their drones for naughtiness if the authorities are looking over their shoulders..."

And the "authorities", in this case, is a Chinese company. And it is only to ensure legal operation, not data slurping, of course.

"Last month DJI quietly geofenced off large chunks of Iraq and Syria in conjunction with a US-led military offensive..."

Yes, please, give me a drone where the manufacturer can add limitations remotely, retroactively and without my consent. Of course that would only happen if I'm a "terrorist."

18
1

Banking association calls for end of 'screen-scraping'

Frank Bitterlich

Re: Isn't there an API already?

Obviously not or inconsistently, and EBICS looks like it is only for payments.

No, EBICS is for almost everything banking-related - statements, payments, direct debit,card processing, even investment management. The security model seem sound to me (public/private key signature and encryption, key update mechanism etc.)

0
0
Frank Bitterlich

Isn't there an API already?

What about EBICS? I know that (here in Germany, at least) banks often make it seem like a big deal, but you can get EBICS access at least for every business account; not a big deal to do it for private accounts, too. (The actual implementation is often lousy, but that's another topic.)

0
0

Avast blocks the entire internet – again

Frank Bitterlich
Devil

Email from the future

I just received an email from the not-too-distant future. I reads:

> It's unclear how widespread the problem is.

Avast has been receiving reports that a very small percentage of our users are affected by a minor issue today.

> Avast's PR reps have acknowledged our requests for comment but are yet to supply a substantive response.

The security of our users and their equipment is very important to us. We're sorry that you can't access the web any more. To fix this problem, please visit our knowledgebase at http://....

30
0

BT to pay £22m in interest to rivals in ethernet overcharging case

Frank Bitterlich

We're talking about the overcharging up to 11 years ago. An interest rate of just 3% amounts to roughly 34% over 10 years.

4
0

Microsoft Azure capacity woes hit UK customers. Yes, you read that right

Frank Bitterlich

Re: data sovereignty is a PR issue?

Wel, that's not completely wrong - as long as the FBI can demand (and was confirmed in this by a US judge) the data regardless of where it is, as long as it is accessible from the US (i.e. any data), European data protection laws are just a PR issue and/or the cause of an extra paragraph of text in a National Security Letter.

7
2

OLE-y hell. Bug in MSFT Word allows total PC p0wnage

Frank Bitterlich
Stop

Re: Security is Job One at Microsoft

"Of course opening documents from unknown sources is a security risk."

OK, let me ask a rhetorical question here: Why should opening a document (from whatever source, in whatever format) be a security risk? Isn't it rather that using certain applications is a security risk?

A software vulnerability is, without exception, a software malfunction (a.k.a. bug.) By telling users to be "careful where that document comes from", "not 'open' emails from unknown sources", "not click on links to unknown sites", you're putting the blame for malfunctioning software on the user instead of the creator/publisher/vendor of the software – "we told you to be careful." But that appears to be generally accepted now.

And if anybody wants me to rant a bit more, ask me about why software companies can shed all liability for their software with the inclusion of a single paragraph in their small print.

30
0

Twitter app pwned by pro-Turkey hackers: Users' accounts sling 'Nazi' slurs

Frank Bitterlich

Re: Twitter Counter

.. oh, and twittercounter.com is down currently, with the message "Just fine tuning the experience. We should be back shortly."

There must be some heavy "fine tuning" going on :)

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