* Posts by Schultz

1406 posts • joined 22 Oct 2007

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Kremlin hacking crew went on a 'Roman Holiday' – researchers

Schultz
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Allies don't do that kind of thing...

You forgot to use the <irony> tag, it's not obvious to all readers otherwise.

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Sad Nav: How a cheap GPS spoofer gizmo can tell drivers to get lost

Schultz
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More ways to spot the spoof

- Have the system track additional satellites, compare to the Galileo, Glonass, and BaiDu systems.

- Analyse signal strength, jitter, and noise of signals. That device in the trunk will become much more expensive if it has to properly simulate a GPS satellite including atmospheric ally induced noise.

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Schultz
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Re: Chilling

Climate change science has already proved that most people can't distinguish opinion and expertise.

Now how did this relate to GPS hacking again?

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Indictment bombshell: 'Kremlin intel agents' hacked, leaked Hillary's emails same day Trump asked Russia for help

Schultz
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"Thats how these games are played."

@OP, are any of your claims actual facts, or do you just play the game of 'spot what I just made up' for your entertainment'? Hillary Clinton was I the limelight for decades, you can bet that countless hours of research went into finding any possible dirt on her in the run-up to the elections, so why do you claim there is (some handwaving now) some mysterious unknown juicy evil stuff on Hillary waiting to be discovered?

In dubio pro reo, so I'll assume the OP is not a paid shill for the GRU. Or (some handwaving again) is he?

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Schultz
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For democracy to work...

there should be a level playing file for all participants / parties. If one team cheats, they should be persecuted to protect the democratic process. This is not because you believe the right or wrong party won, but because you believe in democracy!

Some Russian operatives tried to cheat - go get them and try to make sure this won't happen again. This should be a no-brainer for anyone believing in the democratic process, right up there with the need to accept the outcome of a democratic election even if you don't personally like it.

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It's 2018 so, of course, climate.news is sold to climate change deniers

Schultz
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"decried as 'fake news' because it's written by well known climate 'deniers'"

I don't know why you make this claim about the cited article. The abstract seems to discuss the scientific consensus about climate warming (towards a new equilibrium that may be some 1.6 K warmer), as assessed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Maybe the authors ruined their reputation previously, but in the cited work they seem to just summarize reviewed scientific results.

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US drug cops snared crooks with pre-cracked BlackBerry mobes – and that's just the start

Schultz
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Symptoms of misguided policies

I like the fact that the police in this case specifically targeted the bad guys with surveillance - and succeeded. But in the bigger picture, these efforts are futile, because the invisible hand of the market will balance supply and demand and the long war on drugs does not seem to make a difference on the demand side.

Time to fix the policy on drugs. The government should not start a war against its people if they want to enjoy their addiction, be it for alcohol (I am looking at you, average TheReg commentard), nicotine, equasy, or cocaine. The resources wasted on the fight against drugs would be more productive elsewhere.

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AI threatens yet more jobs – now, lab rats: Animal testing could be on the way out, thanks to machine learning

Schultz
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Boffin

Re: Only 57%?

The toxicity of chemicals in the Chemical Safety Data Sheet (CSDS) is given as LD50 value (lethal dose causing 50% mortality). I assume the additional 7% die from natural causes.

The big question I didn't see addressed in the article is whether the 'predictive power' was evaluated based on chemicals that were part of the training data (making it more of a recognition AI) or whether the predictions were made for compounds that were not part of the training data.

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Leatherbound analogue password manager: For the hipster who doesn't mind losing everything

Schultz
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"it's the labelling of jars 'Kitchen Utensils' (...) that I don't understand."

That's to remind the users to Put It Back Where It Belongs after use. Nifty, isn't it?

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An $18m supercomputer to simulate brains of mice in the land of Swiss cheese. How apt, HPE

Schultz
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"as intelligent as your average socialist"

Now who would that be? I would not consider myself average (who does), but having grown up in a 'social market democracy' and being a proponent of government controlled redistribution (progressive taxes, welfare) and socially responsible regulation you can probably throw me into that pool.

Maybe, next time, check your prejudice against real people you know. Or if you don't know anybody that would fit the bill, go out and meet some - encountering new ideas won't shrink your intelligence even if those ideas are connected to socialism.

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Trump's Supreme Court pick will decide critical tech issues for decades – so what are the views of the contenders?

Schultz
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"Union rights =/= worker's rights"

While the above statement is logically true, a quick look into the history books tells us that worker unionization is strongly correlated to worker's rights. Before unionization, workers had almost no power to influence their own working conditions and this correlation is still very strong today.

So in the big picture of things, union rights == worker's rights.

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Uncle Sam is shocked, SHOCKED to find dark-web bazaars trading drugs, weapons, etc

Schultz
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WTF?

"... the Darknet invites criminals into our homes ..."

How does that work exactly? Did I miss the invite?

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Trainee techie ran away and hid after screwing up a job, literally

Schultz
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Thumb Up

LeeD: "I work on the basis of: - I don't *want* to do that, it's not my core job. ..."

So then you do the dishes and bring out the garbage, ...

That's the deal I try to get when I hear this particular argument..

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How a tax form kludge gifted the world 25 joyous years of PDF

Schultz
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Stop

"Placement and styling is important" ...

if the content requires it. Sometimes you just want the text, which explains the great success of the good old printed book. Sometimes you want sound, or moving pictures, or VR. Just find the right medium for your job and accept that others may prefer a different medium / file format.

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MOS-SAD: Israeli govt weighs in on Facebook privacy, promises action

Schultz
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Stop

"Zuckerberg - The clues in the name"

Now how would you address that issue? Maybe hire IBM to create a database (don't forget to create a sensibly graded system for those of mixed ancestry), make them wear a star so they can be recognized, ...? Of course the same critique applies to the OP with his 5 beautiful upvotes. Your racist comments disgust me.

Now wheres the Grammar Nazi when you need him.

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Microsoft tries cutting the Ribbon in Office UI upgrade

Schultz
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Boffin

"OK I understand that people didn't like it when it was introduced, ..."

It was a shitty user interface when it was introduced and it will still be a shitty user interface in a thousand years.

(1) It eats up lots of screen space.

(2) It doesn't allow you to remove functions you don't need.

(3) All the stuff you don't need clutter the interface and make it hard to quickly find the stuff you actually need.

(4) The ribbon layout changes when you resize the window, making it even harder to find the stuff you need.

The useful part of the old menu system was that you could remove the 90% stuff you would not need. The result was a single, concise menu bar with everything you regularly use, easily accessible by a single mouse motion. They broke it. I still don't understand why.

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Tech rookie put decimal point in wrong place, cost insurer zillions

Schultz
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Romania: RON and LEU

Right, they officially dropped 4 zeros and then, to confuse the innocent tourists, they continued to give prices in thousands of Ron. Pleasant surprise, when you pull the big bill to pay the totally overpriced soft drink, just to receive 90% back as your change. Or not, because as a stupid tourist you totally deserve to overpay.

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EmDrive? More like BS drive: Physics-defying space engine flunks out

Schultz
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Boffin

"Cold fusion "didn't work" because they announced too early"

You are right for all the wrong reasons: cold fusion was demonstrated in 2005 using the pyroelectric effect to accelerate deuterium atoms into a deuterium target (see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyroelectric_fusion). Unfortunately, this concept doesn't seem suited to generate meaningful amounts of fusion energy.

As for the rest of the cold fusion claims, they seem to have moved from the scientific fraud stage (delusional chemists having trouble with nuclear physics measurements) to the financial fraud stage (delusional chemists collecting M$ to build cold fusion power plants). Come back when one of those demonstrator power plants produces any meaningful quantity of power. Until then, I'll continue to laugh at your cold fusion.

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Schultz
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Re: There's a reason these things don't work.

"Next on the chopping block (hopefully): spooky action at a distance."

It's not spooky, it's just a manifestation of the wave nature of matter. You presumably have no trouble believing your eyes when you see a diffraction pattern (get a laser pointer if your teacher never showed it to you). What you see is the transversal wave interference. Your spooky action is based on the longitudinal wave properties (along the propagation direction). No magic, just very long and regular particle waves doing their thing.

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About to install the Windows 10 April 2018 Update? You might want to wait a little bit longer

Schultz
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Re: Windows Schrödinger edition

It really feels like they bring the quantum uncertainty alive. I updated my computer over lunch yesterday and afterwards some recently edited files were just gone. It was subtle enough to make me doubt my sanity.

Fortunately, the backed up versions were fine, lost about an hour there (on top of waiting through the bl**dy slow update procedure).

Oh, and I don't run Avast, but some locally mandated Ahn V3 thingy. Don't get me started on that one.

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Peak smartphone? Phone fatigue hits Western Europe hard

Schultz
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Re: 1st phone in 4+ years

Still holding out on an ancient S3. Even better, I replaced the cracked screen with the one from the broken S3 my wife discarded several years ago (the kids dug that up from under the sofa). That took a screwdriver and mere 20 minutes. A factory reset magically removed all lags and the only real limitation is the small internal memory. So I don't try to run 4 different browsers, 5 mapping apps, and all the Facebook clones.

Every now and then I look at the shiny things around me and decide there is still time. The only pressing reason I see for an update would be to run games (that's what got me the cracked screen - thanks, kids).

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The Sun will blow up into a huge, glowing bubble of gas during its death

Schultz
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Cute conversion: 40,000 Kelvin (~ 39,727 degrees Celcius)

Does anybody believe that those 40000 K were estimated to within 1 K precision? I believe the proper conversion should be: 40,000 Kelvin (~ 40 000 degrees Celcius). Or use proper engineering units to give proper significant digits: 40 kC.

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It's World (Terrible) Password (Advice) Day!

Schultz
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Rule number 6

Make your better half write down her login passwords in that old calendar. Or, better yet, incorporate them into your password manager. Because you will be held responsible if she can't recover that hotel booking.

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HP Ink to compensate punters for bricking third-party ink cartridges

Schultz
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Go

Re: Obvious answer..

Buy the 90% discounted ink, or some other 10% of the HP cost ink, or spend a few dollar for ink and refill yourself.

If you let your printer phone home to HP to protect you from dangerous ink cartridges, well, then you are a hopeless case.

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Danish submariner sent down for life for murder of journalist Kim Wall

Schultz
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Boffin

"life in prison should mean life in prison"

Unless you want to be dispassionate about it and consider:

- the cost of imprisonment\

- the decreasing deterrent effect of 'unimaginably' long sentences

- the fact that a decade or two is a very long time and the person coming out of jail is probably a different person than that going in (think back 10 years in your own life ... and you didn't have your life disrupted by prison)

- second chances in life

I'd say some scientists should look at the statistics and inform the judiciary about sensible prison terms. Maybe they already did that in Denmark?

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ISO blocks NSA's latest IoT encryption systems amid murky tales of backdoors and bullying

Schultz
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Lightweight encryption

I would expect that lightweight encryption could be very useful. Security is proportional to the cost of breaking in. It's not a binary function of unhackable versus hackable; your secure front door will just force the intruders to go through the windows or the walls.

To maximize its effectiveness, lightweight encryption should be indistinguishable from heavyweight encryption. If the bad actor cannot predict the resources required to break in, it will raise his cost.

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Facebook can't admit the truth, says data-slurp boffin Kogan

Schultz
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"there was real anger out there..."

Indeed, and a good part of real anger was foment es by fake news. The brilliant strategy of C.A. et al. was to figure out how to serve personalized 'news' that were tailored to fit a person's existing misconceptions.

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Audiophiles have really taken to the warm digital tone of streaming music

Schultz
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The problem ... and the solution

The fundamental problem of the music industry is easy to see: Once upon a time, there was great technological innovation, allowing every human to spend months' worth of their income into technological devices that would reproduce sounds and music with unprecedented fidelity. Everybody loved it and the industry supplying the music grew and grew and some of the workers in this industry became immensely rich. But the amazing technology got ever better and cheaper, so that every human could listen to music wherever and whenever they wanted, could record their own sounds and music whenever they wanted and share those. Unnecessary to say, it all got a bit boring after a while and humankind decided to spend their hard earned income elsewhere. The End.

The solution: Get over it.

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Boffins pull off quantum leap in true random number generation

Schultz
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Re: True randomness, but ....

Thanks for the answer ... I guess I'll have to read the full article to understand which assumptions remain :).

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Schultz
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Boffin

True randomness, but ....

as any claim for random number generation, this one is based on underlying assumptions about physical reality and our understanding thereof. You can always postulate hidden variables that would destroy the randomness (when we eventually understand and predict those hidden variables).

Alternatively, you can trust our current understanding of physics and build much simpler quantum detection devices. Avalanche amplification of tunneling events (cf. http://iank.org/trng.html or similar) is a sensible approach. The devil, of course, is in the details of the implementation.

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Skype for Business has nasty habit of closing down… for business

Schultz
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"For those that (for one reason or another) can't migrate to a 64-bit version of Windows"

So that reason would be the Microsoft licensing restriction when upgrading earlier Windows versions? Or is there another reason we should be aware of?

Anyways, the problem seems to be based in some lazy programmer choices. At least they are open about it.

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'Our way or the highway' warranty scams shot down by US watchdog: It's OK to use unofficial parts to repair your gear

Schultz
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Re: Will no one think of the printers?

Everybody thinks about printers:

http://mobile.gmarket.co.kr/Search/Search?topKeyword=Ink%20cartridge

https://m.aliexpress.com/wholesale/Ink-cartridge.html?keywords=Ink-cartridge

Local rules and regulations may apply... So check with your federal trade commission before ordering.

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Terix boss thrown in the cooler for TWO years for peddling pirated Oracle firmware, code patches

Schultz
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Re: Well done, well done

It is unclear to me why the support company requires the licence. If the customers had properly licensed oracle software running, would they not have a right to download and apply the patches? The support company may then take over the hassle of performing the patching but actually never runs the oracle software on its own computers.

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Is there alien life out there? Let's turn to AI, problem solver du jour

Schultz
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Re: Is there anything neural networks can do?

There are definitely very few problems where you can't swap a computer algorithm for another computer algorithm (aka AI) and collect fresh grant money/investment.

When I count the headlines, I have to wonder which is th bigger bubble: bitcoins or AI?

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What's silent but violent and costs $250m? Yes, it's Lockheed Martin's super-quiet, supersonic X-plane for NASA

Schultz
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Re: Only $247.5m?

This is just an exploratory project, so I expect that they'll be allowed to glue a long nose onto an existing military propulsion system. Also, from the pictures, I'd expect this to be a small scale model, so the pilot and copilot will have to stand in for first and second class passengers.

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No Falcon Way: NASA to stick with SLS, SpaceX more like space ex

Schultz
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Go

It's about government control

Due to obvious military applications, rocket technology used to be under government control. Musk and co. change the rules of the game, but it'll take a while until a new division of labor is established.

I don't see the parallel development of different rockets as a problem -- the bigger question is whether the NASA is still capable to properly plan and budget their projects. Falcon heavy was late and over budget -- but you could expect that for rocket science done by amateurs, starting from scratch. NASA supposedly has all the know-how already. Or did all the competent engineers move to private industry by now?

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F-35B Block 4 software upgrades will cost Britain £345m

Schultz
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WTF?

£7.67bn ($10.8bn) for software development

Wow. Let's hope they don't pay the code by the line.

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Probe: How IBM ousts older staff, replaces them with young blood

Schultz
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While they are doing their house-cleaning...

they should re-imagine their brand and sell the 'IBM' moniker to Lenovo. Gotta do it quick, those brand values are fickle things.

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Prez Trump's $60bn China tariff plan to hit tech, communications, aerospace industries

Schultz
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Boffin

... China does not play by the same rules ...

Whereas the western countries always played by the same rules, ensuring equal and fair treatment of everyone involved?

Except, they didn't. Check the history books, start with colonialism if you want some egregious examples. That's why the WTO made such a big difference: finally some countries agreed on some common rules and it made all the difference for trade.

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US Congress quietly slips cloud-spying powers into page 2,201 of spending mega-bill

Schultz
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Stop

Re: I can't see what the problem is..

The law specifies the oversight required before data can be collected and shared. The problem occurs if there is no proper oversight and some bureaucrats can do whatever they want with whatever data they find.

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Brit MPs chide UK.gov: You're acting like EU data adequacy prep is easy

Schultz
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"The EU obviously can't allow one of the founders... to leave"

You are mistaken. Some countries (e.g. Germany) have strong federalistic traditions. From that point of view, it is bizarre that a country can force its regions to stay (Catalonia, Basque country,...). When Bavaria and Baden Würtenberg considered skipping out of the Federal Republic in the late 80s, the discussion was not about whether they can, but only whether is would be practical, sensible, and economically advantageous.

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BOOM! Cambridge Analytica explodes following extraordinary TV expose

Schultz
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Go

Re: Popcorn

I heard that Great Britain has quite restrictive laws concerning slander. Maybe the CA data vault will deliver rich pickings for British law firms. I'll cheer for the bad guys on this one. No, the other bad guys, silly!

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Intel: Our next chips won't have data leak flaws we told you totally not to worry about

Schultz
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Multicore, multiprocessor architectures in the future

We'll probably end up with less memory sharing and the ability of processes to reserve a core+memory for their security relevant processes. Is there really another way to solve this issue? Finally a good reason to build seriously parallel processor architectures.

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Stephen Hawking dies, aged 76

Schultz
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If life gives you lemons, make lemonade

Stephen Hawking showed us what you can do with your mind, even if life gives you a really, really hard time. Let him remain an inspiration for generations to come.

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Bad blood: Theranos CEO charged with massive fraud

Schultz
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Boffin

"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."

(A.C. Clarke)

In this case, the investors just followed the money, assuming someone else had checked the magic. Holmes was happy to lead them along.

Technology will continue to give us great advances in medical diagnostics and treatment, but it takes a lot of work and time to make each little step. Theranos promised it all at once and right now -- that's usually not how science progresses.

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There's more to blockchain than dodgy cryptocurrencies

Schultz
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Boffin

Cambrian explosion kind of moment ... being Teutonic about it

How invigorating, as Teutonic being, to be related with trilobites and echinoderms.

Concerning that blockchain technology, I would personally wait until it reaches the Silurian period - I like my creatures with some backbone and that was notably absent in the Cambrian.

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Boffins discover chemistry that could have produced building blocks of life in space

Schultz
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Oh, the hyperbole

Those polyaromatic hydrocarbons (Pyrenees, etc.) are the thermodynamically (energetically) favored species when you heat carbon rich mixtures. Think candle soot, Diesel engine, etc. This is like the house of cards in its collapsed state - really easy to make if you have cards and gravity. I assume there must be something else in the paper to make it interesting.

And a molecule of life, it isn't. Those typically contain oxygen and nitrogen in addition to carbon an hydrogen and they are much more fragile. That's why dinosaurs readily turn into coal (=PAH), but coal rarely turns into a dinosaur.

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US Supremes take a look at Microsoft's Irish email slurp battle, and yeah, not a great start

Schultz
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'congress should have a look at the issue'

I guess there is one way the judges can ensure that congress will get its act together: completely block access of US law enforcement to any data stores outside the US. Congressmen would be working in it Tomorrow.

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At last, sex trafficking brought to an end with US House vote on new internet law (Yeah, right)

Schultz
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The possessive is hitting again

Or the possessive is is hitting again? Anyways, long live 's, it's entertainment for the ages' ...

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NRA gives FCC boss Ajit Pai a gun as reward for killing net neutrality. Yeah, an actual gun

Schultz
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Mushroom

Comparing guns to cars ...

there is the little issue, that cars generate (facilitate) a good fraction of GDP by transporting persons and goods to the place where they are needed. Guns seem to have a somewhat smaller economic impact -- except in those exceptional cases of war, where the GDP tends to take the bullet (so to speak).

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