Reply to post: Re: Have 1809 , works fine

It's official: In May, Microsoft will close the door, lock the vault, brick over the entrance of dreaded Windows 10 1809

Snake Silver badge

Re: Have 1809 , works fine

I know it is (extremely) unpopular on this board to say, but I'm no longer a religious fanatic when it comes to OS UI experience. I was, long ago, but I am simply too busy doing work inside the applications that an OS runs to fret, hand-wring and otherwise soapbox on the fact that they changed the UI.

Windows 10's UI is *not* that bad. If I could post a screen grab of the computer I am currently on, upgraded from Win7 to Win10, you'll find a desktop interface with surprisingly little difference. The Start Menu and those tile buttons?? You can remove all the tiles (which only take up a very small area of the desktop space once opened as I've only added a small number of them) and end up with just a menu of programs without any tiles at all.

https://www.techjunkie.com/small-windows-10-start-menu/

My own Start Menu with tiles is even smaller than what is shown as the beginning example on that tips pages.

And, rather like Android, I barely go into my Start Menu anyway due to the fact that I have taskbar shortcuts for everything I truly use every day.

So I'm not sure why so many people rant and rave about this thing, I simply have far more important things to go on about. 1/2 of the complaints I think I read about is due to the complainer still commenting on the first generation of Win10 installs, or tablets (computer in Tablet mode), both of which, intentionally, have very large, touch-friendly Start Menu tiles even if you don't actually have a touchscreen. But those Big Tiles were shrunk several revisions ago on non-touchscreen devices, so much that they aren't even a real issue any more.

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