* Posts by Remy Redert

439 posts • joined 2 Mar 2007

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In news that will shock absolutely no one, America's cellphone networks throttle vids, strangle rival Skype

Remy Redert

Re: If only

The solution to peer to peer NAT and firewall traversal others use is to connect both sides to a mediation server so that they can more or less simultaneously open connections to each other. While this isn't 100% reliable, it works most of the time and for the few times it still doesn't work, you already have a mediation server to act as a go between.

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Sure, Europe. Here's our Android suite without Search, Chrome apps. Now pay the Google tax

Remy Redert

Re: Or the fourth option...

You mean the Google apps, which is what they license. Android itself is a combination of a patched Linux kernel and a bunch of stuff attached to that. Google does not own the license for most of that and playing games by restricting those licenses by location might result in things like contributors pulling their code on short notice and leaving core Android dead in the water.

So regardless of what Googles decides, Android phones wouldn't be going away, they'd just stop being Googly all of a sudden.

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Microsoft has signed up to the Open Invention Network. We repeat. Microsoft has signed up to the OIN

Remy Redert

Re: Android?

There are no valid software patents, so yeah, extortion.

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Microsoft's Jet crash: Zero-day flaw drops after deadline passes

Remy Redert

Because that local file can be downloaded and opened by executing javascript. In fact, that seems to be the preferred method, since the target Jet needs to be 32-bit and a lot of people are still using 32-bit browsers, which will call the 32-bit Jet to handle a Jet file it's been tricked into executing.

The mitigation is to run only 64-bit applications and to not execute Javascript from untrusted sources.

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Remy Redert

No database engine exploits on databases that are installed with the OS and can't be removed, no.

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Flying to Mars will be so rad, dude: Year-long trip may dump 60% lifetime dose of radiation on you

Remy Redert

Re: Six months?????

If only there was a way to use that reaction mass an order of magnitude more efficiently, for example by using a nuclear thermal rocket or an electric plasma drive using a nuclear reactor for power.

You would still want a pretty big ship to make it fast and to carry a lot of provisions, but you'd have a lot less reaction mass to haul around.

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Chap asks Facebook for data on his web activity, Facebook says no, now watchdog's on the case

Remy Redert

It does matter if they can't prove informed consent was present when they gathered this data. Of course that's separate to his request for all the data they have on him.

Get all the information they have, then sure then for the data they have because you never have consent.

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Just how rigged is America's broadband world? A deep dive into one US city reveals all

Remy Redert

Re: Finally!

You don't even need to go that far. Make it a federal crime to file false reports on this (Oh wait, it probably already is) and then go around doing spot checks all over the country to enforce it. Go to one of those nice ISP websites and check if broadband from them is available at 'your' address by filling in random addresses in the regions those ISPs claim they are available.

Then go around some of those places, knock on doors or make appointments to come by and test their actual connection speed.

After a few billion dollar fines and some execs jailed for this bullshit, the situation will rectify itself. Good luck getting the government to go that far though.

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Use Debian? Want Intel's latest CPU patch? Small print sparks big problem

Remy Redert

EULAs in general are unenforceable in the Netherlands, since our courts decided that they don't meet the requirements for a contract.

That is to say, pretty much all EULAs are not shown prior to purchase and they are never negotiated or biased in favour of the customer.

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Bitcoin backer sues AT&T for $240m over stolen cryptocurrency

Remy Redert

Pretty much this. If I want a new SIM, I have to go the provider's store, show my ID and then they will send me a text message with a code. If I have a working phone with that number I can obviously enter the code immediately in the store to unlock the SIM to be programmed to my number and can then immediately activate and use that SIM.

If I do not have a working phone with that number, the text is still sent and I have to wait 24 hours before corporate will make the SIM and send it to my registered home address. Of course if someone else tries to get a SIM for my number, they'll need an ID that matches mine for the computer to accept it and they'll need that text or a way to intercept or redirect my mail.

That's a lot of work for something that I'm liable to notice and put an end to as soon as you try to use it.

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Dropbox plans to drop encrypted Linux filesystems in November

Remy Redert

Re: Er wait...

Pretty much this. I mostly use Dropbox to keep a replica of my various character sheets and game notes. Because I've learned that lesson the hard way. Pretty much everything else is either easily replaceable (all the software, PDFs, etc.) or sensitive and so only backed up locally. And for this purpose, Dropbox is great since it means I can go up to any PC anywhere and be ready to play or run an RPG within 30 minutes, with all of my character sheets, notes, etc. intact.

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Top Euro court: No, you can't steal images from other websites (too bad a school had to be sued to confirm this little fact)

Remy Redert

If you can't find the copyright holder, you can't get permission. I agree that there should be some central copyright database to help people find copyright holders for content they found elsewhere and want to use, but the copyright conventions prohibit such a thing from being mandatory since Copyright is automatic, no registration is required for your work to be protected.

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Remy Redert

Re: New internet standard...

DRM has been tried in the past. It never works. If I can display the picture on my screen, I can copy it. If I can play your song over my speakers, I can copy it. If I can play your video on my screen, I can copy it.

What can be done and should be made illegal to remove, is placing that information into the EXIF as is already done by many photographers. Unfortunately a lot of websites routinely strip that information and for average joe, that information is usually not readily available.

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Remy Redert

Re: Prepare for...

But the kid's project was fine. That IS covered by educational uses. The problem was the school then posting the project on their website and thus reproducing the image for uses that were not strictly for education.

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Grad sends warning to manager: Be nice to our kit and it'll be nice to you

Remy Redert

Re: I dunno...

My parents are inevitably having issues with the printer. I never have issues with the printer and if I walk downstairs to check on their issues, problems disappear into the aether.

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Doctor, doctor, I feel like my IoT-enabled vacuum cleaner is spying on me

Remy Redert

Re: IoT foolishness

How else will it download updates over the air to protect it from hackers?

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As Corning unveils its latest Gorilla Glass, we ask: What happened to sapphire mobe screens?

Remy Redert

Re: Seems obvious ...

My previous phone had a 'case' consisting a replacement back with a flip cover to protect the screen. It was perfect, as slim and light as it could get while sturdy enough to protect the screen.

My new phone, it's impossible to replace the back as a consumer, so the phone has to get a sleeve with a hard backing and a flip cover. It completely destroyed any advantage the phone had in being thinner and is in fact almost 50% as fat as my previous phone, even though the new phone is about half as thick.

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Windows 10 IoT Core Services unleashed to public preview

Remy Redert

Re: Updating

It says tried and tested. Not tried and found to be a workable solution for updating an OS.

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'Fibre broadband' should mean glass wires poking into your router, reckons Brit survey

Remy Redert

Re: Is it important?

I have an FTTC atm. I'm about 150 meters of cable from said cabinet and easily make 100mbit/s.

My neighbors have FTTP (our house is also set up for it). They manage 500mbit/s and there are plans to go to 1gbit/s.

I'd call a factor 5 going up to 10 with the possibility of future upgrades all the way to tens of gigabits a pretty significant difference.

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California lawmakers: We swear on our avocados we'll pass 'strongest net neutrality protections' in America

Remy Redert

It was more an issue of California having a way to force a thing into law if you can get enough support for it, by forcing it into the ballot at the next vote and if it gets a majority, the law is passed, bypassing the usual legislative process.

They were working on exactly that process and at the last moment the legislative branch gave in and passed something similar enough, to stop it going on the ballot.

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Who fancies a six-core, 128GB RAM, 8TB NVMe … laptop?

Remy Redert

Re: Delta T

Funnily enough, my current 'gaming' laptop, which mostly gets used for coding and compiling, has its heat vent on the right. Fortunately it's towards the back and angled to the rear so it's not normally an issue, but it's definitely something to be aware of when you're putting the GPU under heavy load because the exhaust air gets pretty toasty.

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'Plane Hacker' Roberts: I put a network sniffer on my truck to see what it was sharing. Holy crap!

Remy Redert

Re: So... who pays for the 3G/4G data connection?

Ownership of maintenance data might be questionable, but location tracking and general usage information is very clear here in the EU. That belongs to whoever happens to be driving the car at any given time and cannot be collected or processed without explicit, informed consent. They also cannot claim it to be a condition of use (even in a leased vehicle) unless the data is absolutely required for the service they are delivering.

EG, if you use the Onstar service, the company needs to have your location information when you press the button so they can help you or in the event of a crash. But there's no need to store that information.

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Four US govt agencies poke probe in Facebook following more 'oops, we spilled your data' shocks

Remy Redert

Fortunately, what the US might not want to do, plenty of national regulators here in the EU would love to do now that they've got a big enough stick with GDPR.

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Google Chrome update to label HTTP-only sites insecure within WEEKS

Remy Redert

Re: @Roger Greenwood

Worse still, Cloudflare is a giant security hole waiting to be abused.

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Google weeps as its home state of California passes its own GDPR

Remy Redert

Re: Zuck on that Bitch!

How GDPR works: Are you a legal resident or citizen of any country inside the EU? If yes, GDPR applies to you and your data regardless of where you reside at any given moment. If you go the US, some company collects your data without informed, freely given, consent, they are in breach of GDPR.

Now getting a remedy against such cases might be hard if they have no presence in the EU, but that is a whole different matter. I have not read the new Californian bill, so I don't know how its language defines whom it applies to.

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Big Cable unplugs Cali's draft net neutrality protections yet AGAIN

Remy Redert

What sort of silliness do the Americans have with all their amendments? Here, a bill is introduced and voted on by the 2 chambers of the legislature, either of which can amend the bill. Once a bill passes the first chamber, it's voted on in the second. If the second chamber makes any amendments, they have to send the bill back to the first chamber to be voted on again.

As a result, a bill getting amended in the second chamber is relatively uncommon and you can never end up with a bill passing after reconciliation that would not have gotten a majority vote in both chambers.

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Microsoft Azure Europe embraced the other GDPR: Generally Down, Possibly Recovering

Remy Redert

Re: MTBF vs Blast Radius

Pretty much. If you must run in the cloud, make sure you're spread across multiple cloud providers.

Fortunately their platforms are all highly interopable to make this kind of safe arrangement much easier to achieve. Right?

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Apple hauled into US Supreme Court over, no, not ebooks, patents, staff wages, keyboards... but its App Store

Remy Redert

Re: Counterexample

No, they're saying that if the Apple App store was not a monopoly, they wouldn't be able to charge 30%.

Google's Play store very much has a monopoly on Android, there's no competitor big enough to present a significant challenge. Yet. That might still change though.

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Keep your hands on the f*cking wheel! New Tesla update like being taught to drive by your dad

Remy Redert

Re: Auto-crash-pilot

You would be able to keep a safe braking distance from the car in front to start with, at which point the auto-pilot's reaction (full on braking the instant it sees the stationary car) would prevent the collision.

In this case the auto-pilot could have swerved, but in most cases in traffic that would be unsafe to do anyways. Creeping up close behind the car in front works only when you can communicate with that car so you can effectively see through it.

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EU-US Privacy Shield not up to snuff, data tap should be turned off – MEPs

Remy Redert

Right up until the first time such an arrangement is challenged and fines start getting slapped on because it's bloody obvious they can never comply with the GDPR requirements as long as they're based in the US.

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Which? calls for compensation for users hit by Windows 10 woes

Remy Redert

Re: Dickman

When you 'upgraded' to Windows 10, your key was also converted. After a short grace period during which you could revert back to Win7 that change became permanent and it will no longer be possible to activate a Windows 7 install with it.

So you have to either resort to cracking the Win7 install to make it work, which depending on your local laws may or may not be illegal, it's also definitely a violation of the EULA but that's not worth the paper it's written on anyways.

Or you have to buy a new Win7 license, which of course Microsoft no longer supplies.

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Continental: We, er, tire of Whatsapp, Snapchat on work phones. GDPR, innit?

Remy Redert

Re: Interesting stance.

This processing and holding of private data without permission from the owners is precisely why NOYB is suing Facebook, Google and company under the new rules.

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Clock blocker: Woman sues bosses over fingerprint clock-in tech

Remy Redert

Re: Stupidity

A lot of these scanners were and probably still are vulnerable to some extremely simple duplication attacks. While breaking into a fingerprint scanner lock with a print out of a fingerprint was perhaps a bit extreme and is unlikely to work on any kind of quality scanner made these days, it's absolutely conceivable to make copies of fingerprints for other people to scan you into work with at minimal expense.

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Remy Redert

Which in turn means that fingerprints are not a great means of authentication. You could use a fingerprint like you use a username, but you wouldn't want to use it instead of a password.

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Russian battery ambitions see a 10x increase in power from smaller, denser nukes

Remy Redert

But we don't need a continuous signal. A pulse every couple of minutes would be more than enough to find the black box (eventually). And that would be quite doable with these batteries. And they would keep going for decades after a crash, so the odds of recovery are much greater.

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Russia to Apple: Kill Telegram crypto-chat – or the App Store gets it

Remy Redert

Re: Lack of a World Government

AFAIK France was, as were the Netherlands. Germany still had a Kaiser at that time, but I don't know off hand how much actual power he had.

What about Spain, Italy, Greece?

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BOFH: Their bright orange plumage warns other species, 'Back off! I'm dangerous!'

Remy Redert

Re: Excellent BOFH

At the animal shelter I work at we had enough incidents with the wet floor warning boards that we got rid of all but 1 and just plastered "Warning, floors may be wet" stickers on all the doors leading into areas that get mopped regularly and aren't open to the public without an escort anyways.

The only remaining board is to be hung from the meeting room door when the meeting room is or has just been mopped. We haven't had any tripping accidents since.

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Max Schrems is back: Facebook, Google hit with GDPR complaint

Remy Redert

Re: This will go nowhere in court...

And under GDPR, making that consent to process PI for reasons other than providing the service itself mandatory to use the service is specifically on the shitlist. Facebook has consent to process data required for the service itself by your use of the service, but to process data for any other purpose they have to get informed consent and it has to be possible to use Facebook without giving consent.

The same for Google, Whatsapp, etc.

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US websites block netizens in Europe: Why are they ghosting EU? It's not you, it's GDPR

Remy Redert

Re: Overreach

In the case of the US vs Microsoft, it wasn't a matter of whether or not the US could get that data, it was data held for a US citizen and the US justice department, FBI, etc. definitely had a right to get a court order to get it.

The problem was that they tried to enforce a US court order against a US company for data held by a subsidiary in Ireland, with which the US has agreements on how to handle this kind of thing.

On a related point, all of those websites now shuttered to EU people? If any EU people EVER visited them and they hold data on them from that visit, they are subject to GDPR anyways. Shuttering the website because you're not compliant just makes you look like a target because you're admitting non-compliance.

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Open justice FTW! El Reg fought the law – and El Reg won

Remy Redert

Re: Nicely Done Reg!

Your view is correct, however crucially, this has never been ruled on before. Now that it has, it's very likely that other Tribunal judges will release these documents without a hearing because a previous ruling has established that they should.

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Pentagon in uproar: 'China's lasers' make US pilots shake in Djibouti

Remy Redert

Re: Binding Protocol?

If you are a non-combatant, you're not bound by the laws of war. If you are being targeted and are defending yourself, you can cover pretty much anything you do to the people attacking you as legitimate self defense.

Of course if those people are American, you're now a terrorist.

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FTC Commissioner refuses to budge until Trump fulfills promises

Remy Redert

The way it's worded, she promised to step down if she made judge. She hasn't been made judge yet, so she's not stepping down. Presumably out of a justified fear that as soon as she does step down, her pending confirmation will disappear down the drain and never be heard from again.

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UK Court of Appeal settles reseller's question: Is software a good?

Remy Redert

No, HMG. The distinction that's making the judge rule that software is not goods is one issued by the UK government, not from the EU. The law that is being sued over is EU-wide and specific to goods.

Either the UK can amend their local version of it to fit their local issue of Software being defined as not goods because they've got a separate definition of it. Or the EU can pre-empt them and rewrite the original law to include Software specifically. The question is, is this an issue in any other EU countries?

We've already got rulings here in the Netherlands holding that a perpetual software license is treated as a good in all ways applicable to it, including right of sale and transference. AFAIK Germany and France have similar rulings.

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Windows 10 to force you to use Edge, even if it isn't default browser

Remy Redert

Re: Fucking idiots

The EU did investigate both of them some time ago. That's where the mandatory browser selection screen came from. And a few years back when they investigated Apple, they decided that Apple didn't have a big enough market share to worry about possible monopoly abuse. If you don't like iOs forcing you to use inferior apps, don't get an iOs based device.

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Microsoft says 'majority' of Windows 10 use will be 'streamlined S mode'

Remy Redert

When I set up a computer for my little brother, who is mentally handicapped and has a long history of bricking Windows installs, I installed Debian linux on it and set him up with a user account with minimal rights.

4 years later, it's still running. It needs my attention for a few minutes every few weeks to authorize updates. My brother cannot install, download or otherwise mess with anything important. He can't even change the settings for the wireless network, only turn it off and on.

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Remy Redert

Re: Games, anyone?

Valve's not going to charge Windows 10 S users anything, because Steam's not on the Windows app store and probably will never be, since it's a direct competitor to Microsoft's store. Instead, Windows users will switch out of S mode. And if S mode becomes the default on new installs or even better, if Microsoft wants to charge money to switch people out of it, EU anti-trust is going to come down like several tons of bricks.

Building Steam for ARM's probably not too difficult, but how much work is it going to be to convert games to ARM? Win32/64 to Linux isn't generally too hard, especially if it's something you've considered from the start, but from there to ARM is quite a leap.

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123 Reg suffers deja vu: Websites restored from August 2017 backups amid storage meltdown

Remy Redert

Re: It is safer to presume

Both of your examples, the accountant and the solicitor are legally responsible for any repercussions should they make a (terribly negligent) mistake and should be insured against the costs of any such repercussions.

When I trust an accountant to do my accounting and he loses the last 6 months of accounts, he has a problem with the tax man, not me. When I trust a solicitor to check a contract for me and it later comes out it has a clause that is severely to my detriment, I can sue the solicitor for the resulting costs and thus be made whole.

When I trust a hosting provider to host my website and manage back-ups, I have no legal recourse when they fuck up. Since there are no repercussions for failure on their side, I shouldn't trust them unless they've earned that trust in other ways and should assume that they will fail.

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Remy Redert

What if you make a back up on 31-12-2017 and your machine drops dead on 01-01-2018? We can make an exception for that one right?

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UK peers: Is this what you call governance of facial recog tech? A 'few scattered papers'!

Remy Redert

It's a little less overly broad than that. But face coverings in public without a good reason absolutely will attract police attention. Generally I expect they'll ask you kindly to remove the offending article, as this is the modern German police, not the US.

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Remy Redert

That would be after the prosecutor gets to see the images over which you were arrested, 3 months into the trial after a year+ of detention?

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