* Posts by Lotaresco

861 posts • joined 24 Sep 2007

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Snopes.com asks for bailout amid dispute over who runs the site and collects ad dollars

Lotaresco
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Re: Baby on board

"Although they may post their sources etc., how many people actually check it and make sure it all adds up?"

My lack of trust of Snopes started over an incident they dismissed as myth. It was about someone getting a Zippo lighter as a present and filling it by siphoning petrol out of the tank of his BMW, messily, getting petrol on his clothes and skin. He struck the Zippo to test it and set fire to himself and his car. He ran out of the garage and died on his lawn. Neighbours ignored him because they thought the burning bundle was a garden bonfire.

Snopes said they could find no evidence and dismissed it as "myth". I had seen the incident reported in my local paper and the brother of the Zippo lighter victim worked in the same office as me at the time. I carefully documented what I could and sent them the clippings and references. I got a mail back dismissing the evidence because it was in a local paper and they didn't trust it because it wasn't published in an American local paper. It seemed terribly parochial on their part.

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You can't DevOps everything, kids. Off the shelf kit especially

Lotaresco
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Same old, same very old

"It's a good idea to have your Devs and Ops collaborate over the lifetime of a piece of software.."

I started my career in the pharmaceutical industry, in the 1970s. Big Pharma has always been a consumer of Big IT and spends a lot on IT projects. In the 1980s it became obvious to us that something was badly broken because no matter whether we talked about R&D in the sense of "new product" or D in terms of "new/improved IT systems" often what was delivered to operations wasn't fit for purpose. We used to refer to it as "over the wall" rather than "DevOps" but the problem we tried to shift was that there was a wall between development and operations and every so often development would run up to the wall, throw something over it with a note pinned to it saying "This is what you asked for."

By the 1990s we had fixed it for all aspects of business delivery by doing the logical thing of having operations included in all phases of development. It worked, no need for "a method" or shiny suits or six figure salaries.

When I emerged from that environment to more mainstream IT I was horrified that the old crap way of doing things has survived. Now I'm horrified that smoke and mirrors has been applied to "leverage" <retch> huge salaries for stating the bleeding obvious.

I agree with you that it's a marketing wet dream but it's not selling much of value. Since my thing these days is security, I'm really ticked off that in most DevOps projects security isn't thought of at all. It seems to be common that they think "Just get it working, we'll keep security happy by throwing some in at the last minute[1]."

[1] That is, if they bother at all. Just look at the DevOps approach leading to Internet of Tat. Not a pretty sight.

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UK ministers' Broadband '2.0' report confuses superfast with 10Mbps

Lotaresco
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Re: Available but not realistic

"not if you're a marketeer it isn't."

Yes, sadly that is true. I've been in the same room as the lizards when "truth" is being discussed. Once I saw a graph being presented by a technical person to a roomful of lizards. The graph showed that compared to the gold standard reference test method that the company's "new" test system was a random number generator. The results plotted on the graph formed a vaguely elliptical cloud rather than a straight 1:1 line.

A lizard asked for the slope to be calculated and it came out as 1 with an intercept close to zero. However the probability was laughably small.

Lizard response "We'll say we have perfect agreement with the reference method and just show the slope, not the actual data point."

B Ark material, all of them.

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Lotaresco
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Re: it makes more sense to not have FTTP

"I am currently waiting to see how reliable overhead FTTP is."

It depends on many factors. How stingy the supplier is factors heavily. If they use armoured cable then it may survive but the costs tend to make that uneconomic. The details of the site are also important. Trees grow back after being cut and eventually the branches waving in the wind damage the cable. We have outages of power and telecoms because of that. As mentioned before passing trucks cause cable to whip around, particularly if the cable is hung over the road rather than along it.

If the hedges/trees are kept neatly trimmed and the cables aren't over a road that's heavily used by trucks and if the cable has a steel support cable as well as the plastic sheath then there shouldn't be a significant problem.

On private lines you could monitor the line quality and improve resilience by using a multicore cable and putting an OTDR switch at each end so that in the event of a break or degradation the switch uses another pair in the bundle. Sadly no service provider is going to go to those lengths for a SOHO user.

The sort of cable we use for this sort of work is £2,000 per km and service provider flinch at those costs.

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Lotaresco
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Re: Available but not realistic

"any links to those 100mbs fibre products that can only be used upto 80 mbops?"

No, because to get such a link you have to enter the details of your premises into the supplier's coverage and speed web application. You can try it for yourself if you like, at the site of the rural broadband initiatives suppler, Callflow UK. There you will find that they advertise 100Mbps then state "Up to 80Mbps Download & 20Mbps Upload ".

Seriously, why would I bothered to lie to you about this as you seem to be implying?

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Lotaresco
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Re: Don't shoot/kill the messenger...

"Reading the comments here...boy, so much misinformation."

Yes, most of it coming from Anon. Cowards who snipe at others.

If you're worried about your network traffic being transmitted over copper, WTAF do you do within your premises? Someone was complaining earlier that 1 ft of copper would make 5km of fibre irrelevant. I wonder how he, it has to be a he, connects his PC to his home network?

"maybe, at 100Mbps+ G.fast signals over copper, not a chance."

Oh right, I must be imagining the Gb over copper network on UTP we already have then?

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Lotaresco
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Re: it makes more sense to not have FTTP

"And in reply to Lotaresco, they don't have any fibre flapping around in the air, they perform "micro-trenching" which just means digging a little trench not-very-deep."

If only you understood more than the limited amount that you do. You can't trench across a road without disrupting traffic, this costs money and takes time. It's more usual to do this using a mole so that there's no need to break the road surface. This isn't as cheap as cable providers like. It makes sense to provide cable via trenches in urban areas where adoption rates will be high enough to pay for the work.

However, if you bother to look in rural areas you will see that the cable duct runs down one side of the road (only) meaning that you need to reach premises on the other side of the road somehow. The solution used by *all* providers in rural areas is to run a cable up the nearest pole and then from there to the premises. If you bother to look you'll see that the cable flaps about. A lot.

This is what most rural roads look like. Notice how the poles are on the opposite side of the road to the housing.

Rural Telecoms

Also if you don't bury fibre sufficiently deep under a road, it will break because those trucks pound the road. One way to do traffic monitoring is to bury a fibre optic under the road and monitor the deflection.

Heck but I've only been designing networks for a few decades. What would I know, eh?

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Lotaresco
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Re: Available but not realistic

"Do you really want to rely on a decent 4G connection, when the school bus is late and there are a dozen teenagers waiting at the bus stop outside your premises?"

Given that there's no bus stop, no pavement, the area doesn't have more than a handful of teenagers and we're in the centre of a National Park plus there's no 4G at ground level but a strong signal on the roof of our premises because it's a tall building so we can put 4G aerials on the roof and use a DSL/4G router so that in the absence of 4G we can fail over to DSL, no I'm not really concerned. YMMV.

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Lotaresco
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Unhappy

Available but not realistic

In the rural community where I live central and local government have been bragging for months that they have brought "fibre to the area under a rural broadband initiative". This seems to be all the interest that politicians have, it's available. Uptake has been minimal, mostly for the simple reason that no one can afford it and the service offered is no better (practically) than the existing DSL. We get about 18Mbps DSL (give or take depending which way the wind is blowing). The fibre offered is "up to 30Mbps" but it's capped, traffic shaped and costs twice as much as the BT DSL. You can go up to 80Mbps (advertised as 100Mbps in typical marketing fraud, but it is stated that the rate will not exceed 80Mbps). That rate is only available to businesses and costs £200 a month. Although not capped, there is the usual "fair use" restriction with no mention of what is "fair use".

Also customers are not permitted to use their own kit for connection to the network, hence my business which sits behind a firewall would be forced to connect to the internet using the crappy built in service provider router firewall rather than our own enterprise model. Given how much traffic we see being dropped on the WAN interface, I'd be very worried about switching to something that we can't configure.

There's a gulf between "available" and "worth paying for".

The better way ahead for us seems to be to buy 4G access which is available in the area and which costs less than the cheapest available FTTC/P offering available to us. The 4G is faster, cheaper and although capped, it offers double the data volume offered by the "rural broadband initiative".

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Lotaresco
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Re: Super Fast Broadband != "fibre"

"1 ft of copper is enough to make 5Km of fibre irrelevant to the SERVICE a customer receives."

In rural areas it makes more sense to not have FTTP because the only ways to bring fibre to the premises is via overhead cable, often crossing from one side of the road to the other. To get FTTP underground is disproportionately expensive. In these circumstances copper is far more resilient and maintainable than fibre for the segment from the cabinet to the premises.

Fibre cracks fairly quickly when subject to the cable moving around in the slipstream of passing trucks.

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Kill something, then hire cleaners to mop up the blood if you want to build a digital business

Lotaresco
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Flame

More oblocks

So errrm the current business is using "apps", eh?

But it's not "digital"?

The last time that I used an analogue computer it was a cold war legacy system, mostly used for teaching just to prove that everything doesn't need to be digital. That was more decades ago than I like to think about. Even if the business to be "transformed"[1] is running on Systimes, PDP-11s, CDC Cybers, NASCOMS, PETs and BBC Bs it is still "digital". The smell of Gartner merda di bue is strong with this "report". At least the good news this time is that I didn't have to pay them hundreds of pounds and sign an NDA just to come to the conclusion that it wasn't worth reading.

[1] Transformed always seems to mean transformed as in transformed from functioning to broken. if you want to see what "transformation" does, look at the history of ICI. Transformed from an industry giant to nothing by John Harvey-Jones. The best day's work done by Morgan Cars was telling him to sling his hook. Everything he touched is dead, Morgan continues to thrive.

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Moneysupermarket fined £80,000 for spamming seven million customers

Lotaresco
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"the law allows a "soft opt-in" for customers"

And there's your problem right there. Corrupt politicians who imagine that marketing companies are more important than the electorate.

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Lotaresco
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I have a simple solution to this.

I give each organisation that I deal with a unique-to-them email address to be used to contact me. I always opt out of marketing. Any organisation that ignores my request is (a) blacklisted on the mail server and (b) added to the long and growing list of companies that I will never, ever deal with again.

If everyone were to boycott the companies that spam us they would go to the wall quickly.

BTW, the most pernicious of these companies is "Visit England" which ignores all opt-out requests and uses "unsubscribe" to confirm that the email they have for you is working. They regularly close the company down and then re-incarnate under a slightly different name, with the same directors. Complaints to OFCOM have had no effect, yet.

They're as bad as the cold-calling double glazing companies.

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Robo-Uber T-boned, rolls onto side, self-driving rides halted

Lotaresco
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Latest news

Uber robot claims accident caused by fatigue after being bullied by Uber management into working long shifts without rest.

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The AA's copped to credit data blurt, but what about car-crash incident response?

Lotaresco
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Re: Not comprimised?

"I came on to say the same thing. The data in the leak was no different to what you find in the dustbins on every gas station forecourt where someone pays by credit card, then throws the receipt in the bin as they pass it on the way back to the car."

Wrong. The paper slip does not show the start and expiry dates for your payment card nor does it reveal your AA user account and password.

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The Atari retro games box is real… sort of

Lotaresco
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"as Thomas Wolfe said: You Can't Go Home Again."

Presses Home button.

Goes Home.

Invokes App.

Presses Home button.

Goes Home.

Thomas Wolfe was wrong.

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Brit neural net pioneer just revolutionised speech recognition all over again

Lotaresco
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Re: All human languages are undersandable by neural networks, as that's what humans use.

"Leveraging phonemes"

Go wash your mouth out. There's no need for the bullshit bingo here.

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Lotaresco
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Re: Sounds similar to the way we work.

"You had a temper like my jellied eels:

Too hot, too greasy."

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Lotaresco
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Faster speech recognition

It's all about Time, team.

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'My dream job at Oracle left me homeless!' – A techie's relocation horror tale

Lotaresco
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WTF?

Re: Oracle treating employees badly?

"Don't let facts get in the way of a good tale, right?"

I used to work in Switzerland. My employer won the America's Cup for Switzerland, beating Larry Ellison, go figure.

I like the way that you feel it necessary to hide behind Anonymous Coward because you're the second of those things.

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Lotaresco
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Meh

Oracle treating employees badly?

Who'd have thought it? Apart from anyone who has ever negotiated pay and conditions with them.

I was headhunted by Oracle in the 1990s. We talked about salary and other benefits. It took months until they realised I wasn't going to work for peanuts. Salary package agreed. Then they sent me the contract. I sent it to my lawyer. He said I would be mad to sign it because Oracle tried to own me body and soul every hour of the day. This included Oracle laying claim to any intellectual property that I created while working for them. That meant that if I wrote a book, composed any music, created a video all royalties would go to Oracle. I write books that are nothing to do with my work and I'm not assigning those rights to an employer. I told them so. They refused to change the contract. I refused to sign the contract. They decided they didn't want to employ me. The hiring manager took it personally and took to calling me at home and telling me I had "Insulted Oracle".

Later I heard that at trade shows Oracle staff were blackening my name and telling people not to hire me. Fortunately the publicity did my career no end of good and I ended up as a very well paid consultant. So I have something to thank them for.

I suppose it didn't help that before they headhunted me that I used to work for someone who had thrashed Team Oracle in the America's Cup.

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Shock: NASA denies secret child sex slave cannibal colony on Mars

Lotaresco
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Leather Goddesses of Phobos

Everyone knows that this is not NASA, it is the acolytes of the Leather Goddesses who snatch people out of a bar in Upper Sandusky, OH. The first thing you know about it is when you wake up wearing just a brass loincloth in a cell with a guy named "Trent".

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A minister for GDS? Don't talk digital pony

Lotaresco
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Breaking the mould?

"Maude is regarded as having achieved more than most in trying to break the insane amount of money the public sector still spends on, frankly, crap IT."

By whom, may I ask? All that he has done is to change the type of crap rather than to eliminate it. The same big players are still there, doing the same rubbish. The gCloud turned out to be a massive waste of effort and money that no one wanted to use. Maude destroyed CESG mostly it seems in a fit of pique because he was told he couldn't use his personal iPad for government business so he just got rid of the people who gave that advice and replaced them with some who said "risk is good". That's gone well this week with the Parliamentary hack, hasn't it?

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Lotaresco
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She can't be

... any worse than the rest of GDS who, to be honest, are in the chocolate teapot or transparent blackout curtain field of competence. Every so often I have to engage with GDS for some reason or other and leave feeling that there is time that I will never get back again.

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Concorde without the cacophony: NASA thinks it's cracked quiet supersonic flight

Lotaresco
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Re: BS

"The Boeing SST was canceled because of environmental reasons, specifically SSTs damage the ozone layer."

You are right, that is total BS.

We didn't even know about damage to the ozone later at the time and... guess what? SSTs were not implicated in damage to the ozone layer at the time and the NOAA did not evaluate ozone depletion by SSTs until 1995. The NOAA concluded that ozone depletion by Concorde was "negligible" and that a fleet of over 500 SSTs would be needed to produce measureable depletion of the ozone layer *if nothing were done to clean up nitrogen dioxide emissions*.

Depletion of the ozone layer was due to the use of CFCs as an aerosol propellant and refrigerant.

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Lotaresco
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Re: It was however

"unable to cope with moderately tight turns (hence the Paris Airshow breakup) and was vastly thirsty (not having stolen Concorde's secret to optimising fuel flow across the operating speed range, but they did "borrow" most of the rest of the design)."

The rumour at the time was that the Paris Airshow breakup was along the line where they had folded the Concorde plans when they stole them.

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Pwned UK SME fined £60K for leaving itself vulnerable to hack attack

Lotaresco
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Re: Zero day...

"how do you protect against the unknown?"

Getting your web payment site hacked is not "the unknown" it's the "all too bloody obvious even to a moron". Taking very basic steps to lock down systems and separate payments/finance and personal data from the customer-facing sites is also not unknown. It's just appropriate business practice. People who think that because they don't know how to design a secure e-commerce site that no one does are suffering from a massive does of Dunning-Kruger syndrome.

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Lotaresco
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Re: It's a start

"At last we have an official recommendation for regular penetration testing.

I don't think I've seen one of those before, except buried somewhere in a lengthy post mortem.

?

I think you haven't been paying attention in that case. The publicity about penetration testing from Cabinet office, GDS and the Government Cyber Essentials Scheme has been constant for the last four years at least. Also the PCI DSS rules require an organisation taking payment by credit card to undergo a penetration test at least annually. These bozos were lazy, incompetent and were breaking the rules that all merchants must apply when handling credit card payments and processing card holder details.

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Lotaresco
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Re: OK

"If I got hit by a N Korea ICMB"

An Ice Cream Meringue Bombe? An Insanely Clever Mystical Book?

BTW, you may want to look at this Wikipedia page: List of fallacies

Your argument falls into the categories of "False equivalence" and "Tu quoque" with an element of "Vacuous truth". Quite a haul of fallacies for two sentences.

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Humanity uploaded an AI to Mars and lets it shoot rocks with lasers

Lotaresco
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We can now confirm that there is no life on Mars

There was life on Mars until we unleashed a nuclear powered killbot on the face of the red planet. Now there's just ash.

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IBM's contractor crackdown continues: Survivors refusing pay cut have hours reduced

Lotaresco
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Re: Why contract these days?

" I wonder why anyone contracts these days."

I was with HP as a contractor when they tried this nonsense and tried to play hardball with the contractors. We had a meeting and we all said "Fine, we'll be off then if you don't need us."

Odd, how a big company can suddenly realise what a massive gooly it has just dropped. Several years on I'm still contracting and my day rate is a lot higher than it was then.

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The biggest British Airways IT meltdown WTF: 200 systems in the critical path?

Lotaresco
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Re: Do any really large companies rip it all out and start again?

"I'd love to hear examples of really large companies that wrip-out their IT and start again to get genuine resilience back after x years of smooth operating."

It does happen. I know one company that did exactly that building two new parallel DCs to replace the adding tat with new, shiny, reliable kit. The problem was that retirement of the old DCs became a tangled and difficult process that took over five years to complete leading to a doubling of costs for those five years. Even then it wasn't perfect. Decommissioning the last DC resulted in a massive outage because someone had forgotten something important.

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Police anti-ransomware warning is hotlinked to 'ransomware.pdf'

Lotaresco
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"You know, when I see the Police doing mad stupid shit like this, it makes me wonder how on the ball they are when they're spying on everyone's communications?"

They are terrible at it, mostly because that's someone else's job.

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Lotaresco
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NCSC

NCSC know what they are doing? When did that happen?

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Italian F-35 facility rolls out its first STOVL stealth fighter

Lotaresco
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Re: Engines & Turkey do we need to?

"I am sure we could fund a British jet engine manufacturer to produce one, or even a European consortium."

We used to have an all-weather combat proven VSTOL fighter that was perfect for carrier ops. Out government threw it away, remember? Now we get some bag of nails that carts around a "Lift System" that for most of the time is dead weight. But at least the lift system is British made. Hoorah! Let's wave a bulldog, drink some beer and drape ourselves in a flag.

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Lotaresco
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Re: Optional

"If that had happened, not only might Lockheed have lost the 60-odd aircraft sale to Italy, but there was a risk that other smaller F-35 customers (particularly Netherlands, Norway, Denmark) might have gone with a European alternate."

Or "Welcome to the wonderful world of Brexit, brought to you by knee-jerk prejudice, ignorance and inability to think further than the end of one's nose."

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Lotaresco
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FAIL

Keep it factual

"There was an 80% turnout in the referendum."

No there wasn't, it was 72.2%.

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Cabinet Office losing grip on UK government departments – report

Lotaresco
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Why Cabinet Office is being ignored

It's simple. Their initiatives are, for the most part, a waste of time and money. Remember they brought into being the GDS fiasco, the huge waste of time and money that is the GSC, they're the ones who have people saying "I'll take the risk on this" who are then notable only for running away when the shit hits the fan. They are being ignored for the same reason that I ignore the pub bore, they don't know what they are talking about and are just a source of noise.

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SpaceX spin-out plans to put virtual machines in orbit

Lotaresco
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Re: What's your vector, Victor?

"Skynet is the sort of snappy name the marketing folk would go for."

That name was taken long before the movie. Back in 1969 in fact.

Skynet

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Lotaresco
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Re: Vector?

He commits crimes with both direction and magnitude.

Vector!

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Gig economy tech giants are 'free riding' on the welfare state, say MPs

Lotaresco
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Sick pay

As the owner of a small business I have to say that the notion that a self-employed person would pay me (something) in order to receive sick pay from me is a clear flag that there is no element of self-employment. If I get sick no one pays me, not even the state. If there is sick pay then the person being paid is an employee, no matter what deductions are made from that individuals pay packet to cover sick pay provision.

HMRC need to get their act together. It's HMRC that permits these practices to slide past

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Lotaresco
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Re: Definitions of employed/self-employed ?

"Employed" - you work for someone else in "their" company (either full time or part time)

"Self-employed" - you work for "your own" company (even if providing services to someone elses company)

Not really. If you work for your own company you are "Employed" (by the company which is a legal entity). Directors are employees.

"Employed" you don't have to work for a company. You could be employed by a partnership or sole trader, neither of these are incorporated. You could even be employed by a non-trading individual (i.e. as a nanny, cleaner, groundskeeper etc.)

Self-employed in most cases means in a partnership with someone else or operating as a self-employed sole trader.

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Game authors demand missing ZX Spectrum reboot royalties

Lotaresco
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Re: From the Facebook page...

"on - page 53 of "Creating the Sinclair ZX Spectrum Vega" - Published by Andrews UK and Co-Authored by RCL's former MD, Paul Andrews states "I negotiated the necessary IP agreements with the various patent holders and licensors that would allow us to create and market the product" . "

Hold on a freaking minute, RCL is claiming that the authoritative source for copyright agreements with the IPR holders is a one line throw away comment in a book written by a former MD? This gives the impression that RCL don't have any evidence to support their claim that they have agreements in place and that their "crack legal team" needs to s/ck/p/g

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Lotaresco
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Re: The Sky-Amstrad-Sinclair chain

"So once again, the titular complaint, specifically of unpaid royalties, is undermined."

Still has a strong whiff of an RCL shill about this post.

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Lotaresco
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Trollface

Re: I'm more confused than normal.

"The 'VEGA+' product is still an Indigogo project in development, which some people seem to be dead-set on sabotaging. "

<sniffs Anon Troll>

Hmmm, would you care to confirm or deny your association with RCL, Mr Trolly McTrollface?

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Lotaresco
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Re: I'm a little in between with this...

"You're saying that infringing for the purposes of making a product and selling it is "personal use"?"

You're saying that you're a fully paid up member of DAESH?

Oh look, I can do straw men too!

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Lotaresco
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Re: I'm a little in between with this...

"You're saying that infringing for the purposes of making a product and selling it is "personal use"?"

No, are you saying that you're unable to read a post?

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Lotaresco
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Re: I'm a little in between with this...

"It's especially important not to be a "goofball" if you're planning to steal others' work. From the CDP Act: "A person guilty of an offence under subsection (1)(a), (b), (d)(iv) or (e) is liable (a) on summary conviction to imprisonment for a term not exceeding six months or a fine, or both; (b) on conviction on indictment to a fine or imprisonment for a term not exceeding ten years, or both"."

Hmm, you're rather guilty of quoting out of context there since Criminal Liability only applies if the infringing works are "otherwise than for his private and domestic use". Hence someone who "steals" other's work ["steal" is the wrong term to use, copyright infringement is not "stealing"] has not committed a criminal offence if the work was copied for personal use.

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Teen charged with 'cyberstalking' in bomb hoax case

Lotaresco
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Shirly Shome Mishtake?

So, for how long have US Swat Teams been using Snatch Land Rovers?

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Sysadmin 'trashed old bosses' Oracle database with ticking logic bomb'

Lotaresco
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Re: Putting at the stake

"I'm always surprised to read the full name of someone who wasn't condemned yet."

In this case Nimesh Patel is about as unique as John Smith so I'm not too surprised. I certainly hope it's not the same person I worked with some years ago because he was a very nice chap and unlikely to do anything so short-sighted.

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