* Posts by Frumious Bandersnatch

2112 posts • joined 8 Nov 2007

WIN a 6TB Western Digital Black hard drive with El Reg

Frumious Bandersnatch
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re: "not even the dead mouse the snake rejected because it was in shed."

re "in shed"---huh? I just noticed this. Did you just steal my joke from last week (a pun on Slough) and take it as your own? For shame!

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Aaaaand still with "SexyCyborg"'s bid over the Internet. Going once ...

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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<off topic>

The jellyfish, slightly perplexed

Jellyfish don't have brains, though. Just saying...

</off topic>

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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BOFH Moss was sure he'd sorted out the minor spontaneous combustion issue, but just to be sure he roped in one of the beancounters to activate it while he monitored from the safety of his Skype link. He lingered expectantly at the back just in case there was another "golf" incident.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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So as you see, the echolocation system emits a burst from here and a 3d reconstruction is mapped onto the user's breast via a network of electrodes.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Intel's "Bra-Z-Air" also includes heating elements.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Just over 50 years after the original "Wonderbra", Intel pitches in with "I wonder what the hell they were thinking" concept.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Thanks to the magic of voice recognition, it opens with a simple "aBra cadaBra".

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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hackers defeat "chastity" mode in 5, 4, 3 ...

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Geeks rejoice!

Smartphone-based bra unlock set to completely eliminate defer the awkwardness of groping around in the dark not having a fucking clue what they're supposed to be doing.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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"Pinky, are you pondering what I'm pondering?"

I think so, Brain, but where are we going to find a duck and a hose at this hour?

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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I, for one, approve of new methods of getting women into technology.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Fully supports, POKE and PEEK on mammary addresses

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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So that's what those SQUID things from those WIlliam Gibson novels look like.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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The smart bra includes extra dangly bits for your dangly bits.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Don't tase me, bra!

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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It also does some sort of smart/IoT type thing. For no apparent reason.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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New bra allows Red Dwarf fans to say "well twist my nipple nuts" without looking like a right tit.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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I was NOT looking at your breasts. I was just checking out your cool smart bra.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Intel to outsource manufacturing to S3 (Silicon Support Services)

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Smart bras today, teledildonics tomorrow.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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We all know that fashion designers have really weird ideas---but wrapping tables in brown paper? WTF?

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Hacker, Tailor, Solderer Mai

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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go low bra for a better chance to win

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We are the Knights who code Ni!

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: I don't quite understand ...

Sounding like you couldn't be bothered to look at the language ...

I generally like your rants, Michael, but seriously, what's with the ad hominem? The OP is clearly making a general point about new languages (not this one) and makes no bones about the fact that he's possibly being cynical and a curmudgeon (something you yourself mentioned in your OP).

So have an upvote for your original post, and a thumbs down for that one :(

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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barely more legible than INTERCAL? (and never as polite)

But of course INTERCAL will throw a fit if you're too polite, too.

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It's alive! Farmer hides neglected, dust-clogged server between walls

Frumious Bandersnatch
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something similar

Was called in to a factory to look at a PC doing CNC duties (probably not directly) for cutting up various wooden sheets to size. The PC was in the same area as all the cutting equipment and it was apparently being controlled by software stored on a floppy disk. The whole thing apparently had no IPS rating. Needless to say, I had to tell them I couldn't fix it.

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Crash Google Chrome with one tiny URL: We cram a probe in this bug

Frumious Bandersnatch
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double-decoding bug, eh?

It's been a while since I've seen one of those.

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Microsoft has developed its own Linux. Repeat. Microsoft has developed its own Linux

Frumious Bandersnatch
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re: systemd ... parallelises the startup procedure

The thing is, that functionality is trivially implemented by adding like two scripts to your system. Let's call them 'await' and 'provide' for the sake of illustration. The 'await' script blocks until some other part of the system calls 'provide' after setting up the matching service. If you want you can have a third script that does static analysis of the boot scripts to make sure that every 'await' has a matching 'provide' and that there aren't any dependency loops (or potential race conditions, perhaps). You could easily also put such dependency information in a comment section (like upstart, I think) so that analysis is easier and quicker.

The problem is that systemd wants to take over your entire system and the supposed killer feature of faster boot times has become basically irrelevant to most users (thanks to suspend/hibernate and fast SSDs).

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Internet Doomsday scenario: How the web could suddenly fall apart

Frumious Bandersnatch
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archaic spellings, was Re: Domesday scenario?

I know this is a bit OT (we're quite some time from the 5th of November, for one), but the word "bonfire" was originally "bone-fire". It might seem a bit of a pointless factoid except for (a) burning Guy Fawkes in effigy and (b) modern Irish still uses "tine chnámh" (literally "bone fire").

Anyway, I guess I'm just chyming in to support your regurgitation of obsolete/archaic/obscure words. You never know, it might end up giving them a resurgence in use.

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D-Link spilled its private key onto the web – letting malware dress up as Windows apps

Frumious Bandersnatch
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can't sign with an expired key?

Why ever not? I'm thinking that in the worst case you just manually set the time, do the signing and then reboot? The fact that you say that existing signed code will continue to work suggests that any safeguards around expired keys are on the signing end, and surely it's possible to get around any restrictions?

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BOFH: Press 1. Press 2. Press whatever you damn well LIKE

Frumious Bandersnatch
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good, but not *completely* original

http://lwn.net/2001/0621/a/kernel-adventure.php3

But then, great bastards steal (while those merely "good" borrow). Plus, the comedy is weak in the ESR.

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BAN the ROBOT WHORES, says robot whore expert: 'These AREN'T BARBIES'

Frumious Bandersnatch
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are friends electric?

only, mine's broke down ...

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IPv6 is great, says Facebook. For us. And for you a bit, too

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Nat as a security measure

NAT makes for better privacy. The use of IPv6 without any NAT is likely to make each device in your site uniquely identifiable by its global address.

Sorry, but that's probably the #1 myth about ipv6. If you use SLAAC then the global address for a single host will change over time. See for example, this page which says (emphasis added):

IPv6 provides both a stateful and a stateless address configuration functionality. Stateful address configuration is similar to the existing DHCP functionality in IPv4. IPv6 also supports Stateless Address Auto Configuration (SLAAC). In this mode, nodes can automatically configure their network configuration by generating a local IP address, locating neighbors on the same local segment, locating a default router, and even generating a globally routable address using the prefix supplied by the router through ICMP messages. All of this occurs without any user interaction. Another interesting note is that IPv6 provides the ability to easily renumber these global addresses via the routers on the network instead of configuring the hosts individually. Securing these interactions is definitely something to consider when deploying IPv6.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: There's begillions

Do you have to configure a /64 as a routed subnet?

Are you sure you can't be more granular than that?

That link you gave was too long for me to read (quickly) but from what I understand, you could * use a smaller subnet but it's definitely not recommended. The problem is that ipv6 lets you do some neat automatic configuration at the "single user end LAN" router but only if the address space it's managing is /64. If your LAN space is smaller than that then the Stateless

Address Auto Configuration (SLAAC). mechanism won't work. Basically you will want to use SLAAC even thought technically you don't have to.

* ipv6 routing tables aren't significantly different from ipv4. You can still, for example, put in arbitrary static routes, but it's not the "ipv6 way".

* edit: just to add another explanatory note, ipv6's natural subnet size is /64, while they define /56 as being for "Minimal end sites assignment". So (to keep things really simple) ignoring any special address spaces carved out of the global address space, there are up to 2**56 different "end sites", each of which can have 2 ** (64-56) = 256 subnets, each of which can have up to 2 ** (128 - 64) individual hosts.

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OpenWrt gets update in face of FCC's anti-flashing push

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Poor show

it's a really poor show when you've already run out by 9:30am on a Monday, too :)

The gin, yes, but running out of grenadine? It's non-alcoholic, isn't it?

Also, minor quibble... all the OpenWRT releases are named after cocktails. The splash screen (motd) when you log in has always given the recipe on any release I've ever used.

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Reviewed: Shadowrun: Hong Kong, Until Dawn, Hearthstone expansion and more

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Until Dawn -- "I’m almost relieved when the blood starts flying."

So, basically your standard "Twenty minutes with jerks" trope.

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Confession: I was a teenage computer virus writer

Frumious Bandersnatch
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"I didn't really understand it, but it solved my issue, so I used it."

Sums up my entire career as a "developer" :(

There's a name for that ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cargo_cult_programming

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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Two obvious questions

1. Did you get caught; and

2. Is there some sort of statute of limitations?

I found the whole field very interesting for a while. Not so much the basic idea of a virus (which is trivial) but more the ingenuity that some authors had in finding novel places to stash their code in memory, evade detection (like some viruses that would hook DOS or the BIOS interrupts to show infected files in their original, uninfected forms if resident) and especially polymorphic viruses (especially the Dark Avenger Mutation Engine).

I never used a BBS. I tended to use Usenet (VIRUS-L? All the 40Hex, 2600 and so on were also available) and a few key resources (Ralf Brown's Interrupt List, Patricia Hoffman's VSUM and IIRC, "The Programmer's PC Sourcebook/Handbook" by Thom Hogan). Was never part of any "hacker" scene. More of an academic interest with me. Kind of a strange hobby for teen/twenty-something, but still, I learned an awful lot about PCs, the BIOS, Dos and x86 assembly from it.

They really were simpler times. Most viruses were no more than stupid and ill-advised pranks. Even PCs were kind of more like a novelty than a serious tool. When serious money started being involved (PCs becoming mission-critical and the Internet becoming a conduit for commerce and banking) the scammers and crooks took over. That was the end of the fun/innocence.

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The last post: Building your own mail server, part 1

Frumious Bandersnatch
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maildir format

That brings me back. I used to use it with the mh mail client and exmh (which I think integrated with fetchmail). Despite exmh being written in tcl/tK, it was as nice to use as any "full fat" mail client I've used since.

The problem I eventually ran into back then was scalability. With the possibility of tens of thousands of emails, each with their own file, the mail directory could get really slow as the dir had to be rescanned for each sub-command. Mind you, that was in the days before the ext? filesystems had optimisations (automatic indexing or something) for huge directories like that. Even with the drawbacks, the maildir format still beat the alternative of a bunch of huge Inbox.bz files that needed to be decompressed twice when you were searching for something (once to find out which inbox file it was in, with no tools apart from zless) followed by a second decompress when you issue the command needed to extract the particular mail you want.

Of course, if I'd foreseen the need to index mailboxes before archiving I could totally have used something like glimpse on them instead of torturing myself with slow searches.

Nowadays, of course, all that seems like an anachronism when Google or Microsoft will happily index everything automatically. That's good, of course, but at what price?

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WIN a 6TB Western Digital Black hard drive with El Reg

Frumious Bandersnatch
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a chop too far?

El Reg photo department shuttered, work speedily outsourced to N. Korean shop shop.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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when given the choice

between the browsing The Register via its mobile app and a snake-infested laptop, most chose the laptop.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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The Register's occasional booze-up with the readers sometimes revealed some surprising faces behind the screen handles.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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The new 3W TDP CPU wasn't quite as toasty as his last laptop, but at least it wasn't crippled by a 1366x768 screen resolution.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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On the internet, no one knows you're a snake.

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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This was definitely not what I had in mind when they said "come work in Slough"

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Frumious Bandersnatch
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New Atom range fails to put a tiger in the tank.

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GCHQ wants to set your passwords. In a good way

Frumious Bandersnatch
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Re: Cracks?

If GCHQ recommends SHA 256 and PBKDF2

I just happened to be reading this article about hacking WPA/WPA2 on Tom's Hardware the other day. Though they didn't mention it by name, they describe PBKDF2 as using an iterative HMAC construction for protecting the key. As far as I know, there are no practical attacks against this, so the attacker is forced to use brute force. I would be extremely surprised if someone ever did manage to come up with any better attack since the construct effectively includes two one-way functions (the HMAC part and the chosen digest function). Plus, even if someone did find an attack that's better than brute force, increasing the number of rounds or alternating between two separate digest functions should make it secure again.

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