Reply to post: Re: Simple explanation

IPv6 growth is slowing and no one knows why. Let's see if El Reg can address what's going on

doublelayer Silver badge

Re: Simple explanation

Ok. This will get a bit of a reaction...

IP addresses are never going to be simple. They are big numbers. The same reason we don't memorize phone numbers for everyone and every takeaway we know means we won't memorize IPs for all the websites we visit or even all the systems we run. However, we do memorize some phone numbers, and some IP addresses. Because they are shorter and have fewer rules, the relevant IPV4 addresses are easier to memorize. 127.0.0.1 is localhost. 10.0.0.0-10.255.255.255, 192.168.0.0-192.168.255.255, and 172.16.0.0-172.31.255.255 are private space. I didn't have to look that up.

This has a certain level of convenience. I've been trying to get an openwrt device to make a range extender for a network, which I haven't done before and evidently it's not as easy as I thought. I've entered the address 192.168.8.1 a lot today, because that gets me to the shell. I've also entered the address 192.168.1.1 a lot, because that's the shell for the actual network. And sometimes, I have to disable DHCP on this device, meaning that I have to set my computer's IP manually. 192.168.8.2 is rather easy to enter. Like it or not, if I have to remember that the shell can be accessed at 29a0:37e9:0103:::382:011f:1, it will take me longer to figure this out and I will be more annoyed at the end.

In my mind, this isn't a reason to ditch IPV6. However, you can't deny (or actually I assume somebody can) that the addresses are easier. I can convert hex just fine, into binary, octal, and decimal. That's not the problem. The problem is that IPV6 requires me to memorize the whole number, which is a long number, whereas for IPV4, I basically only have to memorize "8". The 192.168 part never changes, and of course the network device is .1. For the same reason, I have memorized the IP of a site I use for ping tests. I never actually use the site or type the IP, but I can use my coincidental memorization of its address to say "Oh, DNS is working." I also know my personal VPS's IP address, although I definitely don't need it.

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