* Posts by Graham Dawson

1898 posts • joined 5 Mar 2007

systemd-free Devuan Linux hits RC2

Graham Dawson
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@arnolf

If systemd only handled init, there wouldn't be an argument. The fact that it has swallowed logging, interprocess communication and device management, to name just three formerly independent subsystems, is precisely any there is so much hostility. Each new subsystem it absorbs is one less that can be replaced with alternatives and one more dependency on systemd that did not previously exist.

Devuan has non-defaulted the big desktops because they have dependencies on systemd thataren'teasilly resolved. Why in the hell should kde have deps on the init?

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Graham Dawson
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And I'm sure the fact that systemd rolled a couple of very important daemons (such as udev) into its monolith, forcing dependency on it where none previously existed, has absolutely nothing to do with its forced adoption.

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Graham Dawson
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Politics.

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Chip design chap arrested for using photocopier

Graham Dawson
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Trollface

Re: Charges

Yes, lets get back to calling it yellow.

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Just how screwed is IT at the Home Office?

Graham Dawson
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Re: So how are these aging systems going to handle

The EU and the ECHR are separate entities. Quitting the EU would not mean that we are no longer bound by the ECHR.

Not that it matters much. Per Russia's behaviour, if a country is determined to ignore the ECHR then there isn't much that can be done about it.

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M6 crowned crappiest motorway for 4G signal

Graham Dawson
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Re: Fun fact.

Nah, it wasn't build to relieve the A1.

However, I will cop to it not being called M1 because it was the first, which was a silly claim now I think about it. It's called M1 because of where it originates.

Motorways and roads out of London are numbered clockwise from 1 in the north, dividing the areas around London (and including some other parts of the country) into 4 zones. The M1 was the northernmost motorway out of London, so it gets a 1. The M2 and A2 are named for where they poke out in zone 2. Roads in zone 1 and get the scheme 1n, so between the M1 and M2 you get the A11 and the M11, which go in completely different directions; the A10 which goes in roughly the same direction as the M11; and no M10, because it's now part of the A414 (originates in zone 4), but was originally an eastbound motorway spur from the bottom of the M1.

The rest of the country is also divided up into numbering zones. The crucial bit of information is that the zones are different for A roads and motorways.

So really it's just a coincidence. An apparent correlation that falls apart once you consider more evidence.

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Graham Dawson
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Re: Fun fact.

You have to get very technical to claim the m6 was built first. It was a bypass around preston which only later was incorporated into the m6. The first dedicated motorway to be built was the m1.

Whence m1.

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systemd-free Devuan Linux hits version 1.0.0

Graham Dawson
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Re: geez, the ignorance about systemd here is astounding (rtfazeberdee)

First among them: poettering, to declare his ignorance.

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Graham Dawson
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Re: It's not infighting

You very poorly characterise what actually happened.

Immediately after the issue was fixed by someone else, he declares the issue wasn't a problem and demonstrates a profound ignorance of the basic utilities systemd is replacing. Several people then corrected his woefully poor understanding of how rm functions.

If these are "haters" then I'm the fucking pope.

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Graham Dawson
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Re: @Andy

Which is why the post specified operating systems and not ecosystems. What an external application developer chooses to do is irrelevant. The closer you are to pid0, the closer you should stick to the Unix philosophy.

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Graham Dawson
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Re: Cat among the pigions but...

As I pointed out below, this was exactly what udev was built to handle. It had issues, but it was far superior to the prior solutions. It worked. it just needed to be made more robust.

Instead, Poettering and Sievers decided that udev should be rolled into systemd and made some argument about the init having to know about hardware changes to justify the change. The init doesn't need to know this. Not this intimately. udev, formerly a "do one thing" project, became locked into the "do lots of things" project and has been steadily locked down and crippled to fit the vision of systemd - and of course, in the process, it has forced a dependency on systemd in a wide number of subsystems that formerly only had a dependency on udev.

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Graham Dawson
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Re: They missed a trick

Udev handled that just fine... which is why they rolled it into systemd I guess.

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Graham Dawson
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Re: They missed a trick

Not every change is for the better. systemd changes a whole bunch of things for absolutely no purpose, to the detriment of users and developers. It isn't any form of progress. This idea that new is always better is a fallacy.

systemd is a regression - a reduction in quality and maintainability. Rejecting regression is a good thing.

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Graham Dawson
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Re: I don't understand the hype

Given that's pretty much what poettering wants...

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Graham Dawson
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Re: It is not that clearcut

It wasn't difficult before systemd came along. Other inits aren't tied to disparate elements of the OS and don't pile so much functionality into a single package. They just run and manage daemons.

If systemd just ran and managed daemons, there wouldn't be any arguments.

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Graham Dawson
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Re: It is not that clearcut

Yes.

It should be vi.

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Graham Dawson
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@rtfazeberdee Re: It is not that clearcut

By that he means running another init as PID1.

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Good job, everyone. We're making AI just as tediously racist and sexist as ourselves

Graham Dawson
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IAT tests don't show implicit racism, but cognitive delay when dealing with the unfamiliar. Tests in hol l and, using all "white" imagery and names, showed that participants demonstrated the same apparent bias when presented with names in finnish.

Does the name-race implicit association test measure racial prejudice? (van Ravenzwaaij D, van der Maas HL, Wagenmakers EJ.)

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Nerd Klaxon: Barbican to host Science Fiction exhibition this summer

Graham Dawson
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Re: Gilgamesh

And a comedy is always a tragedy for the antagonist.

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Governments could introduce 'made by humans' tags - legal report

Graham Dawson
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Trollface

That's not a birthright, it's an obligation.

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Graham Dawson
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Re: A Lesson from History

Depends on the supplier. Taking the boots example, I have (or had) two pairs for a comparable price of around £80: one from Clarks, one from some clothes store that I can't recall the name of.

The generic boots wore out in a year. The leather went in holes despite treatment, the soles split and revealed they were made of nothing but laminated cardboard dressed up to look like leather. The laces frayed and shredded after no time at all and had to be replaced twice.

The clarks boots are nearly ten years old and still going fine. I had to replace the soles because the tread had worn out, and one of the zip sliders had to be replaced because it had also worn out and wouldn't close properly, but the leather is still in decent nick and I don't see it breaking any time soon. I fully expect I'll still be using these shoes in another ten years.

It may seem that it's getting harder to find quality goods, but they're still out there.

Incidentally I also got a coat from the same clothes store. It's lasted me a very long time as well. The real problem is that there's no single, consistently good supplier.

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Graham Dawson
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Re: post scarcity

I'm not sure you understand what a post-scarcity society is. Our current economy is based on the notion of scarcity of resources by necessity, because resources are scarce - at least partly because there is still the requirement for direct human intervention in the gathering and processing of resources.

More than anything, the single limit on economic activity is energy supply. The greater the supply of energy a society has, the more it will automate, because automation is more efficient than using humans to do equivalent work.

If machines are capable of doing "all the work" - running an entire economy from primary to secondary to even tertiary industries, then those machines would by their very nature be capable of gathering resources in ways that are either impossible or very difficult for humans.

The more energy a society has, and consequently the more automation it engages in, the more resources it can gather. If a society has reached the point where it can automate everything, then it follows that such a society will have enough energy and automation to gather effectively unlimited resources. It will have enough energy to make routine journeys beyond earth in order to gather those resources, as that, too, is only a question of the application of sufficient quantities of energy.

A society with effectively unlimited energy, complete automation and the ability to gather effectively unlimited resources will inevitably transition to an entirely different economic model as a result of these things. Post-scarcity means simply that: there is no effective scarcity of resources, and with absolute automation it becomes nigh on impossible to artificially enforce scarcity. Without scarcity, traditional economic models break down.

Notice that I did not say it would become some sort of socialist paradise, just that the economics of a society that can completely automate its industries will be radically different from those we currently understand or abide by.

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Graham Dawson
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Re: Illogical conclusion

If all jobs can be done by machines, then we'll be entering a post-scarcity society and economics will already have begun to change in a fundamental way.

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Head of US military kit-testing slams F-35, says it's scarcely fit to fly

Graham Dawson
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Re: Clarke correct beyond the military

They should have built the pane with devops somehow.

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Europe to push new laws to access encrypted apps data

Graham Dawson
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Re: So wrong

I don't see why I got downvoted. The Euro parliament has no legislative authority. It's in the same position as the House of Lords. It can reject or accept legislation and suggest modifications, but it has no power to enforce them. It can't legislate. That means it has no legislative authority.

Legislative authority rests with the Commission and the Council. If the Parliament rejects the Commission's legislative proposal or proposes amendments that the Commission or the Council aren't interested in, the two bodies can turn around and say "we're passing it anyway."

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Graham Dawson
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Re: So wrong

EU parliament has no legislative authority.

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Y'know CSS was to kill off HTML table layout? Well, second time's a charm: Meet CSS Grid

Graham Dawson
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Re: Finally!

That's because tables were evil. Entirely inflexible and semantically retarded, and they made screenreaders throw a fit. They also couldn't be reshaped for differing screen resolutions and broke up the flow of content in arbitrary ways.

Some of the replacement techniques have been nearly as verbose, but they at least separated content from presentation and are easier on screen readers.

With this, all you need as a set of divs and a few css rules. The flow becomes entirely natural and there is no overlap between content and presentation at all. They're nothing like tables except in the final appearance.

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New plastic banknote plans now upsetting environmental campaigners

Graham Dawson
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Ahhh, that old west-country charm...

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I need an ISP that offers IPv6. Virgin Media: Whatevs, nerd

Graham Dawson
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In their defence, they did get around to offering ssl by default after a few years complaining about everyone else not offering it.

They'll get there.

Eventually.

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Disney plotting 15 more years of Star Wars

Graham Dawson
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Re: Getting old ...

Yeah, old enough to mix up Rogue One with TFA, obviously.

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In the land of Google, Holocaust denial, death threats – all fine. LGBT? Oh, no, that's sensitive

Graham Dawson
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Re: Obviously

Nazi symbols aren't illegal in Germany. What's illegal is their use in glorifying the nazi regime, and only that use.

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Bloke cuffed after 'You deserve a seizure' GIF tweet gave epileptic a fit

Graham Dawson
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Re: What an asshole

Clear proof that you have ignored the rebuttals entirely. But that's par for the course, really.

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Graham Dawson
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Re: What an asshole

If the argument rests on a false premise, then the argument is false.

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Graham Dawson
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Re: What an asshole

The fire-in-a-crowded-theatre argument is not a justification for restricting speech. It was originally posited as an ad-hoc justification for imprisoning a man for "espionage" in world war 1, whose only crime was printing a pamphlet peacefully opposing the draft. Here's a good article on it.

Eugene Volokh explains it as well.

And this is a very good paper on the matter.

This isn't a free speech matter and this man's prosecution doesn't need to be defended in terms of "restrictions" on free speech. The argument should not even be addressed except to point out its irrelevance.

It's a simple assault, no different to flashing a strobe light in an epileptic's face.

(e: corrected war)

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Ubiquiti network gear can be 'hijacked by an evil URL' – thanks to its 20-year-old PHP build

Graham Dawson
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I'm vaguely disturbed by the concept of a 20 year-old PHP build...

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This is where UK's Navy will park its 65,000-tonne aircraft carriers

Graham Dawson
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We do have the tech, though. All our subs are nuclear.

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What went up, Musk come down again: SpaceX to blast sat into orbit with used rocket

Graham Dawson
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Re: Don't call it "re-used"

The shuttle had unanticipated costs. The entire vehicle had to be refurbished, which included removing the engines and shipping them to a separate facility to be completely rebuilt.

A great deal of the cost was in replacing the heatshield tiling, which was an extremely time consuming process. It had been originally planned that the shield would be made from generic tiles over most of its surface, but they ended up having to construct custom-shaped files for nearly the entire shield, which massively inflated the costs there as well.

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Anti-TV Licensing petition gets May date for Parliament debate

Graham Dawson
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@ ZSn Re: Good going cobber

I don't speed. I pay attention to the road and drive at an appropriate speed within the posted limit. You'll rarely see me doing more than 65 on the motorway.

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Graham Dawson
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Re: Good going cobber

Given only 3% of traffic accidents are caused by people driving over the limit, I'd say that isn't a particularly useful outcome.

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Graham Dawson
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Re: Good going cobber

I think you'll find that those accidents are not caused by "speeding", but by inappropriate speed for the conditions.

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Your Amazon order is confirmed: Eutelsat via Blue Origin. Estimated delivery date: 2022

Graham Dawson
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Re: @Graham Dawson

SpaceX was founded in 2002, and has only managed a successful launch since last year. That's 15 years of (intense) work.

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Graham Dawson
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What are you talking about? They made their first successful launch in 2010.

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Palmtop nostalgia is tinny music to my elephantine ears

Graham Dawson
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Re: Not understanding the nostalgia

The modern things I hope and elect it to do are: write documents, ssh, maybe tinker with some code, possibly play music.

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Revealed: UK councils shrug at privacy worries, strap on body cams

Graham Dawson
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Can't say I'm all that surprised. My experience with Tameside Council was that they had absolutely no privacy or data retention audit policies whatsoever - or never enforced them - which resulted in one of their departments casually retaining someone's bank statements for several months, before handing them over to me in an entirely unrelated information request.

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New UK laws address driverless cars insurance and liability

Graham Dawson
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Re: Driverless Upgrades

Insurance doesn't just cover collision accidents. Theft, fire and if you're fully comp, breakdowns and other issues with the vehicle are also covered.

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Alert! The dastardly Dutch are sailing a 90-ship fleet at Blighty

Graham Dawson
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Yes.

The only question is how we intend to go about it. We could transition to the EEA/EFTA for continuity and then use that as a place to negotiate long-term deals, or we could do it the way May wants: run around gibbering, jump off a cliff and shoot ourselves in the face on the way down.

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UnBrex-pected move: Amazon raises UK workforce to 24,000

Graham Dawson
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Re: all part of their grand plan

Nah, he stopped because he has the choice.

For now.

(Although I'm not so worried about the possibility of Amazon getting a monopoly, I can easily understand why others might be. They're trying.

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Oh happy day! Linus Torvalds has given the world Linux 4.10

Graham Dawson
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Re: -0.8

Mathematics jokes are serious business.

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King's College London bods recruit members for penis ring study

Graham Dawson
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Re: Limiting the sample size...

The salt is real.

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Nokia's 3310 revival – what's NEXT? Vote now

Graham Dawson
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And if you tell kids today that, they wouldn't believe you.

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