* Posts by Chika

1750 posts • joined 2 Oct 2007

Kaspersky files antitrust suit against Microsoft

Chika
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Trollface

Re: "We want Microsoft to stop misleading and misinforming..."

Perhaps Kaspersky think that Unicorns exist and everyone lives inside a huge hug bubble.

But they DOOOOO!!! Isn't that right, Twilight?

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Chika
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Re: This is deja vu all over again

I guess the innovation of bullshit has stopped at last as well..

Tower to Porker 1, you are cleared for take off.

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Wannacry: Everything you still need to know because there were so many unanswered Qs

Chika
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Re: PITA

Reminds me of the Millenium Bug panic...

Don't remind me! Months of pulling code apart and updating libraries on software that was written in the 1970s and 1980s...

Mind you, it was what first switched me on to Linux. Project Cora2000, you are still remembered!

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Chika
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Happy

Rule 1 back your shit up

Rule 2 back your shit up

Thanks, Bruce!

Mind you, last time I had a back up of shit, I had to call a plumber!

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Chika
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Black Helicopters

Re: Oh, the irony!

Windows 7 machines most affected after so-called "experts" advised switching off updates to avoid Windows 10 upgrade notifications?

See my earlier comment. If Microsoft hadn't tried so hard to insert spyware into some of their patches for W7 then people would have not even suggested switching off updates. Well, some might have done but nobody would have listened to them.

Having said that, pointing fingers at users for not patching doesn't really escape the fact that the hole was there, it was exploited by the NSA, it was then stolen and somebody else used that same exploit to try to extract money. How many more holes are there in Windows, current version included, that the NSA knows about and keeps under wraps, even from Microsoft?

Or MacOS? Or Linux? I know where I'm pointing and it isn't at any specific end users.

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Chika
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Terminator

Re: Great analysis - thanks

So the question is - why have you got several thousand W7 desktops unpatched?

I can think of a couple of reasons. The first isn't that unusual; as many have noticed, even Microsoft, there are always those that plead incapable when it comes to computers. The question here is whether such users should be allowed access; consider that these people can cause all sorts of problems for other users by not being up to the task of handling their system responsibly.

The other is a little more sinister. Since just before the release of Windows 10 there have been increasing amounts of concern about Microsoft's patching habits. The biggest concern has been that Microsoft have spent a lot of time and effort trying to integrate spyware into their products (see the Register article "Mud sticks: Microsoft, Windows 10 and reputational damage") to the extent that some people have stopped patching. While originally it was easy to spot the spyware patches and avoid them, the current regime of rollups makes this all but impossible to do.

So if finger pointing is really necessary, and before we charge headlong into a fit of blaming unpatched users or the people that perpetrated this problem, let us also consider Microsoft's role in this.

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Huawei Honor 8 Pro: Makes iPhone 7 Plus look a bit crap

Chika
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Happy

What is the point if most users record in vertical (moron) mode.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bt9zSfinwFA

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'Crazy bad' bug in Microsoft's Windows malware scanner can be used to install malware

Chika
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"Windows has a customer commitment to investigate reported security issues, and proactively update impacted devices as soon as possible."

Reactively, Shirley?

Of course. And don't call me... (Bloody Kentucky Fried Theatre!)

"We recommend customers use Windows 10 and the Microsoft Edge browser for the best protection."

We also recommend that we never miss an opportunity to plug our latest shitware.

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Is Britain really worse at 4G than Peru?

Chika
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Re: Nice llamas

Llamas are larger than frogs

Cuidado! Llamas!

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It's been two and a half years of decline – tablets aren't coming back

Chika
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Smug mode activated

Some years ago now I said that tablets were a fad.

I owned two of them. OK, they were cheap beasts; the first one died after a year of use which didn't impress me at all given that it didn't have much use to its name and I stopped using the second after I realised that the firmware had a bug in it which made it insecure.

The trouble was that I never really found a good use for them. Apart from those two, I had an iPad briefly at one job I had but again it often sat in my drawer doing nothing. That isn't to say that they didn't have their uses but it does show that I never really had a use for them. In fact the last use I had for a tablet was swiftly supplanted when I realised that my smartphone could do the same job with a lot more portability.

The idea that tablets would replace laptops soon came to an end with such things as ultrabooks and so forth in that people still wanted a decent keyboard rather than faffing about with a touchscreen when typing. It's the reason why Windows 8 was a flawed concept and it's the reason now why tablets are on the decline, and that's before we consider the market saturation.

Tablets were a fad just as smartwatches and netbooks were fads. There may have been good intentions behind them but a fad is a fad and all fads must end.

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Secure Boot booted from Debian 9 'Stretch'

Chika
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Pint

Re: UEFI secure boot booted from Debian 9

Very droll.

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systemd-free Devuan Linux hits version 1.0.0

Chika
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Mushroom

Re: Systemd v sysvinit

the answer from the lead systemd developer (Poettering) is that - it isn't our problem.

And that's one of the biggest reasons why Poettering is mistrusted here. He acts like his word is law, as though he was the second coming of Linus. Systemd is not a replacement for init in his eyes, he wants it to eventually become a replacement for Linux in general, and not only does he have the trust of Redhat, but all the major distros are following him too. I killed off openSUSE on my latest box because it relies too heavily of systemd and Poettering's shite but though I've moved to Mint, I can see the creep going on there too. At least one of the mainstream distros needs to put him in his place but none of them have the balls to do it. If it takes something like Devuan, then more power to them!

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Chika
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Happy

Re: What is systemd??

And may you never have to.

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Chika
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Mushroom

Re: @ lpcollier

'The beauty in GPL software is that if you don't like it, you can just grab the code and fix it yourself.'

Quite so, but generally speaking a user would prefer not to have to fix bugs introduced by twats like Poettering. Fixing accidental bugs, incompatibilities and adding functionality is one thing but having to repair the damage done because somebody working high up wants to dictate how your system should work and doesn't give a flying f*** about complexity, compatibility or usability is something I'd rather not have to do.

Especially when the other big names in Linux have their collective hooters stuffed firmly up Poettering's taskmaster's rear end and will not see reason.

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Chika
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Facepalm

It's not a "Registry for Linux" as many articles/posts have claimed,

It's something a lot more sinister than a "registry". Something like a registry could be added if one were really needed without everything that systemd is bringing into being.

it streamlines bringing up a Linux box and does away with a confusing script-based system

There was nothing confusing about it. When comparing the various sysvinit machines with my current crop of systemd systems, the way in which systemd is gobbling up various modules and making them difficult, sometimes impossible, to access is, if anything, overcomplicating what was previously trivial to work on.

that was years out of date and difficult to optimise/parallelise.

The age of the system is immaterial if it works. As for optimisation, sysvinit was pretty good where that was concerned and "parallelisation" is merely yet another fad which has little real use.

Having said that, the most recent Devuan beta felt like a bit of a let down when I tried it; even the first beta worked better for me. I'll give it a go with a view to possible future use but it all depends on how well it is set up and, more importantly, how well updating works.

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Farewell Unity, you challenged desktop Linux. Oh well, here's Ubuntu 17.04

Chika
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Linux

Re: My thoughts on this ...

Agreed but then wasn't that one of the reasons behind Cinnamon coming into being, much like MATE? The biggest problem, as I see it, is that too many UI developers don't pay enough attention to what users actually want and while that isn't necessarily bad - it's worth trying new things to see what can be accomplished - it has given us some pretty awful UIs (including Windows) over the last five or so years at least.

So yes, while I like Plasma 5 more than I ever liked KDE4, for example, I recently built my new box around Mint and Trinity 14 since I much prefer KDE 3 even to this day.

And yes, it's good to have choices. It's the biggest reason why I have dumped openSUSE after about two decades of use since they have their noses well and truly up Redhat's anal passage and Leap is becoming too unwieldy to modify to my liking.

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Microsoft raises pistol, pulls the trigger on Windows 7, 8 updates for new Intel, AMD chips

Chika
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Re: Optional

@Chika>There will always be a resistance to aggressive sales tactics blackmail like this.

FTFY

Sheesh...

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Chika
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Facepalm

Optional

By making sure all new PCs run Windows 10, Redmond will also be able to further inflate the usage numbers for its latest OS...

..and will make others delay their plans to change their hardware and still more to seek alternatives. There will always be a resistance to aggressive sales tactics like this.

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An echo chamber full of fake news? Blame Google and Facebook, says Murdoch chief

Chika
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Re: Or page 3

Yes. But the text was usually along the lines of "Phwoar! Lookit dem jugs!" or something like that. I don't think they could do much more than that, mostly because they couldn't fit anything more on there with the huge crayons they had to hand.

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Boaty McBoatface sinks in South Atlantic on her maiden deployment

Chika
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Pint

Clickbait comment? You betcha!

Clickbait headline? You betcha. Now, where's my beer...

You can wait for Beer o' Clock like everyone else!

Of course, it's beer o' clock somewhere in the world...

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Microsoft slaps Apple Gatekeeper-like controls on Windows 10: Install only apps from store

Chika
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The moment they switch it on could see a very interesting legal situation develop.

Mind you, many corporates disable installations by users anyway, going back to XP and beyond...

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Want to come to the US? Be prepared to hand over your passwords if you're on Trump's hit list

Chika
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Coat

Re: Papiere bitte!

Hmm...

Considering Drumpf's views on certain religions and various other political issues, especially his posturing following the temporary injunction on his executive order regarding certain people entering the US, comparing The Donald to The Adolf seems...

Well, consider how they came to power. These will be trying times for the remaining branches of the US government to make sure that Drumpf stays in his place and does not change things to suit himself and the minority that voted him in.

Anyway, with Godwin's law well and truly invoked...

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BOFH: Password HELL. For you, mate, not for me

Chika
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Re: "I rarely get cold calls"

There's a guy that has been posting YT vids where he torments the scammers. Nothing unusual about that; there are plenty of these knocking about but this one has been giving users a few pointers with regard to the kind of epithets guaranteed to wind them up from weaker taunts like "chutiya" to more hard core terms like "teri makichoot"... I'll say no more than that!

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It's now 2017, and your Windows PC can still be pwned by a Word file

Chika
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So a quiet month for Microsoft then...

We never say that until the patches are applied and the fallout evaluated.

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Chika
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Re: It never stops...

They'll have to stop milking it eventually...

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Twas the week before Xmas ... not a creature was stirring – except Microsoft admitting its Windows 10 upgrade pop-up went 'too far'

Chika
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Re: M$ Long History

My first impression on seeing the W95 UI was that it had adopted many features of the AmigaDos 2 UI.

They hoisted bits out of a number of UIs, it seemed. There were quite a few similarities with RISC OS as well, for example. Then, of course, Apple fanbois would probably have a list of rip offs they could invoke...

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Chika
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Headmaster

Re: Microsoft has been getting it wrong with user interfaces

no windows 7 is what Vista should of been

*sigh* Merry Christmas all!

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Chika
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Trollface

Re: "not stepping over the line of being too aggressive is something we tried"

the Xbox steaming app

Doesn't that invalidate the warranty? ;:

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Chika
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Re: Microsoft has been getting it wrong with user interfaces

How is Win10 so unusable?

I'm not sure that this is the argument here, but...

You turn it on, then you turn it off.

True, but it's what you do with it between those times that makes all the difference. I turn on Windows 7, openSUSE, RISC OS, Mint and Devuan systems and turn them off again. They all do things differently and I do different things with them.

Almost everything else you do in between involves the use of 3rd party programs that are bugger all to do with win10.

That's a bit of an oversimplification. A typical operating system does quite a bit in the background, even the ones that don't slurp your data. If they didn't chances are that your 3rd party programs would probably do nothing!

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Chika
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Re: Re: M$ Long History

The Windows 95 user interface was widely recognized as superior to anything else available.

Not so sure about that, really. At the time it was released it was certainly a step up from its predecessor, Windows 3.11 for Workgroups, but it had some problems and more than one competitor. The competition had their own problems but there were a number of benefits in these that were eventually "adopted" by Microsoft in later versions of the interface. Certainly it had its benefits though and on hindsight we may give it its due but even by Windows 7, the last version to even pretend to have the same interface, had its flaws and various other GUIs had benefits over it.

The point is that while so many GUIs have surfaced, none of them have got it completely right.

As far as this story goes, though, it's a typical bit of tat from Microsoft, admitting it was wrong long after the deed has been done and the damage has been sustained. It wants to be trusted and adored and is willing to sacrifice somebody to do it. They did the same with Windows Me and Windows Vista, you may recall. What they NEVER do is apologise and stop at the time, in this case because they were all too blinded by the dollar signs in their eyes.

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London's Winter Wonderland URGENTLY seeks Windows 10 desk support

Chika
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FAIL

Support for Windows 10 and Office 10?

Quite.

"Yeah, put in Windows 10 because it's nice, new and shiny but I don't want to give up my old reliable Office 10."

Been there...

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Chika
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Re: Not just Win 10

Matters not. They could be running Windows XP and it wouldn't matter. I think most of us get it - a project with its arse hanging out needs urgent underwear before it gets any colder.

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Chika
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Trollface

MWAHAH! Your complimentary ITIL certificate is in the post...

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Chika
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Re: Wake up and smell the coffee already.

How are there so many stupid managers out there that keep basing new projects on Windows even though there is metric tons of evidence that it is a completely unreliable POS?

1. Managers tend to believe the glossy brochures thrust at them by the various concerns that push Windows and often have no idea what the alternatives are.

2. Windows isn't necessarily unreliable, though it is very unforgiving if you try to set things up without the requisite amount of planning. Mind you, I could say the same about most systems - "It just works" is a marketing slogan and nothing more.

3. In this particular case, if they are looking for support this close to Christmas then they must have been spectacularly unlucky or, more likely, ridiculously stupid. Any project that gets this close to its target day in this condition would smack of poor planning and I pity anyone that has to deal with it.

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Chika
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Re: Just...

Yeah. I'm jolly enough that I found work before I could be lured in my desperation into what looks like a dead-end job with little job satisfaction. Office 2010 on W10? Something stinks in central London, methinks.

Hah Bumhug or something like that...

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Google may just have silently snuffed the tablet computer

Chika
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Trollface

Oh joy.

A few years ago, when tablets were on the up and everyone was predicting that tablets were the next big thing and would kill the PC, I said that tablets were a fad.

I remember saying so quite clearly.

More than once.

This is me in smug mode.

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Kids' Hour of Code turns into a giant corporate infomercial for kids

Chika
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Re: Why Hour of Code?

Last time I checked, IT doesnt.

Ah but it does! I've had more than one apprentice pass through my department at one of my last jobs, and you'll find that quite a few of the larger concerns run IT based apprentice schemes, not to mention quite a few authorities. More than one run them as a way of contributing to the workforce, others run them as a way of contributing to their own workforce.

Of course there are those that run them as a way of running their IT with cut price labour, but you can usually spot those sorts of employer.

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Chika
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Re: Duh - coding on pencil and paper

The "blind" tape punch machines looked like ancient typewriters but the two with an actual teletype-like printer were built as an entire desk unit.

Sounds a bit like the ASR33s or the ITT Creeds I used to work on when I did my A level. We weren't allowed to program from scratch on those though, hence the coding sheets. They were for editing only and we had to share because there were more of us than them. I did try out the punch tape system a few times though the most punch tape I ever had was a distro kit for one of the earlier RSTS/E versions when I started working for a certain local authority back in the 80s. All gone now...

Oi, Reg! We still haven't got that old farts icon I asked for yet!

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Chika
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I was going to suggest Disney's "Education for Death" but that might be a bit obscure.

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Chika
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Re: Duh - coding on pencil and paper

You haven't really coded unless you tried to type on an ASR33! THUNK! THUNK! THUNK! <return>

Now those were the days!

(And I still have some coding sheets somewhere...)

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Chika
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Re: Duh

Actually I saw this coming a long time ago. Consider that I grew up, technologically speaking, in the days of the 8-bit system when coding was all there was. As systems became more complex and big business took over at the reigns there was a lot less interest in developing machines that could be easily used for the teaching of coding, let alone anything else. In the UK, the biggest change happened when schools and colleges started to exchange machines such as the various Acorns for PCs, mostly advised by people with vested interests or no real knowledge of what a computer was used for in a classroom.

As soon as the Raspberry Pi came out, it was quite obvious that it would be a boon to educators that wanted to teach a subject that, over the preceding years, had been increasingly neglected and to students that wanted to learn but at best could only turn to relics of that past age if they could turn to anything at all. An exploding market like that is like a honeypot to corporate bees like Microsoft or Apple, not to mention the multitude of people building workalikes in the hope that they could be the next big thing whilst failing to innovate anything of their own.

Now I could put Apple to one side as they do have some sort of educational heritage but I question whether Apple now is the same as Apple back then when machines like the Apple II were big in schools. Microsoft, however, hasn't changed much in that the majority of what they do is focussed more on the making of money now rather than making a future that could turn them a tidy profit in future years, and I think that Apple has gone down the same road, particularly since Jobs passed on.

While I agree that computers are not meant to be used solely for the teaching of coding, they should be all round general use systems that can be used for teaching many different things, an area where the PC has always been poor and mostly because the people behind it aren't really interested in making a system that could be used in that way. Yet again we see the corporate mentality at work.

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Stay out of my server room!

Chika
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Holmes

And this story is probably not the worst there is to come!

Let's face it, most non-techies see a nicely laid out server room as a possible space for all kinds of storage but the task of getting a nicely laid out room is a feat in its own right. I can recall having to move from one rather antiquated but serviceable server room to an area temp-walled off from an open plan office with no cooling and a ventilation system that opened onto what at that time was a building site. What I found thereafter in the various fans, filters and whatnot can be left to the imagination!

Or, if your imagination isn't up to the task... here's a hint!

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Was IoT DDoS attack just a dry run for election day hijinks?

Chika
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Trollface

I'm still hoping for attacks that will explode Internet of Things devices.

Have you spoken with anyone at Samsung about this?

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Chika
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Re: Glad for no online voting

What aspect of modern elections relies on internet functionality?

Depends on the country. Here in the UK, the election itself is completely manual though the register of electors is often handled digitally and registration is increasingly available via the internet. I've heard rumblings of changes to all that though with more than one clueless non-techie insisting that putting the whole process on the net will make it "better".

One-Button Syndrome* is alive and well.

*One-Button Syndrome: An affliction of those with little or no exposure to technology that leads them to think that technology can solve any problem like magic. All it takes is the press of one button...

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Living with the Pixel XL – Google's attempt at a high-end phone

Chika
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Re: fast charging...

I'm not so sure. When it came to tablets I was happier with a bigger size; I couldn't stand the 7" form that seemed so prevalent, but with phones I'm not so happy with larger sizes. I've gone from very small stuff like the old candy-bar phones through the diminutive ZTE Blade which was a bit too small, then to the Huawei G330 which was a great phone size-wise. While my current Honor 6 is a good beast for much of what I do, the 5" plus bezel can be a bit too big on occasion.

Horses for courses, methinks...

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Chika
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Re: Software SIMs are a superior solution

I don't recall ever actually being able to swap a SIM.

I do and I don't. The SIM from my last Nokia, a 6610i, went into my LG, then into my Orange San Francisco (ZTE Blade) without a squeak, then into my Huawei Ascend G330. It was only when I changed to an Honor 6 that I needed to change sizes.

I suppose it all depends on what you are swapping with.

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Chika
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FAIL

Re: Wanna buy a Pixel?

That's what I get for posting late at night after a hard day at the coal face! Thanks for noticing!

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Chika
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Wanna buy a Pixel?

Hmm... high price, no SIM slot, non-removable battery... that's three strikes.

I'll keep my Honor 6 for now, thanks.

That's the way I suspect that a few folk will think when looking at this. We shall see...

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England expects... you to patch your apps and not just Windows

Chika
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Sounds like it's suffering from whatever Microsoft stuffed up in Windows Update last year. You could always try Autopatcher - it's not going to be fast on first use but it may be a better bet than trying to get WU to do its worst and if you save it once you are done, you can always reuse it should you ever need to do a reload.

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Google: We look forward to running non-Intel processors in our cloud

Chika
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Re: Blast from the past

No one putting KVM in datacenters anymore for at least 10 years, everything you might ever need can be made available remotely to any part of the world.

And how many server rooms have you graced with your presence in that time? Yet again somebody assumes that all servers can be configured and monitored from the network even when said network is stuffed up...

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