* Posts by Ben Tasker

1516 posts • joined 23 Oct 2007

Kentucky gov: Violent video games, not guns, to blame for Florida school massacre

Ben Tasker
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There are rampage type games outh there - Postal being one series. But even then I don't remember there being a school or anything like that.

Mind you, it's irrelevant because nothing will desensitise an impressionable mind like there being a school shooting on the news every other day, inevitably followed by politicians making excuses for it to avoid having to actually deal with the issue.

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Ben Tasker
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Re: Guns should be almost totally banned

Doesn't seem to come up much, as most of our criminals don't carry a gun either.

Push comes to shove and you have no choice, you grab the nearest object and twat the bastard as hard as you can.

The primary aim being to get into a safer situation. Don't ask me why but we just don't get a boner for killing someone like some of your gun owners do.

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Ben Tasker
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> There are games that literally replicate and give people the ability to score points for doing the very same thing that these students are doing inside of schools, where you get extra points for finishing someone off who’s lying there begging for their life

Rather difficult to amass those high bodycounts without the gun though, isn't it?

Kids in the UK also play those games, and yet we don't seem to have the equivalent happening.

And that's being generous and accepting the hypothesis that games are anything to do with this. Couldn't possibly be just that an angry, misguided and disenfranchised teen had access to an AR-15 and chose to take that anger out on those he felt had wronged him

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Mueller bombshell: 13 Russian 'troll factory' staffers charged with allegedly meddling in US presidential election

Ben Tasker
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I'm almost certain I argued with that account at one point. Really weird seeing it in the news, I just assumed it really was just a bunch of extremely right wing idiots (or maybe it was the real account I argued with and they really are just twats)

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Ben Tasker
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Re: Last name on the list is not likely to be Russian

> Russia may have seen a benefit in having Trump instead of Hillary early on. It is clearly a choice between Pestilence and Plague though. Both are not someone you would like at your table.

As has been mentioned elsewhere, the aim may not have been to get a given candidate to win so much as to sow enough discord to destabilise the system.

In fact, if you look at the position Trump was in when this allegedly started, they may not even have believed Trump could win it even with their help.

Even more telling though is that they apparently staged both a pro-Trump Rally and a counter rally on the same day. Other than to cause discord, the only other reason I can think of would be a weird attempt to cover their trail.

They also apparently attempted to support Bernie Sanders, so it's also possible the original aim was to get anyone but Hilary.

None of that automatically means Kremlin though. As you suggested it could also be driven by financial interests, either in Russia or elsewhere

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UK mobile customers face inflation-busting price hike

Ben Tasker
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Re: Abuse

> Are their any (reasonable) simm only with wifi calling? I can't seem to find one

EE do a 20GB/month (unlimited texts and minutes) for £22/mo with wifi calling.

Next tier down is £17/mo but you only get 4GB data.

The catch? It means using EE. So you better hope there's wi-fi available as chances of a consistent signal are slim outside of cities/towns. They had 3 masts down near me a few weeks ago

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Ben Tasker
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Re: It makes no sense.

Yup, the reminder has prompted me to look at the upgrade options. Between my phone and the Mrs' phone I've just saved £25 a month and got significantly more data to boot.

Had they left the price alone, apathy would probably have maintained its hold until next time one of us needed a new phone (could easily be years)

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Who wants dynamic dancing animations and code in their emails? Everyone! says Google

Ben Tasker
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Re: how to turn that shit off @JetSetJim

> Had I been given that tip earlier, my life might be entirely different. I find AMP to be such a usability nightmare that I switched to Bing. No, really.

Yeah, thankfully this news story prompted me to decide I should pull my finger out and actually do something about it (especially as I follow a lot of news links from Twitter). So I've updated my adblock list (to block the AMP JS - particularly amp-ads) and created a Greasemonkey/Tampermonkey script to detect AMP pages and send me to the canonical URL instead: Remove AMP from my browsing

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Ben Tasker
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Re: how to turn that shit off

Problem is, Google Search is just one of the routes that takes you to AMP now. If you browse twitter from a phone, they'll now "helpfully" try and direct you to an AMP version when you click a link to an external site.

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Ben Tasker
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Re: Rinse, repeat

> Any singing, dancing email messages will get AMP turned off

What, based on AMP for Web, gives you any inclinatiom there's going to be an option to disable this heap o' shite?

Plenty of 'users' have asked for a way to globally opt out of AMP. It's not been forthcoming.

They're almost certainly going to go out of their way to shove this heap as far down our throats as possible.

About the best you'll be able to do is reply to say you can't read their email and could they please resend as plain text. Almost back to the days of eejits sending everything as a word attachment.

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Microsoft's Windows 10 Workstation adds killer feature: No Candy Crush

Ben Tasker
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Re: A thought.

> I have a Fujitsu Celsius R650 workstation dating from 2007 running XP Pro x64, it has dual quad-core Xeon's.

So you have 2 processors.

2 is less than 4, so you're golden.

It's physical processors (i.e. slots on the motherboard), not cores that this seems to be based upon.

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Ben Tasker
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Re: A thought.

I wondered if perhaps they meant cores rather than actual physical processors (though 4 seemed stupidly low).

But, googling around it looks like it is definitely physical processors than cores that are limited.

Not had much luck finding hex socket workstations from a quick search, so a limit of 4 does seem reasonable (especially given they don't want this used on a server). Looks like server edition supports up to 64 sockets.

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Chrome adblockalypse will 'accelerate Google-Facebook duopoly'

Ben Tasker
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Re: Pages prediction ...

> Finally you can't do it at all unless you (wait for it) "download our app".

I'm going to take a wild guess here and say that if you download the app, you also find it requests a truly disproportionate number of permissions, before sucking in your contacts (to support some functionality you'll never use) and potentially crashes half the time.

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Ben Tasker
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> despite their protestations about "improving the experience" Google actually want to sell more advertising, not less.

A cynic might even suggest that this is actually about making sure some of their competitors are far less appealing (because they'll get blocked by Chrome), driving more advertisers to Google (who'll make sure their ads follow the new rules to avoid blocking).

If it gets rid of some of the worst types of ads, that's good, but I do wonder what the long-term price we're going to pay is.

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Top tip: Don't bother with Facebook's two-factor SMS auth – unless you love phone spam

Ben Tasker
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Re: I hate to be that guy . . .

Yeah, I've left mine all but derelict for quite some time. On the odd occassion I take a scroll through I tend to wonder how people can spend so much time on there when most posts are just junk.

They're also one of the services I would resolutely never give my mobile number. Even if that was their only 2FA option.

Similarly, I just click past the Google nags to provide it.

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Yes, Assange, we'll still nick you for skipping bail, rules court

Ben Tasker
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Re: Sheltering Criminals.

Splitting hairs, he is actually a convicted criminal. Back when he went as Mendax he was caught and pled guilty to (IIRC) 20 charges.

So technically he is a criminal and has already been found guilty of some crimes.

That,of course, should have no real bearing on the current case, but the OP referring to him as a criminal isn't actually incorrect.

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UK Home Sec Amber Rudd unveils extremism blocking tool

Ben Tasker
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> This blocking tool will be a piece of code linked to an evolving government block list and I do not for one minute think this will be limited to social media.

Worse, they're using AI so when they inevitably get caught blocking something they shouldn't, they're gonna shrug and say "sorry, dunno how it learned that one, clearly a mistake"

I don't trust this government either, but actually the one that really worries me is the next government (or the one after that). What are they going to do with this lovely infra we, the tax payer, have been building for them?

Longer term, it's almost certain newer platforms will arise to get around the Government's fuckery, but in the short-term it's potentially pretty unpleasant (and spinning up those new platforms may potentially carry a lot of risk).

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Ben Tasker
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Re: 99.995% is impossible

> 99.995% is impossible

Not at all impossible for the test's they'll have run.

If you've _very_ carefully curated your test content, with an eye to claiming a high headline effectiveness rate you could quite easily score damn near 100% (though you don't want 100, because people would question that). Of course, the Government would *never* massage figures, so it couldn't possibly be they're using the best result from a test designed to prove it works (rather than look for failure scenarios)

In real world conditions, definitely not going to happen.

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As GDPR draws close, ICANN suggests 12 conflicting ways to cure domain privacy pains

Ben Tasker
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Re: when I registered my domain back in 200

> But yes, as a private individual you can opt out of having the contact details for a .uk domain published.

One caveat though. I don't know if this is still the case, but when they originally made the change their definition of what constituted "commercial use" of a domain was somewhat contentious.

- Got ads on the site? Fuck you, no privacy

- Talking about something you might be selling elsewhere? Fuck you, no privacy

- Got anything resembling a shop section (even if it's a tiny proportion of the site)? Fuck you, no privacy

At the time, they also doubled down by making these decisions and removing the privacy without actually telling the domain operator in advance (so no chance of appealing before your details went public).

I'd hope they've improved in the meantime, but given Nominets apparent determination to circle drains, I'm not going to hold my breath.

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New strife for Strava: Location privacy feature can be made transparent

Ben Tasker
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Joke

You won't be laughing so much when they decide to get revenge by stealing just one of the trainers, and tidying up behind themselves so that you spend days trying to work out what the hell you've done with the missing one

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Assange fails to make skipped bail arrest warrant vanish

Ben Tasker
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Re: A Flagrant Rotten Denial of Justice and a Blot in the UKGBNI Landscape

> Very suspect how 98% of the comments on here originate by the same IP address.

Start your comment with a crock, that'll help establish your credibility.....

Others have already pointed out just how broken and wrong the rest of your comment is, so I won't repeat it

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Ben Tasker
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Re: A Flagrant Rotten Denial of Justice and a Blot in the UKGBNI Landscape

That's a circular argument though, so he can't use it.

He's currently being pursued because he jumped bail. He needs to show that he had reasonable cause to jump bail, you can't then point at the result of you jumping bail as 'proof'.

Irregardless, I don't think that line of argument is likely to fly anyway. Even if an extradition request to the US were then to appear, he'd have had a right to challenge it, so the other side will argue that jumping bail still wasn't reasonable.

So he'd need to show a reasonable likelihood of a 'dodgy' removal to the US, which he's probably not going to be able to do. Even the rumours of the sealed indictment would ordinarily result in a formal extradition request rather than a snatch.

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T-Mobile US let hackers nick my phone number, drain my crypto-wallets, cries man who lost $20k

Ben Tasker
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Re: Cell Phone != secure

> And some detail from documentation a scammer isn't likely to have, like your last P60.

I've not once had them ask for this during login (or submitting a return)

> And you can choose a Verify provider instead of UK Government Gateway

That reads to me like a justification on the basis that we've fucked up our own auth systems, so please instead provide your details to a 3rd party so that we can cop-out of doing things properly

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Morrisons launches bizarre Yorkshire Pudding pizza thing

Ben Tasker
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Re: Missing a crucial step

If it were up to me, you'd get all the prizes.

Might need to stop by Morrisons and then go to a chippy I know is happy to batter random shit

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Dodgy parking firms to be denied access to Brit driver database

Ben Tasker
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Re: Petty Speeding

> Oh, and learn to spell... breaking is very different from braking.

Perhaps he means they're breaking their concentration?

Which, to be fair, camera's (especially surprise ones) do tend to do, because some people start paying more attention to the speedo than the road.

Not that all camera's are bad, mind. There are a couple of places near me where the camera is very much needed because of poor (well, terrible) junction design and road layout. You'd hope, though, that sooner or later they'd spend some money to correct the layout....

But, like you say, the easiest way is to avoid going (too much) over the speed limit. Doing 58 in a 50 is an example of too much, I'd be far more sympathetic if it was 51-54 given that speeds drift a bit and attention should really be on the road. If you can't tell the difference between 58 and 50 though, it's questionable how much attention you're actually paying.

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'WHAT THE F*CK IS GOING ON?' Linus Torvalds explodes at Intel spinning Spectre fix as a security feature

Ben Tasker
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Re: The bug is better than the buggy fix !!!

> Indeed you are correct.I'm avoiding these updates and there is nothing on my home PC of any interest anyway.

So you never, for example, do Internet Banking? Or send of any kind of identifying documentation?

The odds of getting caught by it are very, very slim (at least at the moment), but it's very, very easy to underestimate the value of the stuff we actually use our machines for.

Not updating because you think there's nothing of value on your machine is naive. Base your decision on an actual assessment of the risk vs the trade-offs, not on the perceived value of the data on your system,

Just my 2p

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Facebook has open-sourced encrypted group chat

Ben Tasker
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Re: "FB" and "FBI"

But.... But... The "I" stands for Investigation, not Intelligence.

On the other hand, as others have noted, the FBI seems to be sat on 8000 phones with no other evidence of the "perp's" guilt. So maybe they shouldn't have that last letter either, given they don't seem to be doing any actual investigating

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Hackers' delight: Mobile bank app security flaw could have smacked millions

Ben Tasker
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Yeah, I forgot to make that clicky - https://www.bentasker.co.uk/blog/security/315-the-state-of-mobile-banking. The summary is, all pretty crap but in a variety of different ways

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Ben Tasker
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Still about 18 months old, but I did have a tinker with some mobile banking apps last year - https://www.bentasker.co.uk/blog/security/315-the-state-of-mobile-banking - though that was on Android not iOS and involved a MiTM

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BT lab domain grab – 17 years after cheeky chap swiped 'em

Ben Tasker
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Re: Martlesham Heath

As for the blasted Heath there was modern pub there called the 'Douglas Bader'. They were not happy when I said it looked like a great place to get legless in.

Still there, and they still don't like that joke ;)

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Open source nameserver used by millions needs patching

Ben Tasker
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but there is no "advertising itself" element here either. DNS is no BGP. Unless I missed something?

Took me a few reads too....

Assuming El Reg hasn't just gone off the deep-end, they're talking about the recursor (which can also use locally configured data rather than going to the authoritatives). So you could potentially inject configuration which would tell the recursor to return a specific set of A records for any lookup.

If you stuck the recursor's own IP in there, then you could DDoS it (though you wouldn't gain much). It's more likely though that an attacker would just redirect specific domains to their own servers (for some MiTM goodness).

No change in NS records required to achieve that.

But yeah, there's no advertising itself - and the reference to youtube getting blackholed does leave me a little unsure that El Reg hasn't confused BGP and DNS.

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Don't shame idiots about their idiotically weak passwords

Ben Tasker
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I thought that was the point behind periodic password changes: to deal with undetected breaches

That was the point yeah. The thing is, it's unusual for someone to just sit on a known-good password - generally they'll use it as a point of entry more or less straight after gaining it. Usually it'll be used to gain a pivot point so that they can go after something more useful (like gaining domain admin or the like).

So unless they get your password on day 89 of your 90 day rotation period, it doesn't actually offer that much protection. Especially when you factor in the fact that enforced rotations tend to lead to lower quality passwords, as users get sick of having to memorise a new one.

Essentially, having an Intrusion Detection System on the network probably offers far better protection than rotating passwords ever did.

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Some 'security people are f*cking morons' says Linus Torvalds

Ben Tasker
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Re: Userland

> Unlike other userland processes, the death of PID 1 is fatal. So things which are perfectly acceptable in other process are not in tolerable in PID 1.

Oh, agreed, but the joke was based on your typo ;)

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Ben Tasker
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Re: Userland

> The only userland event that should cause a panic is PID 1 existing.

But only if it's SystemD. SysVInit should be allowed to continue as normal

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DNS resolver 9.9.9.9 will check requests against IBM threat database

Ben Tasker
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Well, yes, if you configure your malware (or the host system) not to use DNS, then obviously a DNS service (however good) isn't going to offer any protection to the users/victims.

On the other hand, you throw away a lot of flexibility for yourself, as you're no longer so easily able to periodically rotate the C&C address to evade detection (and circumvent blocking). There's a good reason why malware tends to use domain names and not simply have a hardcoded IP in there - editing /etc/hosts is essentially the same as hardcoding the IP into the payload.

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Ben Tasker
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It claimed users wouldn't suffer a performance penalty for using the service, but added it plans to double the Quad9 PoPs over the next 18 months.

They're both right and wrong.

You won't suffer a performance penalty on your DNS lookups, they'll come back nice and quickly.

But, the service doesn't support the EDNS Client_Subnet extension, so most CDN's will wind up geo-locating you to wherever the resolver you've hit is located. If it's a US DNS server that answer's your query, you'll get a CDN cache in the US even if you're the other side of the ocean.

IMO, it's a pretty big feature to be launching without on today's internet, and it's likely going to cause various CDN's lots of tickets from users/operators claiming that delivery is slow and they're being routed to machines in the wrong country.

The lack fo EDNS is deliberate - to preserve the user's privacy (so that they're not spurting your source subnet out to each authoritative nameserver you require records from). On the other hand, that "privacy" pretty much vanishes the second you use the received records to establish a connection to their servers, so *shrug*.

Definitely nice to see a new competitor to OpenDNS/Google pop-up, but I'm not going to be using them until they've got working ECS support in place. It's claimed that 9.9.9.10 does support ECS, but a packet capture on my authoritative servers suggests that either this isn't the case, or their using a whitelist of authoritative nameservers (which I'm not on).

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Does UK high street banks' crappy crypto actually matter?

Ben Tasker
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Re: 2 Factor Authentication

There's nothing more infuriating than being sent an SMS that you cannot access without going outside, or even have to drive somewhere else to receive.

Yes, ^ That.

I'm looking in particular at HMRC - do you want me to do my Tax Return or not? If I need to go out just to receive the text, I'd much rather go out to the pub for a quiet afternoon than walk back in and fill out paperwork.

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Ben Tasker
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If you use the latest and greatest browser, then your connection will use the highest available encryption, so is not at risk.

If the bank / business also allows connections using weaker encryption for people with older browsers, that doesn't compromise your connection.

To be fair, as noted in the previous article, the highest available encryption available from some of the banks is actually quite low/old (with some not even have PFS).

But, as the current article notes, crooks don't generally both trying to attack your connection to the bank. Far easier to either deploy malware or use traditional phishing tactics.

As we continue to secure connections, those routes are only going to become more popular too. You only really need a low(ish) bar on the connection itself to make these the more lucrative and desirable routes, and that bar is already in place.

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Ben Tasker
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Security researcher Scott Helme and encryption expert Professor Alan Woodward were both adamant that this was a serious failing, not least because updating to support the technology would be straightforward,

I've often found that you'll see people saying "it should be done, and is straightforward to do" only to later find they have no understanding of either the systems they're referring to, nor the operational requirements of the organisation operating those systems.

It's straightforward to update a low-traffic VPS to do almost anything, it's almost never straightforward to "just" update anything at scale, particularly where there are strong security considerations to be made infra-structure wise.

As others have noted, any plans to do so are probably stuck deep in beauracracy at the moment.

Lack of HSTS isn't all that big a deal in the scheme of things. Especially when as late as last year, certain banks were still using plain old HTTP to load assets for their banking apps: https://www.bentasker.co.uk/blog/security/315-the-state-of-mobile-banking

Funnily enough, that bank was the only I'd tested that had bothered to configure HSTS on their "main" domain, and then they went and did something like that. They're also the only one who scored an A in the Reg's tests... go figure

I think calling the lack of HSTS a "serious" failing is one hell of a stretch. It's a failing, but there are far bigger issues than need to be addressed first. Just my 2 cents

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Parity's $280m Ethereum wallet freeze was no accident: It was a hack, claims angry upstart

Ben Tasker
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Assuming it *was* deliberate, the aim probably wasn't to freeze the accounts so much as to gain access to them.

Which in a way, he sort of did - he managed to get his key onto those wallets/contracts as required for authorising a transaction. The next step would have been to find a flaw that allowed that key to authorise transactions without the sign-off of the other (legitimate) keys. At that point you could move the funds out and ride off into the sun.

Assuming, again, that it was deliberate, the sticking point seems to have been not being able to find a flaw that allows that second step.

Deleting the "new" wallet was a bad move though. If it had been left active he could at least have freed everyone elses funds back up. On the other hand, the funds are now sat waiting for someone to find a way to gain access to them, legitimately or not. If it was a deliberate act then he's probably looking for a way at the moment.

The thing is, deliberate or not, its something that should never have been able to happen. If a crypto-currency wants to be considered, well, currency then users need to be able to trust that they're not suddenly going to get hit by something like this.

Its quite possible that by the time access is recovered (if at all) that the value may have flopped significantly. It's not the first issue Parity have had, and it's not exactly a small deal having your funds frozen indefinitely because of a bug in the code

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Facebook's send-us-your-nudes service is coming to UK, America

Ben Tasker
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Re: Hash?

To satisfy my curiosity, I succeeded in changing the hash value of an image I downloaded from a website merely by opening and then saving it with an image editor. I didn't have to modify any pixels at all.

That won't affect the software they're using.

If you're patient enough to try it, get the original indexed by TinEye.

Then reverse search your "modified" one. Then crop it and try again, then change some pixels and try again.

You will most likely find that TinEye correctly returns the original every time. When they say hashing, they don't mean filehashes.

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Ben Tasker
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Re: Worthless?

It's not a simple filehash.

We've had TinEye - capable of taking an input image and finding cropped variations across the net - for years and years. It's developed in the meantime, but this is far from new technology.

The hashing is based (AIUI) on the variation between pixels in "key" locations (of which there are more than a few), so cropping the image won't help. Even contrast tweaks have to be fairly extreme to throw it off.

All that said, it's far from perfect.

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Ben Tasker
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Re: Why...

If they're saying it's completely automated then they carry the same risk even when you upload for hashing (could you, for instance, upload a bunch of Trump images?).

There'll be hell to pay, though, if they fuck this up and it turns out to be leaky

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Give us a bloody PIN: MPs grill BBC bosses over subscriber access

Ben Tasker
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Re: In the past, I would have cared about the BBC

> but since the Brexit vote, they've taken on the mantle of "Brexit Broadcasting Corporation".

I dunno, Have I Got News For You (for example) is fairly anti-brexit when it comes up, as are other programmes. Coverage seems to flip between pro and against. I'd rather they just wrote the facts too but it's not unexpected for a journalist to interpret them to some extent.

> Both by giving disproportionate airtime (the correct proportion being "zero") to Nigel Farage

I think the idea, pre-brexit was probably to make sure he couldn't whinge that he was being oppressed and censored. Better to make a pillock of himself for all to see, as it were. What they seem not to have factored in is our seeming current fondness for twats (see BoJo).

> by an editorial stance which seems to be "if it's from a Brexiteer, it can't be challenged or held to scrutiny". Even Radio Four has suffered.

I've not really noticed that to any great extent, and I tend to hear a little bit of radio 4 in the mornings. Though it's more than possible - there seems to be this general idea that Brexit is set, final and cannot be argued with (or rolled back). We had one chance and fucked it, basically. Not sure I agree with that, it should be an ongoing debate, given that there are facts which were available to no-one at the time of the vote (and still some we don't have yet, as things haven't progressed all that much)

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Ben Tasker
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Re: RE: AC

> Bill was a terrible gay character. If your character has to remind everyone they're gay EVERY episode then something is seriously wrong.

To be fair, I've known gay people who felt the need to re-assert their homosexuality at every possible opportunity. Conversely, I've also known people who you'd never have guessed were gay if they hadn't told you. Different people differ, so I don't think Bill's character was that unrealistic

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Google Drive ate our homework! Doc block blamed on code blunder

Ben Tasker
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Re: Vapourous clouds

"It keeps it out of US jurisdiction."

No, it doesn't. $orkplace didn't use them for corporate mail because they explicitly WOULD NOT provide a guarantee that data could be held out of US jurisdiction. It goes everywhere.

The poster you're replying to is saying that using his own computer instead of Google keeps it out of US jurisdiction. Which is true (depending on where you're based....)

Whether MS's solution does or not is something we're likely to see in the near future.

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UK.gov: Snoop laws not 'significant' obstacle to EU data protection talks

Ben Tasker
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Re: Should not?

> Should not? Confident? Significant? Whatever happened to evidence and certainty?

Evidence and certainty in these matters tends to come from experts, and apparently we've "had enough of experts"

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Google AMP supremo whinges at being called out on team's bulls***

Ben Tasker
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So why does El Reg (amongst many others) publish AMP-formatted pages? And why do so many people voluntarily view them?

It's not always voluntary.

If you hit a link on Twitter to (say) Ars Technica on a mobile device - you'll almost certainly go to the AMP page first, and then have to click a link to go to the properly formatted version.

Aside from AMP pages being unadulterated dogshit (IMO) one of the common complaints about it is that there's no way to opt-out of being served the AMP crap.

They've got more reach because of the way Google is pushing them - it doesn't automatically mean that AMP is a better solution. It's more than possible to create a page that'll load quickly on a mobile without AMP, and doesn't even take that much effort.

If you like AMP pages, that's fine. The difference is, that those of us who don't like them are getting them pushed with no way to say once (whether per-site, or globally) that we'd actually rather have the full-fat version of the site. IMO it's as, if not more, annoying than the sites that insist on loading a modal to say "We see you're on a mobile, why not install our app?" every time you visit.

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WhatsApp? You still don't get EU privacy laws, that's WhatsApp

Ben Tasker
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Re: Helpful tips to make the above concept better welcome.

Last night I needed to send a text message with a picture , which costs extra money and is not part of anybodys free texts in their phone contract. To avoid spending 50p I sent the message via whatsapp instead.

How else could I have done that? Bear in mind the recipient was a "normal" and dosent have their own ftp server set up or anything like that.

Presumably, like most people, they've hooked their email up to their phone right? No FTP servers needed.

Course, if you want to go the whole hog, you set up your own box, push the images to that and send them a secure link, but that probably is overcooking the effort side of things.

There are always ways around it if you want to solve problems like that. The trick to making it work is to make sure any extra effort is on your side, and then work to minimise that too.

Personally, I've just given anyone I really care to talk to a jabber account on my server and dumped an app on their phone for them. They can talk to each other, and they can talk to me via it. Nothing extra really needed - if they want to use WhatsApp to talk to other people that's obviously fine, but I've neither need nor intention of doing so.

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Linux kernel community tries to castrate GPL copyright troll

Ben Tasker
Silver badge
Joke

Re: I'm confused

,,, 10K per violation. There's 100 of them, so thats 100 grand please. ,,,

You've missed a zero, mate. It is a million.

Nah, Theresa May made a speech while I was typing and Sterling plummeted again

Also, D'oh

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