* Posts by Lotaresco

819 posts • joined 24 Sep 2007

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Game authors demand missing ZX Spectrum reboot royalties

Lotaresco
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Re: From the Facebook page...

"on - page 53 of "Creating the Sinclair ZX Spectrum Vega" - Published by Andrews UK and Co-Authored by RCL's former MD, Paul Andrews states "I negotiated the necessary IP agreements with the various patent holders and licensors that would allow us to create and market the product" . "

Hold on a freaking minute, RCL is claiming that the authoritative source for copyright agreements with the IPR holders is a one line throw away comment in a book written by a former MD? This gives the impression that RCL don't have any evidence to support their claim that they have agreements in place and that their "crack legal team" needs to s/ck/p/g

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Lotaresco
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Re: The Sky-Amstrad-Sinclair chain

"So once again, the titular complaint, specifically of unpaid royalties, is undermined."

Still has a strong whiff of an RCL shill about this post.

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Lotaresco
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Trollface

Re: I'm more confused than normal.

"The 'VEGA+' product is still an Indigogo project in development, which some people seem to be dead-set on sabotaging. "

<sniffs Anon Troll>

Hmmm, would you care to confirm or deny your association with RCL, Mr Trolly McTrollface?

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Lotaresco
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Re: I'm a little in between with this...

"You're saying that infringing for the purposes of making a product and selling it is "personal use"?"

You're saying that you're a fully paid up member of DAESH?

Oh look, I can do straw men too!

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Lotaresco
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Re: I'm a little in between with this...

"You're saying that infringing for the purposes of making a product and selling it is "personal use"?"

No, are you saying that you're unable to read a post?

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Lotaresco
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Re: I'm a little in between with this...

"It's especially important not to be a "goofball" if you're planning to steal others' work. From the CDP Act: "A person guilty of an offence under subsection (1)(a), (b), (d)(iv) or (e) is liable (a) on summary conviction to imprisonment for a term not exceeding six months or a fine, or both; (b) on conviction on indictment to a fine or imprisonment for a term not exceeding ten years, or both"."

Hmm, you're rather guilty of quoting out of context there since Criminal Liability only applies if the infringing works are "otherwise than for his private and domestic use". Hence someone who "steals" other's work ["steal" is the wrong term to use, copyright infringement is not "stealing"] has not committed a criminal offence if the work was copied for personal use.

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Teen charged with 'cyberstalking' in bomb hoax case

Lotaresco
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Shirly Shome Mishtake?

So, for how long have US Swat Teams been using Snatch Land Rovers?

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Sysadmin 'trashed old bosses' Oracle database with ticking logic bomb'

Lotaresco
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Re: Putting at the stake

"I'm always surprised to read the full name of someone who wasn't condemned yet."

In this case Nimesh Patel is about as unique as John Smith so I'm not too surprised. I certainly hope it's not the same person I worked with some years ago because he was a very nice chap and unlikely to do anything so short-sighted.

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Lotaresco
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Re: Conversion?

@TheVogon "When you pick it up, it becomes a stolen hammer..."

No, which is why shoplifters don't get arrested in the store. The Theft Act 1968 states that a person is guilty of theft if they dishonestly appropriate property belonging to another with the intention to permanently deprive the other of it. It's that intent to permanently deprive that is important. This is also why there is an offence relating to motor vehicles of "Taking Without the Owner's Consent" (TWOC) because "borrowing" a car and intending to return it later is not theft.

There are some interesting wrinkles such as if someone takes money and then repays the exact amount they took they are still guilty of theft unless the money they put back is the exact same notes and coins as the ones they took.

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Large UK businesses are getting pwned way more than smaller ones

Lotaresco
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Re: I'm a computer security "expert".

"Does being a contractor or independent consultant make the angst of being a permanent Cassandra, doomed to see the future but never believed, more bearable than being stuck in the bowels of a corporate brontosaurus?"

The ability to walk away helps and it's necessary to move on every couple of years to avoid IR35 nonsense. It also helps to have multiple simultaneous contracts and to substitute in other people from time to time. All of this comes with expanding one's network of contacts by a sort of osmosis and it's quite pleasant to have friends who are all in the same boat and willing to step in to help from time to time.

I also live in a high rent area, buying a house (AIEEEE the mortgage payments!) and running a car - that's essential - and I rack up tens of thousands of miles a year chasing work. I've been doing this since 1992, so I guess I'm happy with it. Much happier than I was being a wage droid.

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Lotaresco
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I'm a computer security "expert".

So, please feel free to ignore everything I say, just like the big corporates who hire me do.

It's an odd business, advising businesses about security. Small businesses tell me it's all a rip-off and that they don't want to spend money on "consultants". The small businesses that think they can avoid security are the ones that probably need to pay some attention to it. Solicitors, insurance agents, internet cafes, pubs, clubs etc. For these businesses there is a tendency to under report incidents. Partly because they don't recognise when their systems have been compromised and partly because they are, as others have observed, not really of interest to anyone. Not enough assets. Also they tend not to have their assets in one place. They will have on-line banking but it tends to be separate from their billing, invoicing and payroll systems. Much of their financial work will be done in spreadsheets and then copy-typed into the on-line banking system. A type of air gap. That said there are criminals who target these sort of businesses and who get them to pay fake invoices, hand over their banking details, perform transfers for "security" reasons to the scammers accounts, of course, and the scammers get away with it.

The medium large companies seem to be the ones where there's a perfect combination of laziness, tight-fisted attitudes and incompetence. They don't recognise they have outgrown their systems, they keep going and do silly things like hosting their own web delivery on the same system that processes their finances. Their IT support guys are behind the curve and do silly things like logging in as root over and over again. They have inadequate passwords, they password share and they like to work from home. Even in this day and age they use insecure protocols for remote access. They also tend to do things like having no separation between development and production systems (or usually have no concept of using a development system) and they take chances like patching live systems during office hours using a patch they downloaded at home and whacked on a USB stick. These organisations will often pay for security advice then ignore it, because it seems "a bit difficult" or "costly". However they won't have costed the proposal it will just be done by "gut feel".

Larger business are also vulnerable because of the infinite money cage effect. A business with 10 employees has to be unlucky to have someone who will not care about their job to the extent that they will do something careless. A business with 1,000 employees is guaranteed to have some prize careless dopes on the payroll. The sort of people who will click on that link despite being told hundreds of times not to do it. When they happen to coincide with the manager too mean to keep the anti-malware updated and systems patched then bad things happen.

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That apple.com link you clicked on? Yeah, it's actually Russian

Lotaresco
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Glyphs from a mixture of different languages would be silly

ʘ︡ᴥʘ︠

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Mondays suck. So why not spend yours playing with an original Mac and games in your browser

Lotaresco
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I must go down to the lock-up again, down to the lock-up in the barn...

... where I shall dig out my Mac SE/30 with a RasterOps ColourBoard 264 and a 13" Apple Monitor.

I recall lugging this into work, having paid thousands of pounds for it and being quickly surrounded by sneering and jeering colleagues who told me it wasn't as good as a PC. The all told me Macs were monochrome only and useless little toys. I started up the 13" display and showed the interactive Authorware demo for new owners. This started in B&W and there was more jeering about that. Partway through the screen fades out and enters a 24bit colour demo. The room suddenly went quiet. These were the days of blocky PC EGA colour screens with 16 awful colours. The slide show was displaying full colour photographic images and fading neatly between images. There was a "my PC can't do that moment" and then they all faded away.

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NASA agent faces heat for 'degrading' moon rock sting during which grandmother wet herself

Lotaresco
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Re: Clanger..

"No, these are clangers."

This is fake new folks! Fake news! I know, bigly that no such knitted creatures were found on the moon and we never went there Folks. We are the greatest. A great, great nation and we never went there. My best friend Barroom Bill says we never went there and he's a great American Folks, a great, great man. Me was in 'Nam and Iraq and that other place. He's sure we never went to the moon Folks and he sold me this tinfoil helmet that Ivanka will sell to you. It's a $80 savings folks. It's great, the greatest. We're a great nation and great, great nation that went to the moon and we did everything better than those Chinese who live in Chai-Nah, Chai-Nah, I like saying Chai-Nah to I'm going to say it a lot. Chai-Nah. Hey, I can get my head in this rubber glove. Look at me I'm in a glove. I'm choking... choking, Chai-Nah...

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Linux/BSD replacement fow WinXP for Newbie?

Lotaresco
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Re: Linux/BSD replacement fow WinXP for Newbie?

After fiddling with several flavours of Unix recently I would go with Mint with Xfce desktop or possibly MATE. I'd avoid Cinnamon since even on a quad i7 system with a decent graphics card it's painfully slow. Xfce is close enough to XP to be familiar and it works well on even modest hardware.

I tried Elementary OS which can look good for a few minutes but is far too irritating to use.

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Alabama man gets electrocuted after sleeping with iPhone

Lotaresco
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Re: so much wrong here...

"US electrics are scary. It helps a bit that they're only 110V so less likely to be lethal,"

Au contraire. The decision to use 110V electrics in the US makes them more rather then less dangerous. The reason for this is because apparently US electrical engineers didn't realise that the heating effect in a wire is proportional to I^2*R. To run the same power appliance at half the voltage means that the current must be double but the heating effect in the conductors is four times greater at 110V than at 220V. Also conductors need to be massive to supply enough current.

The end result is under-specced electrical distribution systems within domestic premises with a propensity to overheat and cause fires.

USA 160 fixed wiring fires per million residents

UK 43 fixed wiring fires per million residents

Sources:

USA - ESFI Home Electrical Fires report

UK - ONS Fire Statistics England

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Lotaresco
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Re: so much wrong here...

"Most "European" mains plugs look similar, being basically a 2-pin live/neutral round pin device"

Sort of. The thing you are describing is the one I'm used to referring to as a "Tedesco" or Schuco plug. The earth can either be a pin in the sicket or a sliding contact on the top and bottom of the socket that mates with a contact on the outer edge of the plug. Then there are the b-Ticino range of three pin plugs that are rated as 10A or 16A. No polarity, these can go in either way up. Then there are the double sockets that can take either a 10A or a 16A plug despite the pin spacing being different. There are two-pin versions of the 10A plug which IIRC are rated 5A but fit a 10A three pin socket. And finally the "universal" socket which mates with the Schuco, 10A, 16A and shaver plugs despite these all having slightly different pin spacing and diameter.

To make the entire mess slightly less safe the sockets are often moulded from the sort of plastic used to make the trays for a box of chocolate. Also the pins on plugs are rarely properly aligned, the plastic part of the pin is easily deformed so that the pins are too close together, too far apart of even skewed left/right. The conductive part of the pin is wider than the plastic shroud which means that plugs often get stuck in the socket as the bent pins catch on the edges of the socket when they are withdrawn and shatter the socket leaving exposed conductors.

The great thing about standards in Europe is that there are so many of them.

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Lotaresco
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And the moral of the story is...

"Instead, the dogtags he had been wearing had fallen into a gap between the charger plug and an extension cable, touched the metal prongs, and sent 110 volts through his neck."

That only a bell end wears dog tags. Still, at least he can prop up his paintball warrior credentials by pointing to the scars on his neck that he "Like got in Nam, like. Y'all don't know what hell that was... only the bravest of us came through it. Like I killed like five Charley with my dog tags d00d then this like Ninja got behind me and strangled me with his electric fingers... Whaddaya mean I'm too young?"

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DDR5 to jump off the drawing board in 2018

Lotaresco
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Persistence

Time to rewrite the rules on equipment disposal, again.

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SpaceX wows world with a ho-hum launch of a reused rocket, landing it on a tiny boring barge

Lotaresco
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Re: Uncanny

"Perhaps the Law of Conservation of Stupidity will soon mathematically establish that every time someone does something wonderful, clever, beautiful then a counter-balancing amount of cretinous mendacity is unleashed?"

The sight of videos in the same feed that have been created by greedy, mendacious snake-oil salesmen to sell tat to people who are too uneducated to know the difference between science and magic is bad enough. But the thing that causes me to rend my garments and daub my faces with ashes is the response of the moonhowler commentards who can barely wait to jump in and post a message that all of this rocketry is "fake news". Why the actual do they do it?

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Lotaresco
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Re: The first reusable?

"Not to put too fine a point on it (I'm not trying to say the Shuttle was the best thing ever), but you _are_ aware the SRBs were reusable as well, right?"

I do think the Shuttle was brilliant and it's still up there as the best thing ever until something else comes along. However its reusability was always over hyped. Of the 2,030 tonnes launch mass just under 300 tonnes was reused each mission being about 100 tonnes orbiter and 100 tonnes for each SRB. The SRBs are really questionable on reuse since they were of course the component that caused the Challenger disaster and that's something that might not have happened had the design been throw away. No need to design the SRB as a series of demountable ring sections.

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Lotaresco
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Re: The first reusable?

"Didn't someone called NASA have something called a Shuttle back in 1981 that was mostly reusable?"

No. NASA had a thing called a shuttle which launched as part of a vehicle assembly most of which got thrown away at launch. The bit that returned to Earth was a small part of the total.

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Lotaresco
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Boffin

Re: Uncanny

"I look forward to an actual landing on the boat video."

What like this one?

You Tube video of Falcon landing on a barge.

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Lotaresco
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Re: Amazing

"But it seems our billionaires are boring old farts who prefer to play it safe by buying properties."

To give him his dues, and it pains me to say this, Richard Branson is investing in technology projects. Sadly it seems that his vision is a little restricted though. Musk and Bezos are clearly enthusiastic and have been steeped in The Culture as well as culture. Those two want to make our future like the ones we saw in old re-runs on Saturday morning Kids TV. The world of "Lost in Space", "TinTin", RKO serials and "Flash Gordon" where rockets were infinitely reusable.

Branson's ambitions are more modest but have the potential to pay off in slightly unexpected ways. So there's Virgin Galactic which isn't much more than a way of separating millionaires from their cash in return for an experience which used to be possible from Thunder City - an edge of atmosphere trip. White Knight 2 and Spaceship 2 have other potential uses for lifting loads for sub-orbital missions at low cost and given the lift capability of WK2 it could be used to lift a two-stage payload that could be fired into orbit.

Branson's other project is his investment in Boom, which is planning a small (45 seat) SST. I hope that comes off also.

The shame is that these are US projects and an investment in Reaction Engines would be an investment in UK engineering.

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How Ford has slammed the door on Silicon Valley's autonomous vehicles drive

Lotaresco
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Boffin

Re: ... start your vehicle and warm it up from inside the house on a cold day...

@Chemist

"@Mage, your own link (correctly) says CO2 is not toxic."

You might like to read the rest of the paragraph !

Yes... I'd really hope that a chemist would know the difference between toxicity and asphyxiation.

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Lotaresco
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Re: unattended

""you shower, ..." What, EVERY week?"

Every first of April whether I need it or not.

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Lotaresco
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Boffin

Re: Sounds reasonable

"91 is still too much .... "

You claimed airbags kill more people than they save.

That was incorrect. At the level of about 19,000:91.

So now you say 91 is "still too much".

Your bright idea is to remove airbags from cars.

So you would sacrifice 19,000 people to save 91.

That's seriously messed up.

Here's a clue. Next time you get something wrong say "I made a mistake, I was wrong." Then you won't look a fool.

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Lotaresco
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Re: ... start your vehicle and warm it up from inside the house on a cold day...

"Toxic level is "6% or 60,000 ppm" though Wikipedia says 7% (70,000ppm)"

There's a difference between "toxic" and "intoxicating". At 6% CO2 can cause near-instant unconsciousness. This is intoxication. If death follows it is as a consequence of suffocation.

Very high CO2 levels can cause lung damage and respiratory problems because of the formation of carbonic acid in the lungs but you would be unconscious long before that point.

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Lotaresco
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Re: ... start your vehicle and warm it up from inside the house on a cold day...

"CO2 kills too. The car uses up oxygen if it's a sealed garage."

You know, I'd appreciate it if people commenting here could be arsed to read the post they reply to. I mentioned a sealed garage as one of the possibilities along with a faulty "cat". However most garages are far from sealed because a sealed garage causes your car to rust spectacularly quickly. The air needs to circulate to keep humidity levels low.

In a sealed garage the thing that will kill you is carbon monoxide because it's more toxic than CO2 and as the engine runs in a high CO2/low oxygen environment it will belt out CO even with a working catalyst.

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Lotaresco
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Re: ... start your vehicle and warm it up from inside the house on a cold day... (4 Voyna i Mor)

"You feel very relaxed and carefree, and an interesting thing happens: your intellect is screaming at you to act to save your life while emotionally you find it *very* hard to care enough to move."

I've suffered CO poisoning from an open fire when peculiar weather conditions stopped the chimney working. I didn't feel in the slightest relaxed or carefree. I felt sick as a dog, short of breath with a ringing headache. I realised what was happening and got up to open all the windows then took a long, long walk outside to clear the carboxyhaemoglobin from my blood.

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Lotaresco
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Headmaster

Re: ... start your vehicle and warm it up from inside the house on a cold day...

"\" Pre 1975 cars emitted about 100,000ppm CO, modern cars about 1,000."

You mean 10% and that's bullshit."

You probably need to attend remedial maths classes sooner, rather than later. If you care to get out your pocket calculator (I'm reasonably sure that you won't be able to do the calculation in your head, because you just proved that you can't) you will find that (1,000/1,000,000)*100 = 0.1 not 10.

So yes 10% is bullshit and the bullshit is yours.

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Lotaresco
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Boffin

Re: ... start your vehicle and warm it up from inside the house on a cold day...

"It's why hydrogen sulfide is so much safer than hydrogen cyanide"

Hydrogen sulphide is a killer at concentrations above 100ppm. Unfortunately above 100ppm it is odourless. I suspect that if you or I could be bothered to do the searches we would find that H2S kills more people annually than HCN. Despite the known risks, utility workers are poisoned each year by H2S when working underground. Three died in January this year in Key Largo, Fla and a firefighter who tried to rescue them was in a critical condition in hospital.

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Lotaresco
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FAIL

Re: Sounds reasonable

"Yeah the guys who can't keep airbags from killing more than they save are getting into IT?"

The US statistics for 1990-2007 are:

Drivers killed by airbags - 91

Drivers saved by airbags - 19872 of which 12104 were idiots who were not using seatbelts.

Source: NCSA July report 2007

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Lotaresco
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Re: ... start your vehicle and warm it up from inside the house on a cold day...

"It wouldn't be clever to run your engine in a garage."

Petrol engine, catalytic converter. The old suicide by car exhaust is extremely unlikely these days. If the catalytic converter is defective, if the garage is tightly sealed then it may be possible. However I can recall when working in a hospital someone being brought into A&E who had tried to kill themselves with exhaust fumes but failed. They had used 40 litres of fuel and yet still had low blood CO levels. Pre 1975 cars emitted about 100,000ppm CO, modern cars about 1,000.

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Lotaresco
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Alexa?

"More impressively, at CES it also announced integration with Amazon's Alexa"

This is the sort of news that makes me want to strangle the idiot who thought it was a good idea. My experience with the security of in-car electronics leaves me feeling that the Internet of Trash is better secured and we all know how great that is. The automotive industry does not have people who are aware of the threats that voice activation and remote access introduce to a system. They don't understand encryption or the need for a key infrastructure. They just pat themselves on the back if a "feature" works reliably within the limited use cases they imagined.

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'Clearance sale' shows Apple's iPad is over. It's done

Lotaresco
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Death of Apple Predicted, News at Eleven

Again. It seems to come around as regular as clockwork that someone tells us that Apple is dead. And every time it sounds like another sour grapes story.

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Effort to fire Euro Patent Office president beaten back – again

Lotaresco
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Facepalm

Re: I've started a timer...

I need a faster timer, five Brextards appeared in microseconds.

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Lotaresco
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I've started a timer...

To see how long it is before the first knee-jerk pro-Brexit comment appears.

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Linux, not Microsoft, the real winner of Windows Server on ARM

Lotaresco
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"EATHPC - THAT would work."

It could be improved by adding an initial 'D'.

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Lotaresco
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Hope triumphs over experience?

I'd hope that Linux on ARM was taking over. I've a vested interest in remaining in work for a few years more. Also working with Windows gets more and more painful as time goes by. However Microsoft has a long history of pulling the sort of thing that IBM used to do, where FUD is used to convince the management layer that "No one gets fired for buying IBM Microsoft." PHBs like that sort of talk and I've encountered several projects which started off sensible but then were diverted down the MS route after a sales person had some words with the PHB and spread the FUD about "An OS designed in a teenager's bedroom".

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Can you ethically suggest a woman pursue a career in tech?

Lotaresco
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Re: Nobody in their right mind would choose IT as a career

"Take the STEM degree and do something else instead."

I was a scientist for the first twelve years of my career. If you want a thankless, underpaid job that's it right there. I moved to IT because it was way better paid and more rewarding. I get 10x the pay that I used to as a scientist and I don't regret the move.

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Lotaresco
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I miss F-International

Before being absorbed into another organisation F-International stood the tech world on its head by having a ratio of 300 women to 3 men. Set up by the brilliant Stephanie "Steve" Shirley FI proved that a woman dominated business could compete for and win the contracts. Sadly the Sex Discrimination Act forced FI to change their policy. We need more entrepreneurs like Dame Shirley. And probably more sticking plaster for the mouths of some of the knuckle-draggers.

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Lotaresco
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No it's not unethical

Women deserve the right to work in the industry of their choice. Tech jobs are engaging, interesting and many women work happily in tech industries, they should not be discouraged.

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UK Home Office warns tech staff not to tweet negative Donald Trump posts

Lotaresco
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There are of course simple options

Like not using your real ID on social media and being careful to not provide information that links to you in real life. There's also the ultimate failsafe which is to make sure that you never set foot in the People's Republic of Trumpistan. I mean why would you? The place is awful and they grab every last bit of your personal data that they can when you enter the country.

Learn a European language and absorb a culture that doesn't need treating with heavy-duty antibiotics.

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Lessons from the Mini: Before revamping or rebooting anything, please read this

Lotaresco
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Re: Nice article...

"Nowadays a Range Rover is indistinguishable from many other saloon cars."

No, it's easy to tell it's a Range Rover because it will be driven by an ignorant oik, especially if it is a "Sport" or an Evoque. This didn't use to be the case, Rangies were driven by laid back people. Now it's only bought by the sort of moron who works in marketing or runs a gym or is a parasite of similar kind.

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Kodi-pocalypse Now? Actually, it's not quite here yet

Lotaresco
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Re: Shaming

"And presumably created 15,000 redundancies once the film was completed?"

Do we get het up that in the IT industry that jobs are created to build IT systems then those jobs evaporate when the system is handed into operations? No. Because those people will be redeployed on other projects. That's the same in the film industry. People come together to create a movie, then they go on to other things, most of them seem to move to work on another movie. Some of them use the experience to get a job in another media business. I'd say giving 15,000 people work for a period of 2-3 years is good going these days.

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Lotaresco
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Re: IP

"Of any given revenue stream in the content distribution industry, how much actually reaches the writers, performers, what have you? "

I have no idea and neither do you. However the fact that we don't know doesn't give someone the right (in law or morally) to take what they want for free or to distribute that material to who they see fit. The people who create the content have signed deals or employment contracts with the organisations that hold the copyright. They presumably did so happy that they got more or less what they wanted from the deal. The copyright holder is then free to sign deals to distribute the material with whoever they like in order to make a profit. In this copyright holders takes risks, spread risk across projects and try to balance their gains and losses as best they can. The people they employ are not undeserving of their reward in this process.

We can argue about the relative proportions of risk, reward and the balance between "creatives" and those who support the creatives but so far it's the business model that works. It works in Hollywood, Bollywood and Nollywood; it even works in Pineywood. In fact the model isn't confined to the arts, it's pretty much how software publishing works and publishing in general. Yes there are admirable attempts to make an alternative of honesty payment and free distribution work but they aren't working as well as could be hoped for. People, it seems, are not that honest or keen to pay for media once they have viewed it.

Perhaps you could give us your vision of how it can work if people just suck down on unofficial copies distributed through unofficial channels. Bear in mind that in the case of the Pirate Bay et al. The artists don't get a penny and the owners of the sites have been making large amounts of money. That's even less equitable than the official distribution channels.

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Lotaresco
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Re: IP

"You are losing your freedom on the internet to give and share."

Not at all. If you want to commit several years of your life to creating media content then give it away free under a Creative Commons licence, no one will stop you. In fact many will applaud your bravery and there are several people/organisations doing just that.

You can watch all the copyright free movies you want from Archive.org, including some good modern documentaries and the historical archive of recorded material going back to the start of the 20th century. If you like reading there are numerous sites, including Project Gutenberg that will provide legal, copyright free ebooks for your enjoyment. These include recent works by enlightened authors such as Charlie Stross who see that releasing copyright free ebooks hasn't hurt their sales and allows people who can't afford a book or have access to a public library to obtain reading matter.

All of these works you can use and distribute on a share-alike basis.

You can also go to a library, register for a reader's card and access copyright material legally for free or for a low rental.

However, I suspect that your high ideals don't amount to much more than wanting to sit and vegetate in front of a Hollywood "Blockbuster" that you didn't pay for.

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Lotaresco
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Re: We Keep going on about Kodi but what about Google Chrome

"What is Kodi doing wrong if it is just a piece of software that puts all that Google does in one simple format"

That's not what Kodi does. Kodi is a media player, which is open and extensible. The out of the box versions of Kodi do not provide any tools for copyright infringement. It just plays content and is limited to content stored on the local HD, DVD, Blu Ray, CIFS shares and DLNA streams. The issue is that because it is extensible some add-ons are available that are designed to leach copyright material.

It's possible to buy pre-configured boxes (advertised as fully-loaded) that are configured to stream content from copyright infringing sources. I suspect most customers know this and it's what they want but I have encountered some clueless parents badgered into getting a Kodi box by teenage children who say "It's wonderful, I've cancelled Netflix and Sky because we can get brand new movies before they appear in the cinema." They then look very confused if one mentions that the heads bobbing at the bottom of the frame might be a give away that the content is a tad illegal.

So, Kodi is doing nothing wrong but may suffer because third parties are doing something wrong. Eventually Kodi will fail because the human race is greedy and stupid and they can't resist grabbing things for "free" without thinking "How do the people who make this stuff get paid?" Kodi will be punished because no media content provider will collaborate with them or let them have access to code/keys. I wish it wasn't so.

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Help wanted: Uber boss Travis seeks babysitter for him and his execs

Lotaresco
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Re: Advice for Mr. Travis

"Do like other companies in trouble, change your company's name."

You mean something to fit with Uber's vaguely Germanic name but to reflect better the caring, sharing side of the company that wishes to look after its workforce and passengers? Something touch-feely.

How about "Protection Team", although it would probably be better rendered in German rather than English.

They could have a nice new logo to go with it, something that represents, protection, safety and the lightning fast response of the taxi company.

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