* Posts by Daniel B.

3158 posts • joined 12 Oct 2007

Drugs, hookers and cranked customers: Ex-Broadcom boss indicted

Daniel B.

Why drink and drive...

"One incident alleges Nicholas and others smoked so much marijuana during a flight on his private plane between Orange County and Las Vegas that the pilot had to put on an oxygen mask."

Why drink and drive, when you can smoke and fly? I had never seen someone actually *doing* that!

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Virgin Media and BPI join forces to attack illegal filesharing

Daniel B.
Flame

Re: Thank Virgin Records

Just what I thought. Kind of like those reports from "independent" sources bashing Linux that suspiciously end up having a significant Microsoft funding.

Even if they are separate entities, and/or legally barred from "helping" one another, they are doing so under the "legality" banner, which isn't exactly anti-trust material. It isn't like VM is forcing its customers to buy only Virgin Records music, is it??

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Microsoft proposes gadget feature disabling tech

Daniel B.
Thumb Down

Yeah, right...

I usually switch my cellphone to 'vibrate' or 'silent' when I go into a "quiet" environment. I expect, however, that even in these situations, calls still go through, as you might actually get important calls in. Ditto with SMS, I would be p*ssed if I got "need 2 go hospital FAST" about 2 hours after my mum sent it because I was in a "restricted" environment.

Restricting digital cameras is even more stupid, as the tech can be abused as some other people have mentioned above. I guess I'll keep my BB on "Connections disabled" while photographing protests...

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ISS toilet sucks again

Daniel B.
Coat

Oh good

Good, no more waiting.

On the other hand, that means there will be no more 'Constellation Urine'...

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Qinetiq ships first 'Transformer' war-droid

Daniel B.

Re: Anybody remember Toys?

Hm. .. I was thinking precisely that. So now they will have Zevo's "videogame wars"!!!

Oooh nice .. Toys, Terminator and Short Circuit references!!! Ok, the thing actually looks more like the product of an HK/Johnny 5 breeding project more than a Transformer.

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IBM fills chips with water

Daniel B.
Linux

Re: Energy re-use.

Heh. You just reminded me of the old computer lab at college. As I was a temp-admin there, I had the keys for the small private office, which gave me a cozy space to sleep when we had to do overnight stuff. The "lab" was actually a "converted" warehouse, so on cold nights it got mighty cold, and we had *no* heating facilities.

So those days, I just fired up the 5-Pentium-class "cluster" and let it heat the small office. Nice energy re-use, even if the cluster itself wasn't really used after its initial demonstration phase.

Penguin 'coz the cluster ran Linux.

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Hummer glummer on high oil price bummer

Daniel B.

Kids & SUV's

If you really, really need to move a lot of kids ... I think thats what the minivan was made for, wasn't it? Town & Country, Grand Voyager, etc. They actually have *space* for people, and relatively good fuel efficiency.

SUV's, on the other hand, usually are 7-seaters (Dodge Durango) or just standard 5-seaters (Grand Cherokee) so there is absolutely no reason to actually choose an SUV.

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Verizon sends text messages to the big screen

Daniel B.
Coat

Rate my movie

I would rather see this technology to provide for "instant" movie ratings, that is, that I can rate the movie as soon as it's finished. Then cinemas could send shite movies to uglier timeslots and focus on the really good ones.

That way, it might be easier to send stinking turds to the bottom... but then again, maybe not.

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'Untraceable' phone fraudsters eye your credit card

Daniel B.
Flame

I'm immune to this one...

I'm basically immune to this trick, as I have acquired BOFH-level treatment for telemarketers:

Caller: Hi, is this <unkown person>'s house?

Me: No. <SLAM>

Caller: Hi, is this (my name)

Me: Yes

Caller: Hi, we're calling from HSB.... <SLAM>

You can be as rude as you want to telemarketers as you like. I used to redirect my landline to my mobile, but after 5 days of cold calls, I decided to cease this practice. Good thing I can't get cold callers on my mobile :)

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US imposes 72 hour pre-reg for Visa waiver travellers

Daniel B.

Heh.

Go figure: there's a reason my dad flies from Juarez City instead of El Paso these days. The land US/Mexico border is much nicer to cross, especially because the US border cities' economy is tied to border-jumper shoppers; that is Mexicans that (legally) cross the border to buy stuff that's cheaper over there. So if crossing the border by foot/car was as painful as doing so by air, I'd assure you that most of these border towns would go down in flames!

As for me, I haven't gone to the US since summer-2001, so I've never been subjected to the stupid security theater. By the way, many flights from Mexico City to <insert foreign country here> used to have stops in the US, but recently the popular options are those that don't stop in the US. Guess why?

I really hope Obama (or Hillary?) will fix this shite and restore the "free"dom in "the land of the free".

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Safari practices self-love, claims code monkey

Daniel B.

null

In C, null = 0 only if you're talking about a pointer. But don't EVER go on that assumption!!! Please!!!

Reminds me of that BOOL someone posted in the Daily WTF:

enum BOOL {

TRUE,

FALSE,

NOT_TRUE_OR_FALSE };

Extra points for those who notice how bad that is...

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US bank loses unencrypted data on 4.5m people

Daniel B.
Coat

Oh, their first blunder!

It seems like the "NY Mellon Bank" is a recently-merged financial entity. It is barely one year old, and they've already done an epic SNAFU. Way to go!

With that name, though, I'd wonder if speaking 'friend' will give me full r00t access...

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HP biased against BIOS password security

Daniel B.
Coat

Stupid users

I think it might be more of an issue that HP must have been overwhelmed by zillions of users forgetting their BIOS password.

Back in 1998 (10 years ago, wow!) one guy in school feared a "hacker" (which I would rather call "script kiddie") would hack his laptop, so he decided to set the BIOS and HDD password on his IBM Thinkpad. Only to forget said password ... 60 *minutes* later.

Setting aside the sheer ignorance of thinking that a BIOS password would protect your laptop from the net, we found it even funnier that this guy was effectively locked out from his 15-day-old laptop; which remained locked for at least one full year. In fact, none of us ever knew if he was able to get it working again.

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Apple store detains teens for installing iPhone game

Daniel B.
Coat

Oh please...

Demo machines/devices are ASSUMED to be monkeyed about by the customer. I bought the "demo" Fujitsu Lifebook 280Dx back in '98 because it was the only one left, and they gave me a $300 discount for it. Sure the laptop was riddled with bloatware (someone installed the AOL stuff) but I only needed to chuck in the Recovery CD and wait about 60 minutes for the whole thing to do its job. Hard? Not at all.

Around this time I remember having somewhat a similar experience: I was checking out some nice desktop PC's at Office Depot, and found one that had the shareware version of DESCENT. Oooh, nice! So I proceeded to play on it, until some employee came asking if I needed some help. So I rambled a bit on asking if the graphics card could do 1024x768 and 3D acceleration, knowing this dude would be hoplessly lost on this. (Note: all this info was already in the sticker that these boxen usually have.) So he went away, and I kept on playing.

Lo and behold, he had gone for the manager (?) who I also asked the same thing, but instead of answering me, he proceeded to close Descent (whatever, I had just beaten the Level 7 boss anyway) and tell me "we can't let you play on these PCs". So I did my comeback, "oh well then I can't let you SELL me this computer, I can build one myself!". Oh yes, and duly followed by a complaint in the "Suggestions" box.

Had I been "detained" by a store manager for something like this though, I think said bloke would've been introduced to my juicy little 50kV BOFH-approved TASER Gun!

These days, my fun basically relies on having cmd access, and making small assembly programs that read something like "ALL YOUR PC ARE BELONG TO US" or so.

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Japanese woman moves into bloke's closet

Daniel B.
Unhappy

@AC

She was 58 all right, but the actual resident was 57. Kind of "in the age" you know.

Though I'd wonder if the bloke couldn't just offer her the space anyway. Oh well, at least it seems she'll live in "Bar Hotel" for a while...

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UK electricity crisis over - for now

Daniel B.
Joke

Wait a moment...

"The initial warning was issued to cover the period until 7pm yesterday, saying that a further 1200 megawatts was required."

There you got it. The 'crisis' was caused by Doc Brown plugging the DeLorean into the National Grid!!!

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Daily Mail cites video game as proof of terrorist doomsday plot

Daniel B.
Coat

Red Alert 2

This just in!

We have received these shocking images of a real-time simulation of Russian zeppelin warships in a full-blown invasion of the United States of America!

Mine's the one with the Tesla gun .... >>ZZZZZZAP!<<

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BOFH: Testing the obscenity filters

Daniel B.
Thumb Up

Reminds me ...

Of my "line failures" when my dad was scolding me on the phone

Dad: I told you that <SLAM>

*ring*

Dad: Call went dead. Ok, I was telling <SLAM>

*ring*

Dad: Hey why are you hanging up?

Me: I'm not. <SLAM>

For helldesk-style support, though, my favorite is the infinite hold method. If your phone doesn't actually have a "hold" button, you can just leave the phone besides you (on mute, of course) and you get the added benefit of no *other* calls getting in! Ah, those old days...

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Deadly Oz snake bites tourist's todger

Daniel B.
Joke

It figures

Obviously it saw the one-eyed snake and decided to engage into a snake fight!

Mine's the one with the "Snakes in a Toilet" poster.

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Palm's new OS not dead, just going Nova

Daniel B.
Boffin

The Palm

... was my first "true" PDA. The first PalmPilot, that is ... the one that was made by US Robotics. It was fairly decent for its time, and it had the original Graffiti writing system (I was never able to use the Graffiti2 version). The only drawback was that it used AAA batteries, which meant I had to change batteries every 1-2 weeks. Ironically this is why I got the thing in the first place, as my dad couldn't be arsed with changing batteries.

Mine lasted a lot, until a friend accidentally smashed the screen, and I was left without a PDA. By then, the device had been with me for 5 years, and had a total life of about 8 years.

PalmOS is pretty nice for a PDA, but it may need an overhaul for smartphones. On that area, I'd say RIM's got the upper hand.

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Split on support for 'old' Java in next Eclipse

Daniel B.

Drop 1.4? Are they crazy?

Taking that there are loads of app servers running J2EE 1.4, I doubt it to be a good idea dropping 1.4 at all.

Java 5 dropping Entity Beans was reason enough *not* to embrace the Java EE 5 thingy. It isn't nice to set up a standard, and then changing everything in the next release, leaving those who actually adopted it in the cold.

Kind of like those SOAP rpc/encoded webservices...

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Man accused of siphoning $50,000 in micro-payments from Schwab, E-trade

Daniel B.

Re: Obligatory quote from clueluess IT movie

Ironically, said quote comes from a movie where the "bad guy" uses said salami technique to siphon away a boatload of cash.

It seems the new generations of Internet users have forgot exactly *why* did hackers use public phones for their activities. It wasn't just "free calls": it was harder to track down someone who isn't using his own phone.

Always-on broadband might give you a faster connection, but it also gives the feds a nice IP address that can be cross-referenced with the ISP, which will definitely pinpoint you quicker than old-school call-tracing (which seems to have gone into disuse thanks to Caller ID.)

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RIAA abandons iTuneski suit

Daniel B.

iTuneski

It is AllOfMP3 the main reason I just stopped doing p2p downloading. It cut off the hassle of searching all that stuff using crappy p2p apps like Morpheus/Kazaa, totally spyware/trojan free, and also giving me a choice for the actual format, for a competitive price. At $1-$2 bucks/album, they could easily compete with the actual pirates over here in Mexico (std. pirated CD price: $1, some are mp3 compilations of 300+ songs though) and its a price tag anyone would pay over here.

The RIAA was used to the gringos buying crap at the $20 price tag, because there was no other option on that; ever since the home user has been able to do personal recordings, they've been fighting it (remember "home taping is killing music"?) and instead of lowering prices, they keep the price tag, and add retarded DRM on the CDs such that they aren't playable anymore.

Instead of fighting the allofmp3 business, they should embrace it, and release one similar service themselves. I'm pretty sure it would succeed as long as it retains the DRM-free, any format stance. Hell, they might even be able to market it as "we do pay royalties".

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Dell guilty of defrauding New York customers

Daniel B.
Thumb Down

Please type the letter "bye"...

"After that, you move your call center to India. Ooops! There's a negative backlash. So then you segment your product line, so that the PCs on the low end, you have to call India for support. The higher end (read higher priced) you can get on-site and US based support. (OK, so I'm an American. So that would explain the American centric viewpoint. ;-)"

I don't live in the US, and yet I much prefer to have someone from the US on the line, than someone in India. I once endured the pain of one such call, where I couldn't understand the guy, and I was the only native English speaker in my company! My co-workers had an even harder time with that call. This guy tried to spell a password on the phone, but I got lost after being told to type the letter "bye".

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Russian crackers spread nuclear panic

Daniel B.
Dead Vulture

Re: Errrrr.... different...

"While opposition to such things is fair enough, surely this passes WAY beyond what anyone might think a "reasonable protest"?"

You mean like Greenpeace "protests"? It is either some radical anti-nuke group, some really bad taste prank, or some kind of "social experiment" to see how the masses react to such a thing.

Last weekend a chain-mail went around the 'net where the drugdealer cartels supposedly imposed a "curfew" in Juarez City, Mexico; stating that anyone on the streets would be killed, and it would be the bloodiest weekend in history. Guess what: nothing happened. But it does sound more like "terrorism" in its original meaning: get people to live in terror. Such a prank stating "NUCULAR MELTDOWN, D00D!" sounds like that, especially in a country that's near the site of the worst nuclear accident in human history.

The vulture died of iodine overdose.

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Handset sales drop for first time in mobe history

Daniel B.
Alert

Mid-range

Hm... even if I am now a Blackberry owner, I used to go for the mid-range ones. The SonyEriccson W300 is good enough for what I wanted: mp3, radio, bluetooth, camera, and it uses m2 memory sticks (so I can up the storage capacity if I want). When I was originally searching for a replacement, it seemed like SonyEriccson decided to go all "high-end" and none of the snazzy new models convinced me. There was nothing like my ole W300 out there, and I wasn't about to sign an 18-month contract just to get... another W300.

So I went for the Blackberry 8300, as it had at least an unlimited data plan. SonyEriccson lost because it thought I wanted a non-clamshell phone with dozens of stuff I don't want, and a handset that looks shiny enough to get mugged for.* And given the entire mobile range, it seems like people are shifting back to the "simple, but works" handsets. Luddites would do well with the Motorola F3... but using it for SMS is really, really ugly. If that thing had a good display for SMS reading, that would be the phone of choice for a lot of people, I'm sure.

* There's been a rise in muggings with the sole purpose of stealing mobiles over here. So "shiny handsets" rate low on my scale, as I don't want to pay more to *increase* the probability of me being mugged over a stupid phone.

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UK to outlaw cartoons of child sexual abuse

Daniel B.
Black Helicopters

Manga?

I think by "Manga" they're actually referring to "Hentai", aren't they?

Plus, if anything, "cartoon underage sex" might even ban V for Vendetta as well: Evey's offering her "services" at the beginning of the graphic novel, and she's 16!

Its just as stupid as the "Extreme Porn" law, and as someone else already mentioned, some manga/hentai publications have already dodged the bullet. Example: one of the Bleach characters is a 400-year-old "death god", who happens to roam the "mortal world" as a 16-ish schoolgirl. Any "hentai" version would simply claim its a 400 y/o character, not 16 y/o. Bleh.

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ID fraudsters soak the rich

Daniel B.
Joke

Re: Why don't I feel sorry?

Ah, true, they're stealing the rich.

But then, wouldn't those statistics be wrong? Everyone knows its Nottingham where the rich people are robbed ;)

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Japanese children warned off mobiles

Daniel B.
Thumb Down

Re: Internet bullying...

Actually, some of this "cyber-bullying" can be truly damaging, even more than actual bullying. One highschool girl got "cyberbullied" or whatever in her last semester; her ex-boyfriend sent a spoofed e-mail posing as her, saying "my phone is X, I like to f**k on the first date" and adding her *actual* nude photos. To the entire school. Of course, he could've easily spread the photos on the whole school by himself (which wouldn't require the Internet) but it was easier, and more far-reaching to do it through the internet.

At least with old-school bullying, you can solve it the old-fashioned way: fight back and beat the **** out of the bully 'till he learns not to mess with you again.

As for voice-only phones ... given the 5-to-1 value of SMS-voice costs, I tend to disagree with that. Much cheaper to text than to actually call and spend 10x to convey something as simple as "Going out, meet you in Tacubaya Sta. 8 o'clock sharp. Kisses!" or mere informative stuff like "I've just sent you the package" or whatever.

Mobiles for kids - As soon as your kid starts wandering solo, that's the right time to give him a mobile. That would be sometime around age 12, right after entering secondary school. I got my first mobile at age 15, but that was because *no one in the family had one before* except my dad. My sister got hers when she was 13.

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Bluetooth finally reaches ten (years, not users)

Daniel B.
Boffin

LAN Access Profile

Hm... the LAN Access service is basically the only way I'm able to transparently use my W300 handset as a GPRS modem without resorting to arcane setups and *99# numbers that just don't seem to work with my carrier. Just fire up the LAN access service, and there you go! Instant mobile access ;) however, my Blackberry has no such support.

I would've liked to see something akin to "Bluetooth SMS" by default on all Bluetooth-enabled phones, as it would be an interesting feature, given how many people have their bluetooth turned on. Oh well...

I haven't done the "earphone Bluetooth" yet, and might not do it for fear of the "bluejacking". Then again, my Blackberry does have a "disable phone calls from BT devices" option.

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National Grid computers locked-down in outage cock-up

Daniel B.

Oh god...

"One source claimed that Active Directory (AD) clusters on the energy giant’s Windows 2003-based server were deleted late last Tuesday. "

So they're using Windows there. I hope they're not using it to actually *run* the power grid!

Then again, back in 1993 one hydro powerplant went offline here in Mexico, taking down power in *nine states*. Why did it go offline? Lightning struck one critical piece of equipment. Oops!!!

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Climate profs 'can't recommend' enormo-space-parasol

Daniel B.
Coat

@John Latham

"If the sunshade was constructed as a giant solar collector and beamed the energy back to earth using frikkin laser beams, we'd solve both global warming and energy supply at once. The "sunshade deathstar" could double as a great "defensive" tool against the rebel alliance (sorry, Axis of Evil)."

Oh no, we need the full Dyson sphere around the sun to get a sunny deathstar ray!

Mine's the one with the XKCD strip.

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3 told to cut rates

Daniel B.
Boffin

The Great Leap Backwards?

Oh yeah, pay to receive. Great idea ... NOT.

We used to have the same system as the US over here, but COFETEL (kind of like the Mexican Ofcom) implemented the termination fee system, known as "caller-pays" since 1998. It was only local until 2006, when they switched it to nationwide. So, while we do still have the same area codes as the geographical city the phone's based in, we do have to dial 044 prefix for local mobiles, 045 for long-distance mobiles.

There you have it. Now the only way you pay to receive is when you're outside your home city. Funny how a "developing country" seems to be more up to date on mobile rates than the US. Oh well, maybe its a telecom thing: we use E1/E3's instead of T1/T3's, so it might be natural we stick to the European standard for termination fees.

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Can't decide how to vote? Publicwhip.org will tell you

Daniel B.
Unhappy

@Marvin the Martian

True. Just like in Mexico, we have three main parties, and a zillion "small parties", of which some of them insist they are the TRUE LEFT, yeah right. If you add up all the votes those parties got in the 2006 "elections", it is large enough to have actually tipped the balance in those elections. Voting for them for president/governor is just a waste of time, though voting them for "diputado" or senator does help a bit.

And that's here, where we don't have that funky "electoral college" system. In the US, it is simply stupid to vote anything other than Democrat, as even if the independent dudes do manage to have a considerable support on one state, it is basically stolen by whoever "wins" the EC votes. Oh, I know I should've said Democrat *or Republican*, but given Bush II's record, you'd have to be infinitely stupid to still vote Republican.

The UK seems to have a similar problem, except there is no election-ruining EC system in place. :)

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Unmanned Aerial Manhood outrage at Kasparov rally

Daniel B.
Black Helicopters

Helicockter

Now someone seems to have been playing too much Second Life, and decided to do it in real-life! Or were they just trying to be a d*ck?

Black helicopter, because it would've made a larger err.... "model".

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Privacy? Forget it. Sell your brain and desires to the highest bidder

Daniel B.
Coat

Now I get it!!

amanfromMars is actually warping the AdSense machine!!! With his postings, the adsense system picks up so much words it starts to screw up the ads it serves!!!

I remember reading many years ago about "intelligent fridges" that would tell you "Hey dude! You're low on milk! BUY MORE! BUY MORE!" Even better was that coupling this with RFID would give stuff like "Duuuude!!! Yoour milk's rotten! Expiration date was last week!!!".

Mix in these old (ca. 2000?) ideas with Web 2.0 and Phorm, and you'll end up getting "You're low on milk, do you want me to order Borden 100% Top-Quality Milk?"

Or one I'd find hilarious: "You're almost out of Pepsi. Do you want to restock?" *click yes* "Thank you. Ordering 4 liters of Coca-Cola Zero. Coca-Cola, official sponsor for the IntelliFridge 2.0"

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Stungun shootout in Colorado leaves slowest man standing

Daniel B.
Joke

Re: Who Shot First

Greedo!

Oh wait, wrong version, this is the *enhanced* Geroge Lucas version. Oops!

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'Hacker Safe' leader defrauded investors, prosecutors say

Daniel B.
Joke

Oliphant?

I suppose that his company was a 'White Oliphant' then...

Mine's the one with the LoTR reference.

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'Secure' PayPal page is... you guessed it

Daniel B.
Coat

Yeeipes!

Ok dudes, stop messing with timelines... two people have messed with space-time and now both IE3 and Outlook Express have born in 2007 instead of 1996/97???

Mine's the one with the DeLorean's keys...

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World economy group gives IPv6 big push

Daniel B.

IPv6 still undeployed

I've always wondered why haven't we already done the "Great Leap Forward" into IPv6. Maybe it is that IPv6 is more complex than IPv4; as those addys look mighty ugly with being 16-bit hex numbers separated by :s like 7348:3fca:31ad:... but the need IS there. Funny thing is that most OS already support IPv6, and I think recent Cisco equipment also has IPv6 support.

NAT's a cheap solution, and while it does have its uses, I absolutely HATE ISP's that give end-users non-routeable addys. However, with IPv6 I'd like to see extremely cheap IP spaces, as we would be able to.

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Outback hack suspect denied bail

Daniel B.
Joke

Oh, I think I get it...

In Soviet Russia, Macintosh hacks YOU!!!

It is the first time I see a Mac hacking systems. Was this a PowerPC Mac, or one of the evil Intel ones? ;)

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Koreans tout standard for US mobile TV

Daniel B.
Thumb Down

Mini-TV

... so I am to watch microTV? No thanks. However, "mobile TV" does make sense if you got a PSP, and are stuck in a long commute in public transportation systems.

But on a standard cellphone display? I doubt it.

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Billg bigs up SharePoint and Touch Wall

Daniel B.

Deja vu

Hey, I think a saw this somewhere ...

oh yes. My university has one, you know, they're called "smartboards". The only innovation in this one is multitouch. Yeah, right.

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Swiss birdman in Alpine backpack-jetplane stunt flight

Daniel B.
Joke

Screaming Fist

So now I know where those flying cyberwarriors got their gear from...

Just remind Rossy to make these wings EMP-resistant. ;)

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HP leaves Dell with an EDS-shaped hole

Daniel B.
Boffin

Re: RE: better known as Crap Pack

"Where would HP be without the Proliant line of servers? HPs X86 gear sucked compared to Compaq's business line."

Maybe actually cranking out more PA-RISC servers that actually perform better, like the HP 9000 series.

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Apple okay with Safari 'carpet bombing' vuln for now

Daniel B.
Alert

Ask before you download

You mean, this browser downloads anything without asking? Even Firefox, that has its annoying "download all to Desktop" 'feature' by default, will ask you if you want to download. Basic rule since the advent of the web browser.

Having first-time-run checks may be nice, but I could easily see this as a potential DoS attack: a malicious page could do an infinite loop that makes Safari download craploads of files 'till the harddisk fills up. Thanks to JavaScript, this might even happen background, and the user wouldn't realize it until its too late...

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Developing world buoys up software pirates

Daniel B.
Gates Horns

In Mexico...

I am surprised Mexico isn't one of the "top countries with pirated software". Pirated stuff is so common, it kind of has blended with the culture, as you can see with tons of "Aypo" players (if you read that out loud in Spanish, it sounds like "iPo"), businessmen carrying "Monlblanc" pens and the massive pirate music CD market that put P2P "illegal downloads" statistics to shame... taking in mind that this CD market actually *profits* from it. (I remember distinctly that "piracy" was *selling* duplicated CDs for a profit. P2P doesn't fit there, does it?)

Thing is, most tech stuff is actually more expensive than in the US, sometimes being even 200% higher; and this effect is also seen in software. Mix that and piracy culture, surprise! Most people I know have either a pirated Windows XP copy, or pirated MS Office. With $300 price tags on software, and basically $500/month average income for *entire families* nationwide, you aren't going to spend those amounts on what basically has become a commodity.

Actually, people who buy *original* software (non-pirate) for personal/home use are usually called some equivalent of "paytards", as the mindset is "Why pay $300 for something you can get for $1?".

I'm all for stricter piracy controls ... 'coz that means we'll be switching pretty fast to non-Windows platforms! ;)

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Google kills Anonymous AdSense account

Daniel B.
Joke

The sleeper has awakened!

I must drink beer.

Beer is the mind-killer.

Beer is the little death that brings total obliteration.

I will face my beer.

I wil permit it to pass over me and through me.

And when it is has gone past I wil turn the inner eye to see it's path.

When the beer has gone there will be nothing.

Only I will remain.

As your new Kwisatz Haderach, I will cease melange shipments to the Co$. ;)

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How to rescue Java from the men in suits

Daniel B.
Flame

Entity Beans

"Rod Johnson in March cited the creation of Entity Beans - a type of Enterprise Java Bean (EJB) that was part of the JCP's Java Enterprise Edition spec - as setting back the cause of object-relational mapping by six years and for causing billions in wasted investment."

How about 4 years of knowledge gone into the toilet because the EJB 3.0 spec trashed the entire Entity Bean spec?? I found the EntityBean encapsulation a nice feature, and seamlessly working with the entire Session Bean transaction manager. This weird "Entity Class" and "Java Persistence Manager" stuff borked all this, and now I can't even use .setRollbackOnly() on the TransactionManager!!! Aaaagh!!!

Now I have to re-learn *everything*, and don't have the time to do it. Fortunately, my current job's on WebLogic 8.1, so we're still in good old J2EE 1.4, EJB 2.1 specs.

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Next Ubuntu LTS in 2010, unless Linuxes synchronize

Daniel B.

X11

As annoyed as I might be with failing X configs, I for one wouldn't ditch X. The problem resides in that when it correctly detects your config, it'll work fine. When it doesn't, prepare for a living HELL. I had these issues with Xfree86 back in 1999, my Fujitsu Lifebook 200 had a video chipset that XFree didn't like. It took me 1 year of waiting untill one XFree86 update gave me the correct drivers.

My current setup was easier, as nVidia has made "self-extracting executable installers" which do everything for you ... but they are command-line installers, *and* require kernel-source or whatever that pkg is called in your different distros. (Done it in Ubuntu, and Fedora 6.) I think that at least in nVidia's case, they've done very well on making the X experience easier on the user.

Too bad not everyone's as good on that, yet.

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