Reply to post: Re: Still Not Getting It

Spring is all about new beginnings, but it could already be lights out for Windows' Fluent Design

Mage Silver badge
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Re: Still Not Getting It

Absolutely... Small to medium touch (mainly consumption) vs keyboard & mouse (mainly content creation) need different GUIs. TVs need a 3rd GUI. Larger tablets need easy to use with touch window management (certainly even 8" rarely wants multiple application windows at the same time.

But also transparency and ESPECIALLY flat are just a GUI disaster on ANY platform. The bare minimum is two highlight lines and two shadow lines with convention of top left light. Then its obvious if something IS a GUI element and if "latched" or not and easily momentarily showing if "clicked".

Text links without buttons must always LOOK like a hyperlink or a menu item. They should only exist without a menu if they are actually merely hypertext (i.e. NOT action buttons or menus, but simply a new page with "back" and no change of anything. This is why Web Forms had button elements, not purely links. Links need not be HTML/Webpages, but should NEVER action/change state or be menus, but "go in". We had hyperlinked documents 10 years before HTML and websites.

"Modern" Websites and GUs are breaking every sensible 40 year old GUI convention (based on REAL research) purely for cosmetic reasons. Graphic designers only fit to design paper documents with NO understanding of document navigation and GUIs and no understanding of Menus, Actions etc vs document navigation and display.

Do not hide GUI elements or minimise them automatically, except maybe toolbars at edges of screen or Window.

Ban flat monochrome icons. Worse than photographic skeuomorphic stuff, which is also silly (distracting, some abstraction is good).

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