Reply to post: What a load of b*ll*cks

That was some of the best flying I've seen to date, right up to the part where you got hacked

ecarats
Alert

What a load of b*ll*cks

Their marketing spiel is just that - pure marketing. The whole 'cyber anomaly' bit is one big clue.

And even allowing for the unlikely scenario of their demo what exactly are they proposing? Message filtering for incoming data transmissions? Already happens, mostly by just binning everything not expected & forcing strict formatting. Protecting the RTOS running in a box? Can already be done, not really needed most of the time. Filtering the databus? If it's an expected message with spoofed data you won't know the difference - plus it may well just clash with the 'real' data from the proper source if you're just injecting - and if it's an unexpected message it'll just be binned. Just like data that deviates too much is usually just binned - more often than not to get unusual things successfully injected you have to start forcing values straight into process memory.

I can sort of see why they went with 1553/429 as a target as it's a simple old thing which is why it drifted of to the peripheries. Try that stuff with the newer things like AFDX and you'd trip up much more quickly.

That's not to say you can't make avionics dance to any tune you want with knowledge and effort but it isn't trivial, it's extremely specialist as a skill and it certainly isn't something you can do as a remote 'hack'. Even with physical access you'll usually only win by rehosting and poking things in ways the original platform just can't do.

Though I'm sure none of this will get in the way of selling something unnecessary that doesn't really do anything useful. It works well enough for the PC & phones markets so they may as well try the same game for aircraft.

POST COMMENT House rules

Not a member of The Register? Create a new account here.

  • Enter your comment

  • Add an icon

Anonymous cowards cannot choose their icon

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR WEEKLY TECH NEWSLETTER

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2019