Reply to post:

As browser rivals block third-party tracking, Google pitches 'Privacy Sandbox' peace plan

NATTtrash
Childcatcher

Although I agree with your base principles, I'm afraid your analogy with print media doesn't work. What you're omitting is that with printed advertisement "the user" has some meaningful influence. Like with other life situations, saying no means no. In the digital world this seems to be like a red light in Naples: a nice suggestion. Furthermore, printed advertisement is seen one time, and then lands in the bin. The digital version is like a sweaty guy, running after you continuously, harassing you to read the ads again. Again. And again...

Oi, did you see this? You know you're missing out, don't you? Come on, don't act so difficult, take another look. Mate, I'm only saying this because you're my friend, and I don't want you to miss out. This opportunity will not come back you know. And what an opportunity it is! You do realise that, don't you? Really, you are a bit of an arse if you don't grab this one. Oh COME ON, don't be such a tosser, look at this and I will lift the block on what ever you wanted to do here originally...

I suppose because the reach/ spread of the digital world is so big, those peddling their cookies think they get away with it without any backfire. And, to be honest, they are right. Where in the "real world" things are a bit more absolute, in the digital universe other rules seem to apply. Which by now cross over back to the real world. Ah well, their advantage is that those people that do remember that it was illegal (not to mention rude) to steam open other peoples mail to read it will disappear without them having to do anything for it. So let's just drill their replacements on the new norm (history buffs: sound familiar?)

POST COMMENT House rules

Not a member of The Register? Create a new account here.

  • Enter your comment

  • Add an icon

Anonymous cowards cannot choose their icon

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR WEEKLY TECH NEWSLETTER

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2020