* Posts by Lotaresco

718 posts • joined 24 Sep 2007

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Cancel your cloud panic: At $122bn it's just 5% of all IT spend

Lotaresco
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Cloud doesn't work for many

Cloud and even [A-Z]aaS doesn't work for some, I suspect many, businesses and government organisations. The latter are throwing themselves at "cloud" solutions more vigorously than the former. Large integrators are pushing cloud services to government frantically while choosing to keep their own core services in their own DCs.

For SOHO and even MO businesses and fly by night start-ups there are obvious short-term advantages, particularly that there's no big capital outlay at the beginning. The business may get saddled with costs that don't scale well in the future and may even face the unpleasant task of lifting their systems from the cloud and transferring (somehow) to their own provision if the business succeeds; but that would be someone else's problem.

Cloud provision could but doesn't AFAICS offer a fifth service, security; with a decent SOC and skills at a level that no small business could afford. Sadly there's still a hill to climb convincing small businesses that they need to do anything to secure their systems, let alone pay a monthly service charge for security.

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In colossal shock, Uber alleged to be wretched hive of sexism, craven managerial ass-covering

Lotaresco
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Re: Bad Uber

"By the taxi licencing authority plate affixed to the rear of the vehicle"

The Uber model is private hire, booked in advance. Not all LAs require a plate on vehicles to be used for private hire.

For example in London the vehicle needs to show a PCO licence in the front and rear windows.

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Lotaresco
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I'm not in the slightest surprised.

I work in computer security. I got into this line of work after discovering several hundred MB[1] of filth on a manager's PC. Since then and after working in digital forensics for a few years I've ceased to be surprised by the sleaziness of the managerial classes. I'm also no longer surprised that they treat their workers and their sexual partners[2] like meatbags[3]. I'm guessing that to get to the top in a large corporation takes a certain type of sociopath or even psychopath and I'm not alone in thinking this.

The same arrogant tosspot that can stare you in the face and tell you to sign off paperwork that is a lie, often turns out to be intimidating staff into sexual encounters and then using their power in the workplace to silence everyone in sight. I'm lucky in being born with a spine and being physically large enough and mean enough to stare down these idiots. I'm also lucky in having marketable skills so that their threats to sack me just make me laugh.

During investigation of some particularly bad cases I found that the people trying to cover up were the victims of the abuse. The abuser had them intimidated to the point that they were terrified to do anything other than cover up for the abuser. I had the suspicion that the abusers often start with HR. Lots of women in HR and threats to expose them to their partners can be a powerful force for manipulation.

I'm glad these days to be in a "cleaner" type of security and not having to get involved in person-to-person nastiness. However I doubt that the basic MO of these types has changed at all in the past decade.

[1] That was a lot in those days, half the hard drive on his laptop.

[2] Not really "partners" in any sense, just someone being used.

[3] Yes, I've seen the evidence for this when prepping material for investigation. These people are so arrogant that they will video themselves abusing someone then put it on a corporate communication system.

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Lotaresco
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Re: I don't work at Uber but...

"One might even make a good argument [HP] died when the brilliant idea to buy Compaq went through."

If not then, then definitely when they tried to introduce their own fondle-slab without having a clue about what the market was or even if there was a market. The only rationale seemed to be "We're HP people will buy anything we make. We can force corporates to take anything we want to sell them. There's no need for an app store, or even any applications. And we'll charge more than Apple because we're HP and we're better than those upstarts."

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Who's behind the Kodi TV streaming stick crackdown?

Lotaresco
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Re: Why Don't You...

...turn off your television set and go out and do something less boring instead...

ITYM

Why Don't You Just Switch Off Your Television Set and Go Out and Do Something Less Boring Instead?

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Lotaresco
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Re: They don't help their case.

“Three or four cases have gone to prosecution,” Matthew confirmed. - Making statements like that makes them look inept. Either a case has gone to prosecution or it hasn't.

Shades of ACS:Law and the fragrant Mr Crossley. His threats against people always had some vagueness about the probability or possibility of prosecution. Ultimately it turned out when he was forced to reveal details that he hadn't taken any cases to court, just threats and bullying.

TBH neither side acquits themselves well in this.

The copyright holders, for the most part, look to squeeze blood out of a stone. They have a fear of losing control so don't like new, disruptive, technology. Instead of doing what they should to make legal use of content easy they try to preserve their old business model. What they don't seem to like is a business model that upsets their belief that they can sell any old crap to anyone and punish artists that they don't like by not marketing their content. They can (and do) also shaft the artists by entering into grossly unfair contract terms with unknowns. Having people choose what content they want to see and not having to go with artificial geographical, time and marketing constraints hurts the suits.

The users who think everything should be free are, at best, naïve. If I create something and you decide to view my work then you should do so with a view to making reasonably payment. If you don't want to do that or if you think you have the right to distribute someone else's work then you will contribute to the death of that branch of the entertainment industry. Such people are in the same group as the restaurant owners who think they can get someone to provide free entertainment for "exposure" i.e. they are leeches.

Kodi provides something useful which is the ability to view material legitimately from several sources. It is not axiomatic that Kodi=="piracy". I'm tired of the limitations imposed by other devices. I have both Humax and Samsung media boxes. Neither gives access to all of the *legitimate* sources available. The Humax can do Freesat + some on-demand and some streaming services. The Samsung can do Bluray and some on-demand and streaming services. But the Humax can't handle anything other than 4:3 or 16:9 properly. The Samsung randomly disconnects without warning especially from Prime and DLNA. Both have appalling user interfaces. Neither can access iTunes. I'd have to buy yet another box for that. I just want one box that can handle video well, that has an appealing rather than appalling user interface and that can be upgraded to access new services. The Kodi seems closer to that ideal than all the other tat.

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Lotaresco
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Re: I'm worried they'll outlaw Kodi in some unenforceable way...

So, thanks for the pedantry, I'd rather use the word 'like'

I'd rather that you used the word "like" as often and as inappropriately as you like. By doing so you mark your post indelibly in a way that signifies "Don't bother reading further, it won't be worth the effort."

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Lotaresco
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Re: I'm worried they'll outlaw Kodi in some unenforceable way...

What's like 9?

9.424777961 ?

int(9.424777961)

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Samsung battery factory bursts into flame in touching Note 7 tribute

Lotaresco
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Reality bites

I wonder if any of the Samsung GN7 fanbhois who were claiming that exploding batteries were "fake news" last year have changed their minds yet? There's been rock-solid evidence that the battery design was not fit for purpose and now this proving that there really is a problem.

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Slammer worm slithers back online to attack ancient SQL servers

Lotaresco
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"What we need to do is ban all IP traffic from those countries through our borders, even if they have current visas, and then build a Yuge firewall."

This is tremendous news folks. Tremendous. This is the best news. It's the best. I run a company it's the best company in the world. The best. Tremendous. Do my hands look big in this?

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Lotaresco
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Mushroom

Re: Bugs? Fixed? Really?

" What's next?"

Probably time for WinNuke to make a reappearance.

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Trump's visa plan leaks: American techies first

Lotaresco
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Meanwhile, in the UK...

People here thought that they were voting to save jobs when they voted to leave the EU. What they didn't realise was that the government wants to leave the EU so that their chums ion what's left of industry can recruit wage slaves in India and China for lower rates than any European will accept. It was the EU that kept the cheap labour out with rules that stated that European labour must be employed in preference to any extra-European. A move that filled jobs no Brit wanted to do, that protected the wages of people born in Britain and prevented the exploitation of British workers.

Turkeys however voted for Christmas.

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Fear not, Europe's Privacy Shield is Trump-proof – ex-FTC bigwig

Lotaresco
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Oh great

So I'm supposed to be comforted by this? The US has a terrible track record on privacy and on the treatment of anyone who is not a US citizen. If they misuse my data I wouldn't know. When my data gets into a government system it's not protected. If I want to sue in a US Court I have to enter the USA and immediately forfeit all right to privacy because they will take my personal details before allowing me into their festering bunghole of a fascist banana republic.

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New York to draft in 250 IT contractors because state staff 'lack talent'

Lotaresco
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Re: In house impossibility

"Why is this increase in complication occurring? "

Because management want more and more from IT. They want systems to be integrated but accessible from the poolside at their villa in Tuscany. They want input clerks replaced by software robots. They want the whole thing moved into the cloud to get rid of that unpleasant to them) CAPEX. They want BYOD for their iThings etc.

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Lotaresco
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Re: Don't know

"the problem with bringing in "contractors " is most of the time they are there only between searching for FT roles.. "

Only in the US, which I know we are talking about. But the US seems to be a special case because the "benefits" of being staff are the things that people take for granted in Europe - pensions, healthcare.

I've been dealing with a big US integrator on several contracts in the UK. The American management team can't get their head around "contractor" being a career choice. They came up with a "brilliant" idea of offering contractors a "permanent" job with them at half the pay, because in their mind working for DREADCO[1] is the best thing every and people would want to do that, right?

Unfortunately the contractors all know they can get paid better elsewhere and don't see a "permanent" job with an organisation that sacks thousands of people on a whim/to ensure the CEO gets his $10M bonus this year as attractive.

[1] Name changed to protect the guilty.

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Secret HPE letter tells sales team and partners to keep selling Arista 'confidently'

Lotaresco
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"When the sales start to tank expect something like this."

Wow, a Roller roll!

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'Celebgate' nudes thief gets just nine months of porridge

Lotaresco
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"Well he's a bloke. If he was a woman he could have had a baby."

That's a defence that's even older than "I have a mental problem" known as Pleading the belly.

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Trump lieutenants 'use private email' for govt work... but who'd make a big deal out of that?

Lotaresco
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Re: The return of the high horse

"You know what Tories and Republicans don't do? Smash shit up when they don't get their own way!"

The Tories and Republicans have shown no hesitation in smashing things. Often it is people they smash, physically shooting or battering workers who dare to ask for decent pay and working conditions, for example. There are many examples on both sides of the pond. Smashing people by putting them on the street. Smashing the homes and possessions of those they disagree with. At present the Tories are trying to smash social medicine and social institutions. They are also trying to smash the European Union. There's much evidence of the desire to ruin things.

Trump is now trying to smash healthcare for people who cannot afford it.

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Lotaresco
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"merely pointing out that at this time there is no evidence of any 'wrong doing'"

There is already evidence of doing wrong.

Officials are subject to the “Disclosure Requirement For Official Business Conducted Using Electronic Messaging Accounts," 44 U.S.C. 2209. If White House staffers have already used the RNC email system for White House work, they must copy or forward those communications into the government system within 20 days.

Clear so far?

The RNC has stated that it has deleted the emails of Bannon, Kushner and Conway.

So they have no intention of filing those emails in a government system.

That, right there, is a Federal crime, the wilful destruction of evidence that leads to a further Federal crime of failing to comply with 44 USC 2209.

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Lotaresco
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Devil

"In other words at this point as far as anyone appears to know, this isn't hypocrisy but simply some people - not holders of cabinet posts or even close - using personal email accounts for emails which as far as anyone is prepared to say at the very least *could* be personal in nature or at least not related to government business."

This is very easy to resolve. Fortunately Trump has put the tools in our hands with his first one-on-one television interview since being sworn in as president. We can get the information from his lieutenants in the manner he approves of. There's probable cause in that they are using non-official channels for communication and that shows they have something to hide. So, let's get them on the rack, break out the hot irons and get the information out of them in a manner which they fully support. A process in which there needs to be only an accusation and someone willing to watch the screaming and attempt to make some sense of it.

It's all good folks. All good. This is going to be tremendous. Tremendous.

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Lotaresco
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Re: As they say in Russia, to my frieds everything, to my enemies the law.

Great, I'll have the full English. I love fried breakfast especially when it has everything. Can you make sure I get fried bread as well as hash browns, keep the beans away from the eggs and it's Bury black pudding not the awful southern thing. Thanks.

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Lotaresco
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"If anyone is looking for some pro-Trump propaganda from 'ordinary' citizens then look no further than the comments of ANY Trump related video featured on LiveLeak.com."

Last night on BBC News they showed three women from California who called themselves the "Trumpettes" and who sing (badly) of their love for Murika and Trump. They did lots of finger pointing during their songs (such as pointing at the floor when they sang "This land is my land". In this they reminded me of the Protestant Orange Order who used to caper bizarrely in parades, wearing white gloves and pointing at things. I suppose it's appropriate that they should look like orange men.

Anyway... they quoted some Bible text as justification for Trump. It was Ezekiel 22:30 which they cited as: "I looked for someone among them who would build up the wall" They thought this was brilliant and we were treated to the sight of three seriously overweight matrons giggling and rolling around like toddlers who have just said "pants".

I note that the King James Version, you know the one that the rightards claim is the "literal word of God" (their capital) makes no mention of wall, it says "hedge", that might be nice, a close clipped Leylandii or yew hedge along the border. Perhaps with a few signs saying "Welcome neighbor, nice to see you!" I dissemble...

They didn't finish the quote, doing that usual thing of picking some words from the Bible in the hope that listeners will consider those words to be authority for whatever stupidity someone dreamed up.

From the New International Version:

"I looked for someone among them who would build up the wall and stand before me in the gap on behalf of the land so I would not have to destroy it, but I found no one."

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Lotaresco
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Devil

Re: The return of the high horse

"All shall bow before His Highness. "

"When the Jews return to Zion and a comet fills the sky, and the Holy Roman Empire rises; then you and I must die. From the eternal sea he rises, creating armies on either shore, turning man against his brother, 'til man exists no more."

Has anyone checked Trump's head for the number of the beast? There has to be a reason why he has such a ludicrous covering of starched hair.

PS: 666+666+666+6+6+6 = 2016. Just sayin'.

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Lotaresco
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Devil

Lock him up!

Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up! Lock him up!

Isn't this how "debate" is conducted in the People's Republic of Trumpistan?

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Lotaresco
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FAIL

"The people who should be holding back are those waving the pitchforks already and baying for the blood of alleged hypocrites."

Nope. This is a blatant disregard of public sensitivities about the arrogance of government officials who use email inappropriately. Using a party email account when in government is blatant avoidance of putting on record the communications that should be on record. That's before we get to the fact that the GOP is not an organisation I would trust to run an email server let along a *secure* email server.

The mahoosive hypocrisy of shouting "lock her up" and then doing *exactly* the same thing she was accused of is missed by no one other than those fitted with political blinkers.

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I've got a brand new combine harvester and I'll give you the API key

Lotaresco
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"“the technological foundation was simply not there to make it all work… the infrastructure was not there.”"

Two decades ago? That's 1997. I must have been completely dreaming spending my time in that era working with sensors on aircraft, boats, ships, medical remote sensing then. All of them connected to various types of network/bus topologies.

Or Georg Larschied is talking carp.

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UK.gov tells freelance techies to slap 20 per cent on fees as IR35 tax hike looms

Lotaresco
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Re: Both feet, and the ankles

"And who has been lobbying for this? Crapita et al. "

I have been through and lost the arguments about this when I did contract work for a government department. At that time I had access to Mad Frankie Maude and attempted to persuade him that clamping down on small businesses was a really, really bad idea. The source of the lobbying was obvious (the usual suspects) and the reason transparent.

The big integrators want to stay the only game in town. They were hurt when Cabinet Office decided that their gravy train should end. CO promoted the use of individual contractors and maintaining details of "talent" so that departments could find trusted contractors. The big ones screamed "not fair" and put a lot of money into greasing the wheels ensuring that their concerns were listened to.

I know several of them have been busy signing up lots of independents using FUD and IR35 to persuade people to join them as permies. I've seen the offers. It's usually an offer of a pay cut between 25-50% with an attempt to sell the "benefits" of company car, pension and health insurance. Of course the rate to government rises by about 50% to pay off "overheads" and the integrator makes a neat 100% (or as they say 50%) profit on each body that they rent out.

They can do one as far as I'm concerned. My order book is bursting at the seams and I've enough private work to see me through to retirement. I don't need to work for politicians who think that someone who actually does something is beneath contempt.

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Make America, wait, what again? US Army may need foreign weapons to keep up

Lotaresco
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Re: Military-industrial 101

"Appeared in my favourite film, "Blazing Saddles""

"That's Hedley!" to quote Harvey Korman

Hedy Lamarr sued Warner Bros. The studio settled out of court for a small sum and an apology for “almost using her name".

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Lotaresco
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Re: Military-industrial 101

"a lot of the European combat vehicles are made by subsidiaries of a US corporation."

The all-American Eurofighter (BAe, Airbus)? The all-American SAAB Gripen (SAAB)? The all-American Rafale (Dassault)? The all-American Eurocopter (Airbus)? The all-American Leopard MBT (Krauss-Maffei)? The all-American Challenger II MBT (BAe)? The all-American C1 Ariete MBT (Iveco Fiat)? The all-American B1 Centauro tank destroyer (Iveco Fiat)? The all-American Heckler and Koch MP5 (Heckler & Koch)? The all-American Airbus A400M Atlas transport (Airbus)? The all-American Goalkeeper CIWS (Thales Nederland)? The all-American Starstreak MANPADS (Shorts/Thales)? The all-American Rapier SAM (BAe)?

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Lotaresco
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FAIL

Re: Military-industrial 101

" Who supplies most of the EU in weapons? We do. You're paying for our industry."

Oh, look at all those handguns the US Army uses, the SIG Sauer P320. Made by a partnership between Schweizerische Industrie Gesellschaft of Switzerland and Sauer & Sohn of Germany.

Is your face red yet? It should be.

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Lotaresco
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Re: Not Just the Fuchs

"BAE M777 Howitzer"

BAe Advanced Gun System for US Zumwalt class destroyers. A 155mm over-the-horizon gun capable of firing at 10 rounds per second.

The BAe Mk45 127mm gun fitted as standard to US warships.

The BAe 57mm Bofors guns fitted to US Littoral combat ships.

The BAe 32-megajoule Electro-Magnetic Laboratory Rail Gun delivered to the U.S. Naval Surface Warfare Center. The US tried to build rail guns for years, it took the British to create a practical functional rail gun capable of firing projectiles at Mach 8 at 8 rounds per minute.

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Lotaresco
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Re: Not sure what the big deal is

Don't forget the Martin B-57 Canberra a tactical bomber and reconnaissance aircraft famous for having an operating ceiling of 70,000ft the same as the U2 spy plane A magnificent example of American military engineering.

Oh hang on, it was a built-under-licence version of the English Electric Canberra which first established the 70,000ft record. The Canberra was operated through the Vietnam war in a reconnaissance role because of its qualities as a stable platform for surveillance that could fly out of the reach of SAMs.

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Lotaresco
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Re: Military-industrial 101

"The encryption that makes eCommerce possible was pioneered by us during WWII when we cracked the German enigma cipher."

A statement of such monumental stupidity that it fails at every level.

As others have said it was Polish Cryptographers who first cracked the Enigma code. The British who developed their techniques of cryptanalysis and who enhanced their Bombe design and eventually invented the stored programme electronic computer to crack the much more difficult Lorenz code.

However cracking the code means that it wasn't invented by the people who cracked it. Hence whoever cracked the code did not "pioneer" it. The Enigma machine was originally used for encryption of commercial data (i.e. e-Commerce) in the 1920s. That was what it was designed for.

As to the encryption that makes e-Commerce possible, that isn't the Enigma code, it's public key cryptography. Public key cryptography was invented in Britain by GCHQ in the 1970s.

The foundation of public-key cryptography is work done by the British economist William Stanley Jevons in 1874 when he described the Jevons' number (8616460799) which was not factored until thirty years later.

The roots of encryption being used in commerce go back at least as far as the Roman empire a mere two thousand years before the birth of the USA.

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Lotaresco
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Re: Dayton Codebreakers

"the Americans manufactured 120 (!!!) of the 'Bombes' "

Yes, using the designs given to them by Bletchley Park.

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Lotaresco
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Re: Military-industrial 101

"Unibody is American through Joseph Ledwinka (Austrian) Citroen went to them for its Traction (1934)."

No, unibody is Italian, starting with the 1922 Lancia Lambda.

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Lotaresco
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Re: Military-industrial 101

"I could call you on that one then lay down the Trump card of the 1959 Mini ... "

Whereas you are right to call him on his stupidity, the 1959 Mini wasn't the first or even an early unibody car.

The first unibody car was the 1922 Lancia Lambda, Citroen were also pioneers in unibody construction with the Traction Avant in 1934.

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Lotaresco
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Re: Military-industrial 101

"Who supplies most of the EU in weapons? We do."

Where do you get that idea, Junior?

The all-American Eurofighter? The all-American SAAB Gripen? The all-American Rafale? The all-American Eurocopter? The all-American Leopard MBT? The all-American Challenger II MBT? The all-American C1 Ariete MBT? The all-American B1 Centauro tank destroyer? The all-American Heckler and Koch MP5? The all-American Airbus A400M Atlas transport? The all-American Goalkeeper CIWS? The all-American Starstreak MANPADS? The all-American Rapier SAM?

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Lotaresco
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"buy American and hire American."

Unless of course you are Donald J. Trump. If you are then as far as Americans are concerned "You're Fired!" ask any of his former workers in Atlantic City or just have a look at the products that he sells with his name on them. Caps, Shirts made in China, Shirts made in Bangladesh and ties and other goods from China. But in Trump's mind it's OK for Trump to do this, because they are cheaper in China.

Not only is Trump an habitual liar and fraud, he's also a massive hypocrite who attacks other UK businesses for doing exactly what he does.

If Trump brand customers took the same stance against his products as he did against Nabisco, it is clear they would be left with few Trump items to buy.

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Unite: CSC UK set for 'jobs massacre' as 1,101 heads put on chopping block

Lotaresco
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Ouch

I did some contract work for CSC a few years ago. Even then it was obvious that the talent was leaving and they were taking on contractors to fill the voids.

Some of the management layers were less useful than a vegetable patch. At least with a vegetable patch you get to eat a decent meal every so often and they can be quite attractive. Also a vegetable patch doesn't wander in and constantly mess about with work in progress. The management I experienced was notable for its talent in messing things up in pursuit of non-business objectives.

I have some good friends still toiling under the lash. I would be sorry to hear that they had been affected by this. I could suggest several people who should go. I have a little list, they'll none of them be missed.

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I'LL BE BATT: Arnie Schwarzenegger snubs gas guzzlers for electric

Lotaresco
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Re: Farday FF

"has recorded a road legal 0-60mph time of 2.3secs, 0-100mph of 4.9secs with 0-150mph taking a mere 8.9 seconds! It has the capability to accelerate onwards to over 240mph. "

And with the average driver of a Citroen Saxo with baked bean can exhaust, 'Lexus' lights, lowered suspension and italic script number plates at the wheel the Ultima can complete the last quarter mile backwards and on fire.

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Irish townsfolk besieged by confused smut channel callers

Lotaresco
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My office telephone number is similar to that of the local pub (the last two digits are swapped around). This means a high volume of calls from people who misdial and want to book a table. Most people who call react reasonably when told of the mistake, apologise, ring off and I never hear from then again. Some however are so mindlessly arrogant that they are sure that they are incapable of making a mistake. The worst of these being the ones who slam the phone down and then either press redial or dial the number incorrectly again and then proceed to harangue me.

When I get someone even slightly awkward now I confess that yes I really am the receptionist at the "Drunken Jovial Peasant[1]" and that I was in error to claim that they could possibly have misdialled. Now, may I take their booking?[2] Then I take a booking and usually tell them that as an apology I will make sure that there's a free bottle of champagne with the meal.

Oh, the best one was when the pub owner drunkenly misdialled his own number one night then spent an hour arguing with me, demanding to know what I was doing in his pub and telling me he was calling the police.

[1] Name change to protect the guilty.

[2] No I don't know why they don't question that I have told them two mutually exclusive things and have now changed my mind and decided I really am a gastropub. See comment about their arrogance, I suppose.

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UK.gov still drowning in legacy tech because no one's boarding Blighty's £700m data centre Ark

Lotaresco
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Re: Legacy?

"(Hmmm, Ark at Corsham. Would that be Arkham for short?)"

A majority of the population at Corsham have "The Innsmouth Look." In fact the locals only have about three faces between them.

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Lotaresco
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Whut?

"Therefore it would it make a lot of sense to put these together in the same data centres. Moving CNI systems to Ark should be a lot more secure as well as their DCs are in the middle of bloody great Army bases."

I've been trying to make sense of this. Is it claiming that the Ark DCs are located in Army bases? If so this is somewhat untrue, as can be seen from Google Maps. The Farnborough site is on the former National Gas Turbine Establishment (Pyestock) site which wasn't "an Army base". The Corsham site is IIRC next door to an Army base but is the Spring Park development which is built on what was a farm next door to an Army base. In neither case is the current development "In the middle of bloody great Army bases."

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Stallman's Free Software Foundation says we need a free phone OS

Lotaresco
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Re: The problem with anything free and open...

"Why was Windows so successful?"

Because it was sold to people who didn't care about the end user experience. The same people who thought that "no one got fired for buying IBM". It also didn't hurt that Microsoft took the approach that they wouldn't kick up a fuss about piracy. Later they drove the nails home by convincing OEMs to ship PCs with Windows installed as the default.

No one in their right mind would have bought Windows for personal use. It was awful. GEM and AmigaOS knocked the stuffing out of Windows on the Jackintosh and the Amiga respectively.

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Lotaresco
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Re: Before we get a proper free phone OS.

"Actually the free smart TV OS is easier: "

But not necessary.

As to running things on your phone, a decent notebook PC will do that better, cheaper with the OS of your choice.

I am actually in favour of people rooting their phone and running any software on it they like. Provided they sign a contract that says that if they are responsible for a malware outbreak they will fund the entire cost of cleanup and a brand new phone for anyone else affected. The contract will also state that if they can't afford the costs they agree to donate all of their organs to those in need. With immediate effect.

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Lotaresco
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Re: Before we get a proper free phone OS.

"We need phone hardware without locked bootloaders... Thats the main crux of the problem."

No, seriously it isn't. The main crux of the problem is where's the demand for this? A phone is just an appliance, where's the need for a "free" ToasterOS or FridgeOS or even SmartTV OS? The consumer just wants something that works and when it breaks either a nice repairman comes to make it work or the shop that sold it to you provides a warranty replacement.

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Lotaresco
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A free phone OS

Well even acknowledging that he means "free" as in speech not "free" as in beer, it's difficult to see how this will work. Free as in speech means that some organisation has to shoulder the administrative and support burdens associated with the OS or every phone manufacturer will have to provide in-house that support or someone somewhere runs an operation that charges the phone manufacturers a licence fee or support fee. Ultimately that's not going to look too different to Android.

Then there is the issue of the freetards to whom "free" means "free" as in beer. They will be there at the watering holes paying nothing, expecting everything.

So the only way this would work is if some organisation got behind it and provided a reference model for hardware, operating system and interface with an administration of effort to develop the code and support the distribution. Maybe we could call that organisation something like "The Free Software Foundation"? Nothing like leading by example, Richard.

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Yet another committee gives UK.gov a lashing for digital strategy delay

Lotaresco
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Re: I would love to be part of a committee

"... Just having to criticize, a glass of wine in the hand, sitting at the table of a good restaurant, and paid for that... sounds a cool job!"

Yesss... well as a member of several committees I admire your optimistic view of what being on a committee is like but the reality doesn't look like that. It looks like bloody hard work in rooms miles away from alcohol and good food with occasional deliveries of vile curled-up sandwiches if the organisation thinks it's worth it. Otherwise you may have go hungry. As to getting paid, long, hollow laughter. Committee work is often pro bono. The members are paying to be there.

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Lotaresco
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Re: Clueless

"I read that as them really not having a clue what to do, let alone how to go about it."

You read it right.

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Lotaresco
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Mushroom

GDS

""Among other things it is expected to include a plan for the Government Digital Service, which was awarded £450m in November 2015 but still has no road map for how that cash should be spent."

Under normal rules GDS would have to give that money back in March. However GDS seems to be "blessed" by the government. No matter how many monumental cockups it is involved in, no matter how lame its strategy is, no matter how clueless the few guidance documents they publish make them look[1] they are the love-child that no one is permitted to criticise. The love child of Francis Maude and Martha Lane Fox (retch).

[1] Look up their security standards document if you can. It's hilarious and appears to have been written by a child in crayon before being typed up by a drunken monkey.

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