* Posts by Flocke Kroes

2118 posts • joined 19 Oct 2007

Wow, RIP hackers ... It's Cyber-Lord Blunkett to the rescue for UK big biz

Flocke Kroes
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From outside the UK, the people you are likely to see representing the UK government are politicians from the house of commons. These are usually loud, because the need media attention to get elected, and ignorant because of the danger of letting anyone with a clue hold real power. They are only one third of the government. Another third is the house of lords. A few of them inherited their title, the others are often ex-members of the house of commons pushed into the other house to make way for someone less competent. A few members of the house of lords actually ask the right questions and get the worst of the house of commons' legislation delayed a year or two. The other third is the civil service - like the US presidents staff, but not replaced with the president. This lot are in theory responsible for implementing the policy dreamed up by the house of commons, but in practice keep everything pretty much as it has been for decades. For a more in depth understanding of UK politics, try the "Yes, Minister" TV series.

In the UK Cyber-Lord is the leader of an army of human brains in metal suits who stomp about saying "Delete".

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Flocke Kroes
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Mixed bag

The requirements do include some bits that are sensible and practical, and some that are neither. Take care to read to the end of each section before flaming. There is a cop-out for most of the over-broad requirements that reduce them to practicality or irrelevance. Careful choice for the definitions of undefined terms can make several requirements anywhere between practical and ineffective. Here are the howlers:

A subset of 8 character passwords are considered secure.

Administrative accounts should be configured to require a password change on a regular basis (e.g. at least every 60 days). - someone hasn't read the memo.

Administrative accounts should not be granted access to email or the internet (Diverting mail sent to an administrative account to the appropriate user account is simple and practical. If a sysadmin cannot fake From: and Reply-to: for the replies then he should RTFM promptly. What I do not get is how to prevent someone with administrative access getting around any restriction to internet access on an internet connected device.)

There is a long list of references to other standards that are not referenced in the text. This is where I expected to find requirements that effectively specify a particular brand of software. As they are not referenced, I would assume they are not requirements for certification.

There are two other documents: a questionaire and something about what to do with the answers. I am sure someone else will critique them before I get back.

Summary: vague woolly and the blind leading the apathetic.

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Samsung intros super-speedy consumer SSDs, 'fastest M.2s ever'

Flocke Kroes
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I want to get WORMs when my spinning disks die.

WORM allows smaller cell sizes (costs endurance that isn't needed any more), more bits per cell (hits endurance again) and does not require significant over-provisioning. Combined, that should reduce to price to the point where solid state reliability is worth the extra money. My plan is to put new files on a 128GB SSD. When it gets over 80% full, copy the oldest 30GB to the WORM and replace those files on the SSD with symbolic links. Backups remain on the surviving spinning disks that only spin up for the backup.

This won't suit everyone, but if your use case has files getting modified, then becoming stable but still accessed for years then you might want to get WORMs too.

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Target lost, Cruz missile misses: Ted's ICANN crusade is basically over

Flocke Kroes
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Re: In other words

Imagine having to write on your CV: Lost party's presidential nomination to Donald Trump.

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Non-doms pay 10 times more in income tax than average taxpayer group

Flocke Kroes
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50%

If you add in national insurance, VAT and council tax you are probably paying over 50% already.

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Jeff Bezos' thrusting cylinder makes Elon Musk's look minuscule

Flocke Kroes
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Four big choices

Falcon heavy demo 1 is scheduled for early 2017. Senate launch System first test launch planned for November 2018, New Glenn before 2020 and Long March 9 in 2025.

Anyone want to bet on the next big rocket (after Saturn V) to have a successful launch?

Perhaps I didn't see the last man on the moon.

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'Oi! El Reg! Stop pretending Microsoft has a BSOD monopoly!'

Flocke Kroes
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Black screens of death

7 working scan-it-yourself POS terminals out of about 20 (and 3 of those 7 tried to short change me last week). Most had a big 'No Entry' sign, which I presume means the software is sufficiently alive and kicking to understand it should say the terminal is broken. There were some Windows dialog boxes saying 'I should have sent an email to the appropriate techy explaining the problem so he can ssh in and fix it, but instead I am going to spew my guts onto the screen and invite any passers-by to poke things with interesting consequences because the committee of clueless twits who specced my OS are too thick to understand that not all computers can rely on friendly humans being near by'.

The last two were the ones with black screens of death: UEFI saying "I bet you wish you had used a Pi now"

The real stupidity prize goes to the customers who thought it would be sensible to form a queue at the entrance to the scan-it-yourself section instead of walking past the obviously broken ones to the point where they would be able to see 4 working terminals ready and waiting.

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World eats its 10 millionth Raspberry Pi

Flocke Kroes
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Re: I thought I'd buy one to try when they first came out..

$80-$150 x86 - I have one. It has an uptime measure in hours. The Pi's uptime depends on the next power cut, so months.

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Flocke Kroes
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Re: Auntie sulking a bit?

IIRC he said something like "I will make the same machine for half the price"

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Brexit? We have heard of this, says Dixons Carphone CEO

Flocke Kroes
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Re: Hang on. ...

The lull will keep going.

1) Us: "Lets talk about Brexit". Them: "You haven't activated article 50"

2) Us: "A50 done. Now lets talk about Brexit". Them: "No rush, the deadline is 2 years away"

3) Us: "The deadline is approaching, and we do not want to get stuck with just the WTO treaties". Them "Would you like an extension?"

4) Us: "Extension please". Foreach(member of EU) {"We want "+consession[member]}

5) Us: "We might go for some of them, but not all". Them: "An extension requires unanimous agreement. Agree to everything or we will ask for more"

6) Us: Cancel A50, and delay a referendum until the older Brexits are dead || fall back on WTO || accept whatever shit the EU dumps on us.

I was expected a longer shouting match about who would be PM, so the politicians are make prompt regress with Brexit.

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Tesla driver dies after Model S hits tree

Flocke Kroes
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Re: clickbaity

Come on, you can do better (and Betteridge's law is clickrepellent):

Killer tree threatens firemen with electrocution

Musk machine arborbreaking attempt ends in RUD

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UK Parliament's back for Snoopers' Charter. Former head of GCHQ talks to El Reg

Flocke Kroes
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Re: The role of mass surveillance in fighting cybercrime cannot be understated

Of course there is evidence. The purpose of legalising hacking for GCHQ is so they can plant their manufactured evidence.

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Flocke Kroes
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@Doctor Syntax

"innocence until proven guilty has no veracity in a court of law" is not grounds for an appeal. A criminal court requires proof beyond reasonable doubt. A magistrate's court only requires the preponderance of evidence. If you are not guilty, but someone wants to abuse the legal system against you, then the accusation will change from crime (prosecution by the state in front of a judge with some legal qualifications) to civil offence (prosecution by an individual or company in front of a magistrate), and the evidence will be "because I said so".

"Innocent until proven guilty" is the wrong target anyway. We should be aiming for "innocent unless proven guilty". In real life, we have bail conditions which are a sentence against the accused before any evidence is heard.

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Japan's Brexit warning casts shadow over Softbank ARM promises

Flocke Kroes
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@anothercynic

Theresa May has been saying no second referendum? Politicians have a different idea about factual statements and promises than ordinary people. So, when is this second referendum going to be announced?

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Flocke Kroes
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Re: inmypjs

I thought the EU was a democracy.

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Nul points: PM May's post-Brexit EU immigration options

Flocke Kroes
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Re: How we leave should be ...

How we leave should be as we agreed when we joined: Trigger article 50, negotiate a leaving strategy agreement and a continuing relationship agreement with EU representatives for up to two years. When the two years are almost up, either beg for an extension from every member state (requires unanimous agreement for an extension), or admit it was all a stupid mistake and stop trying to leave.

The rest of the EU have watched us glue a bomb to our back, and will not start negotiating until we jump off the ship and start the timer. It is in the interest of every other member state to take their time so we end up having to buy an extension from all of them individually. Article 50 was intended to be a complete disaster for any nation that invokes it.

If the UK decides to forget about its contractual obligations, and makes a plan based on a compromise acceptable to the majority of clueless twits in the house of commons or a 'wisdom of the crowd' series of referendums then no-one is going to take any trade agreement we proposed seriously.

The simplest solution is for our government to do what they do best: argue with each other incessantly about things that do not matter. More Brexits are old than remainers. Wait a few years for people to die, and when the spilt reaches 49/51 we can dump Brexit and find some less dangerous topic for our politicians to argue about. If Brexits really want to leave the EU, their is nothing to stop them getting a boat or plane ticket to whatever non-EU country will take them.

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HSBC: How will we verify business banking customers? Selfies!

Flocke Kroes
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Re: I doubt they are all security experts

Clearly 20% of customers have at least a minimal understanding of security.

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Flocke Kroes
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You do not have to

Get a photo of your victim off fecalbook and open an account in his name. Get a loan and buy some bitcoins.

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Windows Update borks PowerShell – Microsoft won't fix it for a week

Flocke Kroes
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I thought the sequence was ...

Ready... Fire... AIM!

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Watch the world's biggest 'flying bum' go arse over tit in a crash

Flocke Kroes
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Almost impossible to create?

Helium is relatively easy to create. It is a by-product in the manufacture of tritium, and a waste product of experimental fusion reactors. Manufacturing elements is expensive and only worth the trouble if the element does not exist naturally and has a profitable / military use. Even collecting naturally occurring Helium is not worth the effort - unless someone creates a market for it by, for example, flying giant airships.

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NIST spins atomic gyroscope to allow navigation without GPS

Flocke Kroes
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Re: That's a rather accurate scale to weigh out 8 million Rb atoms...

Instead of thinking of rubidium metal oxidising on a microbalance, think about a liquid helium cooled vacuum chamber contaminated with a hint of rubidium gas.

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Microsoft, Lenovo cross-licensing love-in: Android mobes knocked up with... Office apps

Flocke Kroes
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Re: I see no crux

The threat is 'Buy a license for MS Office for all Android phones or your marketing support funds for Windows disappears'. Windows costs too much to install on a new PC, but qualifying OEMs get marketing support cash that effectively reduces the cost to competitive levels. To qualify, the OEM must do something like install Windows on all laptops, or discontinue small cheap computers. Marketing cash is a trick to avoid anti-trust regulations about changing the price of your product depending on the obedience or the re-seller.

When something is good, it can be sold to customers. When it is bad, it is sold to businesses. When it is broken, the government buys it. Clearly MS Office is sufficiently non-functional that businesses will not bundle it without credible threats, but not yet so thoroughly broken that it requires a state mandate to force people to pay for it.

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Your wget is broken and should DIE, dev tells Microsoft

Flocke Kroes
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If only ...

If only their were implementations of curl and wget available in source code form on the internet that could be compiled for Windows and distributed for free. Microsoft would be able ship software that has survived decades of testing by demanding techies without having to go to the expense of creating, testing and debugging their own versions.

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Microsoft has open-sourced PowerShell for Linux, Macs. Repeat, Microsoft has open-sourced PowerShell

Flocke Kroes
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Re: Microsoft Open Source ©

Microsoft was doing open source back when I was a PFY. The license went something along the lines of "If you could have glimpsed Microsoft's source code, and you profit from software that does something similar, Microsoft can sue you to bankruptcy".

The article says "permissive MIT licence". The difference between that and a standard MIT license was not obvious with couple of quick web searches. Microsoft have been releasing software with MIT-like licenses for years. It is a big step up from their early poisoned chalices. The bit that is missing is the patent promise. Last time I looked, Microsoft promised not to sue you for patent infringement if you created a standards compliant implementation of the .NET framework. If you created an implementation that was compatible with theirs instead of being standards compliant, you had no such protection.

It has been years since I looked at Microsoft's terms and conditions. I could be very out of date. If Microsoft has made a stronger commitment not to sue developers, a link to it would be appreciated.

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Flocke Kroes
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Why is ssh built in?

If it is not built it in, you can use the latest ssh, tested by programmers all over the world. Any built in version will either be behind the times, or some clone tested only by the brave Microsoft customers running the next version of Windows.

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£11bn later: Smart meters project delayed again for Crapita tests

Flocke Kroes
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Re: "Smart" meters

No need for a problem. The requirement is for someone to pay for them. If something has value, people will buy it. If something is pointless, businesses will buy it and pass the costs on to customers. If it is a broken money sucking disaster, governments will buy it with tax payers' money.

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Some Windows 10 Anniversary Update: SSD freeze

Flocke Kroes
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Re: Satya Nadella fault

IIRC Ballmer fired the test department because they were delaying the release of Vista.

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Flocke Kroes
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Thankyou AndrewDu ...

... for offering to install your MS software on the home device of anyone who needs it to do their homework. Isn't it generous of Microsoft to allow this in their terms and conditions. But what happens when students complete their course? Can they continue with the licensed copy you installed, or do they have to pay a monthly fee / answer questions on the adverts to use the skills they have learned?

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Vodafone: Dear customers. We're sorry we killed your Demon

Flocke Kroes
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I think it would hurt them

Early on, they were using FOSS. They would deliver to your server which you could configure to convert email addresses to user accounts as you chose. Some turd brained halfwit replaced it a Microsoft disaster. You then had to fart around with their steadily deteriorating web site to administer addresses. I assume this was because their Microsoft license depended on the number of unique addresses (on the assumption that this is somehow related to the number of users). Switching back to avoid the growing licensing fees would require hiring someone competent, which I assume is beyond the ability of the current PHB.

The free demon website became a free NamesCo website and a year later they said it was only free for the previous year.

To some extent, this is a good thing. Domain names are cheap, and ADSL is sufficient for a modest website and email server. I no longer have to tolerate whatever PHB was in charge of these services. (And I hope he is now working out his notice because he has made himself redundant)

I assume the next thing to go is the free technical support number, followed by service interruptions to increase revenue from the new premium rate number.

Anyone know an ISP that: puts their terms and conditions front and centre where you can read them, gets their revenue from providing a good service and not a premium rate complaints number and has a termination policy that does not involve finding the secret procedure to arrange a face to face meeting with Mr Inaccessible 36 months in advance?

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Russia is planning to use airships as part of a $240bn transport project

Flocke Kroes
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Re: Fuel

The old solution was Blau gas. A more modern solution is to retain the water vapour from combustion. Fuel has about twice as many hydrogen atoms as carbon atoms. The loss of carbon in CO₂ is balanced by the gain of oxygen in H₂O.

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The curious case of a wearables cynic and his enduring fat bastardry

Flocke Kroes
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To everyone complaining that trousers are too big at the waist:

Belt up.

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BlackBerry: Forget phones, Lawsuits In Motion is back – and it's firing off patent claims

Flocke Kroes
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bazza - try getting your facts right

TSG (The SCO Group) litigation was about contracts, not copyrights. According to TSG, when IBM added code to AIX that made the functionality the property of TSG. Linux destroyed the value of Project Monterey, a joint venture by companies (including IBM and TSG) to create a single Unix for multiple architectures. TSG claimed that IBM broke a contract with TSG when it increased the value of Linux by adding TSG's functionality (that was designed by IBM, and implemented by different IBM programmers for AIX and Linux) to Linux.

TSG said they owned the copyrights for Unix. They actually had a contract to collect royalties for Novell's Unix, pay all the money to Novell and in return Novell would pay TSG commission. TSG's litigation with Novell was about the lack of transfer of copyrights, TSG keeping Novell's Unix royalties and TSG suing IBM over Unix without authorisation from Novell.

TSG also sued former customers because the licence agreement required customers to count the number of installations of SCO Unix they used (zero) and post the results to TSG every year. When the letters stopped arriving, TSG sued ex-customers for breach of contract.

TSG made a lot of noise about copyrights they did not own and patents they did not have. They pressured some companies into signing a contract to pay royalties to TSG for any TSG code or patented material that might be in Linux. The contract was the source of revenue, not STREAMS (Licensed GPL and contributed to Linux by SCO, ignored by everybody and deleted from Linux when TSG started threatening every penguin on the planet).

I am churlish enough to say that BlackBerry have come out from under a other people's bridges and are trollishly demanding money to cross. There is some strange belief that this behaviour is acceptable if the company doing it does (or used to) manufacture something.

Patents were supposed to increase the rate of technological progress by rewarding inventors for publishing the details of their invention so others could use them. Software patents at best describe functionality that is obvious to those skilled in the art. The time consuming part of adding functionality is creating code that implements the functionality and the test vectors that ensure the functionality survives debugging, optimising, porting and feature creep. Software patents (== computer implemented inventions) do not include code (which is protected by copyright), so they do not increase the rate of technological progress because they do not include details that allow others to use them without doing all the work of coding and testing.

Judges are beginning to understand this, and have set precedents reducing the value of patent portfolios. Some states recognise the damage that patents do to their SMEs, and have passed laws to place barriers in front of trolls. Filing in East Texas is by itself evidence that BlackBerry knows it is trolling, and would lose on appeal if their victim has the cash to last long enough. The reason BlackBerry has not been snapped up is they believe their patent portfolio has greater value than experienced trolls are prepared to offer.

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HPE CEO Meg Whitman endorses Hillary Clinton, dumps on Trump

Flocke Kroes
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mainstream media?

ooFie: "almost ALL mainstream media denouncing Trump as the anti-Christ"

I have read plenty of mainstream media about Trump, but this was the first time I heard he was the anti-christ. I tried a web search for "Trump anti-christ" and found plenty of results. I did not recognise any of the sites, and lacking significant knowledge or interest in religion I had difficulty separating sincerity from satire.

As I was clearly out of my depth, I looked for the opinion of an expert. A web search for "Trump pope" showed lots of sites I recognised. No mention of anti-christ so far, but here is what Pope Francis said about Donald:

"A person who thinks only about building walls, wherever they may be, and not building bridges, is not Christian."

Perhaps you could point out a mainstream media site that claims Trump is the anti-christ?

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Chinese Android smartphone firm: It packs a dedicated crypto chip

Flocke Kroes
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I am sure I saw something like this before.

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Virgin Galactic wins US operator's licence for SpaceShipTwo

Flocke Kroes
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Re: Space travel—for those who don't know what that is

I was going to reply that a fraction of the project would be used on something useful: LauncherOne (200kg to sun synchronous orbit). A short fact check before posting showed that White Knight Two is too small for the current design of LauncherOne, and they will need a 747 instead. Also, the LauncherOne design uses an RP2/LOX engine, not N₂O/HTPB so the two projects have very little in common.

I found about $400M of funding for the up/down joyride, $100M for LauncherOne. I found between $100M and $200M of real funding for Skylon, and promises for $350M that could have arrived, or been trimmed to the funding I did find.

The entire Skylon project was expected to require $12B in 2004 and the current first test flight could be in 2025. I can see why investors are going for cheaper toy projects with a shorter promised delivery date. SLS has currently cost most of $7B, and is expected to reach $35B by 2025. If Alan Bond promised to drop half his budget on states that made space shuttle parts, he could have got all the funding he needed.

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You think Donald Trump is insecure? Check out his online store

Flocke Kroes
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That was the old plan

Trump was profiting from the primaries by spending campaign money on Trump businesses. Trump's self funded campaign got money from (initially unsolicited) donations and from loans from Donald Trump. Right up to the nominating convention in Cleveland, Trump could have mostly repaid himself from contributions. Only when the Republican party was irreversibly committed to nominating Trump did he forgive the loans.

The fun part is that Trump might have taken the plunge at the peak of his polling. Americans start taking an interest in their elections at different times. Some will wait for the debates, others waited for the conventions. Only the truly committed followed from the start of the primaries. During the primaries, each party feuds with itself. That is supposed to end at the convention which is used to heal the party's rifts and convince the supporters of the other candidates to accept the nominee.

Trump made his commitment before the Democrat's convention started, and before the Republican convention finished. The polls would have included thoroughly disgruntled Bernie supporters and and Republicans who had not yet looked at who their candidate really is. The Democrats reduced their spending on Trump bashing adverts before the Republican convention. Perhaps they were afraid that if they worked too hard, Trump would not get nominated, and Trump was doing an excellent job of convincing Republicans to vote Hillary. Trump's convention highlighted and widened the divisions in his party, and convinced many senior Republicans to endorse Hillary. When the polling reflects that, Trump will be looking for someone to blame.

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Giant Musk-stick test-firing proves a rocket can rise twice

Flocke Kroes
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Approximately

I keep seeing "first stage separation at about 100km". After separation, stage one is still going really fast, but near horizontal. If a stage one does not get into space before separation, it probably covers the last few hundred meters after separation. There is still plenty of atmospheric heating on the way down, but not as much as for the space shuttle or Falcon 9 stage 2. NS2 has a much easier return path as it is just going up and down with no attempt at getting into orbit.

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Flocke Kroes
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Splitting hairs

"it's the first time a rocket's first stage has ever been fuelled up and fired after it's been to space."

NS2 has been into space and back four times. You can almost exclude New Shepard from the above statement because the first stage is the only stage (and has only half the thrust of a Falcon 9 stage 2). Despite New Shepard's much less demanding missions suborbital test flights, I still think Blue Origins wins the prize for flying the first re-usable stage 1 rocket.

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Auto crypto algo validation? Protocol prototype here

Flocke Kroes
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Doesn't everybody ...

... arrange for 'make test' to whine if some module's output does not match known good output for a set of test vectors?

So the new plan is to use untested code to connect to a spoofed server, get some test vectors, run the untested crypto algorithm on them and rely on a reply from that spoofed server to valid the code that authenticated the wrong server in the first place?

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Dem-owned-crats: Now its congressional committee is hacked

Flocke Kroes
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Re: Someone get Assange a cookie

Would you like to point at the email on wikileaks that proves the democrats are corrupt criminals? If you actually find one, how would you prove it was written by a democrat and not a fake planted by the crackers?

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Windows 10 pain: Reg man has 75 per cent upgrade failure rate

Flocke Kroes
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Guess at Windows 10 specific BIOS

Are we looking at a TPM issue? As a complete penguin, I could be thoroughly wrong here, but as I understand it, Windows machines must be completely locked down to prevent users doing something without explicit permission from one of Microsoft's servers. Imagine if an exploit was found for an old TPM. The driver would already exist for Windows 7, but it would be 'impossible' to create one for Windows 10 because a user might be able to do something that Microsoft want to charge extra for - say extracting a local copy of a file held for ransom on OneDrive.

I thoroughly welcome you to explore Penguinland - on days well in advance of deadlines. On your first visit to the command line, you want 'man 1 less', and find the button that exits from less, which is used for displaying manual pages. Next up is 'man 1 man', and look for the command for searching for manual pages referencing a specific topic. After that, try 'info info' because some raving gnu hates man pages. Before frustration sets in, read about asking questions.

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The return of (drone) robot wars: Beware of low-flying freezers

Flocke Kroes
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Re: Even in 2016

[Expletive deleted] pedestrians deliberately blocking my path and telling me not to ride a bicycle on the pavement. A few have the grace to apologise when I ask them not to obstruct the cycle path. Lane markings, a picture of a bicycle painted on the path and the white bicycle in a blue circle sign, yet pedestrians still cannot spot a cycle path.

[I know there are inconsiderate cyclists, but there are also inconsiderate drivers and inconsiderate pedestrians. No one group has a monopoly on stupid.]

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Fork YOU! Sure, take the code. Then what?

Flocke Kroes
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Re: Forking Debian...

Distrowatch tells me the most recent distribution based on Debian is Bodhi, which came out yesterday. For a proper fork, I would guess Devuan.

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Gullible Essex Police are now using junk science lie detectors

Flocke Kroes
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Simple: choose the right question

Did you steal a cookie from the jar by your neighbour's kitchen sink at 10:30 yesterday?

Have you ever take something you that perhaps you shouldn't have?

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It's 2016 and your passwords can still be sniffed from wireless keyboards

Flocke Kroes
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I thought it was keykerikiki

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5nRlAPtoM0g

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UK membership of Council of Europe has implications for data protection after Brexit

Flocke Kroes
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Re: something as “flexible” as PrivacyShield

How about a papyrus boat? (You can't find me. I am hiding behind a Cheshire cat.)

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Seminal adventure game The Hobbit finally ported to the Dragon 64

Flocke Kroes
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Re: Posh Gits

At school, the compukit UK101 was somewhat accessible. With some extra software you could use the arrow keys to move the other cursor and copy one letter at a time from a different part of the screen! There were rumours of an ITT2020 hidden in a locked room.

If the Trash 80 was too pricey, you could have got the Chinese copy called a Video Genie (mine had both shift keys!)

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No, the VCR is not about to die. It died years ago. Now it's VHS/DVD combo boxes' turn

Flocke Kroes
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Stop making me feel old

Helical scan digital storage tape did exist. It was based on Digital Audio Tape, and the computer storage version was informally known as DAT as well.

Kids today... don't even remember DAT. Time to practice shouting "Get of my lawn!"

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IT boss 'set up fake companies to charge his employers $2.4m'

Flocke Kroes
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Re: Consultancy...

The other way to do hardware:

Delete a driver. Tell victim he needs a new motherboard, purchase for real, swap in the new one, and send the old one for recycling and re-install the driver. Move the old motherboard from your recycling company to your computer spares company and repeat - this time buying from the 'new' motherboard from yourself.

In a couple of years, the Brexiters will give us back the tariff rip-off. Pick something with an import tariff, buy some for real abroad and import it from yourself. Collect broken kit that resembles the product and send it back under guaranty to your foreign self. You can then send replacements to yourself without paying the import tariff and undercut the competition.

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Alleged skipper of pirate site KickAss Torrents keel-hauled in Poland

Flocke Kroes
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Re: Here's a thought...

Thanks for the love, but I do have a wish list of content not available for purchase either at all, or at a sane price. The newest items on the list are exclusively on Amazon Prime. Exclusives are exclusive for a limited time. I can wait. While I am waiting, older items from the wish list become available like my recent purchases. I keep to a strict ≤£5 per film and ≤£1 per episode. I can sit back, feel smug and self righteous with >370 films >3400 episodes until Amazon Prime's temporary monopoly gets broken just like all their predecessors.

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