Reply to post: Re: RE: encryption from my PC to its destination PC/server

New UK Home Sec invokes infosec nerd rage by calling for an end to end-to-end encryption

eldakka Silver badge
Black Helicopters

Re: RE: encryption from my PC to its destination PC/server

"At least with a decent Linux kernel you can check your keystrokes aren't watched and build up from there."

You need a decent userland around it. You can start with that kernel but then wrap it in layers of opaque binaries and it doesn't matter what the kernel is.

Can you?

Have you read the source code of everything compiled into the kernel?

What about the compiler, have you read the source code of that? Do you know if it compiles only what's in the kernel source code files and does not inject its own code into the final binaries? What did you compile the compiler with?

What about the firmware in the USB controller? Did you inspect the source code of the firmware, compile it yourself with a trusted compiler (see above), and is the code that was compiled from that inspected source code and trusted compiler the code that was actually loaded into the firmware? The keylogger could be in there, logging everything between the keyboard and the kernel before it gets to the kernel.

How about the secure controller most commonly available processors (Intel, AMD, ARM, Apple, IBM, etc.) have embedded in them/their chipsets? The same caveats apply as for the USB firmware. Same for HDD/SSDs, NICs, PCIe controllers/switches. They all have embedded microcontrollers with their own firmware.

And they're coming to take me away ha-haaa

They're coming to take me away ho ho hee hee ha haaa

To the funny farm

Where life is beautiful all the time

And I'll be happy to see those nice young men

In their clean white coats

And they're coming to take me away ha haaa

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